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Viewing: Blog Posts from the illustrator category, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 9,076 - 9,100 of 152,953
9076. Upcoming: Lost In Fantasy Show

via LIFE NEEDS ART http://gregnewbold.blogspot.com/2014/11/upcoming-lost-in-fantasy-show.html




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9077. Thanksgiving Movie




















I'm a really fun person to watch movies with.


Addendum:  Thank you so much for the kind words on the new blog design!  It was a long time coming.  We should do something to celebrate...like maybe seeing a movie or something...?*

*But only if you've read the book

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9078. Black Friday / Cyber Monday Sale!

via Jenny Parks Illustration http://jennyparks.tumblr.com/post/103827578821



Get 20% off anything on my online store all weekend until the end of Cyber Monday, Dec. 1st! Use coupon code at check out: blackfriday2014



I’m a bit late in setting this up today, but I decided to give you all a Black Friday/Cyber Monday coupon to use on my online store! Use it wisely…http://www.jennyparks.com/products/




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9079. maleficently ill

I am so, so unwell. Today I felt like death and cheered myself up a bit by watching back-to-back movies and designing my own tombstone.



I think Maleficent is BRILLIANT, I totally loved it. It doesn't try to be a grown-up film like Pan's Labyrinth (which I didn't like) and it's too violent for little kiddies. I think I must be its target demographic; Sleeping Beauty was the first film I ever saw in the cinema. And Maleficent kicks Galadriel's butt any day.

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9080. Witch Hazel of My Own

cartoon witch

 

back to illustration work

The post Witch Hazel of My Own appeared first on Samalou.com | The Art of Lou Simeone.

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9081.

Cute bear character head, 3D sculpting exercise.

More images: metinseven.com

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9082. Shrimp Boat

cartoon shrimp

 

back to illustration work

The post Shrimp Boat appeared first on Samalou.com | The Art of Lou Simeone.

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9083. Candy Fleming's THE FAMILY ROMANOV - Guest Post and Giveaway!

I am thrilled, thrilled, thrilled to have Candy Fleming here today to talk about her amazing new book, THE FAMILY ROMANOV. It's non-fiction at its best and deserves every bit of Newbery buzz that it's receiving. So, take it away Candy!

      Thanks so much for asking me to stop by, Elizabeth. I’m so excited to talk about my new book, The Family Romanov. Today I want to share a little bit about my research. It was a journey that took four paths. The first, of course, was primary research. After all, the heart of research is the firsthand accounts and eyewitness testimonies of those who lived through an historical event. And so I read reminiscences written by the children’s’ tutors, and Alexandra’s ladies-in-waiting and Nicholas’ courtiers. I delved into the royal family’s letters and diaries and other personal papers. I read Yakov Yurovsky’s chilling account of the murders; statements from the guards; depositions from the priests and cleaning women who visited the Romanovs in their last hours. All of it was so personal, so intimate. If you think about it, it really is the height of nosiness… and probably the reason I love this sort of research so much. I get to be part detective, piecing together testimony from all that conflicting testimony, and part gossip, reporting on all the juicy details I uncover.
      My second path? Secondary source material. There are hundreds of books about the Romanovs and the Russian Revolution (although almost none for young readers). Dozens of scholars have made the rigorous examination of Russia’s past their life’s work. They’ve written insightful, enlightening histories. And I read dozens of them. For months every night I curled up with books with titles like The Russian Revolution of February 1917 or The Fall of the Romanovs. There’s no denying that my book stands on the shoulders of these works.
      My third research path led to experts – scholars, historians, and other writers. They are, I’ve learned, incredibly generous. All my nonfiction titles have been immeasurably improved by their time and effort. But no one was more helpful than Dr. Mark Steinberg, professor of Russian, East European and Eurasian studies at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. While doing research, I came to rely on Dr. Steinberg’s work – his accessible histories of Russia, his impeccable translations of documents recently released from the Russian archives, his re-examination of Nicholas’ leadership abilities, his new and brilliant scholarship on Lenin, his admiration for Maxim Gorky. Can you tell I am a fan? So as the first draft of the book neared completion I approached him tentatively. More than anything, I wanted him to read what I’d written. I wanted his opinion, his knowledge. I wrote him, explaining my purpose and my readership. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped he’d answer. He did… enthusiastically. Over the course of the next six months, he read my draft, made suggestions, pointed out errors, suggested more appropriate source material and forced me to look at the evidence in different ways. He sent along books and articles he believed would help in my work. He re-read portions of the book I’d reworked based on his comments, and patiently answered what must have felt like a tireless stream of questions throughout the entire publication process. That’s generosity!
      Last, but certainly not least, my fourth research path took me traveling. I think it’s imperative to visit the places where the story happened. Landscapes speak and houses hold memories and secrets. This was especially true when writing The Family Romanov. In August 2012 I traveled to Russia where I followed in the Romanov’s footsteps, wandering the shady paths of Tsarskoe Selo and traipsing through the hallways of the Alexander Palace; visiting Rasputin’s apartment; exploring worker’s neighborhoods, Lenin’s headquarters and the dark, dank jail cells of the Peter and Paul Fortress. Just walking the streets and feeling the air brought my biographical subjects closer. And because of those travels, I made a surprising and important discovery – one that changed the scope of the book. It happened while I was visiting the Alexander Palace. In none of my sources had anyone mentioned how close the palace sat to the front gate. I’d assumed it was somewhere in the middle of the park, away from prying eyes. Not so. The tall, main gate with its golden, double headed eagle opens directly onto the palace’s circular driveway. Every day the family could look through its iron grillwork to the town of Tsarskoe Selo just on the other side. It gave me pause. The family was so close to it’s people. They were just on the other side of the gate. The Romanovs could look out their windows and see them. They could hear the voices of their people from the palace balcony. They could smell their cooking. They really weren’t as physically removed as sources had led me to believe. So why, I wondered, didn’t the Romanovs feel more attachment to their subjects? I mean, they were right there. The question led me down entirely new paths of thought. And it eventually led to the book’s inclusion of first hand worker and peasant accounts under the title, “Beyond the Palace Gates.”

GIVEAWAY
Random House has kindly agreed to send a free copy of THE FAMILY ROMANOV to one of my lucky followers. Must live in the US to win - enter below.

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9084. Small Business Saturday!

Come visit me at The Book Exchange in Marietta, Georgia today. I'll be sharing THE 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS IN GEORGIA at 10:30am, then A BIRD ON WATER STREET after that! Show your kids the importance of supporting small, neighborhood businesses and tweet at #SmallBizSat.

Click the cover to learn about my picture book THE 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS IN GEORGIA! Makes a GREAT teacher gift!
     Don't live in Georgia? Check with your local bookseller - Sterling has a version for each state.


Click the cover to learn about my debut novel, A BIRD ON WATER STREET, winner of six prestigious literary awards!
     When the birds return to Water Street, will anyone be left to hear them sing? A miner's strike allows green and growing things to return to the Red Hills, but that same strike may force residents to seek new homes and livelihoods elsewhere. Follow the story of Jack Hicks as he struggles to hold onto everything he loves most.

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9085. Proposal Pop-Up Book 10866

3a_corn_fieldCorn Fields
4_ChicagoChicago Skyline Pop-Up
5_Cruise_shipCruise Ship
6_on_bended_kneeProposal- on bended knee - Pop-Up
7_trees_on_beach_top
9_ColosseumColosseum Pop-Up
10_Eiffel_TowerEiffel Tower Pop-Up
11b_SantoriniSantorini Pop-Up, the garden gate opens and closes
11c_Santorini_gate
11d_Santorini_bellTe chursh Bell Swings

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9086. Jetliner Business Card Sculpture

CRJ-7001219_jet_crj700

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9087. Day 29 - wolves

quick grab of wolf studies in my sketchbook
Day 29
Topic - Wolves

A fun topic but my time is short today, so here's a quick grab. 

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9088. Austin Chronicle Short Story Contest

The 23rd Annual Austin Chronicle Short Story Contest Now Open For Submissions

The Austin Chronicle Short Story Contest

Submit Your Manuscript To:

Short Story Contest, PO Box 49066, Austin, TX 78765

Deadline for Submissions

Submissions must be postmarked by December 12, 2014.

Prize Money

$1,500 to be divided among the five winners. Manuscript to be published in early winter in The Austin Chronicle.

Rules

1. Your work must be unpublished, typewritten, and must be no more than 2,500 words.
2. Include the title of the story on the first page of the manuscript. All entries must also be accompanied by a separate cover letter, which contains the name, address, email address, and phone number of the author, as well as the title of the story.
3. The author’s name must not appear anywhere in the manuscript.
4. Only one entry per person.

Regulations

Manuscripts must be the original work of the contestant, unpublished (and not under consideration of being published), typed, and double-spaced on one side of 8.5-by-11-inch paper, and no longer than 2,500 words.

Contestants must submit one copy of the manuscript and a cover sheet containing the name, address, email address, and phone number of the author and the title of the work. Names and copyright markings must be omitted from the manuscript, which will go to screeners and judges anonymously. Do not send originals – no entries will be returned. Staff members of The Austin Chronicle, freelancers who have contributed more than one article since October 2013, and first- through fifth-place winners from the 2013 Short Story Contest are not eligible to enter. Copyright remains in the name of the author, but The Austin Chronicle reserves the right to publish the winning entries and any honorable mentions in The Austin Chronicle and to reproduce them electronically on our online edition.

All entries must be postmarked to The Austin Chronicle by December 12, 2014. NO ELECTRONIC SUBMISSIONS. Finalists will be notified in late January, 2015. Questions should be directed to books@austinchronicle.com. No phone calls, please. Please read all rules and regulations thoroughly.

Contest is open to Texans and non-Texans alike.

Need inspiration? Last year’s winners can be read here.

Good Luck!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Contest, inspiration, opportunity, Places to Submit, writing Tagged: No fee Writing Contest, No state restrictions, Short Story contest, The Austin Chronicle

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9089. Grandparents tsunami

Something a little different from me this month - for a feature about the effect of an aging population on the health service.


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9090. Austin Chronicle Short Story Contest

The 23rd Annual Austin Chronicle Short Story Contest Now Open For Submissions

The Austin Chronicle Short Story Contest

Submit Your Manuscript To:

Short Story Contest, PO Box 49066, Austin, TX 78765

Deadline for Submissions

Submissions must be postmarked by December 12, 2014.

Prize Money

$1,500 to be divided among the five winners. Manuscript to be published in early winter in The Austin Chronicle.

Rules

1. Your work must be unpublished, typewritten, and must be no more than 2,500 words.
2. Include the title of the story on the first page of the manuscript. All entries must also be accompanied by a separate cover letter, which contains the name, address, email address, and phone number of the author, as well as the title of the story.
3. The author’s name must not appear anywhere in the manuscript.
4. Only one entry per person.

Regulations

Manuscripts must be the original work of the contestant, unpublished (and not under consideration of being published), typed, and double-spaced on one side of 8.5-by-11-inch paper, and no longer than 2,500 words.

Contestants must submit one copy of the manuscript and a cover sheet containing the name, address, email address, and phone number of the author and the title of the work. Names and copyright markings must be omitted from the manuscript, which will go to screeners and judges anonymously. Do not send originals – no entries will be returned. Staff members of The Austin Chronicle, freelancers who have contributed more than one article since October 2013, and first- through fifth-place winners from the 2013 Short Story Contest are not eligible to enter. Copyright remains in the name of the author, but The Austin Chronicle reserves the right to publish the winning entries and any honorable mentions in The Austin Chronicle and to reproduce them electronically on our online edition.

All entries must be postmarked to The Austin Chronicle by December 12, 2014. NO ELECTRONIC SUBMISSIONS. Finalists will be notified in late January, 2015. Questions should be directed to books@austinchronicle.com. No phone calls, please. Please read all rules and regulations thoroughly.

Contest is open to Texans and non-Texans alike.

Need inspiration? Last year’s winners can be read here.

Good Luck!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Contest, inspiration, opportunity, Places to Submit, writing Tagged: No fee Writing Contest, No state restrictions, Short Story contest, The Austin Chronicle

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9091.

Celebrate and share! The Wash Rag: Giving the Gift of Literacy (Reading Tub newsletter) #GivingTuesday The Wash Rag: Giving the Gift of Literacy (Reading Tub newsletter)

from Google+ RSS https://plus.google.com/114947522579399768205/posts/gYzgotHMxmu

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9092. Wobble


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9093. Nana’s Fathead Brew Coffee Label

cartoon logo

 

back to illustration work

The post Nana’s Fathead Brew Coffee Label appeared first on Samalou.com | The Art of Lou Simeone.

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9094. ‘Mouse in Transition’: ‘Basil’ Kicks Into High Gear (Chapter 13)

When the Disney strike of 1982 ended and the story artists returned to their respective work spaces in the animation building, "Basil of Baker Street" was still running along two sets of tracks. There were storyboards filled with gags and character bits, and boards filled with plot points.

0 Comments on ‘Mouse in Transition’: ‘Basil’ Kicks Into High Gear (Chapter 13) as of 11/30/2014 1:54:00 AM
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9095. Gouache Master: Albert Brenet

Albert Brenet (1903-2005) was a French artist who painted primarily in gouache. 


As a child he loved to paint pictures of ships in port. Ships remained a favorite theme all his life. 
 
In 1921 he studied at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. 

For seven months he sailed the Antilles on the Bonchamp, one of the last French sailing merchant ships.

He traveled widely and painted scenes of colorful locations around the world, including equatorial Africa and the West Indies.


His gouache paintings were relatively large, requiring a big board and easel.


He worked for many years for the magazine L’illustration, and he painted many posters depicting railroads, aircraft, ships, and architecture for the travel trade.


These subjects require accurate perspective and confident handling of detail.

In the painting above, note how he simplifies the far silhouette and the foreground textures to put the focus on the middle-ground train and the overhead wires.

He delighted in tight cropping, active foregrounds, and immense scale. He achieved scale by alternating big and little strokes, choosing unusual viewpoints, and setting figures back in space.

Look how he blurred the feet of the walking figures, and parked that sales wagon right in the foreground.
-----
Read more about Albert Victor Eugene Brenet:

Do you know these other artists?
Eugène Burnand
Josep Tapiró Baró

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9096. Drawing on Location

via Muddy Colors http://muddycolors.blogspot.com/2014/11/drawing-on-location.html




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9097. FOLLOW THE DRINKING GOURD

It has now been a year since I completed illustrations for the story "Follow the Drinking Gourd" (which hopefully means I can now safely post my work). It's about two runaway slave children who, through the help of good samaritans, are able to escape to freedom. Here is a sampling of the finished pieces:
















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9098. A.B. Frost in Illustration Magazine

via Gurney Journey http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2014/11/ab-frost-in-illustration-magazine.html




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9099. Birdo Created Rio 2016 Olympic Mascots

São Paulo-based Birdo Studio was selected to create Rio's 2016 Olympic mascots.

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9100. Happy Birthday Light My Way

happy birthday cartoon

 

back to illustration work

The post Happy Birthday Light My Way appeared first on Samalou.com | The Art of Lou Simeone.

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