What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(from the News category)

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from the News category, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 68,988
1. Patrick White at 104

       It would have been Australian Nobel laureate Patrick White's 104th birthday yesterday -- as good an excuse as any to read some of his books (even if many are still/again woefully hard to fnd in print ...).
       I missed this a couple of weeks ago, but in the Sydney Morning Herald Linda Morris recently reported that National Library secures Patrick White's first book of poems.
       My favorite part of the story:

White wrote to the National Library saying if they didn't take their copy of his other poetry anthology off shelves he'd steal it himself and destroy it.

Add a Comment
2. Privet Drive at Warner Bros. Studio Tour London

We recently gave you an exclusive sneak peak at the interior of Privet Drive at The Making of Harry Potter tour in London. Fiona Shaw (Aunt Petunia Dursley) opened the doors of her on-film house, leading guests in to tour the set.

This event only runs until June 6th, so make sure you book tickets pronto if you’d like to visit the inside of Number Four Privet Drive before then!

Find more information, and Leaky’s exclusive look at the set here.

CiG2XQrXAAAkQ5C

Add a Comment
3. Emma Watson, Emma Thompson, and others Take Part in Red Nose Day 2016 Celebrity Plea

On May 26, Emma Watson, Emma Thompson, and other celebrities got silly for a cause to raise awareness for Red Nose Day, a global fundraising event that uses comedy to help raise funds for children living in poverty. Spot our Hermione and Professor Trelawney in the video below as they fight other celebrities for the audience’s attention.

 

 

Though Red Nose Day had its start as an iconic British fundraising event, this is the second year of participation for the United States. A primetime television event aired on May 26 featuring comedic skits, musical performances, and short films documenting the lives of children affected by poverty in the U.S. and around the globe. In the days leading up to the television event, celebrities shared their silly side to up awareness for the event–like the photo below that the de-light-fully funny Emma Watson shared on her Instagram account.

 

@rednosedayusa

A photo posted by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on


Red Nose Day donations are still being accepted. For more information, read more at E News. To make a donation, visit the Red Nose Day website.

Add a Comment
4. Certain Songs #551: Guided by Voices – “Tractor Rape Chain”

GBV - Bee Thousand Album: Bee Thousand
Year: 1994

It starts out with just an acoustic guitar being ramdomly strummed in the corner of a room, as if Robert Pollard hasn’t quite worked out the song that the rest of the band — who are filing into the room and grabbing their instruments — are going to play next.

Suddenly, he finds a riff, and “Tractor Rape Chain” explodes into full-blown technicolor glory, guitars perfectly interlocked, drums right on the spot, and everything right with the world. Maybe this is low-fi, but it sure isn’t a song that was accidentally recorded.

This time, when the guitars pop-in-and-out of the mix, it’s for emphasis, not because there was a problem with the recording.

Meanwhile, Robert Pollard alternates verses about a relationship coming apart with a chorus about the furrows a tractor makes in a rapeseed field, sung at the very top of his range.

Parallel lines on a slow decline
Tractor rape chain
Better yet, let’s all get wet
On the tractor rape chain
Speed up, slow down, go all around in the end

I don’t know if that’s supposed to be some kind of metaphor, or if those were just some words that fit the melody that came to his head. Probably the latter.

All I know is that I loved guitar sound on the verses and the stop and build to the chorus. And I really loved the long, arcing melody line of that chorus, how it soared at the beginning, but somehow got almost sad by the time it was over.

And when he got hung up on “Speed up, slow down, go all around in the end”, so did I. That would be the part that I would sing over and over in my head after any time I listened to Bee Thousand.

“Tractor Rape Chain”

“Tractor Rape Chain” performed live in 2014

Every Certain Song Ever
A filterable, searchable & sortable database with links to every “Certain Song” post I’ve ever written.

Check it out!

Certain Songs Spotify playlist
(It’s recommended that you listen to this on Spotify as their embed only has 200 songs.)

Support “Certain Songs” with a donation on Patreon
Go to my Patreon page

The post Certain Songs #551: Guided by Voices – “Tractor Rape Chain” appeared first on Booksquare.

0 Comments on Certain Songs #551: Guided by Voices – “Tractor Rape Chain” as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
5. Sugawara and the Secrets of Calligraphy review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of the classic eighteenth-century Japanese play, Sugawara and the Secrets of Calligraphy, just out in a paperback re-issue (alas, a fairly pricey one) from Columbia University Press.
       Do not expect many calligraphic revelations -- but it is certainly an entertaining piece.

Add a Comment
6. Wanted: Work by writers who ‘like to watch the world burn’

SlashnBurn is “an anti-art arts journal seeking to publish and bring attention to work outside the conveyor belt work coming out of most workshop-based MFA programs.” Currently accepting submissions in fiction, flash fiction, comics, creative nonfiction, memoir, poetry, reviews, and blended-genre. No hard genre work. High-concept is fine, but grounded in real human conflict and action. Deadline: Rolling.

Add a Comment
7. J.K. Rowling: ‘Harry Potter and The Cursed Child’ WILL Make You Cry!

This morning, one Potter fan on Twitter had a very important question for J.K. Rowling: ‘Will the Cursed Child make me cry?’

J.K. Rowling tweeted back pronto, and now it’s official: if you don’t cry, they haven’t done their job right!

Screen Shot 2016-05-27 at 20.53.08

Screen Shot 2016-05-27 at 20.53.27

With preview performances starting next month, we’ll be able to test Jo’s statements and confirm whether the play is a tear-jerker. We have absolutely no doubts that we’ll be sobbing through the entire show (and scriptbook)!

Take a look behind the scenes with J.K. Rowling here!

Add a Comment
8. Writing from ... Indonesia

       With Indonesia as the Guest of Honour at last year's Frankfurt Book Fair there has been a bit more international coverage -- and more translations than usual (still only a handful, but still ...) -- of the local literature, and in The Guardian Louise Doughty now takes a look at '17,000 islands of imagination': discovering Indonesian literature.
       Works by several Indonesian authors -- including some mentioned in the piece -- are under review at the complete review -- though also not nearly enough.

Add a Comment
9. Certain Songs #550: Guided by Voices – “Hardcore UFOs”

GBV - Bee Thousand Album: Bee Thousand
Year: 1994

I’m pretty sure the first time I heard of Guided by Voices was by reading about them in SPIN, whose Senior Editor, Jim Greer, had just written a biography of R.E.M. I liked called Behind The Mask.

I don’t remember exactly what he wrote about GBV, I just remember there was a Jim Greer piece in SPIN that really made me want to hear them. Because that’s how we still discovered music in 1994: we found writers whose opinions we trusted, and triangulated their recommendations with our individual tastes.

But it just wasn’t Greer and SPIN. As a matter of fact, as the release of Bee Thousand became imminent, the advance buzz was so huge and overwhelming that in my review of the album for Kade Magazine, I wrote “at this point, it doesn’t even matter how good Bee Thousand actually is, cos there is now no question that Guided By Voices are going to be the next indie-rock superstars.”

That was a couple of months after I succumbed to the hype and bought it without having ever heard even a note of their of their music, and was instantly confronted with “Hardcore UFOs.”

Featuring a pair of spot-on 1990s guitars — one shimmering in the right speaker and one malfunctioning in the left speaker — a drummer that couldn’t even get going until halfway through the song, “Hardcore UFOs” could have turned me off of GBV right then and there.

Because, frankly, it’s a mess.

But it’s a beautiful, glorious mess, which starts with Robert Pollard and Tobin Sprout (I think) harmonizing in the middle of the chaos.

Sitting out on your house
Watching hardcore ufos
Drawing pictures, playing solos til ten

Are you amplified to rock?
Are you hoping for a contact?
I’ll be with you, without you, again

Hell, even the vocals get fucked up near the third verse, like somebody accidentally hit “record” on the four-track without protecting the vocal track and immediately realizing what he did, and everybody else was too drunk to notice.

Between that and the lead guitar — “lead” guitar because it’s the rhythm guitar that’s mixed the highest — that drops in and out of the mix throughout the song, and GBV became an instant standard-bearer for a certain kind of rock ‘n’ roll aesthetic that has always been dear to my heart.

And it ain’t lo-fi: to me the lo-fi was more of a necessary result of the thing I instantly loved about Guided By Voices — the way Bee Thousand felt like it was a bunch of friends hanging out and making music for the sheer fun of it, even if they weren’t particularly good musicians.

And in June of 1994, when Bee Thousand was released, it felt like that kind of spirit was in short supply. I mean, sure, there was Pavement or Archers of Loaf, but you could tell that they were slumming, and even the most off-handed moments of their music felt somewhat conceptualized. I mean, don’t get me wrong: I loved their concepts, but it always felt like every note & beat — even the bum ones — was right where it was supposed to be.

No so with GBV. They weren’t good musicians playing raggedy music, they were raggedy musicians reaching further than they could possibly grasp. And it was thrilling.

“Hardcore UFOs”

Every Certain Song Ever
A filterable, searchable & sortable database with links to every “Certain Song” post I’ve ever written.

Check it out!

Certain Songs Spotify playlist
(It’s recommended that you listen to this on Spotify as their embed only has 200 songs.)

Support “Certain Songs” with a donation on Patreon
Go to my Patreon page

The post Certain Songs #550: Guided by Voices – “Hardcore UFOs” appeared first on Booksquare.

0 Comments on Certain Songs #550: Guided by Voices – “Hardcore UFOs” as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
10. Burmese 'House of Literature'

       In The Myanmar Times Zon Pann Pwint reports that 'plans for a writers' hub inch closer to fruition' in Rangoon, in House of Literature.
       The selected building/site may have some symbolic appeal but looks hideous; still, if they can finally get this done (if: "the planned House of Literature project faces major delays", even now ...), that would be pretty neat.

Add a Comment
11. The Hotel of the Three Roses review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Augusto De Angelis 1936 mystery, The Hotel of the Three Roses, the second to come out from Pushkin Press, in their Vertigo imprint, this year (with another to follow).

Add a Comment
12. X-MEN: APOCALYPSE on track for $80 million over the 4-day weekend

xmen-apocalypse-gallery-02The verdict is in from audiences and X-Men: Apocalypse has found itself garnering an estimated $65 million over its opening weekend, with its total racking up to $76-80 million for the 4-day holiday. Two years ago, X-Men: Days of Future Past opened in the same slot and grossed $110.5 million. While 80 is nothing to […]

3 Comments on X-MEN: APOCALYPSE on track for $80 million over the 4-day weekend, last added: 5/30/2016
Display Comments Add a Comment
13. Fantastic Beasts of the Wizarding World

With the wizarding world returning to the big screen with a movie called Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, not only will the magic return but so will the many magical creatures we have come to love. But which ones will we meet again, and how many new ones will we be introduced to for the first time?

There were many different types of magical beasts that were mentioned and introduced throughout both the Harry Potter books and movies. We all have our favorites, the ones we’d want as a pet, and now, the ones we want to see return in the Fantastic Beasts movie. I’ve decided to explore a few of my personal favorites. I’ve got my copy of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them here to help us rediscover these fantastic beasts.

Shall we start with the obvious? Probably the most popular and most widely known throughout the wizarding world as well as the Harry Potter fandom. Terrifyingly beautiful, they are the hardest creature to conceal from muggles.

Dragons

We were first introduced to dragons in Harry’s first year, when Hagrid began raising a Norwegian Ridgeback in his cabin. They were mentioned many times from that point on, finally making a reappearance in Harry’s fourth year as the first task of the Triwizard Tournament. Since the four wizards each had to face a different dragon, we had the pleasure of being introduced to four new breeds: the Hungarian Horntail, the Chinese Fireball, the Swedish Short-Snout, and the Welsh Green.

There are ten different breeds of dragons known in the wizarding world but they occasionally interbreed, producing rare hybrid dragons. They have just a few different uses among wizards, namely for their wands. One option for the core of a wand is a dragon heart string. Other aspects of dragons are also useful in brewing potions or as fertilizer for plants.

As full beings, they have been known to be used as obstacles, sort of like guard dogs. Aside from the triwizard tournament, we see them used this way in the lower levels of Gringotts Bank. The Golden Trio even lived my dreams by flying a Ukrainian Ironbelly, the largest breed of dragon, to safety.

Moving on to one of my personal favorites.

Hippogriffs

A Hippogriff is a beautiful creature with the head and wings of an eagle and the body of a horse. They first appeared in the books in Harry’s third year, when Hagrid took over the job of Care of Magical Creatures professor. Hagrid owned a beloved Hippogriff named Buckbeak. Luckily, Hippogriffs are one of the creatures Hagrid owned throughout the books that are actually able to be domesticated.

Hippogriffs are very sensitive creatures. One must be very careful when attempting to approach them, bowing low and keeping eye contact at all times. If the Hippogriff bows back, it is safe to approach farther. Also, it’d be wise to remember “If you have nothing nice to say, don’t say anything at all,” otherwise you may end up with an injury or two.

Phoenix

Very few people have been able to domesticate these birds, but it is not impossible. Phoenixes are grand birds, with rich scarlet feathers and a golden tail. They are very gentle creatures whose tears have powerful healing properties. The Phoenix song is quite magical as well, it is believed that it can increase the courage of the pure of heart and strike fear into the hearts of the impure.

Ablus Dumbledore was one of the few able to domesticate a Phoenix. Harry, along with the rest of us, were quite confused when Fawkes suddenly burst into the flames the first time we saw him. Phoenixes have a regenerative ability that let’s them burst into flame when their body is weakening and be reborn from their ashes once again. They can also disappear and reappear at will, taking anyone holding onto them along with them. Kingsley Shacklebolt had it right, Dumbledore’s got style.

Acromantulas

I’ve never been one for spiders but I think if I ever came within 100 feet of an Acromantula I’d probably soil my pants. It may not be the prettiest magical creature that I know of but it is definitely one of the scariest and most interesting. An Acromantula is a large, eight-eyed spider that is capable of human speech and has near-human intelligence.

Hagrid raised an Acromantula from the egg, creating a profound bond between the two. The Acromantula, Aragog, inhabited the Forbidden Forest until it’s untimely death in 1997. Within it’s life, Aragog established a colony within the forest where it’s children still live today.

 

Since the latest trailer for Fantastic Beasts was released, we have caught a glimpse of two new beasts: the ever-adorable little trouble maker, the Niffler, and the Swooping Evil. The Swooping Evil isn’t in the Hogwarts textbook, so Warner Bros. will be including Beasts fans would never have expected. The Niffler, the creatures listed above, as well as many others, you can learn more about in the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them book!

Leave a comment about which fantastic beasts you’d like to see in the movie!

 

Add a Comment
14. Miles Franklin Literary Award shortlist

       They've announced the shortlist for the (Australian) Miles Franklin Literary Award.
       There's still quite a wait until they announce the winner of the A$60,000 prize -- on 26 August.

Add a Comment
15. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” Midnight Release Party Slated for GeekyCon!

GeekyCon 2016 has just announced that it is creating a large-scale, old-school, Harry Potter release party to celebrate the release of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. The book comes out on July 31, 2016, the last day of the convention, which means that it will be the site of one of the biggest midnight parties in the country.

And this party is just one of all the cool and amazing events and activities scheduled for the weekend long festivity that is GeekyCon. As GeekyCon was once a Harry Potter-only convention and is planned by the same crew that brought us LeakyCon, it is backed by and attended by some of the biggest Harry Potter fans on the planet. As many of the people who run GeekyCon are still the biggest Potterheads, and have attended more than their fair share of Harry Potter book parties from 2004-2007, they decided to recreate the Harry Potter Book Midnight Release Party experience!

The party will be hosted by classic Potter podcast MuggleCast and PotterCast, and many others with experience and knowledge of Pottermania. The fun will start at 7 PM with the convention’s traditional Esther Earl Rocking Charity Ball. Starting at 10:00 PM, festivities will convert themselves into a huge Harry Potter and the Cursed Child midnight book release . In tried and true Harry Potter Book Midnight Release party fashion, there will be a set of games, activities, and events to take part of–including, but not limited to:

  • Costume Contests
  • Sorting
  • Trivia and other games
  • Wizard Chess
  • Quidditch
  • Wizard Rock performances
  • Face painting and other crafts
  • Video retrospectives
  • Appearances from special guests
  • Put your name in the Goblet of Fire! (Submit your predictions, and we’ll go through them together at Sunday’s programming!)
  • Share in the Pensieve: Submit memories about Harry Potter and your experiences; we’ll be sharing them throughout the night.
  • And a lot more!

At midnight, everyone will begin to receive their book copy of the Cursed Child script! You must reserve a copy, and purchase will happen on site. Full, detailed instructions will shortly follow this announcement.

Fans in the Florida area, and maybe those who want to apparate further, can choose to come to just the party (which includes the ball) for $20, to enjoy the night’s festivities. If you are a full registered GeekyCon attendee, you can join us for the whole weekend — during which there will be a lot of Harry Potter related festivities and programming. Sunday we’ll be discussing Cursed Child almost nonstop!

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 11.55.58 PM

Are you pumped up yet? We are so excited!

For more information about GeekyCon, visit the GeekyCon website. For tickets to this absolutely fantastic geeky convention, please visit this link.

 

Add a Comment
16. This journal doesn’t care who you are (in a good way)

Hypertronic LiteraryHypertrophic Literary (AL) is open to submissions for upcoming issues. Looking for pieces that evoke a physical reaction, make readers feel something: joy, nausea, shock, desperation. Open to submissions of poetry, fiction, excerpts, and nonfiction. Hypertrophic accepts work in all genres and “[doesn’t] care who you are, if you’ve been published before, if it’s your first book or seventy-fourth.”

Add a Comment
17. Certain Songs #549: Guided by Voices – “Weedking”

gbv propeller Album: Propeller
Year: 1992

Like so many people, Bee Thousand was where I first heard Guided by Voices, and because of the beyond-indie nature of their back catalog, I’m not sure when I heard Propeller.

My guess is that I found it at Amoeba as part of the Vampire on Titus CD, which helpfully appended Propeller, but which also meant that the superior Propeller material showed up halfway through, and it took me a long time to figure out what was what.

But naturally, the song that first jumped out at me was the bigger than big “Weedking,” an exercise in pure forward momentum that musically belies what is probably a lyric about getting stoned.

Starting of with a quiet “Long live Rockathon” (their label) over swirling keyboards and a quiet guitar, “Weedking” gathers layers of guitars and vocals measure after measure, until suddenly the guitars are riffing riffing riffing as Pollard sings:

And watch colored lights shine down
Dancing round the lady’s face
As we learn the sound
We can’t keep this violent pace

Though we know that haste makes waste
And I’m giving you a ring
For the dreams of the weedking we all sing
For the dreams of the weedking we all sing
For the dreams of the weedking we all sing
For the dreams of the weedking we all sing

As Pollard repeats that last line — at one point substituting “drink” for “sing”, “Weedking” starts marching inevitably off of a cliff of its own making, as the guitars have stopped riffing and have started soloing as they tumble down down down falling falling falling until Pollard wakes up just before they hit the ground, shouting “Stop!”

“Weedking”

Every Certain Song Ever
A filterable, searchable & sortable database with links to every “Certain Song” post I’ve ever written.

Check it out!

Certain Songs Spotify playlist
(It’s recommended that you listen to this on Spotify as their embed only has 200 songs.)

Support “Certain Songs” with a donation on Patreon
Go to my Patreon page

The post Certain Songs #549: Guided by Voices – “Weedking” appeared first on Booksquare.

0 Comments on Certain Songs #549: Guided by Voices – “Weedking” as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
18. The Queue review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Basma Abdel Aziz's The Queue, just out from Melville House.

       Some nice related coverage in The New York Times today too, as Alexandra Alter reports that Abdel Aziz and other Middle Eastern Writers Find Refuge in the Dystopian Novel.

Add a Comment
19. X-Men Apocalypse of Continuity: Who did what to who and when now?

I wasn’t expecting much from X-Men Apocalypse when I went to a screening the other night. Our own Kyle ha-ha-hated it, and so did most other reviewers. And, literal truth, I’ve been on a sleep starved schedule this week and in the comfy theater seat and womblike 3d darkness, for about the first hour of […]

10 Comments on X-Men Apocalypse of Continuity: Who did what to who and when now?, last added: 5/28/2016
Display Comments Add a Comment
20. Seeking speculative writing about social justice issues, the marginalized

The SpectatorialThe University of Toronto’s speculative fiction journal, The Spectatorial, is currently looking for fiction, poetry, articles, essays, graphic fiction, novel excerpts, book/movie reviews, etc. Particularly interested in topics that touch upon other cultures and marginalized groups, whether it’s discussing literature no one has heard of from another country, or addressing social justice issue in a speculative work. Articles 500-1200 words, or pitched proposals for topics of interest. Deadline: ongoing.

Add a Comment
21. Writers’ festival poetry & prose contest

The Eden Mills Literary Contest is open for entries from new, aspiring and modestly published writers 16+. Categories: short story (2500 words max.), poetry (five poems max.). and creative nonfiction (2500 words max.) First prize in each category: $250. Winners invited to read a short selection from their work at the festival on Sunday, September 18, 2016. Entry fee: $15. Deadline: June 30, 2016.

Add a Comment
22. Contest for full-length poetry collections

Rescue PressRescue Press invites entries for the Black Box Poetry Prize, a contest for full-length collections of poetry. Open to poets at any stage in their writing careers. Judge: Douglas Kearney. No reading fee; however donations are appreciated and go toward publishing the winning manuscript(s). Authors who donate $15 or more receive a Rescue Press book of their choice. Deadline: June 30, 2016.
Twitter: @rescuepress.co

Add a Comment
23. Seeking manuscripts from poets with a connection to India

The (Great) Indian Poetry CollectiveMentorship model literary press The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective invites entries for the Emerging Poets Prize & Editor’s Choice Award. The prize aims to help nurture and bring out new poetic voices from India and the Indian diaspora and those that have a meaningful connection to India. Up to three manuscripts chosen for publication. Winners receive Rs. 15,000 (or equivalent in local currency), publication (minimum press run of 250), and 20 author copies, plus membership. Manuscripts must be in English. No translations. Deadline: May 30, 2016.

Add a Comment
24. Contest for dialogue-only short stories

Bartleby SnopesEntries are open for the Bartleby Snopes 8th annual Dialogue Only Contest. First prize: $300 minimum (higher if 50+ entries received). Compose a short story entirely of dialogue — no narration — that delivers a powerful and engaging story. Length: 2000 words max. Entry fee: $10 for unlimited entries. Deadline: September 15, 2016.

Add a Comment
25. Edith Grossman Q & A

       At the Los Angeles Review of Books Liesl Schillinger continues her series of Q & As with translators with the third instalment, Edith Grossman on Reading Spanish and the Pitfalls of Literalism.
       Among the observations:

There are times when I'm translating seven days a week. When I was younger, I was doing seven hours a day, but now I'm down to five.
       Quite a few of her translations are under review at the complete review -- including Carlos Rojas' The Ingenious Gentleman and Poet Federico GarcíaLorca Ascends to Hell, and it's good to hear she's working on another Rojas novel (which The Modern Novel already has under review (where he notes that it appears, to (then-)date only to have been translated into ... Hungarian and Russian -- this despite the fact that, as Grossman notes, Rojas has long been Atlanta-based)).

Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts