What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Tag

In the past 30 days

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing Blog: Library Goddesses Picture Books, Most Recent at Top
Results 1 - 25 of 268
Visit This Blog | Login to Add to MyJacketFlap
Blog Banner
Are you a Library Goddess?...Would you like to share your thoughts on books, materials, fundraising, advocacy, programs, web 2.0, leadership, and other aspects of librarianship with the rest of the library community?
Statistics for Library Goddesses Picture Books

Number of Readers that added this blog to their MyJacketFlap: 3
1. Meet the Dullards by Sara Pennypacker



This is an amusing book about parents who try to keep their kids in their dull world. The Dullards stare at blank tv's, watch paint dry and eat plain ice cream with no cones. Little exciting intrusions keep happening to the Dullards and they're forced to move their children, Blanda, Borely and Little Dud to another location. Of course, excitement follows them: one room has bright yellow floral walls and the kids are caught doing acrobatics outside. To avoid further excitement, the Dullards move back to their old town. At the end of the book, Mr and Mrs. Dullard are blissfully unaware that their kids have joined up with the circus that's visiting town. The illustrations are funny and show the extent of the family's dullness with their grey, plain outfits, blank walls and "pragmatic moving container".

0 Comments on Meet the Dullards by Sara Pennypacker as of 6/3/2015 9:26:00 PM
Add a Comment
2. Wherever you go by Pat Zietlow Miller


This poetic book about a rabbit and his owl friend who take to the roads on a bicycle is gorgeously illustrated. The watercolors are vivid and creatively used. Their journey flows along from page to page, over rivers and through woods, cities and mountainous terrain. They hitch along with bus-riding friends until they part ways and home is once again in sight.

0 Comments on Wherever you go by Pat Zietlow Miller as of 6/3/2015 7:05:00 PM
Add a Comment
3. Snoozefest at the Nuzzledome by Samantha Berger




Snuggleford Cuddlebun, the sleepy sloth protagonist wants to go the the Snoozefest at the Nuzzledome. She and other good sleepers are taken by bus to the Nuzzledome, carrying all their blankets, pillows and lovies. At the Nuzzledome there's a pj parade, food booths, posters and t-shirts for sale. Various animals play quiet sleepy music on stage and Snuggleford sleeps in her hammock only to wake up and realize the festival is over. That's okay with Snuggleford since she's a sloth, but she can't wait until next year's festival. The colorful, pattern-y illustrations are adorable with all the different animals snuggling in their blankies. A cute, kiddie version of festival-going and naptime.

0 Comments on Snoozefest at the Nuzzledome by Samantha Berger as of 6/3/2015 7:05:00 PM
Add a Comment
4. Peace is an Offering by Anette LeBox




This book is basically an illustrated poem about ways to celebrate or express peace and walk away from a fight. The rhyming is relatively simple yet touching and the illustrations are adorably sweet.

                  "Peace is a joining not a pulling apart.
                   It's the courage to bear a wounded heart.....
                   Sing a quiet song.
                   Catch a falling star.
                   May peace walk beside you
                   Wherever you are."

Peace is an Offering has a classic, timeless quality which will help children see ways to be a friend and enjoy the quiet strength of peace.

0 Comments on Peace is an Offering by Anette LeBox as of 5/23/2015 3:53:00 PM
Add a Comment
5. Julia, Child by Kyo Maclear



"Julia, Child" is subtly deceptive. Though it has Julia Child's name in the title, it isn't a picture book biography of Julia as a child. The preface states that the book was inspired by, but not about Julia's childhood. However, the main character does love to cook. Julia and her friend Simca shop, take classes and whip up meals. They begin to notice that adults are too busy to savor food and life. So they decide to make some meals for them. The first foray turns out badly, since most adults "don't have the proper ingredients" and start fighting over the food. Julia and Simca's next effort fixes that: they make "smaller portions....just enough to feed the sensible children from whom these senseless grown-ups grew." This dinner party does the trick; the adults have a wonderful time and are more generous. In a nod to the other Julia, the girls write a book, "Mastering the Art of Childhood" for grownups. Overall, the book has sweet vintage illustrations and the message is a positive one, though more understandable for older kids.

