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This blog is about poetry, prose, publishing, children's books, writing, teaching, and performing poetry.
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1. 5 AWESOME BOOK REVIEWS OF WHY POETRY CAN SAVE THE PLANET By Joe Sottile 

Most Helpful Customer Reviews 5.0 out of 5 stars          Reasons Why Everyone Should Read Poetry October 5, 2014 By Teacher, Reader, and Reviewer Format:Kindle Edition Joe Sottile's poetry that I've read is uplifting and inspiring. It brightens the sometimes dreary world. Now, Joe has written a book titled WHY POETRY CAN SAVE THE PLANET. In this book he gives reasons why even non-poetry lovers should read poetry, valid reasons that make you stop and think, at least they did me.

Joe is a former teacher and from what I can tell, not knowing him personally, he was a good one. When students got angry he'd have them write their anger on paper. This helped them learn to deal with their anger. He offers many other ideas of how parents and teachers can help children and red flags to watch out for.

WHY POETRY CAN SAVE THE PLANET would be a great book for teachers, counselors, and everyone that works with children and teens. If I were still teaching I'd want a copy for my classroom. Let me leave you with a quote from Joe: "...you have to see with your heart, your passion ... and sooner or later your mind will follow."

I was provided with a copy of this book for my honest review.

5.0 out of 5 stars
A different book about poetry October 16, 2014 By Amazon Customer Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase I was not expecting to find such a witty, smart and constructive book when I actually got the book - I was expecting some nice poems that I can read and potentially some interpretation of those. But inside I found a revolutionary approach of poetry - why and how can poetry influence in a positive fashion our lives - the author had the courage to express his view in writing. And his view turned out to be a very interesting read that I enjoyed from the first page to the last.

5.0 out of 5 stars Joe continues to amaze with yet another stroke of brilliance October 16, 2014 By Jill Alcorn Format:Kindle Edition Joe continues to amaze with yet another stroke of brilliance, Why Poetry can Save the Planet. Every page is filled with story after story that is sure to give pause to all readers, even those who don't read poetry. He will always be Joe "Silly" Sottile, but in this book, we are granted more serious narratives, and they make every bit as great a story.

Incredible value for the book, honestly. This is a book you'll be sure to read again and again.

4.0 out of 5 stars A Teacher/Counselor/Therapist Must-Read October 7, 2014 By J. Mctaggart Format:Kindle Edition Although I am not a poetry lover (or anywhere close), I have been using Sottile's poems with students for a great many years. I choose to use his work because he "gets" kids, and he speaks TO them - not above them. In "Poetry Can Save the Planet" Sottile, speaking to the adults who work with children, presents a powerful case for what he believes to be true. And who knows? He just might be right.

5.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book October 7, 2014 By R. Humbert Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase I loved this book! I never really gave much thought to poetry at all. I started reading and couldn't stop! My favorite part is his story about his mom and how he used poetry to help him through such a difficult time. Very inspiring! Lisa Humbert

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2. Book Review: Bev Stowe McClure's STAR OF THE TEAM

Right from the title, I had a hunch that this would be an excellent book. Why? Haven’t most of us while growing up daydreamed about being “the star of the team”? It’s a universal desire. Then I read the dedication, which I always do to find out where the author’s heart is. After I read Beverly Stowe McClure’s dedication, I knew this would be one of her best efforts as a writer ever. I wasn’t wrong.

Because the basketball action was described perfectly—plenty of action, and no needless words, I knew that I was on the right path for a good read. Right on that first page I was introduced to many of the important characters, and one of the book’s major conflicts. One line stood out showing how well the author knows kids and how to appeal to their reading taste: “She looked as if she’d swallowed up a bug and was about to puke the thing up.” Now, I knew my granddaughter, Megan, would love this book because a little grossness goes a long way with young readers.

Good writing goes a long way, too. This novel is action-packed from the get-go. I think that Beverly Stowe McClure is half author, half sportscaster, and half star basketball player, (I hope you caught a little humor there.) But what I said is absolutely true. The author really knows the game of basketball, and kids. Those are two elements that really make this book a fun-read,

Speaking of humor, that’s another quality of the book: it is laced with humor along the way to the championship game.  And Kate struggles with staying true to her good values or being narrow-minded and negative. We are never sure how it’s all going to turn out, especially after she has a major setback. And the author provides us with a number of surprises before we sit down for the final game of the season.

I liked all of the characters, especially Kate, Emily, Coach Mom and Ray. They always talk like real people, thus creating very believable characters and a story to remember. There are lessons to be gathered from this novel. They reveal themselves in a subtle way as you read the book, lessons that I hope all my grandchildren know such as: life is a team sport.

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3. October 13th, 2014

[...]

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4. Joe's New Book:  POETRY CAN SAVE THE PLANET

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5. The Best Part of Growing Up

Growing up in the '50s, the biggest joy of my life was throwing a ball. True, Easter was bountiful in candy; Christmas was full of toys; birthday parties were fun; and the tooth fairy always paid off, but that perfect pink rubber ball symbolized heavenly slices of childhood, and both of my parents knew it

 Our front door looked dented and battle worn from hard rubber projectiles pounding its surface. My father’s ritual nap after work was constantly interrupted by mortar fire. Our ball playing broke windows, tore up the lawn, cheated serious injuies, and created lasting memories.  

A month ago, while riding my bike for exercise, I had an unusual daydream that reminded me of how important a rubber ball could be. As I slowly drove through a plaza, my eyes caught an old brick wall with a perfectly drawn stickball batter’s box. Suddenly I imagined the batter’s box screaming at me, “Stop! Get off your bike! Play here! Practice! Fire your best pitch!”

I yelled, “I don’t have a ball!”

The box declared, “Your loss fella, not mine!”

The rest of that day I couldn’t think about anything else, except the most popular sport played during my childhood—baseball, in any form, including stooball and stickball.


As a younster, I had two choices as what to do with my time. I could go outside or I could go outside. Rain? Rainy days didn’t count. They were strange interludes in baseball limbo before we could take the field again. On rainy days, I played ball by seeing how close I could throw the ball up to the ceiling without hitting it until I exhausted my mother’s patience. In the bedroom I could play “All-Star Baseball” with players represented on cardboard disks. But I’d rather be playing ball outside because inside the house I felt like a baseball without a cork core, hallow and  bounceless.


When I played stickball near my cousin John’s house, his ballpark was on the side of a factory building. If you blasted the ball on the roof of a distant factory, that was a Mickey Mantle home run. As soon as it was hit, the batter automatically yelled, “Going! Going! Gone!”
 


A Mickey Mantle home run was a joy to hit, but a small nightmare to retrieve Now we had to climb on the roof to retrieve our rubber Spalding. A collection of galvanized pipes, running from one building to the other, formed a makeshift “ladder.”

It was like climbing a fire escape with half the steps missing. Fortunately, workers never caught us. They were too busy working, and they always missed our death-defying aerobatics. We used every limb to reclaim our twenty-nine cent investment in fun.

There was that one time we used the back of the house as a backstop and my Aunt Frances warned us, “You’re going to break a window!”

We assured her that the ball never goes near the windows. Of course, we were

absolutely right about that. Wanting to hit a home run with my first at-bat, I slashed at the first pitched ball with all my might, and the wooden-broom-handle bat sailed through the kitchen window.

In disbelief Aunt Frances stuck her head through the shattered window and said, “I thought you couldn’t break a window!”

It was obvious that we had to focus on playing ball at my house for a long while.

Fortunately, I did have special parents.


To play stoopball properly, you needed parents who were enlightened enough to realize that it was “okay” in the long run, if their child periodically broke the amber bug light above the door, bent the scallops on it with erratic foul balls, and riddled the bottom of the door like a car crusher. It was “okay” if John and I wouldn’t allow cars to park near the house or across the street in front of the home run trees, while a game was in progress. It was “okay” to redirect traffic and parking on the block. Playing ball ruled.

We needed access to those trees because that’s where the home run balls were headed. The fielder, standing in the middle of the street, he had one chance to make a miracle catch by swiveling around, racing to the trees, and snatching the ball out of mid-air. These miracles occurred with the frequency of Brooklyn Dodger World Series victories; but when they happened, it felt as if we just had won the Golden Glove Award for fielding.


We knew that we were good at something: catching a little pink missile as it scrambled down through the maple leaves or hitting majestic home runs. And we never had any trouble with self-esteem. We didn’t need brown certificates of merit, blue ribbons of achievement or towering silver plated-trophies. We just needed a special moment in the sun and parents who understood the joys of youth.


That pink ball had magic. We just had to unleash it.



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6. Does Your Dog Go Suffer With Panic Anxiety Because of Loud Noises? Here's the Cure!

Does your dog seem to experience panic anxiety when he or she experiences loud noises such as thunder, lightning, and fireworks? Does your dog or your cat for that matter start to shave and quiver? Hide under furniture or behind furniture? Cower in the bathroom near the toilet.

Symptoms of Stress

If you see any of these signs, your animal is experiencing storm or loud noise phobia. There is a litany of other symptoms that you may see: your dog is pacing; your dog is looking for a place to hide; your dog pees on the floor; your dog is a nervous wreck; your dog looks at you with big brown eye that say “Please do something, just don’t sit there!”

A True Story

And how do you feel about all of this? Do you wish that you had a possible solution up your sleeve? Well, I’ve been there and done it. I’ve felt like racing to the vet through a howling storm, where all the traffic lights in my town and the next were down. I actually did this, and intersections were a gamble on living or not because there were other crazy people on the road, but not all were headed to their vet. Yes, there were a few close calls. And what did the vet do? The vet prescribed some mild medicine for Roscoe. So, that’s one solution: doggy medicine to calm raw nerves.

Other Possible Solutions?

1.     Hug Therapy —Maybe your dog just needs some extra hugs and reassurance. Snuggle up in a blanket and whisper soothing words to your dog. Don’t feed them a stack of treats. This might reinforce the behavior that you want to see fade. Just let your four-legged family member know it loved, and the world isn’t really ending.                               

2.     Thundershirt Therapy--for your dog or cat—According to the manufacturers, this shirt or sweater is 80% effective in reducing the stress of storms, travel, separation, and other anxiety causing events. Check out what PetSmart.com has to offer you and your four-legged buddy. The odds are in your favor.

3.     Be Proactive Therapy —Let rover become used to noise in general, especially if you get your dog as a puppy. Play your CDs periodically in the house over an extended period of time, and from day to day increase the volume, while rewarding him or her with treats. This will develop a liking for music and noise. It won’t become a big deal.
 
4.     If All Else Fails Therapy—race through the storm to see the vet, but be careful on the wet, slipper roads. Or better yet, be prepared with mild, safe medicated treats. If prescribed correctly, they will not turn your dog into a four-legged zombie. Certified veterinarians Know what they are doing.

BONUS: Ah, now you can relax, you have solved your dog’s problem by implementing one of the above four ideas.  So pour yourself a lemonade with lots of ice, and consider writing in your diary or journal how you solved this problem. Enjoy a laugh about the whole situation. If you have any emotional pain left you could even write about traumatized dog to get the pain out.

Does that suggestion sound farfetched? Like I said, I have been there, and here’s a poem that I wrote for Picture Poetry on Parade! Yes, it contains bathroom humor, but it also contains a subtle message: if your dog has this problem, it’s time to do something about it. And please don’t punish your dog for misbehaving. He’s not a “bad dog.”

THUNDER & LIGHTNING

CRASH! CRACK! CRASH!

RIPPLE, RIPPLE, CRASH!

BOOM! BOOM! CRASH!

  PITTER! PITTER CRASH!                                 

My dog who is afraid of nothing

is afraid of thunder & lightning.                                     

He hates BOOM! BOOM!

CRASH! CRACK! CRASH!

He hides under the table,

 shaking in terrible fear, 

refusing to do his “business” outside

 on the dark, wet lawn.                 

BOOM! BOOM! CRASH!

Poor Roscoe, hunched under the table… 

BOOM! BOOM! CRASH!

SLASH! SPLASH! PLOP!

 PLOP! Oh, no!

That’s mom’s new rug!  

She’s going to call you “BAD DOG! 

But you just hate thunder & lightning.
“I love you, Roscoe.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       but I don’t like cleaning up.






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7. The Six People Who Shaped My Life

“Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.” ~ George Bernard Shaw

My life might have been entirely different had I not befriended seven people along life’s journey. It has been said that to understand the path of our life we have to review it in reverse, starting with the early years.

Beyond parents and siblings, throughout my life I have had six people leave deep footprints on my heart: a landscape architect (Dave), a family practitioner (John/Dr. Jensen), an English teacher (Miss Starr Hacker), a professor (Dr. Ralph H. Hunkins), my wife, (Marilyn), and a poet (Shel Silverstein.) Whom and what we love seems to shape the person we become.

I grew up next door to Dave in Queens, New York, until he turned five. Then his family moved 30 miles away. Our parents were great friends. The friendship survived the move because on Thursdays the men met to play cards in the kitchen and the women met to sew sweaters and chat in the living room. They took turns visiting one another with a small group of lifelong friends.

During the summer Dave and I would always spend a week or two at each other’s home. We shared several important interests: chasing girls for dates, blue ribbons on the track team, and a Regents diploma. In our teens, it was frequently more satisfying to write volumes to one another about girls, sports, school, and our domineering fathers than to do anything else. Our moms faithfully exchanged our letters every Thursday. We called it the “Pocketbook Mail Express.” No stamps needed.

Our dads asked a lot from themselves and those they loved. And our generation was the one where kids were seen but not heard. Sometimes our letters were a forum for complaints against the universe. Sometimes they were simply tales of teen triumphs and defeats.

I admired Dave and his family because they took summer vacation trips together. Dave was a Boy Scout, had cute girlfriends, and attended church with his family. He always wore shiny black shoes, a pressed white shirt, and a tie to church. Dave was the first person who taught me how to make a presentable knot. Now whenever I put on a tie, I think of Dave and how I kept my vow to be like his Dad by vacationing with my kids during their formative years. Thanks to Dave and his vacation stories I became a better father than I might have been.

John, the doctor-to-be, was very analytical and loved baseball. As a youngster, I hated playing “Go Fish!” with him because had a photographic mind.  I was better at playing stoop ball, stickball, or sandlot baseball. Because he lived a bike ride away, we played ball all of the time. We grew up loving baseball and rooting for two different New York teams. We had baseball and family in common—Christmas dinners, birthdays, confirmation, and more.

John taught me to stand up for myself, enjoy family gatherings, and cherish our moments outdoors or indoors together. Some of the best laughs we had were watching the “Jackie Gleason Show” and rolling with laugher on the living room floor. We even earned money together by sharing a big paper route. At the age of 12, we sometimes took the train into the city by ourselves with our earnings and attended a Yankee day game. John encouraged me to go after whatever I wanted, but never to lose my sense of humor in the process.

In my senior year in high school, I realized that I wasn’t going to be a professional baseball player. My English teacher, Miss Starr Hacker, thought that I was a promising writer. She believed in me. For her, I wrote my heart out. My weekly essays always had a large red “A” scribbled on them. I actively participated in her class. My mind was growing with possibilities. I started believing that I could be an English teacher or a writer, thanks to her.

 I longed to make a difference in the lives of others, just like Miss Hacker. I even considered being a sixth grade teacher because mine was so dull that I thought that I could do better!

My first education course was taught by Dr. Ralph H. Hunkins. He was a kind, intelligent, and enthusiastic. We immediately hit it right off in class. I loved studying about teaching, especially theories of education and men like John Dewey. Two pet projects of Dr. Hunkins were defining what education really is and fostering World Peace. In his classroom I was politely outspoken. After doing an Independent Study with him, we became friends, and I wrote him often after I graduated. He once told me that my letters about school were better than John Holt’s writings about education. Sometimes I even had the pleasure of his wife’s delicious cooking and friendly company. Thanks to them, my confidence as a future educator or writer was growing.

Around the time I met Ralph, I also met my bride-to-be, Marilyn Dufford. We fell madly in love. I thought she was perfect, beautiful on the inside and the outside. And she loved kids. She wanted to be an early childhood teacher. We studied a lot in the college dorm. She taught me how to really study, love long walks, chick flicks, and pizza at “Arnies.”

We married two weeks after our June graduation. In September she was teaching kindergarten, and I was teaching sixth grade in the same school district. I felt the happiest I ever felt in my life. I taught elementary school for thirty-three years.  She taught public school for fifteen years, became a religious director, and raised two lovely daughters. She finished her teaching career as a Special Education teacher. The two of us always loved teaching kids, books, stories, and words.

Thanks to Ralph’s inspiring words about writing, I published a number of articles for parents and teachers in national magazines, and I fell in love with the works of Shel Silverstein, especially A Light in the Attic and Where the Sidewalk Ends.

Poets like the late Shel Silverstein made the ordinary different and exciting. I read and enjoyed his poetry so much that I internalized it. I never met the man, but he became my mentor and friend. Whenever there was a break from the regular school schedule, I read his poetry to my delighted students. They loved the joy and craziness in his poems. And sometimes his poetry even gave them thoughts to ponder. They treasured the book of poems they created in June. If as a teacher you can make kids laugh, think and create for themselves, they are more apt to become self-actualized students, encouraging the best from themselves and their teachers.

My students encouraged me to be to write and perform poetry for our class and other classes. Now I am the luckiest man alive helping kids to laugh, think, and write, whenever I am invited into school as a poet. Each school is my stadium. Each stage is my diamond. And Coach Sottile enjoys his players and our moments in the limelight, thanks to Shel and six others.   

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8. SEE IF YOU Like THIS ENCOURAGING POEM

The Fire Insideby Anonymous When all is lost and hope has fled
When fear is strong and strength is dead
When love and joy abandon you
When mental anguish grows in you

When the last of efforts fail to save
When your fate is ill, your mind enslaved
And when your head hangs low in misery
This is when you'll find the key

A single ember from deep within
Burns hotter and hotter, as flames begin
The fire of truth will light the way
And help you fight, this lonely day

The battle is long, the struggle is rough
Never regret not giving enough
For when we offer our very best,
Our very soul is put to the test

Stand tall and true and you'll prevail
Just hold on tight and never bail
You will survive if you don't quit
Victory is there, if you reach for it

One day in the future, you will look to the past,
And know you had what it takes to last
So never give up and good things will come,
Not just honor and pride, but a job well done.

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9. Poetry Visits Are So Much Fun OR Are They?

A Reading

Poem: "A Reading" by Wendy Cope from If I Don't Know

Everybody in this room is bored.
The poems drag, the voice and gestures irk.
He can't be interrupted or ignored.

Poor fools, we came here of our own accord
And some of us have paid to hear this jerk.
Everybody in the room is bored.

The silent cry goes up, 'How long, O Lord?'
But nobody will scream or go berserk.
He won't be interrupted or ignored.

Or hit by eggs, or savaged by a horde
Of desperate people maddened by his work.
Everybody in the room is bored,

Except the poet. We are his reward,
Pretending to indulge in his every quirk.
He won't be interrupted or ignored.

At last it's over. How we all applaud!
The poet thanks us with a modest smirk.
Everybody in the room was bored.
He wasn't interrupted or ignored.


 

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10. A Few Beautiful Summers Ago...

Family reunions can help remind us of the importance of family and good times in our lives. A few beautiful summers ago, my wife, Marilyn, and I attended a Sottile Family Reunion in Colorado. More than 70 relatives from states as far as Florida and New York attended. We met in the tourist town of Estes Park for a week of fun and discovery. The town is clean, compact, and even dog friendly. There’s a well-shaded park for dogs and doggie bowls of water in some tourist shops. Picture perfect mountains surrounded this haven.

More than half of the Sottiles that came to the family reunion live in Colorado. There were two major events planned for each day. These events included a western barbecue, hayride in the mountains, a sock hop, a rock climb, an aerial ride over the mountains, racing go-carts, white water rafting, gambling Texas Hold ’Em style, a cowboy and cowgirl dance, mountain hiking, fishing for phantom fish, golfing on a fantastic course (with majestic mountains in the background), and much more.

Each morning Marilyn and I enjoyed eating breakfast in a different restaurant and doing some window shopping. A good breakfast in a new place was a delicious way to start the day. As we strolled around the town, we held hands like newlyweds. On days that were less structured than other days we visited Rocky Mountain National Park. 

On a sunny day you would have to be camera-challenged not to take a superb picture at the park. We enjoyed the breath-taking beauty by taking more than 100 digital photographs. There seemed to be endless photo opportunities to share with the family back home. The park contains 359 miles of trails and 60 peaks above 12,000 feet. In the park you can escape the crowds and enjoy a mountain playground where elk, muler deer, and big horn sheep roam freely in the meadows and along streams.

Matter of fact, the elk sometimes trot into town and you have to be careful just how fast you drive or you might hit one. Marilyn and I each had a turn at yelling, “Look out for the elk ahead!” Both times it was almost lunchtime, so guess elk get hungry too.  

When we weren’t at the park, we caught up on the lives of people who were somehow connected to us by birth or marriage. Later, after hiking or white water rafting, it was easy to go to bed and fall asleep in each other’s arms.

Since this was a vacation with no cooking or cleaning to be done, people were in superb moods. A harsh word was never heard, not even among the many children. The good times and cheer seemed to roll along from day to day. At the last dance there were old films of past family events and new slides of the happy reunion. Some of the old super-eight film brought tears to our eyes as we saw loved ones who we once patterned certain aspects of our lives after, but were no longer with us. Group pictures of our families were taken at our western dance and woven together like a family tapestry of celluloid and light to celebrate our history on our last night together

During a typical day at home, my most strenuous activity might be mowing the lawn with my self-propelled mower. Count me out as far as mountain hiking and white water rafting (during record breaking temperatures in the Rockies). But, sometimes you have to pluck down some coins and courage that were set aside for “someday I’ll do that.” Marilyn and I were the oldest white water rafters on our family’s “ride the rapids” day. We earned our wet badge of courage and had a once in a lifetime experience.


It’s great fun to share stimulating activities with people you know from birth. But there were many Sottile clan members that I had not met; they grew up in Colorado and I in New York. Fortunately, we all seemed to have the same definition of fun: swap family stories and memories, while creating new ones.


Perhaps the funniest new story told around the campfire in the mountain was about my two cousins, Laurie and Jim, from New York. One evening during the week, they came home at midnight to their backwoods condo and discovered a 300 pound bear eating out of the garbage can. They couldn’t get into their place without adding to his menu. (That’s not the funny part.) They honked the car horn and flashed their headlights, but the bear was determined to finish its midnight snack. Finally, they called 9-1-1 on their cell phone. Laurie was told to call “Bearbusters.” She laughed hysterically until the lady at the other end of the phone said that she wasn’t kidding. By that time the bear was done snacking and had wandered off. Bearbuster intervention wasn’t needed. (That was the only unbearable event of the week.

Throughout the week everyone got along amazingly well. We had fabulous food and exciting times. Even when we had an open bar at our dance party on the last night, nobody over-indulged themselves and acted like a fool in the flock.

When my brother Tony left for home, he whispered to me that being at the reunion felt like being, “bathed in love and laughter for a week.” I shared the same feeling.

At the farewell breakfast, there were hugs, kisses, and some tears. I thought of the words of Chief Many Horses had uttered to us one night while speaking to us at the campfire. He said that in his Indian language there isn’t a word for “good-bye.” What they say in their language is equivalent in English to “I hope our paths cross again soon.

I hope they do, too.

 

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11. Live Today, Leave a Legacy for Tomorrow

Live for Today, Leave a Legacy for Tomorrow 

Many people have the notion of legacy as being a gift of money or an estate left for their dear ones or someone else. While this is definitely a part of your legacy, it is not the entire picture. A legacy will also include what you impart to the future generation, including things like your ideas, philosophy, your accomplishments, and also your money.

While great leaders have left behind a legacy that continues to influence the future generations and inspires them every day, you cannot imagine everyone leaving a rich legacy that is influential to an entire community or the entire world. But, your legacy can be something that talks about you and influences as many people as is possible.

In order to leave a legacy that inspires and influences the lives of the future generations it is essential to start planning for it as early as possible and sharing your thoughts and viewpoints to the benefit of the future generations. But, how does one plan on leaving a legacy?

Learn the Purpose of Your Life

Everyone has a purpose in their lives. It is essential to listen to your mind and heart and get to know what the purpose of your life is. Once you do this, you can work a lifetime enjoying each day trying to get closer to this purpose in life. Document this purpose of your life and mention your achievements as you draw every step closer to this goal. This itself will speak monuments about your achievements and thinking and speak of your legacy when people read through what you have left behind.

Identify your Thoughts and Document them

Everyone has their viewpoints on every aspect of life. You too will have your own. Identify your thought process and give in depth thinking to core aspects of life including family, love, philosophy, spirituality, community, etc. Pen down your thoughts and read through them again. You might want to visit them over time and refine your writing depending on your thought process. Enrich your writing with your thoughts and be honest. You will never know how and whom you will inspire with your ideas and thinking.

Think about Overall Improvement

Everyone thinks about improving their family and making them wealthy and rich. By doing so, you might not leave a rich legacy. Think even about overall improvement from a broader perspective, for example, you community or your city. Think about how your thought process and work can help in the betterment of many people. Being wealthy and passing it on to your near and dear ones will not help you create a legacy like the one you can create by working for the betterment of other people that need you to help them out.

It is never late to start working towards leaving a legacy. But, when you are starting early you have more time to put your efforts and thoughts into action and ensure that you are inspiring many people for a long time to come.



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12. A Safe Place

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The limits your parents or teacher set are meant to protect you, even if it doesn’t feel that way. When I was five-years-old, something terrible happened to me that changed my life forever.

The day started like any other day. I got up for school, gulped down a bowl of cereal and marched off to kindergarten. My school day was totally uneventful.

Just before dinner time the smell of burning leaves filled the October air. A large crowd of kids and adults gathered across the far end of the street to watch the fall of a local landmark. A gigantic tree was being taken down right in my own neighborhood. This was no easy task. From the cement steps of my house, I witnessed this unusual event. The tree, bound with heavy ropes and chains, was lowered to the sidewalk. 

This once majestic tree, a neighborhood landmark, was now without limbs or leaves, and it fell safely to the ground with a muffled, “Thud!”

But the kids and grownups did not leave. They moved in closer to linger around this fallen symbol of carefree days, as if it were a giant redwood that had been expelled from the forest without a fair trial, and then bound and now ready to be taken away.

I needed to run my hands on the tree’s bumpy bark and say good-bye to this remarkable tree, but I wasn’t allowed off my side of this busy city block.

I thought to myself, Oh, what the heck! What’s the worst thing that could happen?

I ran across the street to say farewell to the fallen tree. I don’t remember my exact thoughts, but after what seemed like a short while of mingling with the other spectators, a sinking feeling grew in my stomach.

I quickly realized that I had visited the tree too long. My mind was flooded with two thoughts: I am late for dinner, and I am in trouble. Just as I darted out between two parked cars and raced toward my side of the street, a car struck me down. One of my sneakers flew into the gutter. The old car that hit me passed over my body. I was covered with grease, bruises, and blood—my throat was too dry to let me cry.

From a crowd of neighbors and strangers my father appeared. Face ash red, sweat bubbling on his forehead, he leaned over and said, “Joe, I love you son—the ambulance is on its way.”

Then I softly asked, “Dad, am I going to die? Am I? Am I?”  As I passed out, I heard no answer.

Of course, I didn’t die in the accident, nor was I seriously injured. By all the laws of nature and chance, I should have been injured or worse. While the two-ton car drove over my body, the wheels never touched me—a miracle! One that I never forgot. I was grateful to be alive and well, except for some minor bruises.

But not all kids will be so lucky, when they break safety rules. I knew that I wasn’t supposed to cross the street by myself. I learned the hard way to respect the rules my parents set and to be more responsible. When I grew up, I became a teacher and made sure my students always felt safe in my room and on field trips.

On the first day of school we always made up the classroom rules together. I wanted them to follow rules because they made them and they made sense to them.

For thirty-three years my classroom was a safe place for kids.





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13. Never Be Lost for Words

How likely are you to talk to a stranger? Of course, it may be determined by the time of day, where you are, and how relaxed you are. But for some people it’s just not natural for them to be chatty, especially with strangers. The good news is that those who are shy talkers can overcome their fear of speaking. It’s a matter of increasing one’s confidence in the fine art of communicating one-to-one.

Gaining confidence

Gaining confidence is the key to being in one’s comfort zone while sharing verbal thoughts with another person. You should strive to act as natural as possible. You don’t want to memorize what you’re going to say. That would be too artificial. Talking about the weather is always a good icebreaker. Be sure to take an interest in the person who you are talking to, and really listen to what they have to say. Good listeners are as important as good talkers.

Practice Small Talk

You can practice making “small talk” in the mirror until it starts to feel more natural. People enjoy genuine compliments about what they are wear. (So be observant and kind when in the presence of friends or strangers.) We all want to be appreciated. When I was teaching, I used to cut through the library to get to my classroom faster. Invariable I would cross paths with the librarian. She was a very pleasant lady. Periodically I used to compliment her on her smile, new outfit or on having good hair day. When she retired, she said that she always enjoyed running into me because my compliments “made her day.”

Be Yourself 

Be authentic. Be real, and people will like you wherever you go. Look people in the eye when you talk to them. Your eyes speak volumes when you are talking. Be sure to have smiling eyes. It will make everyone feel comfortable and interested in your presence among them. Laugh, if something is truly funny. Just be yourself, and others will want to hear what you have to say, even if it doesn’t spill out as smooth as honey.

Be a Risk-Taker

When I was in college taking my first speech class, I was nervous as heck about giving my first speech. It was an introductory speech, and you had to write your full name on the board. I wondered how I was going to relax my audience, and get them thinking positively about me. I knew that humor is like a gust of fresh air in a stale room. So I went up to the board, and I spelled out my last name in twenty wrong versions. By the time I turned around most students in the class were laughing hysterically, and they did pay keen attention to my speech.

 

 

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14. At the Breast Clinic

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                                               At the Breast Clinic

The Breast Clinic is a brick and glass structure designed with women

 in mind, from fancy murals of Italy to free herbal teas in the lobby.

As you pass through the revolving doors there’s no need to wonder

which way to turn or where to ask for directions to your doctor’s suite.

The receptionist’s desk juts out and your questions about doctors,

appointments, procedures and payments can be answered quickly.

“Will my wife, Marilyn, get a clean bill of health?” takes longer.

 

When we travel together I sometime pretend that I am “Charles,” her chauffer,

since she comes from a long line of glitz, glamour and royalty. I don’t mind

being her driver and court jester, but we will be at the medical institute waiting

up to three hours for x-rays to hear good news. I didn’t sleep well last night

worrying about the Queen of my life for 41 years. There were omens in the air.

She has been called back before after a routine screening, but this is different.

 

The receptionist insisted on a speedy return and told her that a doctor

would be present in the office. The receptionist didn’t reduce fears saying,

“Oh, we just want to take a few more pictures. We do this all the time.”

With words unspoken Marilyn let me know that these were sinister omens.

She needed me to hold her hand and scare away any menacing thoughts.

That’s why I was with her with a room full of women waiting for exams.

 

I kept thinking: It has to be very good news. It has to be very good news.

It had to be good news because she had a run of bad luck, a series of medical

problems all piling up—a  fall, broken bones, arm, ribs, a sleep disorder, TMJ,

COPD, heart problems, arthritis, and two knee operations—all in one year.

I knew she couldn’t take much more of  new doctors, medicines, blood tests,

 and appointments. Marilyn was centimeters away from breaking.

 

I prayed for her and bargained with God to spare her this time from pain,

medical intervention and frequent thoughts about her own mortality. 

She deserves better. That’s what I thought again and again, as I waited

for the verdict via x-rays and a doctor. It didn’t seem fair that she had

to deal with more doctors and examinations. Yes, I know that life isn’t

fair and when things get tough, the tough get going, but there’s a limit.

 

Ninety minutes later she popped out from behind door number one

with a sparkling smile and waving thumbs up. I hugged and hugged

my queen, while others waited to see how their story would unfold.

I wished them well in my heart of hearts, and escorted my fair lady

out the door as fast as I could beyond false omens. At the Princess Diner

my beloved Queen and I ate a celebratory lunch and thanked the heavens.

~Joe Sottile

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15. Welcome Bigfoot Friends

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I strive to be a Welcome Ambassador to Everyone I meet. I know that’s a tall order. I sort act like a Walmart greeter on steroids. I smile, open doors, as I shop, make positive comments about team logos that I see on total strangers. I get money from tellers, not ATM machines. I talk to the mailperson, and don’t duck when I see acquaintances and former co-workers in the wilds of the frozen food section of the supermarket. I am a people person, not a robot mechanically going through mundane motions of life.

Now what’s that got to do with Bigfoot, a large hairy-ape like creature between 6.6-9.8 feet tall weighing over 500 pounds, covered with brown or reddish hair? He’s a legend hiding in the forest somewhere.  Over the years there have been many eyewitness reports about him, large footprint tracks of him, handheld film recordings, audio recordings, blood and hair samples. There also have been many hoaxes and pranks related to finding Bigfoot in the wilds.

Okay, now you have the background story. I can proceed with my encounter.

I was waiting for the garage door repairman to fix the runner on my garage door. My wife accidentally caught backing up with the car. I tried to fix the metal runner, but I crinkled the bend worse, making it almost unrepairable.

As the repairman abled out of the truck, I opened the garage door and wondered if he would get the job done without installing expensive new runners, or even if he had late model ones on the truck.  He had a bald head, jeans on, and a dusty bulging black T-shirt. No uniform. No Mr. Goodwrench-look. I know first impressions aren’t always correct, yet I wasn’t impressed. He looked more like a professional wrestler or a man of the mountains.

I said hello and welcomed him to my garage and my problem, adding these words “I decided to get an expert to help me.”

He said, “I am not an expert in this area, but I have fixed a number of doors like this.”

He wrestled with the bent runner and after quite a struggle he bent it back to working form, and shot some oil into the little revolving wheels. He told me that I was all set, good as new.

I asked him if he wanted a bottle of cold water. He said that he had some in the truck.

I wondered what made this man tick; in other words, what he cared about beside his job. I thought that I might be surprised. I was already totally wrong about my first impression.

I asked, “So what do you like to do for fun?”

He eyes arched upward recalling a fun scene and he said, “I hunt for Bigfoot with my son in the mountains.”

As my mouth dropped open, I asked “Do you believe in him?”

He answered, “Well, we have fun looking for him. It’s an adventure. We don’t want to hurt him, just hangout. Maybe take a few photos. We bring fruit, nuts, and cold water to share with him. If he doesn’t show up, we eat the goodies ourselves. My son, Ryan, loves hiking and the outdoors.”

“How old is your son?”

“Well, he’s 12, but he has the mental age of 5. Ryan has a brain disorder. He literally has problems doing things. The nerve endings in his body are mixed up. He has to think things through to do normal things. But he has been getting better and better. That’s what counts. And he loves talking about Bigfoot, looking at pictures of Bigfoot, and learning about big animals. We frequently read together. I work two jobs so that I have enough money to get the best help for him.”

Tears circled in my eyes. I wrote him a check for his services, and said “Wait a second, I have a present for him, and I ran upstairs to get a copy of the poetry book Waiting to See the Principal and Other Poems.

I signed the paperback for Ryan and I said, “There’s lots of lines that are repeated in my poems. Ryan and you will have fun repeating them. After awhile both of you will have them memorized which makes it even more fun to read.”

“Yes, he will love this book! And the pictures in it are funny too—something like Shel Silverstein’s books. Ryan loves all of his books. Thanks so much. I gotta get back on the road. Thanks again.”

“By the way, does Ryan really believe in the existence of Bigfoot?”

‘OH, YEAH! He says Bigfoot is just a good hider.”

And I said to myself: we are all good hiders unless the right questions are asked by an interested person.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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16. Is the Law of Attraction a lot of Baloney?

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Picture

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17. Making A Difference

 

 
                                                                          A Small Victory

Sometimes you get email that makes your day or week, or month or year. That has happened to you, right? Words are powerful, right? Sometimes those words, spoken or written, validate what you secretly hope that others believe about you. That’s why I believe that the image above spells out  is a golden nugget of wisdom that we all should remember on our journey to Heaven.

I met a man years ago that was clearly a gifted writer at my first writing workshop at Nazareth College, which met once a week for six weeks. Jim Gamble was the only other male, and there was a total of eight aspiring writers. My wife’s GYN had recommended that I start taking workshops if I were serious about writing, and she was getting her Masters at the college. To my total surprise, the workshop turned out fantastic; as a result of it, I made friends with Jim, and published three articles that I was working on. Jim, thanks to a heads up from me, briefly taught English in my school district, and went on to become a college professor. And the doctor whom encouraged me to take a workshop showed up as a participant at Writers & Books in a class that I took! Talk about full circle. It’s always good when people practice what they preach!

Well, today this is what Jim wrote on Facebook next to an ad for one of my articles online:

A fellow teacher and writer. He helped get me my last public school gig before I came to Arkansas. I've been sharing his posts for years. His way of engaging a group of young people with language and heart is one I've never quite been able to emulate. His poem on Charley Rose is a classic. Seriously.

   
Here's the Charlie Rose poem:

At the Mahogany Table

I am retired now, and I have time,
Time to rise late and go to bed late

I cherish the luxury of listening to Charlie
interview people from all walks of life.

How easy it is for me to admire this Rose
with his good looks and tailored suits.

He knows he has won the job lottery,
talking to famous folks around the world.

But his home court, his uncut diamond is
rotunda in shape, made of Mahogany.

The background is usually pitch-black
and the set is noiseless where he sits,

slightly hunched over with a tired face
he has read their books, seen their movies,

enjoyed their concerts, listened to their politics,
and poked into their being with revealing questions.

He washes away their inner fears and jitters,
taking you and them on a gentle journey

where we discover what makes them tick,
what matters most, and what challenges lie ahead.

Charlie understands, appreciates and explores
their passions, while he cradles to his chest

what makes their lives worth living
and their sojourn so important.

By doing so, our lives become richer and fuller.
We may even daydream about Charlie calling us

"Joe, come sit at my Mahogany table
and share how poetry can save the planet."


 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I met a man years ago that was clearly a gifted writer at my first writing workshop at Nazareth College, which met once a week for six weeks. Jim Gamble was the only other male, and there was a total of eight aspiring writers. My wife’s GYN had recommended that I start taking workshops if I were serious about writing, and she was getting her Masters at the college. To my total surprise, the workshop turned out fantastic; as a result of it, I made friends with Jim, and published three articles that I was working on. Jim, thanks to a heads up from me, briefly taught English in my school district, and went on to become a college professor. And the doctor whom encouraged me to take a workshop showed up as a participant at Writers & Books in a class that I took! Talk about full circle. It’s always good when people practice what they preach!

Well, today this is what Jim wrote on Facebook next to an ad for one of my articles online:

A fellow teacher and writer. He helped get me my last public school gig before I came to Arkansas. I've been sharing his posts for years. His way of engaging a group of young people with language and heart is one I've never quite been able to emulate. His poem on Charley Rose is a classic. Seriously.

 



Joe Sottile is a children’s poet, performer, and essayist. A former elementary school teacher, he now works as a poetry enrichment instructor for the Genesee Valley Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) and counts classroom workshops and interacting with young poets among the great pleasures of his life. Joe also rates the necessity of poetry in our lives right up there with sunshine. Learn more about him at www.joesillysottile.net.

The bio sketch was attached to the poem on the next page, which you have read before, but Jim’s comment is a good excuse to read again. Love you all.





 

I am retired now, and I have time,
Time to rise late and go to bed late

I cherish the luxury of listening to Charlie
interview people from all walks of life.

How easy it is for me to admire this Rose
with his good looks and tailored suits.

He knows he has won the job lottery,
talking to famous folks around the world.

But his home court, his uncut diamond is
rotunda in shape, made of Mahogany.

The background is usually pitch-black
and the set is noiseless where he sits,

slightly hunched over with a tired face
he has read their books, seen their movies,

enjoyed their concerts, listened to their politics,
and poked into their being with revealing questions.

He washes away their inner fears and jitters,
taking you and them on a gentle journey

where we discover what makes them tick,
what matters most, and what challenges lie ahead.

Charlie understands, appreciates and explores
their passions, while he cradles to his chest

what makes their lives worth living
and their sojourn so important.

By doing so, our lives become richer and fuller.
We may even daydream about Charlie calling us

"Joe, come sit at my Mahogany table
and share how poetry can save the planet."


A Small Victory

Sometimes you get email that makes your day or week, or month or year. That has happened to you, right? Words are powerful, right? Sometimes those words, spoken or written, validate what you secretly hope that others believe about you. That’s why I believe that the next image is a golden nugget of wisdom that we all should remember on our journey to Heaven:



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I met a man years ago that was clearly a gifted writer at my first writing workshop at Nazareth College, which met once a week for six weeks. Jim Gamble was the only other male, and there was a total of eight aspiring writers. My wife’s GYN had recommended that I start taking workshops if I were serious about writing, and she was getting her Masters at the college. To my total surprise, the workshop turned out fantastic; as a result of it, I made friends with Jim, and published three articles that I was working on. Jim, thanks to a heads up from me, briefly taught English in my school district, and went on to become a college professor. And the doctor whom encouraged me to take a workshop showed up as a participant at Writers & Books in a class that I took! Talk about full circle. It’s always good when people practice what they preach!

Well, today this is what Jim wrote on Facebook next to an ad for one of my articles online:

A fellow teacher and writer. He helped get me my last public school gig before I came to Arkansas. I've been sharing his posts for years. His way of engaging a group of young people with language and heart is one I've never quite been able to emulate. His poem on Charley Rose is a classic. Seriously.

 



Joe Sottile is a children’s poet, performer, and essayist. A former elementary school teacher, he now works as a poetry enrichment instructor for the Genesee Valley Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) and counts classroom workshops and interacting with young poets among the great pleasures of his life. Joe also rates the necessity of poetry in our lives right up there with sunshine. Learn more about him at www.joesillysottile.net.

The bio sketch was attached to the poem on the next page, which you have read before, but Jim’s comment is a good excuse to read again. Love you all.







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18. 4 SEO Strategies to Increase Traffic to Your Site

SEO is the most red-hot way to drive targeted hits to your site. Maximizing the advantages of a well optimized site will bring about lots of earnings for the marketer. But, optimizing your web site may cost you thousands of dollars if you're not skilled in that area.
 

But to tell you the truth, you are able to basically get info on low cost SEO anyplace on the Net. But only several truly show you how to figure out an affordable SEO attempt. And those few that truly inform are included in this article.
 

1. Link exchanges
 

One inexpensive SEO technique that may get you best results is through link exchanges or linking to and from other sites. Depending upon the sites that you would like to exchange links with, this instrument may even cost you zip. Get hold of the author or owner of the site you prefer to have a link exchange with. You'll be surprised with the eventual spiking up of your page ranking utilizing this means of getting your site optimized.
 

2. Author or acquire key word rich material

 
Authoring truly enlightening and keyword-rich material is one surefire way to make your Net business more visible than ever. It's either you author your own material or you get them from article directories that let you post these articles on your site as long as you maintain the resource box or the author's byline . Just don't stuff your material with keywords so people will get bored reading them. The readability and novelty of your articles will still be the cornerstone of whether your readers will keep on coming back to your site or not.



3. Attention-getting Domain Name



What better to make your target visitors remember your site but with a very easy-to-recall DNS. Something sweet and short will evidence to be really priceless. Registering your domain name isn't free of charge. But creative thinking is.
 

4. Mastermind your site navigation


Supplying easy navigation for your site is one way to make your visitors become at ease. This, successively, will improve the flow of traffic to your site.


Affordable SEO is always evolving like any other plan of attack in information technology. There are a lot of techniques that may very well land you on the top 10 rankings of Google or on any other search engines. Some might cost a lot but there are techniques that may give you the same results at a low price or you can even do on your own like those noted above. So take the plunge into better SEO tactics.

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19. Finding Your Way in the World

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When you are trying to develop your personality, there are several things that you need to look at, but probably the most important thing is that you should have the correct realization about yourself. You should know who you are. It is only when you have a complete realization of yourself that you can plan to make improvements.

 

Each and every one of us has their own strengths and weaknesses. You have them too. You may be a very confident person, but at the same time, even if you don’t admit it openly, you surely have some shortcomings. If you are trying to develop your personality, the first thing is that you have to come out of this denial. Denial leaves no scope for improvement, because you become shortsighted about your weaknesses. Overcome the denial and accept to yourself what your limitations are. When you do that, it is as good as telling yourself that these are the aspects where you have to improve.

 

At the same time, you have to realize the things that you can do very well. There will certainly be a host of such things. And there will be one special talent at which you excel. This is the talent that defines your profession, or maybe your passion or your hobby. This is the one thing that you can pursue for your entire life, and keep becoming better at it. This is what you need for your professional, personal and creative growth, and it becomes the focus of your life. You may have a flair for writing, or maybe you can build websites, or probably you are good at sales, or perhaps you can handle a truck very well. All these are special talents. Realize what talent you have and keep improving upon it.

 

Understand your personal limitations as well. Do people think of you as a good, friendly person? Do you have many friends? Is your spouse happy with you? Do you keep your children happy? Are you prone to temper outbursts? These are the things you should know, and work upon them. The main thing is that you should understand that you have follies in you and improve.

 

In conclusion, if you are looking for personal development, you have to have a pragmatic view of your faults and your talents. This tells you which direction you have to take your life into.

 


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20. Bad Dog!

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My dog got in big trouble. He's a criminal now. I wanted him to grow up to be a good dog, and now he has a record. It's very sad. I am too tired to tell you the story right now.

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21. 5 Ways to Have Better Conversations

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You may be a bashful or tense individual by nature and may feel it difficult and a terrible affair to engage yourself in a simple conversation with others due to your internal fears and concerns that override your power of thinking and acting. You should not get disappointed as there are many remedies to overcome these internal reservations and your anxieties that can provide you great conversation skills. You will gain self-assurance and break all the barriers of shyness, anxieties and apprehensions.

1. Relaxing:

Relaxing is the most effective way to keep you from faltering when you enter a dialogue. Always try to be composed and restful and keep your mind calm and not rushing. You should feel assured about yourself and breathe purposefully and gradually to maintain your calm. You will be able to precisely concentrate on what you desire to convey.


2. Try to be meaningful:

One of the most significant skills in conversation is having the proficiency to elaborate the dialogue with the help of insightful and committed questioning to the other persons. This way, you can impress on others that you are not only attentive towards the conversation but also taking time and effort to be methodically thoughtful about it. You will also make him feel your eagerness to specifically cover the subject from every angle.


3.  Maintain the flow:



Do not try to deviate from the main point of discussion. Keep the proper stride and flow in the dialogue. Also, it is crucial to ensure to keep tempo and to confirm that you are in tune with the person you are conversing with. You should not try to hurry up, let it proceed at its own pace. But, do not make it slower either. Let it take its natural course and keep your flow.

4. Look before you leap:


It is always better to think first. If you want to converse effectively, your skill should engage concern and sensitivity. You should be thoughtful and considerate in discussions to weigh how things should be put forth. This does not mean you halt the conversation. This may result in sudden breaks, but with time you will have a smoother flow with practice and experience. The best way is to ponder over what you are going to say only for one or two seconds rather than for long time.

5. Make it simple:

When you are conversing with someone, never try to be too clever. Do not try to make the subject complicated rather try to be precise, clear and simple as much as you can. It will be advantageous for both the partners in conversation.

You can use these tips to easily to converse with people and acquire the skills to discuss things with people and make more friends.






 





















 








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22. WHAT WILL BE YOUR LEGACY?

Many people have the notion of legacy as being a gift of money or an estate left for their dear ones or someone else. While this is definitely a part of your legacy, it is not the entire picture. A legacy will also include what you impart to the future generation, including things like your ideas, philosophy, your accomplishments, and also your money.


While great leaders have left behind a legacy that continues to influence the future generations and inspires them every day, you cannot imagine everyone leaving a rich legacy that is influential to an entire community or the entire world. But, your legacy can be something that talks about you and influences as many people as is possible.


In order to leave a legacy that inspires and influences the lives of the future generations it is essential to start planning for it as early as possible and sharing your thoughts and viewpoints to the benefit of the future generations. But, how does one plan on leaving a legacy?


Learn the Purpose of Your Life




Everyone has a purpose in their lives. It is essential to listen to your mind and heart and get to know what the purpose of your life is. Once you do this, you can work a lifetime enjoying each day trying to get closer to this purpose in life. Document this purpose of your life and mention your achievements as you draw every step closer to this goal. This itself will speak monuments about your achievements and thinking and speak of your legacy when people read through what you have left behind.


Identify your Thoughts and Document them




Everyone has their viewpoints on every aspect of life. You too will have your own. Identify your thought process and give in depth thinking to core aspects of life including family, love, philosophy, spirituality, community, etc. Pen down your thoughts and read through them again. You might want to visit them over time and refine your writing depending on your thought process. Enrich your writing with your thoughts and be honest. You will never know how and whom you will inspire with your ideas and thinking.





Think about Overall Improvement


Everyone thinks about improving their family and making them wealthy and rich. By doing so, you might not leave a rich legacy. Think even about overall improvement from a broader perspective, for example, you community or your city. Think about how your thought process and work can help in the betterment of many people. Being wealthy and passing it on to your near and dear ones will not help you create a legacy like the one you can create by working for the betterment of other people that need you to help them out.


It is never late to start working towards leaving a legacy. But, when you are starting early you have more time to put your efforts and thoughts into action and ensure that you are inspiring many people for a long time to come.





On a personal note, part of my legacy to my grandchildren and other tweens and teens is 101 SECRETS! A BACKPACK OF INSPIRATION FOR TWEENS. I put stories of growing up and some wisdom that I have gathered on life's journey. The aim of the eBook is to enable children to live happier and more purposeful lives.





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23. Can You Better Your Mindset?

Individual Hypnosis (Forget Swinging Gold Watches)



What a lot of individuals state is that many things may be accomplished by targeting the mind over matter. You might be able to see what individual hypnosis may do for you.

There are indeed many Advantages to individual hypnosis, particularly when an individual is determined to see matters to the very end or dedicated to do things that he believes he can, then the possibilities are perpetual.

Even when someone trusts that he may achieve what other people, or occasionally even he himself, would find hard, he may actually do it if he just puts his mind into it.

Individual hypnosis is a positive reinforcement of mental conditioning and positive idea paths. While it might be simple to state that positive thinking may produce many great results, still the idea of injecting the mind to believe that way might not be as simple as you think, particularly when we're at our witting state, particularly when weighing the pros and cons of every one of our actions.

However with hypnosis, the brain may be convinced to do such things and work marvels when it comes to our positive mental training processes.

Here are a few of the areas where hypnosis may do wonders for the mind particularly with behavioral approaches and the positive mental conditioning procedure.
 
With hypnosis, even with self-suggestion, we may heighten our sense of concentration. This is especially helpful when we want to train our minds to center on what is truly important for us and separate out other trivial thoughts.

The concentration facet has been discovered to be specifically helpful for those who wish to improve social and people skills, communicating skills, memory and comprehension, creative thinking, centering and much more.

One’s personal mind-set may also be bettered dramatically through hypnosis, particularly for those who want to improve their personal welfare for the enhancement of their vocations, professional and personal relationships, and focusing toward accomplishing goals.

A different advantage of hypnosis is the life-changing capacity in helping individuals overcome their dreads. By hypnosis, those dreads may be accessed and modified, utilizing hypnosis processes that may eliminate irrational thoughts and dreads.

Taking away negative thoughts in the human mind is out and away the greatest breakthrough that forged the practice of hypnosis and brings about a great glimpse of what individual hypnosis may accomplish for you Individual Hypnosis

What a lot of individuals state is that many things may be accomplished by targeting the mind over matter. You might be able to see what individual hypnosis may do for you.


There are indeed many Advantages to individual hypnosis, particularly when an individual is determined to see matters to the very end or dedicated to do things that he believes he can, then the possibilities are perpetual.


Even when someone trusts that he may achieve what other people, or occasionally even he himself, would find hard, he may actually do it if he just puts his mind into it.

Individual hypnosis is a positive reinforcement of mental conditioning and positive idea paths. While it might be simple to state that positive thinking may produce many great results, still the idea of injecting the mind to believe that way might not be as simple as you think, particularly when we're at our witting state, particularly when weighing the pros and cons of every one of our actions.

However with hypnosis, the brain may be convinced to do such things and work marvels when it comes to our positive mental training processes. 

Here are a few of the areas where hypnosis may do wonders for the mind particularly with behavioral approaches and the positive mental conditioning procedure.


With hypnosis, even with self-suggestion, we may heighten our sense of concentration. This is especially helpful when we want to train our minds to center on what is truly important for us and separate out other trivial thoughts.


The concentration facet has been discovered to be specifically helpful for those who wish to improve social and people skills, communicating skills, memory and comprehension, creative thinking, centering and much more.

One’s personal mind-set may also be bettered dramatically through hypnosis, particularly for those who want to improve their personal welfare for the enhancement of their vocations, professional and personal relationships, and focusing toward accomplishing goals

A different advantage of hypnosis is the life-changing capacity in helping individuals overcome their dreads. By hypnosis, those dreads may be accessed and modified, utilizing hypnosis processes that may eliminate irrational thoughts and dreads.

Taking away negative thoughts in the human mind is out and away the greatest breakthrough that forged the practice of hypnosis and brings about a great glimpse of what individual hypnosis may accomplish for you. It might even help you win a gold medal in the Olympics!




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24. Use Your E-mail Signature to Promote Yourself


Publicizing Your Blog In Your E-mail Signature

If you've a blog that you're especially proud of, and that you wish to share with others, there are a lot of gratis ways that you are able to get your blog acknowledged. Among those ways is something that you do daily, and that you might not even think about as a way to share your blog. Put the link to your blog in your e-mail signature.

Chances are that you send e-mails more times than you are able to count during the day, every time you send an e-mail; you are able to promote your blog by putting the address of your blog in your e-mails signature. It’s always a great thought to write something catchy such as, See what I'm up to today, or Read my newest chapter  here, depending upon what sort of blog you have.

The matter to remember about placing an advertisement in your signature for your blog is to make it brief, but attention-getting. You wish individuals to be interested enough to wish to click on it, but you likewise don’t wish to scare them off.

Exactly like it is with any advertisement, you wish to provide them just enough to be intrigued and take a closer look at what it is that you are promoting.

Think about what it is that your web log is about. What is truly going to interest individuals about it and make them wish to visit that is what you ought to include in your signature, and that is what is going to get individuals to travel to your blog.


I have been promoting my eBook in my e-mail ever since it was published. Here it is:

Joe Sottile
www.joesillysottile.net

101 SECRETS! may be for you and your child if...
Is a ‘tween in your life struggling in that in-between spot between childhood and adulthood? Is she trying to balance the ever-increasing pressure of school, pop culture, friends, and family? Is he feeling lost as he seeks his unique voice, passions, and goals? Joe Sottile’s 101 SECRETS! A Backpack of Inspiration and Hope for ‘Tweens, is the right book at the right time. 101 SECRETS! shows these kids that they are not alone; in fact, they are traveling a well-worn path whose footprints have been obscured by the tumult of modern society. Sottile, a long-time children’s poet, retired elementary teacher, father, grandfather, and liver of life, tells stories and provides practical strategies that immediately reassure his readers, guiding them to a happier ‘tweenhood and beyond.


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25. About Change & Laughter




                       "He who laughs last didn't get the joke."

Do you have the knack to accept the things you can change and the things you can't change?  Can you accept the numerous changes that occur in your life?

When you are able to accept things in life, including you and other people you find a way to take charge. When you're in command, it helps you to see how you are able to better your personal life. When you learn to accept you'll learn to discover you.

Many individuals in the world believe that when we act the same way at all times, we have instituted our identity. Politically incorrect! We have emotions, thoughts, behaviors, actions, and have been infested by a world of influences both great and foul. Every day we will feel something new, which causes our personality to reflect these modifications.

We live in a world that desensitizes us. We're surrounded by 1000000000000s of influences on TV, in the media, on radio, in homes, government, schools etc. Each to their own, but everybody is judging somebody at some time, which is something we have to accept. We can't alter these people’s behaviors and way of thinking, but we may change ours. This is a component of learning and accepting. The best way around the world is become your own influence and let other influences make another persons life misfortunate.

Once you learn to accept you'll be eager to laugh. For example, if somebody makes you crazy you'll see the humor in his or her actions. You might see the humor in your actions if you make an error and feed into their stupidity. Once you begin to see the humor in life, you'll feel better inside. When you learn to change to better you, others might follow. Good conduct has proven far more effective than words to promote others to change.


As you grow you'll feel a fresh hunger, and that hunger will guide you to discover fresh ways to better you. In time as you begin to feel better, you will see a need to exercise, eat correctly, and hang out with positive influences and so on. Once you feel this hunger, you'll feel inspired to labor to accomplish your goals.

Laughter really is the best medicine.



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