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9076. a very nice summary of Oliver

From the Books For Kids blog:


ON THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL OLIVER THOUGHT IT BEST TO STOP BY THE SWAMP AND PICK UP AN ALLIGATOR.

When is an alligator not an alligator?

When it’s the first day of school and a very small boy feels as if his “brave” isn’t up to facing all the strangeness alone.

With his fantasy guardian at his side, Paul feels more in control of the situation. When a strange woman who looks nothing like his mom asks his name, all he has to say to his alligator are two words:

“MUNCH MUNCH.”

The lady is gone, and Oliver’s alligator is a little plumper. A girl who tries to talk to him gets the same message.

Oliver begins to feel a lot better, as his magic words make all of the bright colors and commotion in the classroom go away. His pale green and pink alligator is now as roly poly as a beach ball, and all the activity and noise are gone. Oliver pulls up a stool beside his rotund alligator in the empty room and waits for school to start. It’s very quiet.

SCHOOL IS MAYBE A LITTLE BIT BORING, THOUGHT OLIVER.

Then Oliver hears singing and laughter. Somewhere nearby kids are having fun, and it’s all happening inside his alligator. School is on the inside!

It’s time for Oliver to say “Munch Munch!” one more time and put himself into the scene where the action is, in Paul Schmid’s first-day tale, Oliver and his Alligator (Hyperion, 2013).

Schmid earned a 2010 fellowship to study with the late Maurice Sendak, and it shows in this rather quirky tale of dealing with the first day jitters. While Schmid’s storyline shows the Sendakian hand (cf. the personification of Max’s angry feelings as Wild Things, in Where the Wild Things Are,) Schmid’s illustrations, done in soft, grainy pencil lines and pastel colors, are another matter. His “wild thing,” is a fuzzy-ish alligator who seemingly has no mouth or teeth with which to munch anybody, and Schmid’s narration is as non-threatening as his little first-day-of-school hero, who finds a way to face his fear, just as Max tamed his anger. Some children deal with an intimidating situation by daydreaming, mentally removing themselves, and Schmid’s subliminal message of how to put themselves back into life will find its mark.

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9077. ZOOBEAN – picturebooks by mail!

Ever wish you could receive stunning picturebooks in the mail each month for yourself or you a loved one? Zoobean is a service that not only offers picturebooks by mail, but you can also personalize subscriptions by age, gender, and interests. Created by fellow Syracuse University alumn, Felix Brandon Lloyd and his wife Jordan Bookey, Zoobean is the most exciting addition to picturebooks for me since Reading Rainbow! Welcome to the blog, Zoobean!

photoHow would you describe Zoobean?

Zoobean is the lovechild of your fave indie bookstore and trusted children’s librarian.”  Well, we stole that description from a recent review on Red Tricycle, but it’s perfect, so it’s worth quoting!  Our more formal description is that we are a discovery and personalization service that delights families with products curated just for them, beginning with kids’ books.  

I think a subscription based book club is a great idea! When I was a kid—actually, even now, I still love receiving things in the mail. How did you come up with the idea of Zoobean, and how is it different from similar services?

Our son received the children’s book “All the World,” in the mail as a gift from a friend.  He was so excited to open his gift, and when we read the story, he kept saying, “Me, me, me!” about the little boy.  The family in All the World happens to look like our family, and that was a powerful moment for us.  But, more importantly, it’s simply a great story.  We thought, wouldn’t it be wonderful to delight families with relevant, beautiful books that would engage their kids and inspire an even deeper love of reading. 

At Zoobean, we have curators (all parents who also happen to be children’s librarians or reading specialists) who handpick the books we have in our catalog.  We are quite deliberate with our featured book selections, and we also offer a personalized subscription.  Our highly tagged catalog of thousands of books gives us the ability to curate personalized subscriptions for families.  So, you tell us about your child and what you’d like for them to read (characters’ backgrounds, topics, genres, etc.), and we curate a unique subscription for you.  What’s more?  We offer reading guides for each and every book that is a part of a featured or personalized subscription.

Both of you are super educators. Can you talk a little about the educational component that is built into Zoobean and why that is important to you?

Yes, we met as teachers and Felix was named Washington, DC’s Teacher of the Year!  (Jordan ran education outreach for Google). At its core, Zoobean is inspiring a love of reading in kids by ensuring that all kids (and families) can see themselves and their situations in what they are reading.  As teachers, we understood the importance and power of building lifelong readers.  It’s really as parents that this became even more personal.  Through our personalized curation and highly developed reading guides (the books’ authors rave about them), we help excite kids and give parents the tools to engage even deeper with the literature in their homes.

Diversity is a huge issue in children’s publishing today. According to the the Cooperative Children’s Book Center (http://ccblogc.blogspot.fr/2013/07/i-see-white-people.html) there have been 1183 books published so far in 2013 about human beings, 124 of those books feature people of color. Do Zoobean curators try to create lists that reflect this issue?

One of our earliest customers, enjoying our very first featured book!

At Zoobean, we have three core values: love, inclusion, and remarkability. For us, that means we want to be sure that all of our books are high caliber, and that we do our very best to ensure that all families and kids are able to see themselves in the books we include in our catalog and featured selections.  More importantly, our catalog can serve as a discovery platform.  We’re one of the few places where a parent can go and search specifically by character’s background, including gender, ethnicity, family type, and religion.

Have you reached out to the children’s book community at large (publishers, authors, illustrators, librarians, etc.)? How have they received Zoobean?

We are getting there!  The majority of our curators are in fact librarians, so they have helped plug us into much of the library community.  Generally, librarians are big fans of ours.  Authors and illustrators, especially those with smaller distribution love our platform and often try to get their books listed in our catalog. 

What are your plans for Zoobean’s future?

We intend to extend our catalog, and help families by curating more than books.  We are currently considering apps, along with other markets for which it has become challenging for parents to discover the best products for their children.  One day, we hope that a parent (or aunt, family friend, etc.) sees our Zoobean logo and views it as a trusted seal that represents quality and our core values of love, inclusion, and remarkability.

Thank you so much for stopping by, Zoobean. I am so looking forward to watching you grow and ordering subscriptions for all the young readers in my life!

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9078. Kids!!!!

Kids!!!!

Childhood, The Grand Adventure! Kids just wanna have FUN!


1 Comments on Kids!!!!, last added: 8/25/2013
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9079. מוצרים מאויירים למכירה

בהתרגשות רבה- אני שמחה להכריז על פתיחת המכירה של כמה מוצרים שאני עובדת עליהם כבר כמעט שנה. .

IMG_7568

תוכלו למצוא כאן מגוון תמונות מאויירות  ומנורות לילה מתוקות- לחדרי ילדים ומבוגרים, מתנות ליקירכם, לקרובים מחו"ל ולכבוד החגים

מנורות הלילה מיוצרות מחמרים שאינם דליקים וידידותיים לסביבה,

CandyLAnd

כוללות נורות לילה ותקע תואם שקע ישראלי

lampsamples

ומקושטות ידנית בסרטי בד, נצנצים וחרוזים.

IMG_0213

עטופות באהבה רבה בצלופן לאיסוף עצמי- וארוזות המירב ההגנה בעת משלוח.

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מנסיון עבר- המנורות מתקבלות בהתלהבות רבה על ידי הילדים כמו גם המבוגרים.

IMG_7327

תוכלו למצוא מנורות לבנים  ולבנות

BeachLoveIMG_7976

MoonBoy

וחלק מהמנורות אף נושאות עליהן איורים מספרים שאיירתי-

IMG_1827

כך שתוכלו בלחיצת כפתור-  גם לקרוא על עשייתם של הספרים וגם לרכוש אותם מיוצריהם- ולהעניק חווית טרום שינה מושלמת לילדיכם.

למשל- איורי המנורות הללו- נלקחו מתוך הספר המקסים – ראש גלידה

574824_217268411735252_1675496607_n

ותוכלו לקרוא על הכנתו כאן

- TainbowIceCream

IceCreamStore

                          המנורות הללו מעוטרות באיורי הספר הקסום – נשיקסם

154421_392958330790142_399128662_n

ותוכלו לקרוא גם על הכנתו- כאן

KissBoykissGirl

על המנורה הזו מודפס איור מתוך ספר החובה- הטריק הסודי של אבא

MaraCover

ותוכלו לקרוא על מאחורי הקלעים שלו- כאן

SleepBoy

האיורים שהודפסו על המנורות הבאות- מקורם בספר דיגיטלי לאיפד-

the little girl who could fly

mzl.nmtuafuf.480x480-75

SleepGirlFlyGirlClothesGirl

IMG_7527

IMG_7970

עד כאן המנורות להפעם

IMG_7565.

ליצירת קשר לצורך קניה או בירור פרטים – אנא שלחו לי מייל לכתובת הבאה

pil@actcom.co.il

מחיר כל מנורה הוא 90 שח

85 שח למלייקקים בדף העסקי שלי בפייסבוק בלווית 5 מחבריהם.

לא כולל משלוח- בהעברה בנקאית.

למבקשים לאסוף עצמאית- ניתן לשלם במקום-

בחנות קומיקס וירקות בקינג ג'ורג' , 40

תל אביב.

מוצרים נוספים שניתן לרכוש באותה הדרך ובאותו המחיר- הם תמונות מאויירות יפהפיות לחדרי ילדים, מתנות לגננות או לקרובים מחו"ל- בנושאי עונות השנה וחגי ישראל.

האיורים האלו- מתוך לוח שנה שאיירתי לפני כ-15 שנה

CalenderPics

יכולים להגיע אליכם בהדפסה איכותית על קנבס- 30 על 30 סמ

(80 שח כל אחד בנפרד)

Canvas

או בהדפסת סובלימציה יוקרתית על עץ דחוס ומבריק באותן מידות ובאותם מחירים

BigPlacements

או באותה הדפסת סובלימציה אבל על חמישיית תחתיות לקפה מהודרות- ארוזות בשקיק משי

IMG_6301

IMG_6346

80 שח לכל המארז.

עד כאן – התמונות.

IMG_6312

כמובן שניתן להשכיר את שירותי לאיור מתנות מקוריות לפי הזמנה בטכניקות שונות ומשונות ולשימושים מגוונים- בלינק הבא יש המון דוגמאות חביבות כמו

אני מאיירת ספרים דיגיטלים ולפרינט- – תמחורים וסגנונות, כולל תהליכי עבודה והמון טיפים מגדולי המולי"ם תוכלו למצוא כאן

וניתן להזמין את שירותי גם לאיורי אפנה וטקסטיל, מוצרים, צעצועים ומשחקי ילדים, מגאזינים ועיתונים, פרסום, יח"צ מיתוג וכו- ראו סגנונות ודוגמאות בגלריה למעלה- לפי קטגוריות..

להשתמע

אלית

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9080. Access the Disney Animation Vault with New Interactive iPad App

Walt Disney Animation Studios has partnered with Touch Press, the digital book publishers behind Elements and Leonardo DaVinci: Anatomy, to create Disney Animated, a new premium iPad app that provides “unprecedented access” to the art and technology behind all 53 of Disney’s animated feature films from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to the upcoming Frozen.


Disney Animated, which is available today in the iTunes app store for $13.99, contains 750 interactive illustrations, over 400 short animation clips and 350 backgrounds, concept drawings and storyboards. “The promise of Disney Animated is that it is a serious work about the history and present day practice of making animated feature films, in which the medium is finally able to speak for itself”, explains Theodore Gray, Touch Press COO and co-author of the new app, on the Touch Press blog, “where every image from every film is in fact a short clip, complete with sound, music, and life.”

Source: Wall Street Journal

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9081. IF Hybrid

flying granny color 450Granny/Superhero hybrid. For Illustration Friday.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

Finally peeking my groggy head up after a bit of time underground, building a new portfolio. Squeaked by just in time for the SCBWI L.A. Summer conference, from which I just returned.

I’d love to share some of the inspiration and new focus with y’all, once my head ceases to spin, that is!

It’s great to be back in the blogging seat!


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9082. Organic Architecture: Links to the Whole Series

Organic Architecture SpiralI want to thank everyone for reading my Organic Architecture Series! I realize this was a long series with lots of posts. The following are the links to all the different articles. Feel free to bookmark this page for easy reference!

Happy plotting, structuring, and designing, everyone!

Organic Architecture Series:

Classic Design and Arch Plot:

Alternative Plots:

Alternative Structures:

Designing Principle:

Full Bibliography for this Series:

Alderson, Martha. The Plot Whisperer: Secrets of Story Structure Any Writer Can Master. New York: Adams Media, 2011.
Anderson, Tobin. “Theories of Plot and Narrative.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. July 2008.
Bayerl, Katie. “Must We All Be Heroes? Crafting Alternatives to the Hero’s Journey in YA Fiction.” Critical Thesis. Vermont College of Fine Arts, 2009.
Bayerl, Katie. “Must We All Be Heroes? Crafting Alternatives to the Hero’s Journey in YA Fiction.” Graduate Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montepelier, VT. July 2009.
Bechard, Margaret. “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Plot.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. Jan 2008.
Berg, Charles Ramirez. “A Taxonomy of Alternative Plots in Recent Films: Classifying the ‘Tarantino Effect.’” Film Criticism, Vol. 31, Issue 1-2, 5-57, 22 Sept 2006. Ebsco Host. Web. 6 May 2011.
Burroway, Janet. Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narative Craft. 8th Edition. New York: Longman, 2011.
Campbell, Joseph. The Hero with a Thousand Faces. Second Edition. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1968.
Campbell, Patty. “The Sand in the Oyster: Vetting the Verse Novel.” The Horn Book Magazine. Sept.-Oct.2004: 611-616.
Capetta, Amy Rose. “Can’t Fight This Feeling: Figuring out Catharsis and the Right One for Your Story.” Graduate Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montepelier, VT. Jan 2012.
Carver, Renee. “Cumulative Tales Primary Lesson Plan.” Primary School. 9 Mar. 2009. Web. 31 Aug 2012.
Chapman, Harvey. “Not Your Typical Plot Diagram.” Novel Writing Help. 2008-2012. Web. 6 Oct. 2012.
Chea, Stephenson. “What’s the Difference Between Plot and Structure.” Associated Content. 16 Feb. 2010. Web. 7 May 2011.
Doan, Lisa. “Plot Structure: The Same Old Story Since Time Began?” Critical Essay. Vermont College of Fine Arts, 2006.
Field, Syd. Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting. Revised ed. New York: Delta, 2005.
Fletcher, Susan. “Structure as Genesis.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. July 2012.
Forster, E.M. Aspects of the Novel. New York: Harcourt Inc., 1927.
Gardner, John. The Art of Fiction. New York: Vintage Books, 1983.
Gulino, Paul. Screenwriting: The Sequence Approach. New York: Continuum, 2004.
Hauge, Michael. Writing Screenplays That Sell. New York: Collins Reference, 2001.
Hawes, Louise. “Desire Is the Cause of All Plot.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. July 2008.
Kalmar, Daphne. “The Short Story Cycle: A Sculptural Aesthetic.” Critical Thesis, Vermont College of Fine Arts, 2009.
Kaufman, Charlie. “Charlie Kaufman: BAFTA Screenwriting Lecture Transcript.” BAFTA Guru. British Academy of Film and Television Arts. 30 Sept. 2011. Web. 18 Aug. 2012.
Larios, Julie. “Once or Twice Upon a Time or Two: Thoughts on Revisionist Fairy Tales.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. Jan 2010.
Layne, Ron and Rick Lewis. “Plot, Theme, the Narrative Arc, and Narrative Patterns.” English and Humanities Department. Sandhill Community College. 11 Sept, 2009. Web. 7 May 2011.
Lefer, Diane. “Breaking the Rules of Story Structure.” Words Overflown by Stars. Ed. David Jauss, Cincinnati: Writer’s Digest Books, 2009. 62-69.
Marks, Dara. Inside Story: The Power of the Transformational Arc. Ojai: Three Mountain Press, 2007. McKee, Robert. Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting. New York: IT Books, 1997.
McManus, Barbara F. Tools for Analyzing Prose Fiction. College of New Rochelle, Oct. 1998. Web. 11 Sept. 2012.
Schmidt, Victoria Lynn. Story Structure Architect. Cincinnati: Writer’s Digest Books, 2005.
Sibson, Laura. “Structure Serving Story: A Discussion of Alternating Narrators in Today’s Fiction.” Graduate Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. July 2012.
Snyder, Blake. Save the Cat: The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2005.
Tanaka, Shelley. “Books from Away: Considering Children’s Writers from Around the World.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. Jan 2010.
Tobias, Ron. Twenty Master Plots: And How to Build Them. Cincinnati: Writer’s Digest Books, 1993.
Truby, John. The Anatomy of Story: 22 Steps to Becoming a Master Story- teller. New York: Faber and Faber Inc., 2007.
TV Tropes. Three Act Structure. TV Tropes Foundation, 26 Dec. 2011. Web. 11. Sept. 2012.
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. 2nd Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 1998.
Williams, Stanley D. The Moral Premise. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2006.

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9083. Geo Animals

Here is another recent kid's design I sold  -


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9084. Maurice Sendak and Martha Stewart



So great! I have never seen him like this. 

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9085. Journal page - eating tapas, chatting and drawing

This page was done on such a fun Saturday! Sitting outside in the centre of Amsterdam, eating tapas (sardines! I love them!) and chatting, while drawing... Perfection!

I did a lot of loose drawings on one page, so the cat that I drew (that was lazily slumbering in a planter pot) ended up sticking out from under the plate of sardines... ah well... It's all good.

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9086. Geo Animals

Here is another recent kid's design that I sold  -


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9087. Nighttime 3


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9088. Nighttime 4


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9089. Harts Pass No. 164

I've been sitting on this idea for a while now... but its so true. Sometimes hiking is hard :)
[ But don't tell that to your kids! ]

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9090. Print and Pattern Kids Book

This week Print and Pattern blog posted some snapshots of their new book - Print and Pattern Kids! You can order it in the US. Here is a page in the book featuring my designs. Can't wait to get my copy - will post some more photos when I get it. In the meantime - hurry up and order your copy!


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9091. The Last Bit of New Zealand

I realized I never posted the last leg of my New Zealand journey--Queenstown.
After trekking through the glacier, I stopped off at a hot spring. It was included in the glacier heli-hike package, and it couldn't have come at a more opportune time. I'd been living out of a mini van for 3 days now, and hadn't showered. Ha! So I LOVED IT. Don't worry, I showered before going into the pools ;).

Feeling refreshed, I made my way to Queenstown by way of Wanaka.


I stopped to hike and explore the blue pools.


I wandered through the small town of Wanaka, took another scenic hike, and bumped into some friends I met on the cruise from Wellington to Picton.

Feeling a bit pooped from driving, I wandered Queenstown on foot. I heard from other travelers that Queenstown was their favorite city and immediately I understood the why. It, like the rest of New Zealand, is gorgeous. A medium sized town tucked in the middle of mountains and lakes. I explored my options for exploring Milford Sound and signed up for a fancy tourist bus. Though I did kayak like I originally intended, I had a great time sitting back and letting someone else do the driving for a change. Also, the bus had a glass ceiling and gigantic windows so it was perfect for viewing the scenery.
Welcome to the land of Lord of the Rings! 
We made various stops along the way including Mirror Lake and a river where we were allowed to drink the water. So tasty.
After 4 hours of winding roads and stunning scenery, we entered Milford sound and boarded our boat. The weather was gloomy and rainy but the rain created hundreds of mini waterfalls so it was a win. Our boat also went a bit underneath one of the waterfalls and I got SOAAAKED. Wet butt for the rest of the day.
We got back to Queenstown later in the evening and I drove back to a nearby campsite. The moon guided my way.
The next morning, I wandered the city one last time, grabbed an insanely delicious burger, picked up a bottle of Pinor Noir to take home, and drove about 6 hours to Christchurch to return the car and fly back to the Philippines.

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9092. hooooooo are you?

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9093. Stop-Motion John Lasseter Competes in “Shirt-Off” in “Friendship All-Stars”

Friendship All-Stars of Friendship is a new stop-motion webseries created by Harry Chaskin, Dan Lippert and Justin Michael and executive produced by Robot Chicken’s Seth Green, Matthew Senreich, John Harvatine IV and Eric Towner.

Created for the Lexus owned L/Studio.com, each biweekly episode focuses on a kooky pair-up of celebrities as wacky neighbors and odd couple-style roommates. The latest episode, featuring a sartorial competition between Disney-Pixar’s CCO John Lasseter and character actor Luis Guzman was, according to Chaskin, inspired by an article discovered right here on Cartoon Brew!

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9094. Walt Disney’s Early Life: Up’s and Down’s

Watching Disney movies growing up, I never knew the story of how “Disney” all began.  I never knew the hard times that Walt Disney overcame before he became a huge worldwide success.  At Walt Disney World in Florida, there is an attraction called “Walt Disney: One Man’s Dream.”  It is a walk-through attraction with over 400 artifacts featuring animation art, paintings, storyboards, photos, models, props, costumes and set pieces.  At the end of the tour, there is a 15 minute film hosted by Julie Andrews.  It was here, that I truly felt inspired to continue Adventures of the Bunny Baron: Captain Barnacle’s Revenge.  At one point, I felt too busy and didn’t have faith in myself to make it happen.  After watching this video, seeing the hard times and great times that Walt Disney himself went through and overcame, I knew I could do it.  It gave me new hope, and reassurance that no matter what happens, I wanted to finish my book, and I wanted the world to be able to read it!

I found a Biography on Walt Disney online and decided to add it to this post.  It follows Walt’s highs and lows early on in his career, including many things that I saw in the “One Man’s Dream” video.

Walter Elias Disney was born on December 5, 1901, in Chicago, Illinois.  He was one of five children, living in Marceline, Missouri.  His love for drawing started early, and as he got older, he began drawing, painting and selling pictures to neighbors and family friends.  In 1911, his family moved to Kansas City.

walt disney early

A few years later Walt Disney moved again and took drawing and photography classes at McKinley High School in Chicago.  There, he was a cartoonist for the school paper. At night, he also took courses at the Chicago Art Institute. When Disney was 16, he dropped out of school to join the army but was rejected for being underage.  Instead, he joined the Red Cross and was sent to France for a year.

Disney returned from France in 1919 and moved back to Kansas City to pursue a career as a newspaper artist.  His brother Roy got him a job at the Pesmen-Rubin Art Studio.  He met cartoonist Ubbe Iwerks.  From there, Disney worked at the Kansas City Film Ad Company, where he made commercials based on cutout animation.  Disney began experimenting with a camera, doing hand-drawn cell animation, and decided to open his own animation business.  His first employee was Fred Harmon from the ad company.


Walt and Harman made a deal with a local Kansas City theater to screen their cartoons, which they called Laugh-O-Grams. The cartoons were hugely popular, and Disney was able to acquire his own studio.  Laugh-O-Gram hired a number of employees, including Harman’s brother Hugh and Ubbe Iwerks. They did a series of seven-minute fairy tales that combined both live action and animation, which they called Alice in Cartoonland. By 1923, however, the studio had become burdened with debt, and Disney was forced to declare bankruptcy.

Disney and Roy pooled their money together and moved out to Hollywood.  Ubbe Iwerks also relocated to California.  The three of them began the Disney Brothers’ Studio.  Their first deal was with New York distributor Margaret Winkler, to distribute their Alice cartoons. They also invented a character called Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, and contracted the shorts at $1,500 each.  In 1925, Disney hired an ink-and-paint artist named Lillian Bound.  They married shortly after.

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit

A few years later, Disney discovered that Winkler and her husband, Charles Mintz, had stolen the rights to Oswald, along with all of Disney’s animators, except for Ubbe Iwerks.  Angered and upset, they didn’t give up.  Right away the Disney brothers, their wives and Iwerks produced three cartoons featuring a new character Walt had been developing called Mickey Mouse. The first two animated shorts featuring Mickey Mouse were Plane Crazy and The Gallopin’ Gaucho.  Both were silent films for which they failed to find distribution.  When sound made its way into film, Disney created a third, sound-and-music-equipped short called Steamboat Willie.  Walt Disney voiced Mickey Mouse.  The cartoon was an instant sensation!

Steamboat Willie

 

“Walt Disney Biography.” Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 05 Aug. 2013.

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9095. The Albino Cowboy

It's the latest page from my Memoirs.
Paper53 on iPad.

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9096. Print and Pattern Kids Book

This week Print and Pattern blog posted some snapshots of their new book - Print and Pattern Kids! You can order it in the US. Here is a page in the book featuring my designs. Can't wait to get my copy - will post some more photos when I get it. In the meantime - hurry up and order your copy!


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9097. KLIK! Announces “Fabulous Fifties” Theme for 2013 Edition

The KLIK! Amsterdam Animation Festival has announced the theme for their 2013 edition: The Fabulous Fifties, a major celebration of mid-century animation that will include programs such as The Nuclear Family, Cartoon Modern: The Essentials, and Contemporary Cartoon Modern. The festival will take place between November 12-17, 2013 at the futuristic-looking EYE Film Institute in Amsterdam.

KLIK! is a young event—this is their sixth year—and they’re quirky, fun and unafraid to push things further than the average animation festival. I’ve had the pleasure of consulting with them on the Cartoon Modern theme this year, and they’re putting together some awesome shows and events that reveal fresh insights on the ‘cartoon modern’ movement.

More from their official announcement:

Every year KLIK! dedicates part of the festival program to an exciting theme. This year it’s The Fabulous Fifties, taking you back to perfectly happy families, the magic of home automation and cheesy toothpaste commercials. But the fifties weren’t just that – at the same time animation encountered a groundbreaking change. Animation in that era was greatly influenced by modern design, with its use of graphic, almost abstract, forms and primary colors, earning its term ‘Cartoon Modern’. This turning point in animation history gave us beloved works like The Jetsons, The Pink Panther, 101 Dalmatians and those wonderfully cheesy TV commercials, and went on to influence contemporary animation such as The Powerpuff Girls, Ren & Stimpy, Samurai Jack and even the titles of Pixar’s Monsters, Inc.

Besides the Fabulous Fifties theme, KLIK! will also have a full slate of festival programming including short competitions, animated features, and panels and demos, and a special afternoon for kids.

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9098. Cover revealed: Dairy of a Wimpy Kid 8: Hard Luck


Cover revealed: Dairy of a Wimpy Kid 8: Hard Luck 

It's HARD LUCK being a Wimpy Kid. 



Follow WIMPY KID




USA Today
http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/books/2013/08/08/wimpy-kid-"eff Kinney says that in his next "novel in cartoons,"Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Hard Luck (due Nov. 5), his wisecracking, self-centered, middle-school narrator, Greg Heffley, will try "to reinvent himself."
In his first interview about Hard Luck (its cover is revealed here for the first time), Kinney says Greg isn't aging or maturing but continues to find new comic challenges. It's the eighth book in the wildly popular series, written and illustrated by Kinney for readers 8 and up.
Kinney says Greg's best friend, Rowley, "has a girlfriend. Greg is on his own. He realizes the choices he's made haven't been the best, so he decides to turn his decisions over to chance, using an 8 Ball."hard-luck-jeff-kinney/2628639/"


 Will Greg Heffley's luck ever change?

Find out . . .

11.05.13

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9099. A commission piece



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9100. Organic Architecture: Links to the Whole Series

Organic Architecture SpiralI want to thank everyone for reading my Organic Architecture Series! I realize this was a long series with lots of posts. The following are the links to all the different articles. Feel free to bookmark this page for easy reference!

Happy plotting, structuring, and designing, everyone!

Organic Architecture Series:

Classic Design and Arch Plot:

Alternative Plots:

Alternative Structures:

Designing Principle:

Full Bibliography for this Series:

Alderson, Martha. The Plot Whisperer: Secrets of Story Structure Any Writer Can Master. New York: Adams Media, 2011.
Anderson, Tobin. “Theories of Plot and Narrative.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. July 2008.
Bayerl, Katie. “Must We All Be Heroes? Crafting Alternatives to the Hero’s Journey in YA Fiction.” Critical Thesis. Vermont College of Fine Arts, 2009.
Bayerl, Katie. “Must We All Be Heroes? Crafting Alternatives to the Hero’s Journey in YA Fiction.” Graduate Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montepelier, VT. July 2009.
Bechard, Margaret. “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Plot.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. Jan 2008.
Berg, Charles Ramirez. “A Taxonomy of Alternative Plots in Recent Films: Classifying the ‘Tarantino Effect.’” Film Criticism, Vol. 31, Issue 1-2, 5-57, 22 Sept 2006. Ebsco Host. Web. 6 May 2011.
Burroway, Janet. Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narative Craft. 8th Edition. New York: Longman, 2011.
Campbell, Joseph. The Hero with a Thousand Faces. Second Edition. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1968.
Campbell, Patty. “The Sand in the Oyster: Vetting the Verse Novel.” The Horn Book Magazine. Sept.-Oct.2004: 611-616.
Capetta, Amy Rose. “Can’t Fight This Feeling: Figuring out Catharsis and the Right One for Your Story.” Graduate Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montepelier, VT. Jan 2012.
Carver, Renee. “Cumulative Tales Primary Lesson Plan.” Primary School. 9 Mar. 2009. Web. 31 Aug 2012.
Chapman, Harvey. “Not Your Typical Plot Diagram.” Novel Writing Help. 2008-2012. Web. 6 Oct. 2012.
Chea, Stephenson. “What’s the Difference Between Plot and Structure.” Associated Content. 16 Feb. 2010. Web. 7 May 2011.
Doan, Lisa. “Plot Structure: The Same Old Story Since Time Began?” Critical Essay. Vermont College of Fine Arts, 2006.
Field, Syd. Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting. Revised ed. New York: Delta, 2005.
Fletcher, Susan. “Structure as Genesis.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. July 2012.
Forster, E.M. Aspects of the Novel. New York: Harcourt Inc., 1927.
Gardner, John. The Art of Fiction. New York: Vintage Books, 1983.
Gulino, Paul. Screenwriting: The Sequence Approach. New York: Continuum, 2004.
Hauge, Michael. Writing Screenplays That Sell. New York: Collins Reference, 2001.
Hawes, Louise. “Desire Is the Cause of All Plot.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. July 2008.
Kalmar, Daphne. “The Short Story Cycle: A Sculptural Aesthetic.” Critical Thesis, Vermont College of Fine Arts, 2009.
Kaufman, Charlie. “Charlie Kaufman: BAFTA Screenwriting Lecture Transcript.” BAFTA Guru. British Academy of Film and Television Arts. 30 Sept. 2011. Web. 18 Aug. 2012.
Larios, Julie. “Once or Twice Upon a Time or Two: Thoughts on Revisionist Fairy Tales.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. Jan 2010.
Layne, Ron and Rick Lewis. “Plot, Theme, the Narrative Arc, and Narrative Patterns.” English and Humanities Department. Sandhill Community College. 11 Sept, 2009. Web. 7 May 2011.
Lefer, Diane. “Breaking the Rules of Story Structure.” Words Overflown by Stars. Ed. David Jauss, Cincinnati: Writer’s Digest Books, 2009. 62-69.
Marks, Dara. Inside Story: The Power of the Transformational Arc. Ojai: Three Mountain Press, 2007. McKee, Robert. Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting. New York: IT Books, 1997.
McManus, Barbara F. Tools for Analyzing Prose Fiction. College of New Rochelle, Oct. 1998. Web. 11 Sept. 2012.
Schmidt, Victoria Lynn. Story Structure Architect. Cincinnati: Writer’s Digest Books, 2005.
Sibson, Laura. “Structure Serving Story: A Discussion of Alternating Narrators in Today’s Fiction.” Graduate Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. July 2012.
Snyder, Blake. Save the Cat: The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2005.
Tanaka, Shelley. “Books from Away: Considering Children’s Writers from Around the World.” Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, VT. Jan 2010.
Tobias, Ron. Twenty Master Plots: And How to Build Them. Cincinnati: Writer’s Digest Books, 1993.
Truby, John. The Anatomy of Story: 22 Steps to Becoming a Master Story- teller. New York: Faber and Faber Inc., 2007.
TV Tropes. Three Act Structure. TV Tropes Foundation, 26 Dec. 2011. Web. 11. Sept. 2012.
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. 2nd Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 1998.
Williams, Stanley D. The Moral Premise. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2006.

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