0 Comments on Julia, Child by Kyo Maclear as of 5/23/2015 1:21:00 PM
Add a Comment
6. Sparky! by Jenny Offill



A little girl wants a pet, but her mother says she can only get a pet that doesn't need to be "walked, bathed or fed." After a visit to the library, she picks out the perfect pet from a book: a sloth. She orders one through the mail and Sparky as she calls him, lives up to his reputation as a lay about. The girl is determined to interact with him, but the only game he plays successfully is Statue. She tries one last time to impress her friend by putting on a show of sloth pet tricks. Once again, Sparky refuses to do anything. In the end, she learns to appreciate the sloth's slow companionship. This is a quiet book (as one might expect of a sloth), but the illustrations are cute and the underlying message of appreciating the low-key is a nice one. Winner of the Charlotte Zolotow award.

0 Comments on Sparky! by Jenny Offill as of 5/22/2015 5:29:00 PM
Add a Comment
7. Sidewalk Flowers by Jon Arno Lawson



Sidewalk Flowers is a wordless picture book that manages to convey a lot with just pictures. A girl takes a walk with her father through the city and collects flowers. It's a simple plot line, but there's little episodes along the way where the girl interacts with people, animals and her flowers. The images are done primarily in black shades of ink and watercolor with spots of color for emphasis. The girl throughout is wearing a red jacket and bits of nature are painted with color also. Toward the end, the color is much more prevalent and the illustrations spread across the page. Overall, this is a sweet and gorgeously done children's book.

0 Comments on Sidewalk Flowers by Jon Arno Lawson as of 5/9/2015 1:49:00 PM
Add a Comment
8. Henri's Scissors by Jeanette Winter




Henri's Scissors is another great introductory artist biography for kids. The beginning of the book introduces Matisse, but focuses mostly on his later years when he was confined to a bed and wheelchair. It was at that time that Matisse discovered a new way to express himself through shape and color by using scissors. Jeanette Winter's art captures Matisse and his art with her painting that shows the large shapes and colors Matisse used. At the end is a short author's note with a reference and a quote. Children as young as 4 or 5 would appreciate this book, especially if they love art.

0 Comments on Henri's Scissors by Jeanette Winter as of 5/9/2015 1:49:00 PM
Add a Comment
9. How to Draw a Dragon by Douglas Florian



How to Draw a Dragon is a fun, rhyming book that lists all the aspects of a dragon: pointed spines, claws, wings, teeth and scales. Various children "drag" their dragons to their yard and attempt to draw these huge, imposing creatures while watching out for fiery breath and sharp claws.The illustrations are done in a child-like, mixed media style that echoes the children's perspective in the text. A cute book for the artistic dragon-lover in your family.

0 Comments on How to Draw a Dragon by Douglas Florian as of 5/9/2015 1:49:00 PM
Add a Comment
10. Felipe the Flamingo

 
Felipe the Flamingo 

This is a darling, coming-of-age story illustrated with great watercolor prints of the characters in the story. Felipe has not grown as his parents expected. His neck is still stiff so it is hard for him to eat on his own, and he is still very white, not pink like his parents and the other flamingos in their group. His parents are leaders of the group and need to fly with the other flamingos to show them the way to the next feeding area. So little Felipe stays behind with Eleanor Egret to watch over him. Other animals and a little human girl in a kayak all start to help Felipe with his problems. A couple of friends bring him lots of shrimp, a turtle who once had a stiff neck comes over to try a new neck stretching method, and butterflies teach some of their tricks for flying. Felipe starts to change little by little. He is enjoying all his newfound friends; everyone is helping him so much. His neck feels better and his tummy is full. Felipe can even tuck his head under his wing and has a few successes with flying attempts. Then the big day arrives and he realizes that the feathers that he is preening are PINK, PINK, PINK. 

0 Comments on Felipe the Flamingo as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
11. Flora and the Flamingo

A 2014 Caldecott Honor Book
In this innovative wordless picture book with interactive flaps, Flora and her graceful flamingo friend explore the trials and joys of friendship through an elaborate synchronized dance. With a twist, a turn, and even a flop, these unlikely friends learn at last how to dance together in perfect harmony. Full of humor and heart, this stunning performance (and splashy ending!) will have readers clapping for more!

0 Comments on Flora and the Flamingo as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
12. Iggy Peck Architect by Andrea Beaty



Iggy Peck is a boy who's obsessed with designing and creating structures. He's shown making buildings out of anything that he can get his hands on: dirt, fruit, pancakes, modeling clay etc. Until one day his teacher has had enough and bans Iggy from mentioning anything about architecture. The class then goes on a picnic field trip to a little island. The bridge collapses and traps them on the island. Iggy comes to the rescue, organizes the class in building a new bridge from found objects. Because Iggy saved the day he's allowed from then on to give the class lectures on architecture. The illustrations by David Roberts are fun with each child having a unique look and the structures that Iggy builds are playful. The rhyming text has a fun, bouncy quality that will keep kids interest in a topic that could otherwise be a bit dry.

0 Comments on Iggy Peck Architect by Andrea Beaty as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
13. The Baby Tree by Sophie Blackall




This is a cute book centering around a little boy who's told his parents are expecting a baby. In their morning rush, the parents don't have time to explain further. Then the boy spends the day asking his neighbor, teacher, grandpa and mailman "Where do babies come from?" Each person has a different answer and by the end of the day he's truly confused. All is cleared up by his parents at the conclusion of the book (with some factual information on another page). The illustrations by Sophie Blackall are sweet, subtle and just right for the topic.

0 Comments on The Baby Tree by Sophie Blackall as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
14. Catch that Cookie!


Solve the riddles to find the runaway gingerbread men in this funny and magical cookie hunt!
Marshall knows one thing for sure, despite what all the stories say: Gingerbread men cannot run. Cookies are for eating, and he can't wait to eat his after spending all morning baking them with his class. But when it's time to take the gingerbread men out of the oven . . . they're gone! Now, to find those rogue cookies, Marshall and his class have to solve a series of rhyming clues. And Marshall just might have to rethink his stance on magic. Catch That Cookie! is an imaginative mystery, deliciously illustrated by Caldecott Medal winner David Small. It's sure to inspire a new classroom tradition . . . and maybe even a few new believers!

Also try:
The Eleventh Hour
Wolfie the Bunny
The Gingerbread Bear
Senorita Gordita
The Gingerbread Boy
Gingerbread Cowboy

0 Comments on Catch that Cookie! as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
15. Telephone

It's time to fly home for dinner! In this witty picture book from award-winning and bestselling author Mac Barnett, a mother bird gives the bird next to her a message for little Peter. But passing messages on a telephone line isn't as simple as it sounds. Each subsequent bird understands Mama's message according to its own very particular hobbies. Will Peter ever get home for dinner? This uproarious interpretation of a favorite children's game will get everyone giggling and is sure to lead to countless rereads. -From the Publisher

If you enjoyed this, you might also like:
Yo! Yes?
Wish, Change, Friend
What do you do with an idea?
Mr. Peek and the Misunderstanding at the Zoo
The Book with No Pictures




0 Comments on Telephone as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16. Flora and the Penguin

Flora and the Penguin

Having mastered ballet in Flora and the Flamingo, Flora takes to the ice and forms an unexpected friendship with a penguin. Twirling, leaping, spinning, and gliding, on skates and flippers, the duo mirror each other's graceful dance above and below the ice. But when Flora gives the penguin the cold shoulder, the pair must figure out a way to work together for uplifting results. Artist Molly Idle creates an innovative, wordless picture book with clever flaps that reveal Flora and the penguin coming together, spiraling apart, and coming back together as only true friends do.-From the Publisher

If you like this, you might enjoy:
Flora and the Flamingo
Sam and Dave dig a Hole
The Farmer and the Clown
Telephone
Hug Machine

0 Comments on Flora and the Penguin as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
17. When We Go Walking by Cari Best



A little girl goes walking with her family and discovers treasures all through the seasons. As they walk, the girl wonders where her treasures came from and her parents ask: do you really need that?  Finally, when it gets too cold out to walk, she surprises her family with artwork made from her collection. The collage style of the images is well-suited to the topic with bits and bobs of things discovered on each page. Overall, it's a pleasant "stroll" of a book for kids pre-k and up.

0 Comments on When We Go Walking by Cari Best as of 1/7/2015 12:01:00 PM
Add a Comment
18. Gaston by Kelly DiPucchio



Gaston is a French bulldog who lives with a family of poodles: Fi-Fi, Foo-Foo and Ooh-La-La. He tries his best to fit in, being precious and delicate like his siblings. One day at the park Mrs. Poodle meets another pup family of mostly bulldogs and one poodle, Antoinette. After playing, Gaston and Antoinette switch places and go home with their new, supposedly correct pup family. It doesn't feel right: Gaston isn't as rough and tumble as the other bulldogs and Antoinette is not as delicate as the other poodles. The next day the pups switch back, but keep visiting each other at the park. Eventually, Gaston and Antoinette go on to have a family of their own, teaching them "to be whatever they wanted to be." The colorful, simple artwork and fun names for the dogs will keep most kids entertained by this pup tale.

0 Comments on Gaston by Kelly DiPucchio as of 12/6/2014 1:17:00 PM
Add a Comment
19. Bad Dog Flash by Ruth Paul




If you like dogs, even mischievous ones, you'll enjoy Bad Dog Flash. Ruth Paul captures the energy of a young dog getting into trouble all throughout the house. Flash eats shoes, chases the cat, tracks mud into the house and shreds the laundry among other things; all the while maintaining a look of innocence.The text is easy for the little ones and the illustrations are soft and sweet. In the end, Flash is forgiven by the little girl who loves him.

0 Comments on Bad Dog Flash by Ruth Paul as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
20. Extra Yarn by Mac Barnett





This is a sweet tale about a girl who finds a box of yarn and proceeds to knit for all the townsfolk. An evil archduke covets her box of yarn and steals it, only to find out that the box is empty. He curses the girl, but she gets the box back and continues to knit. There's a message to the story: it's the kindness of the girl's heart that enables her to knit with no yarn. The message is subtle though, and doesn't overwhelm the whimsy of the story. The illustrator, Jon Klassen, even includes his bear from I Want My Hat Back (wearing a sweater). Extra Yarn is a simple story with illustrations that give the book an instant classic feel.

0 Comments on Extra Yarn by Mac Barnett as of 11/17/2014 7:39:00 PM
Add a Comment
21. Happy Birthday Madame Chapeau by Andrea Beaty




Madame Chapeau lives in what seems to be Paris and makes hats for other people. Madame herself is a sad eyed, but fashionable young woman. Every year on a special day she goes out in her finest hat and matching outfit. But this year things go wrong and she loses her hat to a bird. The rest of the story is about Madame Chapeau looking for her hat while others offer theirs. She refuses their kind offers until a girl gives her a hat she knit specially for her.
The clever rhyming and unique illustrations make this a great book, particularly for kids who like fashion.

0 Comments on Happy Birthday Madame Chapeau by Andrea Beaty as of 11/17/2014 7:39:00 PM
Add a Comment
22. This Book Just Ate My Dog! by Richard Byrne




This is a clever little picture book where the gutter of the book "eats" various items starting with Bella's dog. Soon the gutter starts swallowing the fire truck,  dog rescue truck and Bella also. The girl tosses a note out of the gutter asking the reader to help by shaking the book. Finally, the entire crew of helpers, the girl and and her dog fall out of the gutter. The book's premise sounds scary for little ones, but the drawings are whimsical and with the reader's help it becomes a funny, interactive story.

0 Comments on This Book Just Ate My Dog! by Richard Byrne as of 11/22/2014 2:48:00 PM
Add a Comment
23. Shh! We Have A Plan by Chris Haughton


 "Shh! We Have a Plan" revolves around four friends going into the woods to capture a bird. The smallest (or youngest) friend has another idea, however. He just wants to talk to the bird: "hello birdie". After several attempts, the youngest succeeds and draws a whole forest of red-hued birds to him.  A large angry bird chases them off when the friends again attempt to capture a bird. At the end, the youngest points out a squirrel and they're off and running again. Younger readers will appreciate this book's slapstick humor, simple art and minimal text.

0 Comments on Shh! We Have A Plan by Chris Haughton as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
24. The Invisible Boy by Trudy Ludwig



This is a picture book which has a message, but is written in such a way that it doesn't feel preachy. Brian, a young elementary school boy is quiet; so quiet he's invisible. Other children and the teacher ignore him when teams are chosen or hands are raised. He draws when his classmates read or play board games. Things change for Brian when a new boy joins the class. The new boy Justin, appears to be a different ethnicity than the other classmates and is looked upon strangely at first. Being outsiders, Justin and Brian make friends and soon a third friend is included. Toward the end of the book, the three boys work on a project together that cements their friendship. Patrice Barton's illustrations show Brian faintly in the beginning and gain some color when he makes friends. At the end of the book, there's a reference page with further reading for children and adults about friendship and introversion.

0 Comments on The Invisible Boy by Trudy Ludwig as of 11/28/2014 6:30:00 PM
Add a Comment
25. The Girl and the Bicycle by Mark Pett



This is a wordless picture book that nonetheless manages to impart a lovely message about sharing. A girl walking with her little brother, sees a bike in a store window which she must have. The girl goes home and promptly gets busy, looking for loose change around the house and doing chores for the neighbor. When she finally gets enough money (months later) she looks in the window and the bike is gone. The girl buys a tricycle for her brother instead. There's a happy ending for her, which is sweet but not overly preachy. The illustrations have a vintage feel, done in tones of sepia and the bicycle in green. The overall effect is simple and understandable for a variety of ages.

0 Comments on The Girl and the Bicycle by Mark Pett as of 12/6/2014 1:17:00 PM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts