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1. New words, new dialogues

In August 2014, OxfordDictionaries.com added numerous new words and definitions to their database, and we invited a few experts to comment on the new entries. Below, Janet Gilsdorf, President-elect of Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, discusses anti-vax and anti-vaxxer. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or positions of Oxford Dictionaries or Oxford University Press.

It’s beautiful, our English language — fluid and expressive, colorful and lively. And it’s changeable. New words appear all the time. Consider “selfie” (a noun), “problematical” (an adjective), and “Google” (a noun that turned into verbs.) Now we have two more: “anti-vax” and “anti-vaxxer.” (Typical of our flexible vernacular, “anti-vaxxer” is sometimes spelled with just one “x.”) I guess inventing these words was inevitable; a specific, snappy short-cut was needed when speaking about something as powerful and almost cult-like as the anti-vaccine movement and its disciples.

When we string our words together, either new ones or the old reliables, we find avenues for telling others of our joys and disappointments, our loves and hates, our passions and indifferences, our trusts and distrusts, and our fears. The words we choose are windows into our minds. Searching for the best terms to use helps us refine our thinking, decide what, exactly, we are contemplating, and what we intend to say.

Embedded in the force of the new words “anti-vax” and “anti-vaxxer” are many of the tales we like to tell: our joy in our children, our disappointment with the world; our love of independence and autonomy, our hate of things that hurt us or those important to us; our passion for coming together in groups, our indifference to the worries of strangers; our trust, fueled by hope rather than evidence, in whatever nutty things may sooth our anxieties, our distrust in our sometimes hard-to-understand scientific, medical, and public health systems; and, of course, our fears.

Fear is usually a one-sided view. It is blinding, so that in the heat of the moment we aren’t distracted by nonsense (the muddy foot prints on the floor, the lawn that needs mowing) and can focus on the crisis at hand. Unfortunately, fear may also prevent us from seeing useful things just beyond the most immediate (the helping hands that may look like claws, the alternatives that, in the end, are better).

Image credit: Vaccination. © Sage78 via iStockphoto. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/04/vaccines-world-immunization-week/#sthash.9VlGEhJM.dpuf
Image credit: Vaccination. © Sage78 via iStockphoto.

For the anti-vax group, fear is the gripping terror that awful things will happen from a jab (aka shot, stick, poke). Of course, it isn’t the jab that’s the problem. Needles through the skin, after all, deliver medicines to cure all manner of illnesses. For anti-vaxxers, the fear is about the immunization materials delivered by the jab. They dread the vaccine antigens, the molecules (i.e. pieces of microbes-made-safe) that cause our bodies to think we have encountered a bad germ so we will mount a strong immune response designed to neutralize that bad germ. What happens after a person receives a vaccine is, in effect, identical to what happens after we recover from a cold or the flu — or anthrax, smallpox, or possibly ebola (if they don’t kill us first). Our blood is subsequently armed with protective immune cells and antibodies so we don’t get infected with that specific virus or bacterium again. Same for measles, polio, or chicken-pox. If we either get those diseases (which can be bad) or the vaccines to prevent them (which is good), our immune system can effectively combat these viruses in future encounters and prevent infections.

So what should we do with our new words? We can use them to express our thoughts about people who haven’t yet seen the value of vaccines. Hopefully, these new words will lead to constructive dialogues rather than attacks. Besides being incredibly valuable, words are among the most vicious weapons we have and we must find ways to use them responsibly.

The post New words, new dialogues appeared first on OUPblog.

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2. An Oxford Companion to being the Doctor

If you share my jealousy of Peter Capaldi and his new guise as the Doctor, then read on to discover how you could become the next Time Lord with a fondness for Earth. However, be warned: you can’t just pick up Matt Smith’s bow-tie from the floor, don Tom Baker’s scarf, and expect to save planet Earth every Saturday at peak viewing time. You’re going to need training. This is where Oxford’s online products can help you. Think of us as your very own Companion guiding you through the dimensions of time, only with a bit more sass. So jump aboard (yes it’s bigger on the inside), press that button over there, pull that lever thingy, and let’s journey through the five things you need to know to become the Doctor.

(1) Regeneration

Being called two-faced may not initially appeal to you. How about twelve-faced? No wait, don’t leave, come back! Part of the appeal of the Doctor is his ability to regenerate and assume many faces. Perhaps the most striking example of regeneration we have on our planet is the Hydra fish which is able to completely re-grow a severed head. Even more striking is its ability to grow more than one head if a small incision is made on its body. I don’t think it’s likely the BBC will commission a Doctor with two heads though so best to not go down that route. Another example of an animal capable of regeneration is Porifera, the sponges commonly seen on rocks under water. These sponge-type creatures are able to regenerate an entire limb which is certainly impressive but are not quite as attractive as The David Tenants or Matt Smiths of this world.

Sea sponges, by dimsis. CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Flickr.
Sea sponges, by Dimitris Siskopoulos. CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Flickr.

(2) Fighting aliens

Although alien invasion narratives only crossed over to mainstream fiction after World War II, the Doctor has been fighting off alien invasions since the Dalek War and the subsequent destruction of Gallifrey. Alien invasion narratives are tied together by one salient issue: conquer or be conquered. Whether you are battling Weeping Angels or Cybermen, you must first make sure what you are battling is indeed an alien. Yes, that lady you meet every day at the bus-stop with the strange smell may appear to be from another dimension but it’s always better to be sure before you whip out your sonic screwdriver.

(3) Visiting unknown galaxies

The Hubble Ultra Deep Field telescope captures a patch of sky that represents one thirteen-millionth of the area of the whole sky we see from Earth, and this tiny patch of the Universe contains over 10,000 galaxies. One thirteen-millionth of the sky is the equivalent to holding a grain of sand at arm’s length whilst looking up at the sky. When we look at a galaxy ten billion light years away, we are actually only seeing it by the light that left it ten billion years ago. Therefore, telescopes are akin to time machines.

The sheer vastness and mystery of the universe has baffled us for centuries. Doctor Who acts as a gatekeeper to the unknown, helping us imagine fantastical creatures such as the Daleks, all from the comfort of our living rooms.

Tardis, © davidmartyn, via iStock Photo.
Tardis, © davidmartyn, via iStock Photo.

(4) Operating the T.A.R.D.I.S.

The majority of time-travel narratives avoid the use of a physical time-machine. However, the Tardis, a blue police telephone box, journeys through time dimensions and is as important to the plot of Doctor Who as upgrades are to Cybermen. Although it looks like a plain old police telephone box, it has been known to withstand meteorite bombardment, shield itself from laser gun fire and traverse the time vortex all in one episode. The Tardis’s most striking characteristic, that it is “much bigger on the inside”, is explained by the Fourth Doctor, Tom Baker, by using the analogy of the tesseract.

(5) Looking good

It’s all very well saving the Universe every week but what use is that without a signature look? Tom Baker had the scarf, Peter Davison had the pin-stripes, John Hurt even had the brooding frown, so what will your dress-sense say about you? Perhaps you could be the Doctor with a cravat or the time-traveller with a toupee? Whatever your choice, I’m sure you’ll pull it off, you handsome devil you.

Don’t forget a good sense of humour to compliment your dashing visage. When Doctor Who was created by Donald Wilson and C.E. Webber in November 1963, the target audience of the show was eight-to-thirteen-year-olds watching as part of a family group on Saturday afternoons. In 2014, it has a worldwide general audience of all ages, claiming over 77 million viewers in the UK, Australia, and the United States. This is largely due to the Doctor’s quick quips and mix of adult and childish humour.

You’ve done it! You’ve conquered the cybermen, exterminated the daleks, and saved Earth (we’re eternally grateful of course). Why not take the Tardis for another spin and adventure through more of Oxford’s online products?

Image credit: Doctor Who poster, by Doctor Who Spoilers. CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Flickr.

The post An Oxford Companion to being the Doctor appeared first on OUPblog.

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3. Radiology and Egyptology: insights from ancient lives at the British Museum

Egyptian mummies continue to fascinate us due to the remarkable insights they provide into ancient civilizations. Flinders Petrie, the first UK chair in Egyptology did not have the luxury of X-ray techniques in his era of archaeological analysis in the late nineteenth century. However, twentieth century Egyptologists have benefited from Roentgen’s legacy. Sir Graham Elliott Smith along with Howard Carter did early work on plain x-ray analysis of mummies when they X-rayed the mummy Tuthmosis in 1904. Numerous X-ray analyses were performed using portable X-ray equipment on mummies in the Cairo Museum.

Since then, many studies have been done worldwide, especially with the development of more sophisticated imaging techniques such as CT scanning, invented by Hounsfield in the UK in the 1970s. With this, it became easier to visualize the interiors of mummies, thus revealing their hidden mysteries under their linen wrapped bodies and the elaborate face masks which had perplexed researchers for centuries. Harwood Nash performed one of the earliest head scans of a mummy in Canada in 1977 and Isherwood’s team along with Professor David also performed some of the earliest scannings of mummies in Manchester.

mummy
Tori Randall, PhD prepares a 550-year old Peruvian child mummy for a CT scan, by Samantha A. Lewis for the US Navy. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

A fascinating new summer exhibition at the British Museum has recently opened, and consists of eight mummies, all from different periods and Egyptian dynasties, that have been studied with the latest dual energy CT scanners. These scanners have 3D volumetric image acquisitions that reveal the internal secrets of these mummies. Mummies of babies and young children are included, as well as adults. There have been some interesting discoveries already, for example, that dental abscesses were prevalent as well as calcified plaques in peripheral arteries, suggesting vascular disease was present in the population who lived over 3,000 years ago. More detailed analysis of bones, including the pelvis, has been made possible by the scanned images, enabling more accurate estimation of the age of death.

Although embalmers took their craft seriously, mistakes did occur, as evidenced by one of the mummy exhibits, which shows Padiamenet’s head detached from the body during the process, the head was subsequently stabilized by metal rods. Padiamenet was a temple doorkeeper who died around 700BC. Mummies had their brains removed with the heart preserved as this was considered the seat of the soul. Internal organs such as the stomach and liver were often removed; bodies were also buried with a range of amulets.

The exhibit provides a fascinating introduction to mummies and early Egyptian life more than 3,000 years ago and includes new insights gleaned from cutting edge twenty first century imaging technology.

Ancient Lives: New Discoveries is on at the British Museum until the 30 November 2014.

Heading image: Mummy. Public domain via Pixabay.

The post Radiology and Egyptology: insights from ancient lives at the British Museum appeared first on OUPblog.

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4. The Zone of Interest interest

       There's a new Martin Amis out -- in the UK; US reader will have to wait another five weeks or so -- and it was apparently 'embargoed' in the UK until publication-time (meaning: no reviews could/should be posted). Pathetically, UK reviewers obediently held back until now -- even as reviews went up weeks ago at, for example, Kirkus Reviews ("(A)n indelible and unsentimental exploration of the depths of the human soul") and Publishers Weekly (starred; "An absolute soul-crusher of a book, the brilliant latest from Amis") -- folks, if you're going to 'embargo' in this internet age, then get your act together and make sure you've got things covered abroad, too. .... (Though you shouldn't 'embargo' anyway -- it's a silly policy, and the sooner it dies, the better.)
       So now the first UK (+) reviews are up as well, including at:

  • the Irish Times: Eileen Battersby calls it; "Highly cerebral and innovative, and also human, humane -- even humbling -- this is a brave, inquiring work from a literary maverick whose biggest problem as an artist has been his rampaging talent. He has certainly harnessed it here."

  • The Independent: James Runcie calls it: "a frustratingly memorable read"

  • The Independent: Katy Guest finds: "I read this once thinking it horrifically brilliant, and Amis's best novel for years. (It is, though that's not saying a lot.) I read it a second time asking, but what is the point ?"

  • Asylum, where blogger John Self weighs in
       I haven't seen a copy yet, but I hope to soon; I was disappointed by Koba the Dread -- but greatly admired Time's Arrow (possibly my favorite Amis) -- so I'm not sure what to expect.
       Meanwhile, get your copy at Amazon.co.uk, or pre-order at Amazon.com.

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5. Russia-born writers in America

       At Russia Beyond the Headlines Diana Bruk considers A long-distance romance: Russia-born writers in the U.S.

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6. La Mamounia Literary Award finalists

       Marrakesh hotel La Mamounia have an annual literary prize (well, what fine international hotel wouldn't ?) and, as Morocco World News now report, La Mamounia Literary Award Nominates 8 Candidates for its 5th Edition.
       Slightly -- okay, crushingly -- disappointingly it's a Francophone award -- yes, great that they've:

created an essential platform for francophone writers in which they promote their literary works and showcase the Moroccan talents by awarding them basically on the value of their productions.
       But, still ... Morocco, where there are some folks speaking -- and writing ! -- in languages like ... Arabic, Berber, even Spanish .....
       Still, solid literary support, with a prize of MAD 200,000 (yes, that translates into real money) -- though I do have to wonder about the symbolism of the photograph accompanying that article -- empty seats, no one behind the lectern ... easy to read a lot into that ..... Read the rest of this post

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7. The biggest threat to the world is still ourselves

At a time when the press and broadcast media are overwhelmed by accounts and images of humankind’s violence and stupidity, the fact that our race survives purely as a consequence of Nature’s consent, may seem irrelevant. Indeed, if we think about this at all, it might be to conclude that our world would likely be a nicer place all round, should a geophysical cull in some form or other, consign humanity to evolution’s dustbin, along with the dinosaurs and countless other life forms that are no longer with us. While toying with such a drastic action, however, we should be careful what we wish for, even during these difficult times when it is easy to question whether our race deserves to persist. This is partly because alongside its sometimes unimaginable cruelty, humankind also has an enormous capacity for good, but mainly because Nature could – at this very moment – be cooking up something nasty that, if it doesn’t wipe us all out, will certainly give us a very unpleasant shock.

After all, nature’s shock troops are still out there. Economy-busting megaquakes are biding their time beneath Tokyo and Los Angeles; volcanoes are swelling to bursting point across the globe; and killer asteroids are searching for a likely planet upon which to end their lives in spectacular fashion. Meanwhile, climate change grinds on remorselessly, spawning biblical floods, increasingly powerful storms, and baking heatwave and drought conditions. Nonetheless, it often seems – in our security obsessed. tech-driven society – as if the only horrors we are likely to face in the future are manufactured by us; nuclear terrorism; the march of the robots; out of control nanotechnology; high-energy physics experiments gone wrong. It is almost as if the future is nature-free; wholly and completely within humankind’s thrall. The truth is, however, that these are all threats that don’t and shouldn’t materialise, in the sense that whether or not we allow their realisation is entirely within our hands.

The same does not apply, however, to the worst that nature can throw at us. We can’t predict earthquakes and may never be able to, and there is nothing at all we can do if we spot a 10-km diameter comet heading our way. As for encouraging an impending super-eruption to ‘let of steam’ by drilling a borehole, this would – as I have said before – have the same effect as sticking a drawing pin in an elephant’s bum; none at all.

775px-Sanfranciscoearthquake1906
San Francisco after 1906 earthquake. National Archives, College Park. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

The bottom line is that while the human race may find itself, at some point in the future, in dire straits as a consequence of its own arrogance, aggression, or plain stupidity, this is by no means guaranteed. On the contrary, we can be 100 percent certain that at some point we will need to face the awful consequences of an exploding super-volcano or a chunk of rock barreling into our world that our telescopes have missed. Just because such events are very rare does not mean that we should not start thinking now about how we might prepare and cope with the aftermath. It does seem, however, that while it is OK to speculate at length upon the theoretical threat presented by robots and artificial intelligence, the global economic impact of the imminent quake beneath Tokyo, to cite one example of forthcoming catastrophe, is regarded as small beer.

Our apparent obsession with technological threats is also doing no favours in relation to how we view the coming climate cataclysm. While underpinned by humankind’s polluting activities, nature’s disruptive and detrimental response is driven largely by the atmosphere and the oceans, through increasingly wild weather, remorselessly-rising temperatures and climbing sea levels. With no sign of greenhouse gas emissions reducing and concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere crossing the emblematic 400 parts per million mark in 2013, there seems little chance now of avoiding a 2°C global average temperature rise that will bring dangerous, all-pervasive climate change to us all.

Sakurajima, by kimon Berlin. CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

The hope is that we come to our collective senses and stop things getting much worse. But what if we don’t? A paper published last year in the Royal Society’s Philosophical Transactions, and written by lauded NASA climate scientist, James Hansen and colleagues, provides a terrifying picture of what out world will be be like if we burn all available fossil fuels. The global average temperature, which is currently a little under 15°C will more than double to around 30°C, transforming most of our planet into a wasteland too hot for humans to inhabit. If not an extinction level event as such, there would likely be few of us left to scrabble some sort of existence in this hothouse hell.

So, by all means carry on worrying about what happens if terrorists get hold of ‘the bomb’ or if robots turn on their masters, but always be aware that the only future global threats we can be certain of are those in nature’s armoury. Most of all, consider the fact that in relation to climate change, the greatest danger our world has ever faced, it is not terrorists or robots – or even experimental physicists – that are to blame, but ultimately, every one of us.

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8. David Yates to Direct "Fantastic Beast" Films

Director of the last four Harry Potter movies, David Yates, has officially taken on the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them trilogy. As reported previously, J.K. Rowling will be working (along side Yates), writing the screenplays for the films, ensuring the film series spin off stays true to the Potter Universe. The first film is set to hit theaters November 2016, and no production schedule or cast list has been set. Variety reports:


According to sources, the studio had always wanted to approach a person who was familiar with the “Harry Potter” landscape and Yates, director of the last four films in the franchise, was a no brainer for WB. The move draws comparisons to other filmmakers like Peter Jackson returning for “The Hobbit” and Sam Mendes on “James Bond,” who, after insisting they were done with a certain franchise, ultimately came back to a piece of material they were comfortable tackling again.

More of Variety's exclusive article can be read here.

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9. Separated at birth: Spider-Man and Spider-Woman?

spider-man 30

In commenting on his FB page on how drawing a sexy cover got attention at EW.com, artist J. Scott Campbell posted this classic Spider-Man cover, strongly reminiscent of the Milo Manara cover that everyone is STILL talking about.

It is true that the butt-in-the-air arachnid is a classic pose…

…but it is equally untrue that the covers are equivalent. Unless J. Scott Campbell has a forty year career drawing sexy men and is well known for his gay erotica…

Reading the EW comments, the false equivalency of the objectification of men and women in comics is brought up once again. As it is every five minutes. Obviously Spidey has always had a nice butt. But the men in comics are drawn HEROICALLY not sexually.

Can you see the difference?

Has this canard—which is brought up any time the over sexualization of women in comics is discussed—been given a name yet? The False Sexualization Fallacy? The Peter Parker Paradox? Wilma?

Any ideas?

[Thanks to Beat Spy Desert Storm for the link.]

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10. sfilzen: Jukebox last updated in 1980 (at Delta Lodge...



sfilzen:

Jukebox last updated in 1980 (at Delta Lodge Wisconsin)



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11. My friend Flurry saw this while he was out and about in San...



My friend Flurry saw this while he was out and about in San Francisco today. He wrote, “Title page of novel? Contents of package? Taped to teacher’s back?”

I really hope it’s the first. “Now I’d like to read a short section from my novel entitled … ,” etc.



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12. Indie Month-to-Month Sales June 2014: Outcast!

outcast1.jpg

By Chris Rice

My sincere apologies for the lateness of the column this month! Some of you may have seen Heidi’s post from a week or two back, unfortunately my life has become very busy recently and I have to give up writing the column. I’ll be continuing while Heidi recruits the best and brightest candidate for my replacement, but it will be a bit later my last month or two.

Lots of new entries this month, including smash-hit new books from Robert Kirkman and Kieron Gillen and a first ever official comic for a cult film favourite. Elsewhere Valiant continue to falter despite the new Armor Hunters crossover, and Zenescope seem to be similarly slipping down and off the sales chart with their numbers dropping to new lows.

148 indie titles charted in the top 300, slightly down on last month’s 149. Overall sales were down at 1,624,693, compared to last month’s 1,632,573 bt the average sales this month are 10,977, virtually unchanged from last month’s 10,957. 24 titles went up in sales and 98 went down, with the rest made up of new entries and specials.

Image continue at number one with an 8.93% dollar share and a 10.51% market share, IDW at second place with a 5.60% dollar share and 4.45% market share. Dark Horse have a 5.57% dollar share and a 4.89% market share, Dynamite have a 2.62% dollar share and 2.30% market share and Boom! have a 2.52 % dollar share and 2.52% market share.

UK and European sales from Diamond UK are not reported in this chart.

Thanks to icv2.com and Milton Griepp for permission to use these numbers, which are estimates, and can be found here.

9. The Walking Dead (Image)

06/2009: The Walking Dead #62 - 23,910
06/2010: The Walking Dead #73 - 25,645 
06/2011: The Walking Dead #86 - 32,187
06/2012: The Walking Dead #99 - 62,182
06/2013: The Walking Dead #111 - 74,857

====

07/2013: The Walking Dead #112 - 72,975 (-2.5%)
08/2013: The Walking Dead #113 - 70,273 (-3.7%)
09/2013: The Walking Dead #114 - 70,440 (+0.2%)
10/2013: The Walking Dead #115 - 310,584 (329,127)(+340.9%)
10/2013: The Walking Dead Tyreese Special - 40,572
10/2013: The Walking Dead #1 10th Anniversary Ed - 39,780
11/2013: The Walking Dead #116 - 69,913 (-77.5%)
11/2013: The Walking Dead #117 - 68,818 (-1.6%)
12/2013: The Walking Dead #118 - 68,020 (-1.2%)
01/2014: The Walking Dead #119 - 65,151 (-4.2%)
01/2014: The Walking Dead #120 - 65,286 (+0.2%)
02/2014: The Walking Dead #121 - 65,244 (-0.1%)
02/2014: The Walking Dead #122 - 64,810 (-0.6%)
03/2014: The Walking Dead #123 - 64,460 (-0.5%)
03/2014: The Walking Dead #124 - 64,659 (+0.3%)
04/2014: The Walking Dead #125 - 66,761 (+3.3%)
04/2014: The Walking Dead #126 - 67,853 (+1.6%)
05/2014: The Walking Dead #127 - 71,352 (83,445) (+5.2%)
06/2014: The Walking Dead #128 - 74,326 (+4.0%)

Sales increase again, to almost where it was last year, while last issue picks up another 12,093 copies sold.

11. Outcast (Image)

06/2014: Outcast #1 - 71,788

Rob Kirkman takes the one/two this month, with his and Paul Azaceta’s new book launching incredibly strongly. Gone to second print as well.

19. Saga (Image)

06/2012: Saga #4 - 41,143
06/2013: -

====

07/2013: -
08/2013: Saga #13 - 55,372 (+3.8%)
09/2013: Saga #14 - 55,585 (+0.4%)
10/2013: Saga #15 - 54,816 (-1.4%)
11/2013: Saga #16 - 54,593 (-0.4%)
12/2013: Saga #17 - 53,264 (-2.4%)
01/2014: Saga #18 - 53,139 (-0.4%)
02-04/2014: -
05/2014: Saga #19 - 55,422 (+4.3%)
06/2014: Saga #20 - 56,497 (+1.9%)

Saga’s highest chart placing yet and also highest initial sales. Well deserved too.

41. Wicked & Divine (Image)

06/2014: Wicked & Divine #1 - 42,948

Gillen and McKelvie have a genuine smash hit with this book, selling only about 600 copies less than the second issue of their Young Avengers book. In creator-owned terms, that’s huge. Second prints are already out.

43. Serenity (Dark Horse)

01/2014: Leaves on the Wind #1 - 47,285 (54,392)
02/2014: Leaves on the Wind #2 - 38,630 (-18.3%)
03/2014: Leaves on the Wind #3 - 37,516 (-2.9%)
04/2014: Leaves on the Wind #4 - 42,269 (+12.7%)
05/2014: Leaves on the Wind #5 - 42,606 (+0.8%)
06/2014: Leaves on the Wind #6 - 42,069 (-1.3%)

Still holding very well.

77. Star Wars (Dark Horse)

06/2013: Star Wars #6 - 42,806

====

07/2013: Star Wars #7 - 41,611 (-2.8%)
08/2013: Star Wars #8 - 38,792 (-6.8%)
09/2013: Star Wars #9 - 37,502 (-3.3%)
10/2013: Star Wars #10 - 36,019 (-3.9%)
10/2013: 1-for-1 Star Wars #1 - 16,690 (-3.9%)
11/2013: Star Wars #11 - 34,227 (-5.0%)
12/2013: Star Wars #12 - 33,093 (-3.3%)
01/2014: Star Wars #13 - 31,543 (-4.7%)
02/2014: Star Wars #14 - 30,828 (-2.3%)
03/2014: Star Wars #15 - 29,967 (-2.8%)
04/2014: Star Wars #16 - 29,087 (-2.9%)
05/2014: Star Wars #17 - 28,241 (-2.9%)
06/2014: Star Wars #18 - 27,898 (-1.2%)

It seems that the Dark Horse license comes to an end at the end of the year, with Marvel soliciting their first titles in January.

82. Sex Criminals (Image)

09/2013: Sex Criminals #1 - 37,893
10/2013: Sex Criminals #2 - 22,510 (-40.6%)
11/2013: Sex Criminals #3 - 20,712 (-7.9%)
12/2013: -
01/2014: Sex Criminals #4 - 22,433 (+8.3%)
02/2014: -
03/2014: Sex Criminals #5 - 22,593 (+0.7%)
04-05/2014: -
06/2014: Sex Criminals #6 - 26,309 (+16.4%)

Going from strength to strength, and now Eisner award winning!

86. Trees (Image)

05/2014: Trees #1 - 31,926
06/2014: Trees #2 - 25,515 (-20.1%)

Not too bad a drop by recent Image standards.

94. Big Trouble in Little China (Boom!)

06/2014: Big Trouble in Little China #1 - 24,160

Amazingly this is the first time Jack Burton’s been licensed for comics, and this is a pretty strong start.

285. Vampirella (Dynamite)

06/2011: Vampirella #7 - 13,645
06/2012: Vampirella #18 - 9,144
06/2013: Vampirella #30 - 5,995

====

07/2013: -
08/2013: Vampirella #31 - 5,618 (-6.3%)
08/2013: Vampirella #32 - 5,548 (-1.2%)
08/2013: Vampirella #33 - 5,445 (-1.9%)
09/2013: Vampirella #34 - ???? (???)
10/2013: Vampirella #35 - ???? (???)
11/2013: Vampirella #36 - ???? (???)
12/2013: Vampirella #37 - ???? (???)
02/2014: Vampirella #38 - 4,758 (???)
06/2014: New Vampirella #1 - 22,864 (+380.5%)

A very successful relaunch, whether sales will stay up is another question.

105. MPH (Image)

05/2014: MPH #1 - 35,632
06/2014: MPH #2 - 21, 937 (-38.4%)

Not a great drop, but in the same sort of area as Starlight, Millar’s other current book (Jupiter’s Legacy seems a bit awol).

112. My Little Pony (IDW)

06/2013: My Little Pony #8 - 33,114
 
====

07/2013: My Little Pony #9 - 35,153 (41,444) (+6.2%)
08/2013: My Little Pony #10 - 24,475 (31,860) (-30.4%)
08/2013: My Little Pony Cover Gallery #1 - 6,859
09/2013: My Little Pony #11 - 32,784 (+33.9%)
10/2013: My Little Pony #12 - 23,686 (31,365) (-27.7%)
10/2013: My Little Pony 2013 Annual - 18,614
11/2013: My Little Pony #13 - 35,653 (+50.5%)
11/2013: My Little Pony Art Gallery - 6,028
12/2013: My Little Pony #14 - 22,990 (30,725)(-35.5%)
01/2014: My Little Pony #15 - 27,461 (+19.4%)
02/2014: My Little Pony #16 - 26,942 (-1.9%)
02/2014: My Little Pony 100 Penny Press #1 - 21,957 (-1.9%)
03/2014: My Little Pony #17 - 26,683 (-0.9%)
04/2014: My Little Pony #18 - 26,091 (-2.2%)
05/2014: My Little Pony #19 - 22,820 (-12.5%)
06/2014: My Little Pony #20 - 20,711 (-9.2%)

Looks like sales are starting to drop off a bit permanently now.

114. Star Wars Rebel Heist (Dark Horse)

04/2014: Star Wars Rebel Heist #1 - 24,913
05/2014: Star Wars Rebel Heist #2 - 20,387 (-18.2%)
06/2014: Star Wars Rebel Heist #3 - 19,379 (-4.9%)

Leveling out nicely.

115. Buffy TVS (Dark Horse)

06/2012: Buffy TVS Season 9 #10 - 27,867
06/2013: Buffy TVS Season 9 #22 - 21,194

====

07/2013: Buffy TVS Season 9 #23 - 20,768 (-2.0%)
08/2013: Buffy TVS Season 9 #24 - 20,584 (-0.9%)
09/2013: Buffy TVS Season 9 #25 - 20,392 (-0.9%)
03/2014: Buffy TVS Season 10 #1 - 27,851 (+36.6%)
04/2014: Buffy TVS Season 10 #2 - 21,804 (-21.7%)
05/2014: Buffy TVS Season 10 #3 - 20,556 (-5.7%)
06/2014: Buffy TVS Season 10 #4 - 19,365 (-5.8%)

Dropping ominously fast.

116. Starlight (Image)

03/2014: Starlight #1 - 34,080
04/2014: Starlight #2 - 22,305 (-34.5%)
05/2014: Starlight #3 - 19,891 (-10.8%)
06/2014: Starlight #4 - 19,355 (-2.7%)

Leveling.

122. My Little Pony Friends Forever (IDW)

01/2014: MLP Friends Forever #1 - 23,370 
02/2014: MLP Friends Forever #2 - 20,676 (-11.5%)
03/2014: MLP Friends Forever #3 - 20,038 (-3.1%)
04/2014: MLP Friends Forever #4 - 20,149 (+0.5%)
05/2014: MLP Friends Forever #5 - 19,312 (-4.2%)
06/2014: MLP Friends Forever #6 - 18,132 (-6.1%)

Not leveling.

127, 136. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (IDW)

06/2012: TMNT #11 - 19,416
06/2013: TMNT #23 - 17,772

====

07/2013: TMNT #24 - 16,484 (-7.2%)
08/2013: TMNT #25 - 17,833 (+8.0%)
09/2013: TMNT #26 - 17,322 (-2.9%)
10/2013: TMNT #27 - 17,042 (-1.6%)
11/2013: TMNT #28 - 17,045 (0%)
12/2013: TMNT #29 - 15,532 (-8.9%)
01/2014: TMNT #30 - 14,979 (-3.6%)
02/2014: TMNT #31 - 14,684 (-2.0%)
03/2014: TMNT #32 - 15,040 (+2.4%)
04/2014: TMNT #33 - 16,736 (+11.3%)
05/2014: TMNT 30th Anniversary Special - 13,391 
06/2014: TMNT #34 - 17,442 (+4.2%)
06/2014: TMNT #35 - 15,174 (-13.0%)

A bit of a hefty fall this month.

130. Armor Hunters (Valiant)

06/2014: Armor Hunters #1 - 16,484

Valiant’s highest entry this month, launching an X-O Manowar themed event.

132. Deadly Class (Image)

01/2014: Deadly Class #1 - 34,572
02/2014: Deadly Class #2 - 21,159 (-38.8%)
03/2014: Deadly Class #3 - 18,536 (-12.4%)
04/2014: Deadly Class #4 - 17,855 (-3.7%)
05/2014: Deadly Class #5 - 17,099 (-4.2%)
06/2014: Deadly Class #6 - 16,305 (-4.6%)

Still dropping, but it’s at a high enough level for that not to be too concerning at the moment.

133. Star Wars Darth Maul (Dark Horse)

05/2014: Darth Maul Son of Dathomir #1 - 17,905
06/2014: Darth Maul Son of Dathomir #2 - 15,829 (-11.6%)

A pretty healthy second-issue drop really.

135. Nailbiter (Image)

05/2014: Nailbiter #1 - 22,746
06/2014: Nailbiter #2 - 15,193 (-33.2%)

Image’s serial killer book takes a bit of a drop, but still at a decent level.

137. The Manhattan Projects (Image)

06/2012: The Manhattan Projects #4 - 18,544
06/2013: The Manhattan Projects #12 - 17,076

====

07/2013: -
08/2013: The Manhattan Projects #13 - 17,556 (+2.8%)
09/2013: The Manhattan Projects #14 - 16,881 (-3.8%)
10/2013: The Manhattan Projects #15 - 16,842 (-0.2%)
11/2013: The Manhattan Projects #16 - 16,674 (-0.1%)
12/2013: The Manhattan Projects #17 - 15,646 (-6.0%)
01/2014: -
02/2014: The Manhattan Projects #18 - 15,076 (-3.6%)
03/2014: The Manhattan Projects #19 - 14,813 (-1.7%)
04/2014: The Manhattan Projects #20 - 14,253 (-3.8%)
05/2014: -
06/2014: The Manhattan Projects #21 - 15,126 (+6.1%)

The first part of a new arc sees a nice little boost.

139. Invincible (Image)

06/2009: Invincible #63 - 15,226 
06/2010: Invincible #73 - 15,340 
06/2011: Invincible #80 - 15,563
06/2012: Invincible #92 - 14,553
06/2013: Invincible #103 - 15,072

====

07/2013: Invincible #104 - 14,733 (-2.2%)
08/2013: -
09/2013: Invincible #105 - 14,437 (-2.0%)
10/2013: Invincible #106 - 13,961 (-3.3%)
11/2013: -
12/2013: Invincible #107 - 13,268 (-5.0%)
01/2014: Invincible #108 - 12,844 (-3.2%)
02/2014: -
03/2014: Invincible #109 - 12,748 (-0.7%)
04/2014: Invincible #110 - 12,557 (-1.5%)
05/2014: Invincible #111 - 18,440 (+46.8%)
06/2014: Invincible #112 - 14,413 (-21.8%)

Dropping back down after last month, but still a little up on where it was.

141. Fatale (Image)

06/2012: Fatale #6 - 21,828
06/2013: Fatale #15 - 22,373

====

07/2013: -
08/2013: Fatale #16 - 17,045 (-24.6%)
09/2013: Fatale #17 - 16,571 (-2.7%)
10/2013: -
11/2013: Fatale #18 - 16,154 (-2.5%)
12/2013: -
01/2014: Fatale #19 - 15,725 (-2.7%)
02/2014: Fatale #20 - 13,862 (-11.8%)
03/2014: Fatale #21 - 14,799 (-6.8%)
04/2014: -
05/2014: Fatale #22 - 14,694 (-0.7%)
06/2014: Fatale #23 - 14,407 (-1.9%)

Penultimate issue.

145. TMNT Turtles in Time (IDW)

06/2014: TMNT Turtles In Time #1 - 13,840

Drawn by one of my favorite artists, Ross Campbell, the Turtles take a trip to the prehistoric.

146. Adventure Time (Boom!)

06/2012: Adventure Time #5 - 27,165
06/2013: Adventure Time #17 - 20,860

====

07/2013: Adventure Time #18 - 21,071 (+1.0%)
07/2013: Adventure Time Summer Special 2013 - 19,182 (26,278)
08/2013: Adventure Time #19 - 19,852 (-5.8%)
09/2013: Adventure Time #20 - 18,822 (-5.2%)
10/2013: Adventure Time #21 - 18,156 (-3.5%)
10/2013: Adventure Time 2013 Spooktacular - 16,920
11/2013: Adventure Time #22 - 16,905 (-6.9%)
12/2013: Adventure Time #23 - 15,635 (-7.5%)
01/2014: Adventure Time #24 - 14,757 (-5.6%)
01/2014: Adventure Time 2014 Special - 13,388 
02/2014: Adventure Time #25 - 14,191 (-3.8%)
03/2014: Adventure Time #26 - 13,839 (-2.5%)
04/2014: Adventure Time #27 - 13,205 (-4.6%)
04/2014: Adventure Time 2014 Annual - 11,573
05/2014: Adventure Time #28 - 12,806 (-3.0%)
06/2014: Adventure Time #29 - 13,785 (+7.6%)

A small recovery this month.

147. COWL (Image)

05/2014: COWL #1 - 20,851
06/2014: COWL #2 - 13,569 (-34.9%)

Not too bad a drop.

149. Rai (Valiant)

04/2014: Rai #1 - 29,137
05/2014: -
06/2014: Rai #2 - 13,448 (-53.8%)

Ouch, but not unexpected.

151. Rise of the Magi (Image)

06/2014: Rise of the Magi #1 - 13,345

Marc Silvestri makes a return to monthly comics, writing and co-penciling.

153. Angel & Faith (Dark Horse)

06/2013: Angel & Faith #23 - 13,668

====

07/2013: Angel & Faith #24 - 13,368 (-2.2%)
08/2013: Angel & Faith #25 - 13,335 (-0.2%)
04/2014: Angel & Faith #1 - 17,820 (+33.6%)
05/2014: Angel & Faith #2 - 14,200 (-20.3%)
06/2014: Angel & Faith #3 - 13,029 (-8.2%)

Lower than the last series already.

159. Wildfire (Image)

06/2014: Wildfire #1 - 12,552

Matt Hawkins environmental thriller makes a decent start.

161. Star Wars Legacy (Dark Horse)

06/2008: Star Wars Legacy #24 - 29,548
06/2010: Star Wars Legacy #49 - 19,911
06/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #4 - 16,147

====

07/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #5 - 15,854 (-1.8%)
08/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #6 - 15,394 (-2.9%)
09/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #7 - 14,924 (-3.0%)
10/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #8 - 14,576 (-2.3%)
11/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #9 - 13,999 (-4.0%)
11/2013: 1 For $1 Star Wars Legacy #1 - 6,624
12/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #10 - 13,783 (-1.5%)
01/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #11 - 13,398 (-3.0%)
02/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #12 - 13,029 (-2.7%)
03/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #13 - 12,671 (-2.7%)
04/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #14 - 12,523 (-1.2%)
05/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #15 - 12,473 (-0.4%)
06/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #16 - 12,373 (-0.8%)

Very solid.

164. Star Trek City o/t Edge of Forever (IDW)

06/2014: City on the Edge of Forever #1 - 12,028

An adaptation of the Harlan Ellison-penned Original Series episode.

165. Angry Birds (IDW)

06/2014: Angry Birds Comics #1 - 11,939

Can’t imagine the world has been crying out for an Angry Birds comic, maybe two years ago.

166. Spawn (Image)

06/2009: Spawn #192 - 19,796
06/2011: Spawn #208 - 14,468
06/2012: Spawn #220 - 30,136
06/2013: Spawn #232 - 16,077

====

07/2013: Spawn #233 - 15,701 (-2.3%)
08/2013: Spawn #234 - 15,930 (+0.8%)
09/2013: Spawn #235 - 15,081 (-5.3%)
10/2013: Spawn #236 - 13,368 (-11.4%)
11/2013: Spawn #237 - 14,411 (+7.8%)
12/2013: Spawn #238 - 12,459 (-13.5%)
01/2014: Spawn #239 - 12,369 (-0.7%)
02/2014: Spawn #240 - 11,827 (-4.4%)
03/2014: Spawn #241 - 11,766 (-0.5%)
04/2014: Spawn #242 - 11,827 (+0.5%)
05/2014: Spawn #243 - 11,714 (-1.0%)
06/2014: Spawn #244 - 11,837 (+1.0%)

Very solid for the majority of this year.

168, 275. Red Sonja (Dynamite) 

06/2009: Red Sonja #45 - 12,030
06/2010: Red Sonja #50 - 13,017
06/2013: Red Sonja #78 - ????

====

07/2013: Red Sonja #1 - 30,561 (+486.4%)
07/2013: Red Sonja #79 - ????
08/2013: Red Sonja #2 - 18,327 (-40.0%)
08/2013: Red Sonja #80 - 5,066 (???)
09/2013: Red Sonja #3 - 15,928 (-13.1%)
10/2013: Red Sonja #4 - 15,128 (-5.0%)
11/2013: Red Sonja #5 - 13,811 (-8.7%)
12/2013: Red Sonja #6 - 13,291 (-3.7%)
01/2014: Li'l Sonja #1 - 5,465
02/2014: Red Sonja #7 - 12,622 (-5.0%)
02/2014: Red Sonja Berserker - 5,810
04/2014: Red Sonja #8 - 12,392 (-1.8%)
04/2014: Red Sonja and Cub - 5,877
05/2014: Red Sonja #9 - 11,850 (-4.4%)
06/2014: Red Sonja #10 - 11,685 (-1.4%)
06/2014: Red Sonja Sanctuary - 5,486

The main book is pretty settled, with another special selling about half those numbers.

170. X-Files Season 10 (IDW)

06/2013: X-Files Season 10 #1 - 24,270

====

07/2013: X-Files Season 10 #2 - 16,729 (-31.1%)
08/2013: X-Files Season 10 #3 - 17,557 (+4.9%)
09/2013: X-Files Season 10 #4 - 16,999 (-3.2%)
10/2013: X-Files Season 10 #5 - 16,819 (-1.1%)
11/2013: X-Files Season 10 #6 - 15,289 (-9.1%)
12/2013: X-Files Season 10 #7 - 14,792 (-3.3%)
01/2014: X-Files Season 10 #8 - 13,981 (-5.5%)
02/2014: X-Files Season 10 #9 - 13,129 (-6.1%)
03/2014: X-Files Season 10 #10 - 12,252 (-6.7%)
04/2014: X-Files Season 10 #11 - 13,210 (+7.8%)
04/2014: X-Files Annual 2014 - 9,504
05/2014: X-Files Season 10 #12 - 11,773 (-10.9%)
06/2014: X-Files Season 10 #13 - 11,497 (-2.3%)

A bit less of a drop this month, sales possibly starting to level out.

173. Chew (Image)

06/2010: Chew #11 - 13,204
06/2012: Chew #27 2nd Helping Ed - 11,262 
06/2013: -

====

07/2013: Chew #35 - 12,818 (-0.1%)
08/2013: -
09/2013: Chew #36 - 12,402 (-3.2%)
10/2013: Chew #37 - 12,214 (-1.5%)
12/2013: Chew #38 - 12,068 (-1.2%)
01/2014: Chew #39 - 11,487 (-4.8%)
02/2014: Chew #40 - 11,193 (-2.6%)
04/2014: Chew #41 - 10,835 (-3.2%)
05/2014: Chew/ Revival #1 - 18,259
06/2014: Chew #42 - 10,981 (+1.3%)

A small boost.

174. Legenderry (Dynamite)

12/2013: Legenderry #1 - 27,174
02/2014: Legenderry #2 - 14,570 (-46.4%)
03/2014: Legenderry #3 - 12,218 (-16.1%)
06/2014: Legenderry #4 - 10,865 (-11.1%)

The drops are not slowing.

176. Tomb Raider (Dark Horse)

02/2014: Tomb Raider #1 - 18,486
03/2014: Tomb Raider #2 - 13,636 (-26.2%)
04/2014: Tomb Raider #3 - 12,133 (-11.0%)
05/2014: Tomb Raider #4 - 11,300 (-6.9%)
06/2014: Tomb Raider #5 - 10,536 (-6.8%)

Still falling.

178. Blood Queen (Dynamite)

06/2014: Blood Queen #1 - 10,352

Not a bad start for this Elizabeth Bathory -starrer, but there were incentives and I think the book is returnable.

179. Star Trek Ongoing (IDW)

06/2012: Star Trek Ongoing #10 - 11,007
06/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #22 - 10,799

====

07/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #23 - 11,022 (+2.1%)
08/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #24 - 10,886 (-1.2%)
09/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #25 - 11,388 (+4.6%)
10/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #26 - 10,872 (-4.5%)
11/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #27 - 9,985 (-8.2%)
12/2013: Star Trek Annual 2013 - 8,683
12/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #28 - 10,443 (+4.6%)
01/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #29 - 10,127 (-3.0%)
02/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #30 - 9,906 (-2.2%)
03/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #31 - 9,781 (-1.3%)
04/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #32 - 10,801 (+10.4%)
05/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #33 - 9,729 (-9.9%)
06/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #34 - 10,216 (+4.8%)

Up and down, but overall stable over the last year.

181. X-O Manowar (Valiant)

06/2012: X-O Manowar #2 - 21,261
06/2013: X-O Manowar #14 - 13,227

====

07/2013: X-O Manowar #15 - 13,997 (+5.5%)
08/2013: X-O Manowar #16 - 11,019 (-21.3%)
09/2013: X-O Manowar #17 - 10,859 (-1.5%)
10/2013: X-O Manowar #18 - 11,438 (+5.3%)
11/2013: X-O Manowar #19 - 11,744 (+3.0%)
12/2013: X-O Manowar #20 - 9,941 (-15.4%)
01/2014: X-O Manowar #21 - 9,336 (-6.1%)
02/2014: X-O Manowar #22 - 9,808 (+5.1%)
03/2014: X-O Manowar #23 - 9,394 (-4.2%)
04/2014: X-O Manowar #24 - 8,595 (-8.5%)
05/2014: X-O Manowar #25 - 12,493 (+45.4%)
06/2014: X-O Manowar #26 - 10,083 (-19.3%)

Down a bit, but Armor Hunters is still providing a boost.

182. Red City (Image)

06/2014: Red City #1 - 9,981

Sci-fi noir from Moriarty writer Daniel Corey.

183. Shutter (Image)

04/2014: Shutter #1 - 18,984 (21,500)
05/2014: Shutter #2 - 12,267 (-35.4%)
06/2014: Shutter #3 - 9,887 (-19.4%)

Not a very healthy third-issue drop.

184. Revival (Image)

06/2013: Revival #11 - 13,536

====

07/2013: Revival #12 - 13,948 (+3.0%)
08/2013: Revival #13 - 12,549 (-10.0%)
09/2013: Revival #14 - 12,254 (-2.3%)
10/2013: -
11/2013: Revival #15 - 11,468 (-6.4%)
12/2013: Revival #16 - 11,065 (-3.5%)
01/2014: Revival #17 - 10,585 (-4.3%)
02/2014: -
03/2014: Revival #18 - 10,456 (-1.2%)
04/2014: Revival #19 - 10,384 (-0.7%)
05/2014: Revival #20 - 10,341 (-0.4%)
06/2014: Revival #21 - 9,808 (-5.1%)

The drops continue after a few months of relative stability.

185. Transformers Robots In Disguise (IDW)

06/2012: Transformers Robots In Disguise #6 - 11,443
06/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #18 - 9,495

====

07/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #19 - 9,564 (+0.7%)
08/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #20 - 9,218 (-3.6%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #21 - 9,220 (0%)
10/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #22 - 9,044 (-1.9%)
11/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #23 - 10,355 (+14.5%)
12/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #24 - 9,812 (-5.2%)
01/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #25 - 9,609 (-2.1%)
02/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #26 - 9,535 (-0.7%)
03/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #27 - 9,409 (-1.3%)
04/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #28 - 9,568 (+1.7%)
05/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #29 - 9,543 (-0.3%)
06/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #30 - 9,714 (+1.8%)

Solid.

186. Alex & Ada (Image)

11/2013: Alex & Ada #1 - 14,992
12/2013: Alex & Ada #2 - 10,700 (-28.6%)
01/2014: Alex & Ada #3 - 10,242 (-4.3%)
02/2014: Alex & Ada #4 - 9,862 (-3.7%)
03/2014: Alex & Ada #5 - 9,761 (-1.0%)
04/2014: -
05/2014: Alex & Ada #6 - 9,869 (+1.1%)
06/2014: Alex & Ada #7 - 9,579 (-2.9%)

Dropping a little but still not doing too badly.

187. Caliban (Avatar)

04/2014: Caliban #1 - 13,196
05/2014: Caliban #2 - 9,454 (-28.4%)
06/2014: Caliban #3 - 9,506 (+0.5%)

Rock solid this month.

188. Conan (Dark Horse)

06/2009: The Cimmerian #11 - 20,041
06/2010: The Cimmerian #21 - 16,421
06/2011: The Road of Kings #6 - 12,523
06/2012: Conan the Barbarian #5 - 15,393
06/2013: Conan the Barbarian #17 - 12,395

====

07/2013: Conan the Barbarian #18 - 12,331 (-0.5%)
08/2013: Conan the Barbarian #19 - 12,105 (-1.8%)
09/2013: Conan the Barbarian #20 - 11,828 (-2.3%)
10/2013: Conan the Barbarian #21 - 11,800 (-0.2%)
11/2013: Conan the Barbarian #22 - 11,384 (-3.5%)
12/2013: Conan the Barbarian #23 - 11,245 (-1.2%)
01/2014: Conan the Barbarian #24 - 10,924 (-2.9%)
02/2014: Conan the Barbarian #25 - 10,736 (-1.7%)
03/2014: -
04/2014: Conan the Avenger #1 - 11,565 (+7.7%)
05/2014: Conan the Avenger #2 - 9,946 (-14.0%)
06/2014: Conan the Avenger #3 - 9,486 (-4.6%)

Leveling out a good amount down from the last series.

189. Unity (Valiant)

11/2013: Unity #1 - 60,003
12/2013: Unity #2 - 18,845 (-68.6%)
01/2014: Unity #3 - 13,277 (-29.5%)
02/2014: Unity #4 - 10,644 (-19.8%)
03/2014: Unity #5 - 12,268 (+15.3%)
04/2014: Unity #6 - 9,351 (-23.8%)
05/2014: -
06/2014: Unity #7 - 9,442 (+1.0%)

Armor Hunters does little more than arrest the drops.

190. Transformers More TMTE (IDW)

06/2012: More Than Meets Eye #6 - 11,263
06/2013: More Than Meets Eye #18 - 9,394

====

07/2013: More Than Meets Eye #19 - 9,320 (-0.8%)
08/2013: More Than Meets Eye #20 - 9,402 (+0.9%)
09/2013: More Than Meets Eye #21 - 9,258 (-1.5%)
10/2013: More Than Meets Eye #22 - 9,248 (-0.1%)
11/2013: Dark Cybertron #1 - 12,165
11/2013: More Than Meets Eye #23 - 9,579 (+3.6%)
12/2013: More Than Meets Eye #24 - 10,138 (+5.8%)
01/2014: More Than Meets Eye #25 - 9,867 (-2.7%)
02/2014: More Than Meets Eye #26 - 9,663 (-2.1%)
03/2014: More Than Meets Eye #27 - 9,409 (-2.6%)
03/2014: Dark Cybertron Finale - 9,395
04/2014: More Than Meets Eye #28 - 9,667 (+2.7%)
05/2014: More Than Meets Eye #29 - 9,543 (-1.3%)
06/2014: More Than Meets Eye #30 - 9,395 (-1.6%)

Down a little but well within the range of the last year.

191. The Woods (Boom!)

05/2014: The Woods #1 - 13,916
06/2014: The Woods #2 - 9,352 (-32.8%)

An average second-issue drop.

192. Lumberjanes (Boom!)

04/2014: Lumberjanes #1 - 13,129
05/2014: Lumberjanes #2 - 9,904 (-24.6%)
06/2014: Lumberjanes #3 - 9,150 (-7.6%)

Starting to level out.

194. Adventure Time Flip Side (Boom!)

01/2014: Adventure Time Flip Side #1 - 13,372
02/2014: Adventure Time Flip Side #2 - 11,318 (-15.4%)
03/2014: Adventure Time Flip Side #3 - 10,157 (-10.3%)
04/2014: Adventure Time Flip Side #4 - 9,652 (-5.0%)
05/2014: Adventure Time Flip Side #5 - 9,174 (-5.0%)
06/2014: Adventure Time Flip Side #6 - 9,019 (-1.7%)

Last issue.

195. Transformers Windblade (IDW)

04/2014: Transformers Windblade #1 - 9,855
05/2014: Transformers Windblade #2 - 8,980 (-8.9%)
06/2014: Transformers Windblade #3 - 8,920 (-0.7%)

Not too far behind the main books, and leveling out very quickly.

196. The Goon (Dark Horse)

06/2011: The Goon #34 - 9,203

====

11/2013: The Goon #44 - 7,894 
06/2014: The Goon #45 - 8,848

A one-shot issue ahead of another burst of activity in the Goon camp, with a long-form story starting next month.

197. Sonic the Hedgehog (Archie)

06/2010: Sonic #213 - 7,893
06/2011: Sonic #226 - 9,228
06/2013: -

====

07/2013: Sonic #250 - 14,291 (+26.0%)
07/2013: Sonic #251 - 12,782 (-10.6%)
08/2013: -
09/2013: Sonic #252 - 10,968 (-14.2%)
10/2013: Sonic #253 - 10,982 (+0.1%)
10/2013: Sonic #254 - 10,585 (-3.6%)
11/2013: -
12/2013: Sonic #255 - 10,422 (-1.5%)
01/2014: Sonic #256 - 9,840 (-5.6%)
02/2014: Sonic #257 - 9,325 (-5.2%)
03/2014: Sonic #258 - 9,023 (-3.2%)
04/2014: Sonic #259 - 6,228 (9,495)(+5.2%)
05/2014: Sonic #260 - 8,866 (-6.6%)
06/2014: Sonic #261 - 8,822 (-0.5%)

Solid.

201. Real Heroes (Image)

03/2014: Real Heroes #1 - 23,716
05/2014: Real Heroes #2 - 11,426 (-51.8%)
06/2014: Real Heroes #3 - 8,590 (-24.8%)

Not settling down very fast at all, which is a shame, as it’s ace.

202. Samurai Jack (IDW)

10/2013: Samurai Jack #1 - 23,661
11/2013: Samurai Jack #2 - 12,645 (-46.6%)
12/2013: Samurai Jack #3 - 11,553 (-8.6%)
01/2014: Samurai Jack #4 - 10,451 (-9.5%)
02/2014: Samurai Jack #5 - 9,989 (-4.4%)
03/2014: Samurai Jack #6 - 8,960 (-10.3%)
04/2014: Samurai Jack #7 - 8,990 (+0.3%)
05/2014: Samurai Jack #8 - 8,471 (-5.8%)
06/2014: Samurai Jack #9 - 8,464 (-0.8%)

Pretty level this month.

203. King Conan (Dark Horse)

06/2013: Hour of The Dragon #2 - 9,808

====

07/2013: Hour of The Dragon #3 - 9,319 (-5.0%)
08/2013: Hour of The Dragon #4 - 9,492 (+1.9%)
09/2013: Hour of The Dragon #5 - 9,358 (-1.4%)
10/2013: Hour of The Dragon #6 - 9,131 (-2.4%)
02/2014: Conqueror #1 - 9,646 (+5.6%)
03/2014: Conqueror #2 - 8,495 (-11.9%)
04/2014: Conqueror #3 - 8,519 (+0.3%)
05/2014: Conqueror #4 - 8,428 (-1.1%)
06/2014: Conqueror #5 - 8,376 (-0.6%)

Solid.

205. God is Dead (Avatar)

09/2013: God Is Dead #1 - 26,664
10/2013: God Is Dead #2 - 15,366 (-42.4%)
11/2013: God Is Dead #3 - 14,930 (-2.8%)
12/2013: God Is Dead #4 - 13,369 (-10.5%)
01/2014: God Is Dead #5 - 11,897 (-11.0%)
02/2014: God Is Dead #6 - 12,852 (+8.0%)
02/2014: God Is Dead #7 - 12,008 (-6.6%)
03/2014: God Is Dead #8 - 11,515 (-4.1%)
03/2014: God Is Dead #9 - 10,976 (-4.7%)
04/2014: God Is Dead #10 - 10,564 (-3.7%)
04/2014: God Is Dead #11 - 10,326 (-2.3%)
05/2014: God Is Dead #12 - 9,275 (-10.2%)
05/2014: God Is Dead #13 - 8,987 (-3.1%)
06/2014: God Is Dead #14 - 8,262 (-7.5%)

Plummetting, in stops and starts. Still lots of leeway though, it’s ahead of Crossed.

206. BPRD (Dark Horse)

06/2013: Hell on Earth #108 - 10,093
====

07/2013: Hell on Earth #109 - 10,018 (-0.7%)
08/2013: Hell on Earth #110 - 9,842 (-1.8%)
09/2013: Hell on Earth #111 - 9,587 (-2.5%)
10/2013: Hell on Earth #112 - 9,497 (-0.9%)
11/2013: Hell on Earth #113 - 8,904 (-6.2%)
12/2013: Hell on Earth #114 - 8,668 (-2.6%)
01/2014: Hell on Earth #115 - 9,072 (+4.7%)
02/2014: Hell on Earth #116 - 8,674 (-4.4%)
03/2014: Hell on Earth #117 - 8,510 (-1.9%)
04/2014: Hell on Earth #118 - 8,473 (-0.4%)
05/2014: Hell on Earth #119 - 8,306 (-2.0%)
06/2014: Hell on Earth #120 - 8,127 (-2.2%)

Sales are spiraling slowly down, with almost two thousand sales lost this last year.

207, 249. Dream Police (Image)

04/2014: Dream Police #1 - 11,804
06/2014: Dream Police #2 - 8,097 (-31.4%)
06/2014: Dream Police #3 - 6,569 (-18.9%)

Not a great third issue drop.

209. Winterworld (IDW)

06/2014: Winterworld #1 - 7,957

New stories from Chuck Dixon, with Butch Guice standing in for the late great Jorge Zaffino. This feels like it should be selling better.

210. Magnus Robot Fighter (Dynamite)

03/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #1 - 27,497
04/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #2 - 9,898 (-64.0%)
05/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #3 - 8,333 (-15.8%)
06/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #4 - 7,898 (-5.2%)

Starting to level out.

212. Sons of Anarchy (Boom!) 

09/2013: Sons of Anarchy #1 - 27,601
10/2013: Sons of Anarchy #2 - 14,688 (-46.8%)
11/2013: Sons of Anarchy #3 - 13,251 (-9.8%)
12/2013: Sons of Anarchy #4 - 12,215 (-7.8%)
01/2014: Sons of Anarchy #5 - 11,607 (-5.0%)
02/2014: Sons of Anarchy #6 - 11,228 (-3.3%)
03/2014: Sons of Anarchy #7 - 9,910 (-11.7%)
04/2014: Sons of Anarchy #8 - 9,304 (-6.1%)
05/2014: Sons of Anarchy #9 - 8,511 (-8.5%)
06/2014: Sons of Anarchy #10 - 7,857 (-7.7%)

Plummeting.

213. Witchblade (Image)

06/2013: Witchblade #167 - 7,329

====

07/2013: Witchblade #168 - 7,176 (-2.1%)
08/2013: -
09/2013: Witchblade #169 - 7,271 (+1.3%)
10/2013: Witchblade #170 - 7,990 (+9.9%)
11/2013: -
12/2013: Witchblade #171 - 7,263 (-9.1%)
01/2014: Witchblade #172 - 6,221 (-14.3%)
02/2014: -
03/2014: Witchblade #173 - 6,109 (-1.8%)
04/2014: Witchblade #174 - 6,049 (-0.9%)
05/2014: -
06/2014: Witchblade #175 - 7,843 (+29.7%)

The anniversary issue gets a decent boost.

214. Sex (Image)

06/2013: Sex #4 - 17,938

====

07/2013: Sex #5 - 15,996 (-10.8%)
08/2013: Sex #6 - 14,488 (-9.4%)
09/2013: Sex #7 - 13,074 (-9.8%)
10/2013: Sex #8 - 12,082 (-7.6%)
12/2013: Sex #9 - 10,707 (-11.4%)
01/2014: Sex #10 - 9,947 (-7.1%)
02/2014: Sex #11 - 9,302 (-6.5%)
03/2014: Sex #12 - 8,830 (-5.1%)
04/2014: -
05/2014: Sex #13 - 8,192 (-7.2%)
06/2014: Sex #14 - 7,824 (-4.5%)

That’s the smallest drop yet!

215. Turok, Dinosaur Hunter (Dynamite)

02/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #1 - 30,722
03/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #2 - 11,296 (-6.3%)
04/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #3 - 9,586 (-15.1%)
05/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #4 - 8,426 (-12.1%)
06/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #5 - 7,803 (-7.4%)

Maybe starting to level out.

216. Empty Man (Boom!)

06/2014: Empty Man #1 - 7,685

Another one that should be selling better, this is Cullen Bunn’s excellent new horror book.

217. Abe Sapien (Dark Horse )

06/2013: Abe Sapien #3 - 10,250

====

07/2013: Abe Sapien #4 - 10,314 (+0.6%)
08/2013: Abe Sapien #5 - 9,676 (-6.2%)
09/2014: -
10/2013: Abe Sapien #6 - 9,120 (-5.7%)
11/2013: Abe Sapien #7 - 8,709 (-4.5%)
12/2013: Abe Sapien #8 - 8,622 (-1.0%)
01/2014: Abe Sapien #9 - 8,516 (-1.2%)
02/2014: Abe Sapien #10 - 7,995 (-6.1%)
03/2014: Abe Sapien #11 - 7,825 (-2.1%)
04/2014: -
05/2014: Abe Sapien #12 - 7,559 (-3.4%)
06/2014: Abe Sapien #13 - 7,674 (+1.5%)

Solid this month.

218. TMNT New Animated Adventures (IDW)

07/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #1 - 14,397
08/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #2 - 10,304 (-28.4%)
09/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #3 - 8,744 (-15.1%)
10/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #4 - 7,905 (-9.6%)
11/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #5 - 7,112 (-10.0%)
12/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #6 - 6,649 (-6.5%)
01/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #7 - 6,331 (-4.8%)
02/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #8 - 6,034 (-4.7%)
03/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #9 - 6,009 (-0.4%)
04/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #10 - 5,911 (-1.6%)
05/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #11 - 6,075 (+2.8%)
06/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #12 - 7,577 (+24.7%)

This may be one of those comics affected by the UK & Europe ban. Turtles has always had a strong grey market, so US sales may have gone up to fulfill that demand.

219. Bee & Puppycat (Boom!)

05/2014: Bee & Puppycat #1 - 12,204
06/2014: Bee & Puppycat #2 - 7,557 (-38.1%)

Harsh, wonderful comic this.

220. Uber (Avatar)

06/2013: Uber #2 - 16,160

====

07/2013: Uber #3 - 14,594 (-9.7%)
07/2013: Uber #4 - 12,030 (-17.6%)
08/2013: Uber #5 - 11,598 (-3.6%)
10/2013: Uber #6 - 10,747 (-7.3%)
11/2013: Uber #7 - 9,784 (-9.0%)
12/2013: Uber #8 - 9,065 (-7.3%)
01/2014: Uber #9 - 8,448 (-6.8%)
03/2014: Uber #10 - 8,133 (-3.7%)
03/2014: Uber Special #1 - 7,176
04/2014: Uber #11 - 7,732 (-4.9%)
04/2014: Uber #12 - 7,694 (-0.5%)
05/2014: Uber #13 - 7,653 (-0.5%)
06/2014: Uber #14 - 7,493 (-2.1%)

Solid. Not selling enough.

221. Revenge (Image)

02/2014: Revenge #1 - 17,362
03/2014: Revenge #2 - 10,112 (-41.8%)
04/2014: -
05/2014: Revenge #3 - 7,969 (-21.2%)
06/2014: Revenge #4 - 7,490 (-6.0%)

Last issue. Strange comic.

222. Sonic Universe (Archie)

06/2013: Sonic Universe #53 - 11,123

====

07/2013: Sonic Universe #54 - 11,398 (+2.5%)
08/2013: Sonic Universe #55 - 9,239 (-18.9%)
09/2013: Sonic Universe #56 - 9,253 (+0.1%)
10/2013: Sonic Universe #57 - 8,874 (-4.1%)
11/2013: Sonic Universe #58 - 8,433 (-5.0%)
12/2013: Sonic Universe #59 - 8,123 (-3.7%)
01/2014: -
02/2014: Sonic Universe #60 - 7,902 (-2.7%)
03/2014: Sonic Universe #61 - 7,715 (-2.4%)
04/2014: Sonic Universe #62 - 7,927 (-2.7%)
05/2014: Sonic Universe #63 - 7,507 (-5.3%)
06/2014: Sonic Universe #64 - 7,423 (-1.1%)

Pretty stable this month.

223. Solar Man of the Atom (Dynamite)

04/2014: Solar Man O/T Atom #1 - 22,767
05/2014: Solar Man O/T Atom #2 - 8,918 (-60.8%)
06/2014: Solar Man O/T Atom #3 - 7,408 (-16.9%)

Not too bad a third-issue drop, particularly when you consider the second-issue drop.

224. Witchfinder (Dark Horse)

06/2014: Witchfinder Mysteries of Unland #1 - 7,355

Not a particularly strong start.

226. Superannuated Man (Image)

06/2014: Superannuated Man #1 - 7,308

Ted McKeever’s new book. He’s quite a niche taste, so this is pretty decent.

227. Amazing World of Gumball (Boom!)

06/2014: Amazing World of Gumball #1 - 7,285

Another Cartoon Network book, not one of my favorites I must confess.

228. Rachel Rising (Abstract) 

06/2013: Rachel Rising #17 - 8,336

====

07/2013: Rachel Rising #18 - 8,504 (+2.0%)
08/2013: -
09/2013: Rachel Rising #19 - 8,348 (-1.8%)
10/2013: Rachel Rising #20 - 8,166 (-2.2%)
11/2013: Rachel Rising #21 - 7,795 (-4.5%)
12/2013: Rachel Rising #22 - 7,581 (-2.7%)
01/2014: -
02/2014: Rachel Rising #23 - 7,511 (-0.9%)
03/2014: Rachel Rising #24 - ???? (???)
04/2014: Rachel Rising #25 - 7,378 (???)
05/2014: -
06/2014: Rachel Rising #26 - 7,260 (-1.6%)

Relatively solid at the moment.

229. Harbinger (Valiant)

06/2013: Harbinger #13 - 12,930

====

07/2013: Harbinger #14 - 10,709 (-17.2%)
08/2013: Harbinger #15 - 12,086 (+12.9%)
09/2013: Harbinger #16 - 10,199 (-15.6%)
10/2013: Harbinger #17 - 10,686 (+4.8%)
11/2013: Harbinger #18 - 9,203 (-13.9%)
12/2013: Harbinger #19 - 9,237 (+0.4%)
01/2014: Harbinger #20 - 9,060 (-1.9%)
02/2014: Harbinger #21 - 8,473 (-6.5%)
03/2014: Harbinger Bleeding Monk #0 - 8,423
04/2014: Harbinger #22 - 8,213 (-3.1%)
05/2014: Harbinger #23 - 8,011 (-2.5%)
06/2014: Harbinger #24 - 7,256 (-9.4%)

That’s a bit ouch. There’s one more issue, then a mini-series, Omegas, and an Armor Hunters tie-in, not sure of the future beyond that.

231. Lobster Johnson (Dark Horse)

07/2013: Scent of Lotus #1 - 9,586 (-2.6%)
08/2013: Scent of Lotus #2 - 8,844 (-7.7%)
02/2014: Get Lobster #1 - 8,266 (-6.5%)
03/2014: Get Lobster #2 - 7,694 (-6.9%)
04/2014: Get Lobster #3 - 7,480 (-2.8%)
06/2014: Get Lobster #4 - 7,203 (-3.7%)

Last issue.

233. Archer & Armstrong (Valiant)

06/2013: Archer & Armstrong #10 - 13,241

====

07/2013: Archer & Armstrong #11 - 9,880 (-25.4%)
08/2013: Archer & Armstrong #12 - 9,971 (+0.9%)
09/2013: Archer & Armstrong #13 - 9,910 (-0.6%)
10/2013: Archer & Armstrong #14 - 10,811 (+9.1%)
11/2013: Archer & Armstrong #15 - 8,998 (-16.8%)
12/2013: Archer & Armstrong #16 - 8,608 (-4.3%)
01/2014: Archer & Armstrong #17 - 8,112 (-5.8%)
02/2014: Archer & Armstrong #0 - 8,671 (+6.9%)
03/2014: Archer & Armstrong #18 - 8,156 (+0.5%)
04/2014: Archer & Armstrong #19 - 7,969 (-2.3%)
05/2014: Archer & Armstrong #20 - 7,553 (-5.2%)
06/2014: Archer & Armstrong #21 - 7,120 (-5.7%)

Continuing for the moment, but not looking too healthy.

234. Stray Bullets (Image)

03/2014: Stray Bullets #41 - 8,297
03/2014: Stray Bullets The Killers #1 - 14,208
04/2014: Stray Bullets The Killers #2 - 9,147 (-35.6%)
05/2014: Stray Bullets The Killers #3 - 7,935 (-13.2%)
06/2014: Stray Bullets The Killers #4 - 7,092 (-10.6%)

Should be selling better.

235. Flash Gordon (Dynamite) 

04/2014: Flash Gordon #1 - 14,398
05/2014: Flash Gordon #2 - 8,255 (-42.7%)
06/2014: Flash Gordon #3 - 7,034 (-14.8%)

See above comment.

236. Godzilla (IDW)

06/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #1 - 9,813

====

07/2013: Godzilla #13 - 6,741 (-0.6%)
08/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #2 - 7,483 (-23.7%)
08/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #3 - 7,080 (-5.4%)
09/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #4 - 6,820 (-3.7%)
10/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #5 - 6,920 (+1.4%)
11/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #6 - 6,653 (-3.9%)
12/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #7 - 6,587 (-0.9%)
01/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #8 - 6,530 (-0.8%)
02/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #9 - 6,531 (0%)
03/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #10 - 6,677 (+0.2%)
04/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #11 - 6,917 (-3.6%)
05/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #12 - 7.890 (+14.1%)
06/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #13 - 6,980 (-11.5%)

Well, that was a short-lived boost from the movie.

239. Quantum & Woody (Valiant)

07/2013: Quantum & Woody #1 - 17,622
08/2013: Quantum & Woody #2 - 12,818 (-27.3%)
09/2013: Quantum & Woody #3 - 10,734 (-16.3%)
10/2013: Quantum & Woody #4 - 11,242 (+4.7%)
11/2013: Quantum & Woody #5 - 10,816 (-3.8%)
12/2013: Quantum & Woody #6 - 8,855 (-18.1%)
01/2014: Quantum & Woody #7 - 8,590 (-3.0%)
02/2014: Quantum & Woody #8 - 7,992 (-7.0%)
03/2014: Quantum & Woody Goat #0 - 8,747 
04/2014: Quantum & Woody #9 - 7,896 (-1.2%)
05/2014: Quantum & Woody #10 - 7,232 (-1.2%)
06/2014: Quantum & Woody #11 - 6,888 (-4.8%)

Penultimate issue I think, then the Delinquents mini-series. Still the return of the Priest and Bright iteration to come though.

240. EA Poe Fall O/T House of Usher 

06/2013: EA Poe Fall O/T House of Usher #2 - 6,556 

====

10/2013: EA Poe The Raven & Red Death One Shot - 7,560 
04/2014: EA Poe Premature Burial One Shot - 6,925 
06/2014: EA Poe Morella Murders Rue Morgue One shot - 6,861

Another Corben Poe special.

241. Doc Savage (Dynamite)

12/2013: Doc Savage #1 - 13,631
01/2014: Doc Savage #2 - 9,000 (-34.0%)
02/2014: Doc Savage #3 - 8,214 (-8.7%)
03/2014: Doc Savage #4 - 7,561 (-7.9%)
04/2014: Doc Savage #5 - 6,974 (-7.8%)
05/2014: Doc Savage Annual 2014 - 5,042
06/2014: Doc Savage #6 - 6,841 (-1.9%)

Maybe settling down, saleswise.

243. GI Joe Real American Hero (IDW)

06/2013: Real American Hero #191 - 7,407

====

07/2013: Real American Hero #192 - 7,361 (-0.6%)
08/2013: Real American Hero #193 - 7,314 (-0.6%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Real American Hero #194 - 7,314 (0%)
10/2013: Real American Hero #195 - 7,135 (-2.4%)
11/2013: Real American Hero #196 - 8,102 (+13.6%)
12/2013: Real American Hero #197 - 6,983 (-13.8%)
01/2014: Real American Hero #198 - 6,736 (-3.5%)
02/2014: Real American Hero #199 - 6,652 (-1.2%)
03/2014: Real American Hero #200 - 11,780 (+77.1%)
04/2014: Real American Hero #201 - 8,294 (-29.6%)
05/2014: Real American Hero #202 - 6,781 (-18.2%)
06/2014: Real American Hero #203 - 6,791 (+0.1%)

Super-solid this month.

244. Bloodshot (Valiant)

06/2013: Bloodshot #12 - 12,145

====

07/2013: Bloodshot #12 - 10,058 (-17.2%)
08/2013: Bloodshot #0 - 11,303 (+12.4%)
09/2013: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #14 - 10,225 (-9.5%)
10/2013: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #15 - 9,806 (-4.1%)
11/2013: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #16 - 8,666 (-11.6%)
12/2013: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #17 - 8,142 (-6.0%)
01/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #18 - 8,529 (+4.8%)
02/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #0 - 7,895 (-7.4%)
02/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #19 - 7,281 (-7.8%)
03/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #20 - 7,929 (+8.9%)
04/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #21 - 7,630 (-3.8%)
05/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #22 - 7,350 (-3.7%)
06/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #23 - 6,783 (-7.7%)

Last issue I think, with an Armor Hunters mini following.

245, 261. Ghost (Dark Horse)

12/2013: Ghost #1 - 9,805
01-02/2014: -
03/2014: Ghost #2 - 7,412 (-24.4%)
04/2014: Ghost #3 - 6,826 (-7.9%)
06/2014: Ghost #4 - 6,058 (-11.2%)
06/2014: Ghost #5 - 6,699 (+10.6%)

A nice and slightly unexpected boost.

246. Simpsons Comics (Bongo)

06/2013: Simpsons Comics #203 - 6,930

====

07/2013: Simpsons Comics #204 - 6,976 (+0.7%)
08/2013: Simpsons Comics #205 - 6,894 (-1.2%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Simpsons Comics #206 - 7,082 (+2.7%)
12/2013: Wonderful World of Lisa Simpson #1 - 7,744
12/2013: Simpsons Comics #207 - 6,794 (-4.1%)
01/2014: Simpsons Comics #208 - 6,486 (-4.5%)
02/2014: Simpsons Comics #209 - 6,509 (+0.3%)
03/2014: Simpsons Comics #210 - 6,334 (-2.7%)
04/2014: Duffman Adventures #1 - 7,070
04/2014: Simpsons Comics #211 - 6,390 (+0.9%)
05/2014: -
06/2014: Simpsons Comics #212 - 6,619 (+3.6%)

A small increase for no apparent reason.

247. Mega Man (Archie) 

06/2013: Mega Man #26 - 9,290

====

07/2013: Mega Man #27 - 10,332 (+11.2%)
08/2013: Mega Man #28 - 8,404 (-18.7%)
09/2013: Mega Man #29 - 8,042 (-4.3%)
10/2013: Mega Man #30 - 8,086 (+0.5%)
11/2013: Mega Man #31 - 7,854 (-2.8%)
12/2013: Mega Man #32 - 7,352 (-6.4%)
01/2014: Mega Man #33 - 7,015 (-4.6%)
02/2014: -
03/2014: Mega Man #34 - 6,688 (-4.7%)
04/2014: Mega Man #35 - 6,681 (-0.1%)
04/2014: Mega Man #36 - 6,400 (-4.2%)
05/2014: Mega Man #37 - 7,640 (+19.4%)
06/2014: Mega Man #38 - 6,604 (-13.6%)

Sales drop down for the second part of the Mega Man X team-up.

248, 253. Crossed Badlands (Avatar)

06/2013: Crossed Badlands #31 - 7,327

====

07/2013: Crossed Badlands #32 - 7,399 (+1.0%)
07/2013: Crossed Badlands #33 - 7,209 (-2.6%)
08/2013: Crossed Badlands #34 - 7,204 (0%)
08/2013: Crossed Badlands #35 - 6,737 (-6.5%)
09/2013: Crossed Badlands #36 - 6,990 (+3.8%)
09/2013: Crossed Special 2013 - 6,472
10/2013: Crossed Badlands #37 - 6,901 (-1.3%)
10/2013: Crossed Badlands #38 - 6,840 (-0.8%)
10/2013: Crossed Badlands #39 - 6,743 (-1.4%)
10/2013: Crossed Badlands #40 - 6,607 (-2.0%)
11/2013: Crossed Badlands #41 - 6,516 (-1.4%)
11/2013: Crossed Badlands #42 - 6,467 (-0.7%)
12/2013: Crossed Badlands #43 - 6,086 (-5.9%)
01/2014: Crossed Badlands #44 - 6,111 (+0.4%)
01/2014: Crossed Badlands #45 - 5,948 (-2.7%)
01/2014: Crossed Badlands #46 - 5,879 (-1.2%)
02/2014: Crossed Badlands #47 - 5,899 (+0.3%)
02/2014: Crossed Badlands #48 - 5,829 (-1.2%)
03/2014: Crossed Badlands #49 - 5,845 (+0.2%)
03/2014: Crossed Badlands #50 - 8,685 (+48.6%)
04/2014: Crossed Badlands #51 - 7,092 (-18.3%)
04/2014: Crossed Badlands #52 - 6,811 (-4.0%)
05/2014: Crossed Badlands #53 - 6,617 (-2.8%)
05/2014: Crossed Badlands #54 - 6,420 (-3.0%)
06/2014: Crossed Badlands #55 - 6,579 (+2.5%)
06/2014: Crossed Badlands #56 - 6,436 (-2.2%)

Relatively stable this month.

250. Wraith (IDW)

11/2013: Welcome to Christmasland #1 - 12,547
12/2013: Welcome to Christmasland #2 - 8,850 (-29.5%)
01/2014: Welcome to Christmasland #3 - 7,967 (-10.0%)
02/2014: Welcome to Christmasland #4 - 7,404 (-7.1%)
03/2014: Welcome to Christmasland #5 - 6,874 (-7.2%)
04/2014: -
05/2014: Welcome to Christmasland #6 - 6,811 (-0.9%)
06/2014: Welcome to Christmasland #7 - 6,510 (-4.4%)

This was a brilliantly creepy series, I would highly recommend hunting down the collection.

251. Spongebob Comics (United Plankton)

06/2013: Spongebob Comics #21 - 7,043

====

07/2013: Spongebob Comics #22 - 7,020 (-0.3%)
08/2013: Spongebob Comics #23 - 7,001 (-0.3%)
09/2013: Spongebob Comics #24 - 6,965 (-0.5%)
10/2013: Spongebob Comics #25 - 7,254 (+4.1%)
11/2013: Spongebob Comics #26 - 6,741 (-7.1%)
12/2013: Spongebob Comics #27 - 6,745 (-0.1%)
01/2014: Spongebob Comics #28 - 6,456 (-4.3%)
02/2014: Spongebob Comics #29 - 6,377 (-1.2%)
03/2014: Spongebob Comics #30 - 6,254 (-1.9%)
04/2014: Spongebob Comics #31 - 6,233 (-0.3%)
05/2014: Spongebob Comics #32 - 6,623 (+6.3%)
06/2014: Spongebob Comics #33 - 6,450 (-2.6%)
06/2014: Annual Giant Swimtacular #2 - 5,044
252. Five Ghosts (Image)

06/2013: Five Ghosts Haunting of Fabian Gray #4 - 11,357

====

07/2013: Five Ghosts Haunting of Fabian Gray #5 - 10,409 (-8.3%)
08-09/2013: -
10/2013: Five Ghosts #6 - 9,399 (-9.7%)
11/2013: Five Ghosts #7 - 8,417 (-10.4%)
12/2013: -
01/2014: Five Ghosts #8 - 6,890 (-18.1%)
02/2014: Five Ghosts #9 - 6,348 (-7.9%)
03/2014: Five Ghosts #10 - 5,881 (-7.4%)
04/2014: Five Ghosts #11 - 5,735 (-2.5%)
05/2014: -
06/2014: Five Ghosts #12 - 6,444 (+12.4%)
254. Ghostbusters (IDW)

06/2013: Ghostbusters #5 - 7,620

====

07/2013: Ghostbusters #6 - 7,253 (-4.8%)
09/2013: Ghostbusters #7 - 7,097 (-2.1%)
10/2013: Ghostbusters #8 - 6,875 (-3.1%)
11/2013: Ghostbusters #9 - 6,447 (-6.2%)
11/2013: Ghostbusters #10 - 7,088 (+9.9%)
12/2013: Ghostbusters #11 - 6,059 (-14.5%)
01/2014: Ghostbusters #12 - 5,755 (-5.0%)
02/2014: Ghostbusters #13 - 6,355 (+10.4%)
03/2014: Ghostbusters #14 - 6,065 (-4.6%)
04/2014: Ghostbusters #15 - 6,200 (+2.2%)
05/2014: Ghostbusters #16 - 6,061 (-2.2%)
06/2014: Ghostbusters #17 - 6,400 (-5.6%)
255. The Massive (Dark Horse)

06/2013: Massive #13 - 9,371

====

07/2013: Massive #14 - 8,983 (-4.1%)
08/2013: Massive #15 - 8,713 (-3.0%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Massive #16 - 8,345 (-4.2%)
11/2013: Massive #17 - 7,957 (-4.6%)
12/2013: Massive #18 - 7,770 (-2.3%)
01/2014: Massive #19 - 7,387 (-4.9%)
02/2014: Massive #20 - 6,976 (-5.6%)
03/2014: Massive #21 - 6,841 (-1.9%)
04/2014: Massive #22 - 6,650 (-2.8%)
05/2014: Massive #23 - 6,470 (-2.7%)
06/2014: Massive #24 - 6,372 (-1.5%)
256. Thomas Alsop (Boom!)

06/2014: Thomas Alsop #1 - 6,335
258. Clockwork Angels (Boom!)

03/2013: Clockwork Angels #1 - 11,602
04/2013: Clockwork Angels #2 - 6,452 (-44.4%)
06/2013: Clockwork Angels #3 - 6,169 (-4.4%)
259. Powerpuff Girls (IDW)

09/2013: Powerpuff Girls #1 - 38,992
10/2013: Powerpuff Girls #2 - 14,749 (-62.2%)
11/2013: Powerpuff Girls #3 - 13,175 (-10.7%)
12/2013: Powerpuff Girls #4 - 10,029 (-23.9%)
01/2014: Powerpuff Girls #5 - 8,050 (-19.7%)
02/2014: Powerpuff Girls #6 - 7,456 (-7.4%)
03/2014: Powerpuff Girls #7 - 6,457 (-13.4%)
04/2014: Powerpuff Girls #8 - 6,282 (-2.7%)
05/2014: Powerpuff Girls #9 - 6,032 (-4.0%)
06/2014: Powerpuff Girls #10 - 6,106 (+1.2%)
263. Letter 44 (Oni)

10/2013: Letter 44 #1 - ????
11/2013: Letter 44 #2 - 8,352 (+???)
12/2013: -
01/2014: Letter 44 #3 - 7,926 (-5.1%)
02/2014: Letter 44 #4 - 6,945 (-12.4%)
03/2014: Letter 44 #5 - 6,562 (-5.5%)
04/2014: Letter 44 #6 - 6,152 (-6.2%)
05/2014: -
06/2014: Letter 44 #7 - 6,032 (-1.9%)
264. Princess Ugg (Oni)

06/2014: Princess Ugg #1 - 5,961
265. Fuse (Image)

02/2014: Fuse #1 - 15,957
03/2014: Fuse #2 - 9,928 (-37.8%)
04/2014: Fuse #3 - 8,039 (-19.0%)
05/2014: Fuse #4 - 6,637 (-17.4%)
06/2014: Fuse #5 - 5,958 (-10.2%)
266. Doodle Jump (Dynamite)

06/2014: Doodle Jump #1 - 5,940

Really? No seriously, really?

267. V-Wars (IDW)

04/2014: V-Wars #1 - 10,460
05/2014: V-Wars #2 - 6,912 (-33.9%)
06/2014: V-Wars #3 - 5,866 (-15.1%)
269. Grimm Fairy Tales (Zenescope)

06/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #86 - 6,231

====

07/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #87 - 7,201 (+15.6%)
08/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #88 - 6,023 (-16.4%)
09/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #89 - 7,423 (+23.2%)
10/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #90 - 6,779 (-8.7%)
11/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #91 - 6,697 (-1.2%)
12/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #92 - 6,262 (-6.5%)
01/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #93 - 6,362 (+1.6%)
02/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #94 - 6,175 (-2.9%)
03/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #95 - 6,036 (-2.3%)
04/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #96 - 5,928 (-2.3%)
05/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #97 - 6,055 (+2.1%)
05/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales Annual 2014 - 5,089
06/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #98 - 5,828 (-3.7%)
270. Shadowman (Valiant)

06/2013: Shadowman #7 - 12,017

====

07/2013: Shadowman #8 - 10,089 (-16.0%)
08/2013: Shadowman #9 - 9,895 (-1.9%)
09/2013: Shadowman #10 - 10,064 (+1.7%)
10/2013: Shadowman #11 - 10,632 (+5.6%)
11/2013: Shadowman #12 - 8,735 (-17.8%)
12/2013: Shadowman #13 - 9,403 (+7.6%)
01/2014: Shadowman #14 - 7,560 (-19.6%)
02/2014: Shadowman #15 - 7,239 (-4.2%)
03/2014: Shadowman #16 - 7,189 (-0.7%)
04/2014: Shadowman End Times #1 - 7,777 (+8.2%)
05/2014: Shadowman End Times #2 - 6,216 (-20.1%)
06/2014: Shadowman End Times #3 - 5,826 (-6.3%)
271. Jim Butcher's Dresden Files (Dynamite)

06/2014: JBDF War Cry #1 - 5,820
272. Grimm Fairy Tales Oz (Zenescope)

07/2013: GFT Oz #1 - 19,237
08/2013: GFT Oz #2 - 11,119 (-42.2%)
10/2013: GFT Oz #3 - 10,537 (-5.2%)
11/2013: GFT Oz #4 - 12,064 (+14.5%)
12/2013: GFT Oz #5 - 10,158 (-15.8%)
02/2014: GFT Oz #6 - 9,631 (-5.2%)
03-04/2014: -
05/2014: Warlord of Oz #1 - 7,787 (-19.1%)
06/2014: Warlord of Oz #2 - 5,810 (-25.4%)
273. Clive Barker Nightbreed (Boom!)

05/2014: Clive Barkers Nightbreed #1 - 7,790
06/2014: Clive Barkers Nightbreed #2 - 5,702 (-26.8%)
274. 24 (IDW)

04/2014: 24 #1 - 8,515
05/2014: 24 #2 - 6,326 (-25.7%)
06/2014: 24 #3 - 5,655 (-10.6%)
276. Mercenary Sea (Image)

02/2014: Mercenary Sea #1 - 10,728
03/2014: Mercenary Sea #2 - 8,509 (-20.7%)
04/2014: Mercenary Sea #3 - 7,222 (-15.1%)
05/2014: Mercenary Sea #4 - 6,103 (-15.5%)
06/2014: Mercenary Sea #5 - 5,482 (-10.2%)
277. Army of Darkness (Dynamite)

10/2013: Ash & The Army of Darkness #1 - 12,620
11/2013: -
12/2013: Ash & The Army of Darkness #2 - 8,223 (-34.8%)
01/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #3 - 7,261 (-11.7%)
02/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #4 - 6,563 (-9.6%)
03/2014: -
04/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #5 - 6,207 (-9.6%)
04/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #6 - 5,884 (-5.4%)
05/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #7 - 5,690 (-3.3%)
06/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #8 - 5,455 (-4.1%)
278. Dejah of Mars (Dynamite)

06/2013: Dejah Thoris #26 - 6,593

====

07/2013: Dejah Thoris #27 - 6,506 (-1.3%)
08/2013: Dejah Thoris #28 - 6,366 (-2.2%)
09/2013: Dejah Thoris #29 - ???? (???)
10/2013: Dejah Thoris #30 - ???? (???)
10/2013: Dejah Thoris #31 - ???? (???)
11/2013: Dejah Thoris #32 - 5,611 (???)
12/2013: Dejah Thoris #33 - 5,502 (-1.9%)
01/2014: Dejah Thoris #34 - 5,392 (-2.0%)
02/2014: Dejah Thoris #35 - 5,394 (+0.1%)
02/2014: Dejah Thoris #36 - 5,320 (-1.4%)
03/2014: Dejah Thoris #37 - 5,237 (-1.5%)
05/2014: Dejah of Mars #1 - 7,085 (+35.3%)
06/2014: Dejah of Mars #2 - 5,416 (-23.6%)
279. Regular Show (Boom!)

06/2013: Regular Show #2 - 19,507

====

07/2013: -
08/2013: Regular Show #3 - 16,000 (-18.0%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Regular Show #4 - 15,269 (-4.6%)
11/2013: Regular Show #5 - 12,677 (-17.0%)
11/2013: Regular Show #6 - 11,213 (-11.6%)
12/2013: Regular Show #7 - 10,733 (-4.2%)
01/2014: Regular Show #8 - 9,201 (-14.3%)
02/2014: Regular Show #9 - 8,554 (-7.0%)
02/2014: Regular Show #10 - 7,623 (-10.9%)
03/2014: Regular Show #11 - 7,084 (-7.1%)
04/2014: Regular Show #12 - 6,540 (-7.7%)
05/2014: -
06/2014: Regular Show 2014 Annual - 5,377
280. Halo Initiation (Dark Horse)

08/2013: Halo Initiation #1 - 12,584
09/2013: Halo Initiation #2 - 8,771 (-30.3%)
10/2013: Halo Initiation #3 - 7,960 (-9.2%)
11/2013: -
12/2013: Halo Escalation #1 - 8,875 (+11.5%)
01/2014: Halo Escalation #2 - 6,656 (-25.0%)
02/2014: Halo Escalation #3 - 5,961 (-10.4%)
03/2014: Halo Escalation #4 - 5,702 (-4.3%)
04/2014: Halo Escalation #5 - 5,550 (-2.7%)
05/2014: Halo Escalation #6 - 5,432 (-2.1%)
06/2014: Halo Escalation #7 - 5,330 (-1.9%)
281. Undertow (Image)

02/2014: Undertow #1 - 14,859
03/2014: Undertow #2 - 9,247 (-37.8%)
04/2014: Undertow #3 - 7,291 (-21.2%)
05/2014: Undertow #4 - 6,114 (-16.1%)
06/2014: Undertow #5 - 5,270 (-13.8%)
282. Wonderland (Zenescope)

06/2013: Wonderland #12 - 7,765

====

07/2013: Wonderland #13 - 7,253 (-6.6%)
08/2013: -
09/2013: Wonderland #14 - 7,034 (-3.0%)
09/2013: Wonderland #15 - 6,558 (-6.8%)
10/2013: Wonderland #16 - 6,820 (+4.0%)
11/2013: Wonderland #17 - 6,723 (-1.4%)
12/2013: Wonderland #18 - 7,859 (+16.9%)
01/2014: Wonderland #19 - 6,434 (-18.1%)
02/2014: Wonderland #20 - 5,780 (-10.2%)
03/2014: Wonderland #21 - 5,937 (+2.7%)
04/2014: Wonderland #22 - 5,374 (-9.5%)
05/2014: Wonderland #23 - 5,313 (-1.1%)
06/2014: Wonderland #24 - 5,261 (-1.0%)
283. Tales of Honor (Image)

03/2014: Tales of Honor #1 - 13,827
04/2014: Tales of Honor #2 - 6,067 (-5.6%)
05/2014: Tales of Honor #3 - 5,170 (-14.8%)
284. Twilight Zone (Dynamite)

12/2013: Twilight Zone #1 - 21,723
01/2014: Twilight Zone #2 - 11,537 (-46.9%)
02/2014: Twilight Zone #3 - 10,061 (-12.8%)
03/2014: -
04/2014: Twilight Zone #4 - 9,014 (-10.4%)
05/2014: Twilight Zone #5 - 8,140 (-9.7%)
06/2014: Twilight Zone Annual 2014 - 5,154
285. That’s Because You’re A Robot (Image)

06/2014: That’s Because You’re A Robot One Shot - 5,149
286. Peter Panzerfaust (Image)

06/2013: Peter Panzerfaust #11 - 17,683

====

07/2013: Peter Panzerfaust #12 - 9,951 (-43.7%)
08/2013: Peter Panzerfaust #13 - 8,419 (-15.4%)
09/2013: Peter Panzerfaust #14 - 7,714 (-8.4%)
10/2013: Peter Panzerfaust #15 - 10,769 (+39.6%)
01/2014: Peter Panzerfaust #16 - 6,128 (-43.1%)
02/2014: Peter Panzerfaust #17 - 5,598 (-8.6%)
04/2014: Peter Panzerfaust #18 - 5,374 (-4.0%)
06/2014: Peter Panzerfaust #19 - 5,106 (-5.0%)
287. Battlestar Galactica (Dynamite)

06/2013: Battlestar Galactica #2 - 10,503

====

07/2013: -
08/2013: Battlestar Galactica #3 - 9,200 (-12.4%)
09/2013: Battlestar Galactica #4 - 7,955 (-13.5%)
10/2013: Battlestar Galactica #5 -???? (???)
11/2013: -
12/2013: Battlestar Galactica #6 - 6,896 (???)
01/2014: Battlestar Galactica #7 - 6,120 (-11.2%)
02/2014: Battlestar Galactica #8 - 5,992 (-2.1%)
03/2014: Battlestar Galactica #9 - 5,586 (-6.9%)
04/2014: Battlestar Galactica #10 - 5,586 (-6.9%)
05/2014: Battlestar Galactica #11 - 5,243 (-6.1%)
06/2014: Battlestar Galactica #12 - 5,103 (-2.7%)
288. Eye of Newt (Dark Horse)

06/2014: Eye of Newt #1 - 5,087
290. Judge Dredd Mega City Two (IDW)

01/2014: Mega City Two #1 - 6,755
02/2014: Mega City Two #2 - 5,700 (-15.6%)
04/2014: Mega City Two #3 - 5,380 (-5.6%)
04/2014: Mega City Two #4 - ???? (???)
06/2014: Mega City Two #5 - 5,036 (???)
291. Maxx Maxximized (IDW)

11/2013: Maxx Maxximised #1 - 9,714
12/2013: Maxx Maxximised #2 - 7,345 (-24.4%)
01/2014: Maxx Maxximised #3 - 6,322 (-13.9%)
02/2014: Maxx Maxximised #4 - 5,943 (-6.0%)
03/2014: Maxx Maxximised #5 - ???? (???)
04/2014: Maxx Maxximised #6 - 5,377 (???)
05/2014: Maxx Maxximised #7 - 5,241 (-2.5%)
06/2014: Maxx Maxximised #8 - 5,031 (-4.0%)
292. Mass Effect (Dark Horse)

06/2012: -

====

07/2012: Mass Effect Homeworlds #3 - 7,375 (-5.3%)
08/2012: Mass Effect Homeworlds #4 - 7,310 (-0.9%)
07/2013: Mass Effect Foundation #1 - 9,291 (+27.1%)
08/2013: Mass Effect Foundation #2 - 7,310 (-21.3%)
09/2013: Mass Effect Foundation #3 - 6,849 (-6.3%)
10/2013: Mass Effect Foundation #4 - ???? (???)
11/2013: Mass Effect Foundation #5 - 5,820 (???)
12/2013: Mass Effect Foundation #6 - 5,655 (-2.8%)
01/2014: Mass Effect Foundation #7 - 5,222 (-7.7%)
02/2014: Mass Effect Foundation #8 - 5,097 (-2.4%)
03/2014: Mass Effect Foundation #9 - 4,998 (-1.9%)
04/2014: Mass Effect Foundation #10 - ???? (???)
05/2014: Mass Effect Foundation #11 - 4,879 (???)
06/2014: Mass Effect Foundation #10 - 4,998 (+2.4%)
293. Robyn Hood (Zenescope)

06/2013: Robyn Hood Wanted #2 - 7,116

====

07/2013: Robyn Hood Wanted #3 - 6,864 (-3.5%)
08/2013: Robyn Hood Wanted #4 - 5,727 (-16.6%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Robyn Hood Wanted #5 - 7,438 (+29.9%)
11/2013-01/2014: -
02/2014: Robyn Hood Age of Darkness - 6,388 (-14.1%)
03/2014: Robyn Hood Legend #1 - 6,622 (+3.7%)
04/2014: Robyn Hood Legend #2 - ???? (???)
05/2014: Robyn Hood Legend #3 - 5,268 (???)
06/2014: Robyn Hood Legend #4 - 4,964 (-5.8%)
295. Translucid (Boom!)

04/2014: Translucid #1 - 9,487
05/2014: Translucid #2 - 5,507 (-42.0%)
06/2014: Translucid #3 - 4,891 (-11.2%)
297. Madame Frankenstein (Image)

05/2014: Madame Frankenstein #1 - 9,771
06/2014: Madame Frankenstein #2 - 4,692 (-52.0%)

I wrongly attributed this to Steve Niles last month; it’s actually by the lovely Jamie Rich. Sorry Jamie! Oh, and Steve I guess…

298. Pathfinder (Dynamite)

06/2013: -

====

07/2013: Pathfinder #8 - 6,085 (-3.6%)
08/2013: -
09/2013: Pathfinder #9 - ??? (???)
10/2013: Pathfinder #10 - ???? (???)
11/2013: Pathfinder #11 - 5,110 (???)
05/2014: Pathfinder City of Secrets #1 - 7,101 (+39.0)
06/2014: Pathfinder City of Secrets #2 - 4,621 (-34.9)
299. Littlest Pet Shop (IDW)

05/2014: Littlest Pet Shop #1 - 8,211
06/2014: Littlest Pet Shop #2 - 4,593 (-44.1%)
300. Rocky & Bullwinkle (IDW)

03/2014: Rocky & Bullwinkle #1 - 7,022
04/2014: Rocky & Bullwinkle #2 - ???? (???)
05/2014: Rocky & Bullwinkle #3 - ???? (???)
06/2014: Rocky & Bullwinkle #4 - 4,560 (???)

======

All figures on this chart are estimates for comics sold by Diamond to direct market retailers. They include reorders that shipped in the same month. Books shipping in the first week of a month will have more time for reorders to appear than ones shipping in the last week of the month, when reorders will slip to the following month.

7 Comments on Indie Month-to-Month Sales June 2014: Outcast!, last added: 8/22/2014
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13. "I’m not used to seeing people’s faces," he said. "There’s too much information there. Aren’t you..."

“"I’m not used to seeing people’s faces," he said. "There’s too much information there. Aren’t you aware of it? Too much, too fast."

-

The Strange Tale of the North Pond Hermit

Wow. This is an incredible story of a man who lived in the woods of Maine for nearly three decades, surviving almost entirely on things he stole from summer homes. He was finally caught, and reporter Micheal Finkel struck up a sort of friendship with him, visiting him in prison and learning about the years he spent silent and alone. 

(via chels)


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14. Photo













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15. Mishra and Shakeen win CRNI’s 2014 Courage in Editorial Cartooning award

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Michael Cavna has details on the winners of this year’s Award for Courage in Editorial Cartooning presented by the Cartoonists Rights Network International. The award is presented to “a cartoonist in great danger who has demonstrated exceptional courage in the exercise of free-speech rights under extraordinary circumstances.”

The winners this year are Kanika Mishra from India and Palestinian Majda Shaheen.

In the face of death threats against her and her family, the Mumbai-based Kanika Mishra took on the “outrageous hypocrisy” of popular religious leader Asaram Bapu, who was accused of raping a 16-year-old, CRNI says. Bapu was eventually arrested and jailed.

“Kanika, like some cartoonists who find themselves under pressure, refused to bend or compromise her art,” Russell tells The Post’s Comic Riffs. “With every new phone threat or attack, her cartoons just got stronger and stronger.”

Through her cartooning, Shaheen “depicts her view on the relationship between Ismail Haniyeh [senior political leader of Hamas] and the Al-Quds Brigades,” says CRNI, noting that she also faced threats of violence for her commentary.


They are the first women to win the award.

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16. Separated at birth: Milo Manara’s Spider-Woman and Nicki Minaj’s “Anaconda” — UPDATED

nikki_minaj_spider-woman
Yesterday the enduring appeal of the human female rump as an object of sexual desire was reaffirmed in two separate incidents.

Rapper Nicki Minaj released a new video called “Anaconda” (NSFW) which has already been viewed some 22 million times. The video features the amply bootied Minaj shaking it in a tiny thong, tiny denim shorts, a small bikini and tight tights. It is the latter she wears as she crawls on her hands and knees to and then lap dances a visibly shaken Drake. Some have called Minaj’s butt “fake” — I’m not up to speed on hip-hop lore to know if she had implants or not, but whatever, it’s quite a thing, and the video definitely puts Iggy Azalea in her place. And as mentioned, it’s been viewed 22 million times in one day so it’s a hit!
SPIDERWOMAN001-logo-7114a-600x913

SPIDERWOMAN001Manara-06299-600x853
Meanwhile Marvel released a Greg Land regular cover for the new Spider-Woman #1 and a variant by 68-year-old Italian erotica expert Milo Manara.

Did Manara and Minaj somehow share drafts of their work? The resemblance is SCARY!

Manara also copied the pose from the cover of one of his best known comics, Click! in which a woman is controlled by a remote control box and turned into a sexually voracious horndog whenever someone turns the dial. This was not the basis of the 2006 Adam Sandler film, but imagine if it had been.

Jill Pantozzi at The Mary Sue took point on the outrage on this, proving that despite the recent changes, TMS is no man’s site:

I honestly don’t know what anyone involved was thinking. The series is being written by Dennis Hopeless with art by Greg Land, and although it appearsMarvel is attempting to draw in women with a slew of new female-led titles, this does not instill confidence. Nor does it tell women this is a comic they should consider spending money on. In fact, what the variant cover actually says is “Run away. Run far, far away and don’t ever come back.”

That may sound like an exaggeration but it’s really not. This is what we talk about when we ask comic publishers not to actively offend their paying (or potentially paying) customers. It’s important to note, Manara is known for erotic art, and there’s absolutely a place for that. But was he the best choice to promote this particular comic? I would say unequivocally no.


It appears to The Beat that after a period in which the growing female audience of comics has been wooed by Marvel, this new book is meant to appeal to the old “headlights comics” crowd. The interiors by Greg Land and variant by known erotic master Manara confirm that. Kinda simple.

Marvel’s decision to aim Spider-Woman at the male crowd is a little odd, but maybe this is the character Sony is contemplating for their female-led superhero movie and Spider-Woman needs to be made a little more man-friendly? I dunno.

I’ll be brutally honest, I’m more offended by that Greg Land cover than the Manara one. The Land one, as I tweeted a few weeks ago, is really badly drawn and makes it look like Jessica Drew is a double amputee with one shrunken leg. I’m sure he copied it from some photo that is just foreshortened but it still looks awful. It’s just DULL. You can’t say that of the Manara cover, at least.

I’d hope for better for Spider-Woman, but one franchise at a time, I guess.

As for “Anaconda” (The title refers to Sir Mix-a-lot’s line from “Baby Got Back” — “My anaconda don’t want none unless you’ve got buns, hun”), I admit it’s a bit disconcerting to see someone as normally in control as Minaj crawling on all fours and objectifying and fetishing a female body part, but you can’t deny the power of the ass, and Minaj seems to be wielding her own super-power. Perhaps Spider-Woman is just doing the same thing?

Somehow it doesn’t come off quite the same.

UPDATE: Obvs. I’m far from the only person who made this connection, and most have deemed the Nicki-led video as empowering and the Manara image as the male gaze over again. Amanda Marcotte at Slate:

But really what it comes down to is who is in control of the butts in question. With Spider-Woman, we’re looking at yet another example of a man imposing his ideas about the female body and female sexuality onto a character, creating an image that feels like she’s reduced to the ass in question. But “Anaconda” is a video with a woman in charge of her own image. She’s shaking her thing because she wants to and she’s looking directly into the camera and rapping, too, making it impossible to reduce her to a single body part.

Also, Cathy Johnson directed me to this essay on the empowering message of “Anaconda” by The Rogue Feminist:

In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

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17. Nice Art: AlphaBands by Ben Towle

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Cartoonist/comics educator Ben Towle likes to take up half the year in alphabet themed art projects; once it was monsters then animals. This time he drew 26 different musicians in a project called AlphaBands. All 26 are up now, he explains and though not everyone was a hit single, it was also a technical exercise.

Also as usual, though, I used this exercise not just as an excuse to draw regularly, but also to learn some new tools. All of these were drawn and colored in Digital Manga Studio on my Surface Pro 2. I also started investigating some of Ray Frenden’s custom Manga Studio brushes. The CCR illustration, for example, was colored with his watercolor wash brushes and you can see some of his dry media brushes creating charcoal-like effects in some of the later drawings. If you want to try some of these brushes out for yourself, you can buy them from his shop here. They’re well worth picking up.

 

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18. Early Modern Porn Wars

One day in 1668, the English diarist Samuel Pepys went shopping for a book to give his young French-speaking wife. He saw a book he thought she might enjoy, L’École des femmes or The School of Women, “but when I came to look into it, it is the most bawdy, lewd book that ever I saw,” he wrote, “so that I was ashamed of reading in it.” Not so ashamed, however, that he didn’t return to buy it for himself three weeks later — but “in plain binding…because I resolve, as soon as I have read it, to burn it, that it may not stand in the list of books, nor among them, to disgrace them if it should be found.” The next night he stole off to his room to read it, judging it to be “a lewd book, but what doth me no wrong to read for information sake (but it did hazer my prick para stand all the while, and una vez to decharger); and after I had done it, I burned it, that it might not be among my books to my shame.” Pepys’s coy detours into mock-Spanish or Franglais fail to conceal the orgasmic effect the lewd book had on him, and his is the earliest and most candid report we have of one reader’s bodily response to the reading of pornography. But what is “pornography”? What is its history? Was there even such a thing as “pornography” before the word was coined in the nineteenth century?

The announcement, in early 2013, of the establishment of a new academic journal to be called Porn Studies led to a minor flurry of media reports and set off, predictably, responses ranging from interest to outrage by way of derision. One group, self-titled Stop Porn Culture, circulated a petition denouncing the project, echoing the “porn wars” of the 1970s and 80s which pitted anti-censorship against anti-pornography activists. Those years saw an eruption of heated, if not always illuminating, debate over the meanings and effects of sexual representations; and if the anti-censorship side may seem to have “won” the war, in that sexual representations seem to be inescapable in the age of the internet and social media, the anti-pornography credo that such representations cause cultural, psychological, and physical harm is now so widespread as almost to be taken for granted in the mainstream press.

The brave new world of “sexting” and content-sharing apps may have fueled anxieties about the apparent sexualization of popular culture, and especially of young people, but these anxieties are anything but new; they may, in fact, be as old as culture itself. At the very least, they go back to a period when new print technologies and rising literacy rates first put sexual representations within reach of a wide popular audience in England and elsewhere in Western Europe: the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Most readers did not leave diaries, but Pepys was probably typical in the mixture of shame and excitement he felt when erotic works like L’École des filles began to appear in London bookshops from the 1680s on. Yet as long as such works could only be found in the original French or Italian, British censors took little interest in them, for their readership was limited to a linguistic elite. It was only when translation made such texts available to less privileged readers — women, tradesmen, apprentices, servants — that the agents of the law came to view them as a threat to what the Attorney General, Sir Philip Yorke, in an important 1728 obscenity trial, called the “public order which is morality.” The pornographic or obscene work is one whose sexual representations violate cultural taboos and norms of decency. In doing so it may lend itself to social and political critique, as happened in France in the 1780s and 90s, when obscene texts were used to critique the corruptions of the ancien régime; but the pornographic can also be used as a vehicle of debasement and violence, notably against women — which is one historical reality behind the US porn wars of the 1970s.

Front page of L'École des femmes—engraving from the 1719 edition. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.
Front page of L’École des femmes—engraving from the 1719 edition. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Pornography’s critics in the late twentieth or early twenty-first centuries have had less interest in the written word than in visual media; but recurrent campaigns to ban books by such authors as Judy Blume which aim to engage candidly with younger readers on sexual concerns suggest that literature can still be a battleground, as it was in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Take, for example, the words of the British attorney general Dudley Ryder in the 1749 obscenity trial of Thomas Cannon’s Ancient and Modern Pederasty Investigated and Exemplify’d, a paean to male same-sex desire masquerading as an attack. Cannon, Ryder declared, aimed to “Debauch Poison and Infect the Minds of all the Youth of this Kingdom and to Raise Excite and Create in the Minds of all the said Youth most Shocking and Abominable Ideas and Sentiments”; and in so doing, Ryder contends, Cannon aimed to draw readers “into the Love and Practice of that unnatural detestable and odious crime of Sodomy.” Two and a half centuries ago, Ryder set the terms of our ongoing porn wars. Denouncing the recent profusion of sexual representations, he insists that such works create dangerous new desires and inspire their readers to commit sexual crimes of their own.

Then as now, attitudes towards sexuality and sexual representations were almost unbridgeably polarized. A surge in the popularity of pornographic texts was countered by increasingly severe campaigns to suppress them. Ironically, however, those very attempts to suppress could actually bring the offending work to a wider audience, by exciting their curiosity. No copies of Cannon’s “shocking and abominable” work survive in their original form; but the text has been preserved for us to read in the indictment that Ryder prepared for the trial against it. Eighty years earlier, after his encounter with L’École des femmes, Pepys guiltily burned the book, but at the same time immortalized the sensual, shameful experience of reading it. Of such contradictions is the long history of porn wars made.

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19. Rashid al-Din in Edinburgh

       A neat-looking exhibit at the Edinburgh University Library: The World History of Rashid al-Din, 1314. A Masterpiece of Islamic Painting; see now also Si Hawkins piece in The National on it, Edinburgh University gives visitors rare chance to see the 700-year-old The World History of Rashid Al-Din
       It's on through 31 October -- sounds like it is definitely worth a look if you're in the neighborhood.

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20. Teaching translation

       At Words without Borders' Dispatches weblog Margaret Litvin offers a look Between Love and Justice: Teaching Literary Translation at Boston University.

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21. Geek Sublime review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Vikram Chandra's Geek Sublime, due out shortly in the US from Graywolf (after being published in the UK and India earlier this year).
       This was published under the same title by Faber in the UK, but the Indian edition was titled: Mirrored Mind.
       More bizarrely, each edition has a different subtitle:

  • US: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty
  • UK: Writing Fiction, Coding Software
  • India: My Life in Letters and Code
       Publishers -- gotta love 'em.

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22. Nice Art: Blue Estate to be collected

bluestate1

Let’s leave this day with some nice are, a preview of a deluxe hardcover collection of BLUE ESTATE by Viktor Kalvachev and Kosta Yanev. The art provided below is all by different artists — can you spot them?

As dueling crime families battle in the glitziest and grittiest parts of Los Angeles, Rachel Maddox tries to disentangle her life from her abusive action-hero husband in this Eisner Award-nominated tale of desperate starlets, suspiciously macho actors, bungling mobsters, and hapless private dicks.

Kalvachev’s work on BLUE ESTATE garnered nominations for Best Cover Artist and Best Coloring Eisner Awards in 2012. His stunning painted covers and vivid coloring unite the work of a dozen artists — including Nathan Fox, Tomm Coker, Dave Johnson, Paul Maybury, and Marley Zarcone — whose different styles bring different moods and effects to his and Kosta Yanev’s over-the-top story (scripted with incisive wit by Andrew Osborne).

BLUE ESTATE will be in comic book stores on September 10 and in bookstores onSeptember 23. In addition to collecting all twelve issues of the Image Comics series, it’s packed with bonus material, including Kalvachev’s character and location designs, and an exclusive making-of feature about the 2014 HESAW/Focus Home Interactive Blue Estate video game, released for the PlayStation 4 in 2014, featuring art and character designs.

For more information about all things BLUE ESTATE, visitwww.blueestatecomic.com and www.blueestatethegame.com.

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23. Are we too “smart” to understand how we see?

About half a century ago, an MIT professor set up a summer project for students to write a computer programme that can “see” or interpret objects in photographs. Why not! After all, seeing must be some smart manipulation of image data that can be implemented in an algorithm, and so should be a good practice for smart students. Decades passed, we still have not fully reached the aim of that summer student project, and a worldwide computer vision community has been born.

We think of being “smart” as including the intellectual ability to do advanced mathematics, complex computer programming, and similar feats. It was shocking to realise that this is often insufficient for recognising objects such as those in the following image.

segmentation_forOUPblog

Image credit: Fig 5.51 from Li Zhaoping,
Understanding Vision: Theory Models, and Data

Can you devise a computer code to “see” the apple from the black-and-white pixel values? A pre-school child could of course see the apple easily with her brain (using her eyes as cameras), despite lacking advanced maths or programming skills. It turns out that one of the most difficult issues is a chicken-and-egg problem: to see the apple it helps to first pick out the image pixels for this apple, and to pick out these pixels it helps to see the apple first.

A more recent shocking discovery about vision in our brain is that we are blind to almost everything in front of us. “What? I see things crystal-clearly in front of my eyes!” you may protest. However, can you quickly tell the difference between the following two images?

SpotTheDifferenceFigure

Image credit: Alyssa Dayan, 2013 Fig. 1.6 from Li Zhaoping
Understanding Vision: Theory Models, and Data. Used with permission

It takes most people more than several seconds to see the (big) difference – but why so long? Our brain gives us the impression that we “have seen everything clearly”, and this impression is consistent with our ignorance of what we do not see. This makes us blind to our own blindness! How we survive in our world given our near-blindness is a long, and as yet incomplete, story, with a cast including powerful mechanisms of attention.

Being “smart” also includes the ability to use our conscious brain to reason and make logical deductions, using familiar rules and past experience. But what if most brain mechanisms for vision are subconscious and do not follow the rules or conform to the experience known to our conscious parts of the brain? Indeed, in humans, most of the brain areas responsible for visual processing are among the furthest from the frontal brain areas most responsible for our conscious thoughts and reasoning. No wonder the two examples above are so counter-intuitive! This explains why the most obvious near-blindness was discovered only a decade ago despite centuries of scientific investigation of vision.

Another counter-intuitive finding, discovered only six years ago, is that our attention or gaze can be attracted by something we are blind to. In our experience, only objects that appear highly distinctive from their surroundings attract our gaze automatically. For example, a lone-red flower in a field of green leaves does so, except if we are colour-blind. Our impression that gaze capture occurs only to highly distinctive features turns out to be wrong. In the following figure, a viewer perceives an image which is a superposition of two images, one shown to each of the two eyes using the equivalent of spectacles for watching 3D movies.

cularSingleton_GazeAttraction

Image credit: Fig 5.9 from Li Zhaoping,
Understanding Vision: Theory Models, and Data

To the viewer, it is as if the perceived image (containing only the bars but not the arrows) is shown simultaneously to both eyes. The uniquely tilted bar appears most distinctive from the background. In contrast, the ocular singleton appears identical to all the other background bars, i.e. we are blind to its distinctiveness. Nevertheless, the ocular singleton often attracts attention more strongly than the orientation singleton (so that the first gaze shift is more frequently directed to the ocular rather than the orientation singleton) even when the viewer is told to find the latter as soon as possible and ignore all distractions. This is as if this ocular singleton is uniquely coloured and distracting like the lone-red flower in a green field, except that we are “colour-blind” to it. Many vision scientists find this hard to believe without experiencing it themselves.

Are these counter-intuitive visual phenomena too alien to our “smart”, intuitive, and conscious brain to comprehend? In studying vision, are we like Earthlings trying to comprehend Martians? Landing on Mars rather than glimpsing it from afar can help the Earthlings. However, are the conscious parts of our brain too “smart” and too partial to “dumb” down suitably to the less conscious parts of our brain? Are we ill-equipped to understand vision because we are such “smart” visual animals possessing too many conscious pre-conceptions about vision? (At least we will be impartial in studying, say, electric sensing in electric fish.) Being aware of our difficulties is the first step to overcoming them – then we can truly be smart rather than smarting at our incompetence.

Headline image credit: Beautiful woman eye with long eyelashes. © RyanKing999 via iStockphoto.

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24. The real story of allied nursing during the First World War

The anniversaries of conflicts seem to be more likely to capture the public’s attention than any other significant commemorations. When I first began researching the nurses of the First World War in 2004, I was vaguely aware of an increase in media attention: now, ten years on, as my third book leaves the press, I find myself astonished by the level of interest in the subject. The Centenary of the First World War is becoming a significant cultural event. This time, though, much of the attention is focussed on the role of women, and, in particular, of nurses. The recent publication of several nurses’ diaries has increased the public’s fascination for the subject. A number of television programmes have already been aired. Most of these trace journeys of discovery by celebrity presenters, and are, therefore, somewhat quirky – if not rather random – in their content. The BBC’s project, World War One at Home, has aired numerous stories. I have been involved in some of these – as I have, also, in local projects, such as the impressive recreation of the ‘Stamford Military Hospital’ at Dunham Massey Hall, Cheshire. Many local radio stories have brought to light the work of individuals whose extraordinary experiences and contributions would otherwise have remained hidden – women such as Kate Luard, sister-in-charge of a casualty clearing station during the Battle of Passchendaele; Margaret Maule, who nursed German prisoners-of-war in Dartford; and Elsie Knocker, a fully-trained nurse who established an aid post on the Belgian front lines. One radio story is particularly poignant: that of Clementina Addison, a British nurse, who served with the French Flag Nursing Corps – a unit of fully trained professionals working in French military field hospitals. Clementina cared for hundreds of wounded French ‘poilus’, and died of an unnamed infectious disease as a direct result of her work.

The BBC drama, The Crimson Field was just one of a number of television programmes designed to capture the interest of viewers. I was one of the historical advisers to the series. I came ‘on board’ quite late in the process, and discovered just how difficult it is to transform real, historical events into engaging drama. Most of my work took place in the safety of my own office, where I commented on scripts. But I did spend one highly memorable – and pretty terrifying – week in a field in Wiltshire working with the team producing the first two episodes. Providing ‘authentic background detail’, while, at the same time, creating atmosphere and constructing characters who are both credible and interesting is fraught with difficulty for producers and directors. Since its release this spring, The Crimson Field has become quite controversial, because whilst many people appear to have loved it, others complained vociferously about its lack of authentic detail. Of course, it is hard to reconcile the realities of history with the demands of popular drama.

Crimson Field
The Crimson Field poster, with permission from the BBC.

I give talks about the nurses of the First World War, and often people come up to me to ask about The Crimson Field. Surprisingly often, their one objection is to the fact that the hospital and the nurses were ‘just too clean’. This makes me smile. In these days of contract-cleaners and hospital-acquired infection, we have forgotten the meticulous attention to detail the nurses of the past gave to the cleanliness of their wards. The depiction of cleanliness in the drama was, in fact one of its authentic details.

One of the events I remember most clearly about my work on set with The Crimson Field is the remarkable commitment of director, David Evans, and leading actor, Hermione Norris, in recreating a scene in which Matron Grace Carter enters a ward which is in chaos because a patient has become psychotic and is attacking a padre. The matron takes a sedative injection from a nurse, checks the medication and administers the drug with impeccable professionalism – and this all happens in the space of about three minutes. I remember the intensity of the discussions about how this scene would work, and how many times it was ‘shot’ on the day of filming. But I also remember with some chagrin how, the night after filming, I realised that the injection technique had not been performed entirely correctly. I had to tell David Evans that I had watched the whole sequence six times without noticing that a mistake had been made. Some historical adviser! The entire scene had to be re-filmed. The end result, though, is an impressive piece of hospital drama. Norris looks as though she has been giving intramuscular injections all her life. I shall never forget the professionalism of the director and actors on that set – nor their patience with the absent-minded-professor who was their adviser for the week.

In a centenary year, it can be difficult to distinguish between myths and realities. We all want to know the ‘facts’ or the ‘truths’ about the First World War, but we also want to hear good stories – and it is all the better if those elide facts and enhance the drama of events – because, as human beings, we want to be entertained as well. The important thing, for me, is to fully realise what it is we are commemorating: the significance of the contributions and the enormity of the sacrifices made by our ancestors. Being honest to their memories is the only thing that really matters –the thing that makes all centenary commemoration projects worthwhile.

Image credit: Ministry of Information First World War Collection, from Imperial War Museum Archive. IWM Non Commercial Licence via Wikimedia Commons.

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25. Getting to know Anna-Lise Santella, Editor of Grove Music Online

Meet the woman behind Grove Music Online, Anna-Lise Santella. We snagged a bit of Anna-Lise’s time to sit down with her and find out more about her own musical passions and research.

Do you play any musical instruments? Which ones?

My main instrument is violin, which I’ve played since I was eight. I play both classical and Irish fiddle and am currently trying to learn bluegrass. In a previous life I played a lot of pit band for musical theater. I’ve also worked as a singer and choral conductor. These days, though, you’re more likely to find a mandolin or guitar in my hands.

Do you specialize in any particular area or genre of music?

My research interests are pretty broad, which is why I enjoy working in reference so much. Currently I’m working on a history of women’s symphony orchestras in the United States between 1871 and 1945. They were a key route for women seeking admission into formerly all-male orchestras like the Chicago Symphony. After that, I’m hoping to work on a history of the Three Arts Clubs, a network of residential clubs that housed women artists in cities in the US and abroad. The clubs allowed female performers to safely tour or study away from their families by giving them secure places to live while on the road, places to rehearse and practice, and a community of like-minded people to support them. In general, I’m interested in the ways public institutions have affected and responded to women as performers.

What artist do you have on repeat at the moment?

I tend to have my listening on shuffle. I like not being sure what’s coming next. That said, I’ve been listening to Tune-Yards’ (a.k.a. Merill Garbus) latest album an awful lot lately. Neko Case with the New Pornographers and guitarist/songwriter/storyteller extraordinaire Jim White are also in regular rotation.

What was the last concert/gig you went to?

I’m lucky to live not far from the bandshell in Prospect Park and I try to catch as many of the summer concerts there as I can. The last one I attended was Neutral Milk Hotel, although I didn’t stay for the whole thing. I’m looking forward to the upcoming Nickel Creek concert. I love watching Chris Thile play, although he makes me feel totally inadequate as a mandolinist.

How do you listen to most of the music you listen to? On your phone/mp3 player/computer/radio/car radio/CDs?

Mostly on headphones. I’m constantly plugged in, which makes me not a very good citizen, I think. I’m trying to get better about spending some time just listening to the city. But there’s something about the delivery system of headphones to ears that I like – music transmitted straight to your head makes you feel like your life has a soundtrack. I especially like listening on the subway. I’ll often be playing pieces I’m trying to learn on violin or guitar and trying to work out fingerings, which I’m pretty sure makes me look like an insane person. Fortunately insane people are a dime a dozen on the subway.

Do you find that listening to music helps you concentrate while you work, or do you prefer silence?

I like listening while I work, but it has to be music I find fairly innocuous, or I’ll start thinking about it and analyzing it and get distracted from what I’m trying to do. Something beat driven with no vocals is best. My usual office soundtrack is a Pandora station of EDM.

Detail of violin being played by a musician. © bizoo_n via iStockphoto.
Detail of violin being played by a musician. © bizoo_n via iStockphoto.

Has there been any recent music research or scholarship on a topic that has caught your eye or that you’ve found particularly innovative?

In general I’m attracted to interdisciplinary work, as I like what happens when ideologies from one field get applied to subject matter of another – it tends make you reevaluate your methods, to shake you out of the routine of your thinking. Right now I’ve become really interested in the way in which we categorize music vs. noise and am reading everything I can on the subject from all kinds of perspectives – music cognition, acoustics, cultural theory. It’s where neuroscience, anthropology, philosophy and musicology all come together, which, come to think of it, sounds like a pretty dangerous intersection. Currently I’m in the middle of The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies (2012) edited by Trevor Pinch and Karin Bijsterveld. At the same time, I’m rereading Jacques Attali’s landmark work Noise: The Political Economy of Music (1977). We have a small music/neuroscience book group made up of several editors who work in music and psychology who have an interest in this area. We’ll be discussing the Attali next month.

Who are a few of your favorite music critics/writers?

There are so many – I’m a bit of a criticism junkie. I work a lot with period music journalism in my own research and I love reading music criticism from the early 20th century. It’s so beautifully candid — at times sexy, cruel, completely inappropriate — in a way that’s rare in contemporary criticism. A lot of the reviews were unsigned or pseudonymous, so I’m not sure I have a favorite I can name. There’s a great book by Mark N. Grant on the history of American music criticism called Maestros of the Pen that I highly recommend as an introduction. For rock criticism, Ellen Willis’columns from the Village Voice are still the benchmark for me, I think. Of people writing currently, I like Mark Gresham (classical) and Sasha Frere-Jones (pop). And I like to argue with Alex Ross and John von Rhein.

I also like reading more literary approaches to musical writing. Geoff Dyer’s But Beautiful is a poetic, semi-fictional look at jazz, with a mix of stories about legendary musicians like Duke Ellington and Lester Young interspersed with an analytical look at jazz. And some of my favorite writing about music is found in fiction. Three of my favorite novels use music to tell the story. Richard Powers’ The Time of Our Singing uses Marian Anderson’s 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial as the focal point of a story that alternates between a musical mixed-race family and the story of the Civil Rights movement itself. In The Fortress of Solitude, Jonathan Lethem writes beautifully about music of the 1970s that mediates between nearly journalistic detail of Brooklyn in the 1970s and magical realism. And Kathryn Davies’ The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf contains some of the best description of compositional process that I’ve come across in fiction. It’s a challenge to evoke sound in prose – it’s an act of translation – and I admire those who can do it well.

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