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Results 1 - 25 of 141,375
1. Ripley’s Fun Facts & Silly Stories: The Big One!

A new addition to Ripley’s successful Fun Facts & Silly Stories, The Big One! takes things to the next level.

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2. Symbolism

There are many ways to incorporate symbolism into your story. 

http://writershelpingwriters.net/2014/07/5-important-ways-use-symbolism-story/

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3. Hmm Benarkah Sonarika Bhadoria Masih Perawan ?

Berhubungan seks usia muda bukanlah hal yang baru lagi di India. Bahkan, ada beberapa orang yang sudah kehilangan keperawanan dan keperjakaan mereka sejak usia yang masih sangat belia.


sonarika masih perawan
Sonarika " Parwati Mahadewa "
Disamping itu, ada juga beberapa orang, terutama dari kalangan selebritis yang memutuskan untuk tinggal serumah tanpa ikatan perkawinan. Mengakibatkan tak ada batasan dalam hubungan fisik di antara mereka.


Namun di antara banyaknya kasus seks bebas dan kumpul kebo ini, tidak ada satupun pesonanya yang bisa menarik Sonarika Bhadoria untuk masuk ke dalamnya. Bahkan, Sonarika mengaku kalau dirinya masih perawan.

"Aku seorang perawan. Jadi, jangan tanya soal seks kepadaku, karena aku tak punya pengalaman," ujar Sonarika seperti dilansir Kapanlagi dari Telly Chakkar.

Selain itu, Sonarika juga mengaku bahwa ia tidak percaya pada hubungan yang tidak memiliki dasar yang jelas. Karena itulah, ia tak mau tinggal serumah dengan seorang pria tanpa ikatan perkawinan.

"Aku percaya pada institusi pernikahan yang sudah ditetapkan oleh leluhur kita," lanjutnya.

Dalam pandangan Sonarika, cinta adalah kebahagiaan. Dan ia tak mungkin mendapatkannya kalau tidak dengan cara yang sudah ditetapkan oleh agama dan adat.

Tapi, sampai saat ini belum ada satu pria pun yang bisa meluluhkan hati sang Dewi Parwati. Istri Siwa di serial Mahadewa itu masih berstatus jomblo, dan belum ada tanda-tanda ia dekat dengan seseorang.

0 Comments on Hmm Benarkah Sonarika Bhadoria Masih Perawan ? as of 10/24/2014 11:32:00 PM
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4. Huck-and-Rillabooks, October 2014 Edition

It’s been a while since I did a big fat Rillabooks post. The books are piling up! Literally and figuratively. When I want to blog about a book, I leave it out after we’ve read it. This means:

1) There are stacks of books on every flat surface of this house; and

2) We keep reading those books over and over, because they’re out where we can see them.

Which is fine, because I wouldn’t have had the urge to blog about the book in the first place if it weren’t in some way delightful.

Another thing that’s happening a lot lately is that Huck collects favorite picture books to read in his bed at night. I could probably skip writing about them and just post a picture of his headboard every morning. No stronger recommendation for a children’s book than being made part of a five-year-old’s hoard, is there?

But here, I’ll do a proper post. Kortney, consider this my thank-you note for that lovely write-up the other day. :)

NEW:

mixitupMix It Up by Hervé Tullet. Here’s a book that beckons a child in and invites him to touch and “mix” blobs of color on the page. Drag some red into the yellow blob, and when you turn the page, naturally you’ve got orange. What interested me is how completely Huck entered into the conceit, touching and swirling those painted spots on the page just as if he were playing an iPad game. “Like this?”—tentatively at first, touching the dot as instructed, and then turning the page and crowing in glee at the change. He engaged just as thoroughly as if it were an app, red + yellow magically turning to orange under his finger. This thrills me, I have to say—the willingness to enter into a game of make-believe with a book when so much in his world trains him to expect animations for every cause-and-effect. The book is full of fun, with dots of color skittering across the page as if alive. Gorgeously designed, too: big bold colors against clean white space. We also enjoyed Tullet’s Press Here which similarly invites interaction. At five, Huck seems to be exactly the right age for these books. We’ve read Mix It Up together several times but most often he carts it away to his bed to enjoy solo.

(You’ll want your watercolors handy after you read this book. Or do as we did and whip up a quick batch of play dough: 2 cups flour, 3/4 cup salt, 1 cup water [add slowly; you may not need all of it]. Knead until it isn’t sticky. I go sparingly on the water and leave a lot of loose flour in the mixing bowl for the kids to rub their hands in before I start handing out lumps of dough. Then, for each lump, a drop of food coloring. They love working it in, watching it marble its way through the blank dough. After the colors are well mixed, I like to add a tiny drop of lavender or cinnamon oil, or a bit of vanilla extract. The smells make them so happy! “I’m probably going to play with this for one or three hours,” Huck informed me when I got him set up the other day—after I’d remembered such a cheap and easy cure for listlessness existed in the world. Why do I forget about this for months at a time? A batch will last in the fridge for about a week. Rilla can measure and mix it by herself. Very handy when, say, an older sister is wrangling with Algebra 2 and needs mom’s attention for a while.)

OLD:

borreguitaBorreguita and the Coyote by Verna Aardema, illustrations by Petra Mathers—over and over and over again! Beloved by Rilla too (and all her older siblings before her). Utterly satisfying rendition of a Mexican folk tale in which a clever little sheep outwits, repeatedly, with comic effect, a coyote intent on eating her for dinner. Might I recommend reading this one while lying down so that all of you can stick your legs in the air when you get to the part about Borreguita “holding up” the mountain.

 

creepycastleCreepy Castle by John S. Goodall. Out of print but if you can track one down you’re in luck. All six of my kids have loved this book to pieces. No! Not to pieces, fortunately! It’s got flaps inside, each spread flipping to become a new picture. An almost wordless book, which means the kids and I get to narrate the adventure as the two hero mice make their way through a seemingly deserted castle. There’s a sister fellow hiding in the bushes; he locks them in a scary room with a dragon guarding the stairs, but they climb out the window and splash into the moat. My littles especially like the moment when the villain gets his comeuppance at the end. I can’t count how many dozens of times I have read this little book. They never seem to get tired of it.

Another book back in circulation these days is Dinosaur Vs. Bedtime. (Sniffle: two-year-old Huck in that post.)

Meanwhile, I’m making my way through the leeeeennnngggggthy list of Cybils YA nominees and will have some to recommend in a post coming soonish.

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5. Ripley’s Fun Facts & Silly Stories 3

Fun Facts and Silly Stories 2 is the second book in this engaging and humorous series.

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6. EXCLAMATION MARK New from Amy Krouse Rosenthal & Tom Lichtenheld (!!!)

0 Comments on EXCLAMATION MARK New from Amy Krouse Rosenthal & Tom Lichtenheld (!!!) as of 10/24/2014 10:57:00 AM
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7. Bugs in my Hair - a book review



Got the itch?  Could be head lice?..... oh my.....


Fun pics to make you smile on your Saturday morning.















Today's featured book:




Title:  Bugs in my Hair
Author/Illustrator:  David Shannon
Ages:  4-7

How fun are these?










What's it all about?

This fun, quirky and educational book shines a light on a subject that often hides in the shadows and is wrapped in humiliation and shame.  What topic is that you ask?  Head Lice.  

Yep, as a former teacher I have spotted those creepy, crawly, little critters, had my sighting confirmed by the school nurse, and then proceeded to send home that dreaded letter that causes fear and trepidation in parents.  They discover that there is pediculosis (a louse infestation) alive and well in their child's classroom!  Lice have been around for thousands of years and terms like "lousy", "nit-picking", and "going over things with a fine-tooth comb" are part of every day vocabulary.  

David Shannon's book is hilarious and his illustrations are picture-perfect. They are big, bold, colourful, imaginative, and very witty.  He takes you through the process of delousing and the reaction of both the humans and the bugs as finally those pesky and determined creatures are all exterminated.  Whew!  What a battle was waged to rid that head of those unwanted tenants. 

Goodbye forever you nasty varmints making me itch and wiggle and scratch.  But wait?  What is that?  Oh no........a repeat performance is in order because first time around was not enough to wipe those pesky critters out once and for all and send them packing to find a new host to live on.  

I highly recommend this book and in sharing it with your child you can discuss that head lice are not taboo because millions of kids have them and adults too.  By following some simple rules and with proper treatment they can be "cured."  I like the back of the book where the huge warning label shouts:  " Warning: This book will make you ITCHY!" And you know what?   It does. 


About the author:




In the world of David Shannon books, anything can happen. Ducks can ride bikes and kids can get rainbow stripes instead of chicken pox. But not all of Shannon's books are pure fiction. For his 1999 Caldecott Honor book, No, David!, Shannon reached back into his own mischievous childhood for material. In all of his work, Shannon likes to keep the colors bright, the illustrations bold, and the stories entertaining. "I try to have fun when I'm making a book," he says. "I feel like if I have fun, that's going to come across. And whoever reads it is going to have fun, too."

His Life

David Shannon made his first book when he was only five. On orange paper, he drew pictures of himself doing the things that got him into trouble: sneaking into the cookie jar, jumping on the bed, and making too much noise. The only two words in the book were "No" and "David" — two words that he heard often and knew how to spell.
As a young boy, David also liked to draw pirates, baseball players, battle scenes, and characters from books. He pursued his artistic interests at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. After graduating with a degree in fine arts, Shannon moved to New York City, where he worked for ten years as an editorial illustrator for adults. His work appeared in publications such as The New York Times, Rolling Stone, and Time.
When David Shannon first agreed to illustrate a children's book, he thought it would be a fun, one-time diversion. But after How Many Spots Does a Leopard Have? was published in 1992, editors sent him more and more manuscripts to illustrate. Eventually, Shannon began to write and illustrate his own stories, including the popular titles No, David!Duck on a Bike, and A Bad Case of Stripes.
David Shannon lives in Los Angeles, California, with his wife and their young daughter, Emma, who enjoys reading her dad's books, inspiring new ones, and making books of her own.



Book Review Rating:  9 (Close to perfection!)

Read on and read always!  Have a lice...oops...nice day!

0 Comments on Bugs in my Hair - a book review as of 10/25/2014 11:17:00 AM
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8. October Eightieth Birthday!

My dad is turning 80 next week! We HAD to get together for such a momentous occasion, but finding even one day that we could all be present--in Ohio--during the school year--proved impossible. Our overlapping day ended up on a Sunday, so Father Rooster could not be present (having just taken off two Sundays in a row earlier in the month). Blondechick and Bantam19 had to leave in the mid-afternoon to be back for work and school Monday morning, but the rest of us were able to adjust our schedules to travel on Saturday and Monday--even Professor Brother and his family, all the way from Kansas!

It was a whirlwind, but it was totally worth it.

For one thing, we were able to take a first-ever photo of ALL the grandchildren! We have previous editions...but either some grandkids weren't born yet, or we were missing some of the young adults. Here they ALL are!


And here they are looking more like they normally do.


One with Grandma and Grandpa...


...and one with me, my brothers, and my parents.


On Sunday morning, we all dressed up and went to the First Baptist Church, where my family has attended for generations.


B15 can't pass a piano without trying it out. :)


Pilot Brother and his Caterer/Coffee Shop Owner wife provided all the food for lunch, snacks, dinner and of course, birthday cake!


"Johnny Q-Whistle Paperlegs" is what the hired man called my dad when he was a kid. "John Henry Dewberry Brown" was another nickname he was saddled with, by his uncle, but the first one is even more colorful, don't you think?

Dinner was a wiener roast!


While we were toasting marshmallows for s'mores, I snapped this picture of the sunset. The trees in this woods are the scenery of my childhood--the backdrop to so many of my memories.


I was pleased with all that was captured in this next photo too. This is the view from the woods behind our house, looking toward the back of the house. The lit-up room is the addition that my parents put on about 15 years ago to their 1960's ranch, in anticipation of gatherings like these. In the foreground, you can see two ropes--one is a swinging rope, the other is to the tire swing that has occupied kids and grandkids for decades on end. With its headlights shining on a car in the driveway, that's a Toro Twister driving across the yard toward the house. My brother and dad use it for all kinds of tasks around the farm, as well as giving rides to the grandkids! Finally, the light directly above the Twister is a utility pole light that comes on every evening at dusk, and has been since I was a kid catching fireflies in its glow.


We wrapped up our day by watching old 8 mm movies. Some of them were 70 years old or more! In the first one, my dad was a kid in swimming trunks playing with a garden hose. It was easy to see where the hired man got the "paperlegs" part of his moniker--Dad's legs were paper white compared to the rest of him! And my, those legs looked familiar--just like Chicklet12's, right now. He was probably her age in the movie, but several of his grandchildren got his long, lean musculature. I had not realized how much B19 resembled his grandfather and great-grandfather, either! 

It was wonderful to see relatives and friends, and also the way the farm used to be--where the fences were, and the old gas tank, and the chicken yard, and the barn without the milk house, and the farmhouse without the front porch, and cows grazing where now there are no fences, and the trees! Today it would take two people to wrap their arms around some of the trunks, but back then one person could have, easily. 

It's a neat feeling to be connected to a place so deeply. I'm so thankful that my brother and his family have relocated there, giving us ongoing reasons to keep visiting there, and Lord willing, to keep the farm going and keep it in the family. I'm thankful that his children get to grow up there, that they have the run of the place the way my brothers and I did, growing up, and that my younger kids have cousins to visit when we go there. 

And I'm thankful for my dad, and his milestone birthday, for giving this goofy bunch a reason to get together and celebrate being us!


I


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9. Do you know about the MAE Award?

Many ALSC Members are also YALSA members. At the request of the Chair of the 2015 MAE Jury Award for Best Literature for Teens, here is information about an Award in which many of you might be interested.

***********************************************************************

YALSA members who have run an exceptional reading or literature program in the 12 months leading up to Dec. 1, 2014 are eligible to apply for the 2015 MAE Award for Best Literature Program for Teens, which recognizes an outstanding reading or literature program for young adults.

Do you run a spectacular teen book club that engages underserved audiences? Did your summer reading program or literature festival connect teens with literature in an innovative way? Is your Reader’s Advisory always three steps ahead of a trend? Have you connected teens to literature or helped them gain literacy skills via some other exciting means?  Whether the program was large or small, if it was good, you could win $500 for yourself and an additional $500 for your library by applying for this award!  Individual library branches may apply.

The MAE Award is sponsored by the Margaret A. Edwards Trust. Applications and additional information about the award are available online.  Applications must be submitted online by Dec. 1, 2014. For questions about the award, please contact the jury chair, Tony Carmack (tcarmac@yahoo.com).  The winner will be announced the week of Feb. 9, 2015.

Not a member of YALSA yet? It’s not too late to join so you can be eligible for this award. You can do so by contacting YALSA’s Membership Marketing Specialist, Letitia Smith, at lsmith@ala.org or (800) 545-2433, ext. 4390. Recognize the great work you are doing to bring teens together with literature and apply today!

 

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10. Press Release Fun: Nominate a Literary Landmark

From our good fellow in the field, Rocco Staino:

Hello,

As chair of the ALA/CBC committee I am working with United for Libraries and the Children’s Book Council on an initiative for Children’s Book Week.  It is our hope that during Children’s Book Week in 2015 that with your help United for Libraries can dedicate throughout the country at least 7 Literary Landmarks that are connected with a children’s book or author.

It would be great if you or your state organization would take the lead in nominating a possible Literary Landmark in your State.  You may also want to work with your state’s Center for the Book.

Here are some helpful links that give you more information on Literary Landmarks.

http://www.ala.org/united/products_services/literarylandmarks

Only 33 States have Literary Landmarks.  Check to see if you state has at least one. If it doesn’t this is a great time to get one.

http://www.ala.org/united/products_services/literarylandmarks/landmarksbystate/landmarksbystate

I have worked in having several sites designated as Literary Landmarks.  Most recently we dedicated The Walt Whitman Birthplace a Literary Landmark.  At the event we had a Congressman, State Senators and members of the NYS Assembly including the chair of the Library Committee.  I am happy to say that the Landmark was cosponsored by Suffolk County Library Association, Suffolk School Library Media Association and the Lambda Literary Foundation.

Attached is a photo of the Librarians in attendance.

Feel free to contact me of Sally Gardner Reed or Jillian Kalonick (cc’d in this email)  if you have any questions.

Best,
Rocco Staino
Chair
ALA/CBC Committee
@roccoa

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11. Black Tower Books -Yep, Not Just Comics and Graphic Novels!


It's been pointed out to me that many people may think that Black Tower Comics just publish comic albums and graphic novels.  well, the banner reads "Black Tower Comics and Books.


Many people may have missed the mention of those books considering the number of newbies each day and, of course, the number of posts.  This is a BIG blog!


So, for those of you who are unaware of the books Black Tower publishes here's a run-down:

It's a very chunky book as noted and the first of its kind from a UK publisher containing as it does interviews with many UK comic stars as they were breaking into the big time as well as a few American creators -including Marv Wolfman.
Black Tower Books has always tried to step away from what other publishers produce and this has already been called "a major contribution to British comic history!" and I don't argue with praise like that!

The Hooper Interviews


Terry Hooper-Scharf
A4
Black & white
prose and very fully illustrated!
365 pages
Price: £15.00

From a huge selection of interviews covering the Small Press,Independent Comics from the UK,Europe and US,here are a few of the best from over 25 years. These interviewees include:

Including…deeep breath:

JOHN COOPER
YISHAN LI
DONNA BARR
ROBERTA GREGORY
EMMA VIECELI
SONIA LEONG
ALAN CLASS
PAUL BIRCH
KAREN RUBINS
WILLIE HEWES
PEKKA A. MANNINEN
OLIVIER CADIC
JON HAWARD
MARV WOLFMAN
TANIA DEL RIO
JEFF BROOKS
MIKE WESTERN
MORAG LEWIS
DAVE RYAN

And many others.  And, yes, fully illustrated throughout!   This is a bargain book at £15 -a price reduced until 24th December, 2014.

The Truth About Spring-Heeled Jack


The Truth About Spring-Heeled Jack
Terry Hooper-Scharf
Paperback (prose)
A4
53 Pages
Price: £7.00
The terror and mystery created by “Jack The Ripper” has been the subject of countless books, magazine articles as well as movies and TV documentaries. Ask anyone if they have ever heard of Jack The Ripper and it is doubtful anyone would respond with a “no idea.” 

By that same token, ask people who “Spring-heeled Jack” was and you would be lucky to find anyone who had ever heard of him. 
Spring-heeled Jack was the subject (loosely) of a film The Curse of the Wraydons (1946) and Dominic Keating also appeared as Spring Heeled Jack in the 2010 film Sherlock Holmes by The Asylum film company. The character has also featured in both American and British comic books and a number of books, for both children and adults. 
But the fact that the Springald held the country –not just London– in a grip of terror much longer that the Ripper did is all but forgotten except for some half-truths and fanciful theories. 

Now be prepared to read the full story of Spring Heeled Jack!

Illustrated throughout.

The Red Paper:CANINES vol.1


The Red Paper:CANINES vol.1


Terry Hooper-Scharf
Paperback,
A4
202 Pages
Price: £10.00
Up-dated 2011 edition includes section on sarcoptic mange in foxes and treatment plus a list of wildlife sanctuaries and rescue centres in the UK.

 By the 1700s the British fox was on the verge of extinction and about to follow the bear and wolf into history having been hunted for sport for centuries.

The first solely wildlife book by the noted naturalist.

 The answer was to import thousands of foxes per year for sport. But foxes kept dying out so jackals were tried. Some were caught, some escaped.

Even wolves and coyote were released for hunting.

The summation of over 30 years research -all backed up with full references including from books and papers by famous British "fox hunters" and manuals and game keeper guides to keeping foxes for hunting- reveals the damnable lie of "pest control" hunting but also reveals the cruelty the animals were subject to and how private menageries as well as travelling shows helped provide the British and Irish countryside with some incredible events.

The legendary Girt Dog of Ennerdale, a favourite of cryptozoologists and mystery writers, is also dealt with in detail.

Arctic foxes, coyotes in Essex and many more near forgotten mysteries of wild nature in the UK and supported by illustrations and photographs once thought to have been lost many years ago.  Trawling newspaper archives does pay off. 

Low price until 24th December, 2014

Some Things Strange & Sinister


Some Things Strange & Sinister

Terry Hooper-Scharf
Paperback,
A4
358 Pages
Profusely illustrated with photographs, maps and illustrations.
Price: £15.00
After more than 35 years as an investigator and more than forty as a naturalist, the author has opened some of the many files he has accumulated dealing with such things as  The Terrifying Events At The Lamb Inn, The Ghosts Of All Saints Church, Dead Aquatic Creatures of Canvey Island, captured bigfoot like creatures in India -all exclusively presented for the first time and with new added research previously unseen.

PLUS a vastly expanded section on Spring-heeled Jack!

Photographs,maps,line drawings and up-dated to make 358 pages looking at Things truly Strange and Sinister. The cryptozoologist, Ghost Hunter,Ufologist or Fortean will find this book has something for everyone -including the just plain inquisitive!

Low price until 24th December, 2014

Some More Things Strange & Sinister


Some More Things Strange & Sinister



Terry Hooper-Scharf
Paperback,
A4
327 Pages
Price: £15.00
Follow-up to the hugely successful Some Things Strange & Sinister.

For those interested in Ufology, cryptozoology, hominology, unusual natural history, ghosts and mysteries in general.

The secret history of gorillas in the UK -before they were officially  'discovered'. The history of  the Wild men of Europe, the UK and US: something that in the 1800s become very "pop culture"!

Hominology. Sasquatch and Bigfoot -is there evidence for their existence?  You might be surprised.

Giant snakes. Amazons. The Giant serpent of Carthage. The Girt Dog of Ennerdale -another big cult 'creature' amongst paranormal and cryptozoological circles. The Beast of Gevaudan -what was it and were there really descendents of the creature in the 19th century?

 Believe it or not more than one incident of historical crocodiles cases in the UK.

And, after more than a century of claims by 'researchers' that it no longer exists: Silent City of Alaska and the near legendary photograph taken of it.

 And much more. Updated with extra pages and photographs. 

Low price until 24th December, 2014

Pursuing The Strange & Weird:A Naturalists Viewpoint


Pursuing The Strange & Weird:A Naturalists Viewpoint

 
 

Paperback, 
A4
249 Pages
Price: £15.00
2013 UP DATE -From Dead Aquatic (Humanoid) Creatures, the giant squid and yet undiscovered sea creatures; submarine and ships crews encountering true leviathans. 
 
There is a fully expanded section which also refers to the so-called ‘Ningen’ sightings and video footage. 
 
Extinct animals at sea that have been re-discovered. The subject of Sasquatch and other mystery Hominids around the world is dealt with including a look at the “Sasquatch-killer”, Justin Smeja. 
 
Dr. Bryan Sykes and his DNA test results for TVs The Bigfoot Files as well as the controversial Erickson Project and Dr. Melba Ketchum’s Even more controversial Sasquatch DNA test results. 
 
Also included are two early French UFO entity cases that still baffle. Ghosts, strange creatures and the Star-Child hoax. All dealt with by the naturalist and pursuer of the strange and weird

Low price until 24th December, 2014

The Amazing World Of Alan Class



The Amazing World Of Alan Class


Terry Hooper-Scharf
Paperback,
A4
24 Pages
Price: £5.00
Marvel, Timely, Atlas, Charlton, ACG, MLJ/Archie Dennis the Menace (US) -one man published them all. Alan Class. Who?

Class is legendary for bringing black and white reprints of US comics to a country starved of the medium thanks to a certain war! From 1959-1989 Suspence, Sinister, Astounding and Uncanny gave us a comic fix for a few pennies.

Learn more about the man and how Class Comics came about in the long awaited print version of Terry Hooper's exclusive interview!

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12. Spotlight and Giveaway: Court by Cat Patrick

I have enjoyed everything that I’ve read by Cat Patrick, so I was super excited to see that she has a new book coming out. I wanted to share with all of you because I think her writing is awesome…and well, there’s a giveaway you can enter!  So have at it!  Read about Court and then enter away!

 

court_96

Title: Court

Author: Cat Patrick

Date of Publication: October 23rd 2014

  goodreads-badge-add-plus-d700d4d3e3c0b346066731ac07b7fe47   About Court: For more than 400 years, a secret monarchy has survived and thrived within the borders of the US, hiding in plain sight as the state known as Wyoming. But when the king is shot and his seventeen-year-old son, Haakon McHale, is told he will take the throne, becoming the eleventh ruler of the Kingdom of Eurus, the community that’s survived for centuries is pushed to the limit. Told through four perspectives, Court transplants us to a world that looks like ours, but isn’t. Gwendolyn Rose, daughter of the Duke of Coal, is grudgingly betrothed to Haakon — and just wants a way out. Alexander Oxendine, son of the Duke of Wind and Haakon’s lifelong best friend, already grapples with external struggles when he’s assigned to guard Haakon after the king dies. And commoner Mary Doyle finds whispers in the woods that may solve — or destroy — everything, depending on your bloodline.

Money. Love. Power. Community. What’s your motivation?  

Amazon

  Q&A with Cat:

-Where did the idea came from?

After writing The Originals, I wanted to write something from multiple character perspectives. Around that time, I was thinking of my home state of Wyoming. A friend had recently driven through, and I thought about how people who aren’t from there don’t really know that much about Wyoming—it could be its own world, hiding secrets. It could be its own kingdom.

-Out of all the 4 perspectives, which is the hardest to write?

Surprisingly, the boys’ voices came easiest. (And there used to be two more!) As for one POV being more difficult than the others, I think the real challenge was developing each voice individually with only a heaping handful of chapters per character.

How do you think you’ve evolved creatively?

Any craft grows with practice, and I hope that I’ve become a more controlled writer as I’ve published more books. I’m definitely more of a risk-taker than I was in the beginning, as well.

What 5 things would you like readers to know about you?

That I’m the greatest mommy in the world. (Say my children.) I love, and am inspired by, wind. I can kill it at Dance Central on Xbox. I share a birthday with one of my siblings. I once met Muhammad Ali.  

Excerpt: HAAKON

Before he was the enemy, James Haakon McHale III was just a seventeen-year-old in what most people knew as the state of Wyoming, wishing he was somewhere other than the predawn forest with a rifle in his grip.

“It’s colder than moonlight on a tombstone,” Haakon muttered, blowing on his fist. His thick-soled boots swish-thumped on the hard earth as he skillfully avoided twigs, rocks, and low branches.

Alexander Oxendine—youngest son of the Duke of Wind, wide receiver, video game button masher, and Haakon’s best friend—laughed into his collar. It could’ve been mistaken for a cough.

“It’s colder than a whore’s heart,” Alexander said, his tone cautiously low. They were the youngest members of the hunting party, and were only allowed to take part because of their rank. Haakon could think of a thousand superior privileges.

He glanced around to make sure none of the other men were paying attention—especially his father. Smirking, he said, “Colder than a polar bear’s balls.”

The pair stifled laughter.

“Than a witch’s—”

“Too easy.”

“Colder than a dead woman’s touch,” Alexander said.

Haakon checked again, dialed down his voice even more, and said, “It’s colder than Gwendolyn Rose’s kiss.”

“Quiet!”

It was Haakon’s father: dictator, fun-spoiler, and—regrettably for his son—the tenth ruler of the Kingdom of Eurus, also known as the Realm, the monarchy hiding in plain sight in the depths of the Democracy known as the United States of America.

Every schoolchild knew the story. In 1670, after Joseph Dyer’s wife died in the Great Plague in London, he brought his five daughters to what would become the United States one hundred years later, seeking a better life. But it soon became apparent that his family would never thrive under strict Puritan rule in New England–which banned higher education for girls and taught submissiveness above all else, and which centered around extreme religious beliefs that were counter to Dyer’s own.

A friend, John Seymour, who was—controversially—married to a Native woman, suggested that they set out together in search of a new home deep within America’s treacherous unknown. Seymour’s wife had been attacked; her family persecuted. Seymour believed that rather than fighting the Natives, they should live in harmony with them.

Dyer, Seymour, and several other men and their families snuck away. After a long and dangerous journey, together they created their version of paradise: a kingdom that blended the best of England with Native cultures. Dyer was thought of as the Father of the Realm, and Seymour’s Native wife, who ensured their survival through tribal relations, the Mother.

Rather than cause a revolution, the founders decided to keep the kingdom secret. Inside the borders of what they’d eventually stake claim as Wyoming, they’d follow their own rules. Outsiders wouldn’t know they were different because they wouldn’t understand.

Outsiders weren’t to be trusted.

Dyer’s youngest daughter, captivated by the ancient Greek she wouldn’t have been allowed to learn in Puritan society, named the new kingdom Eurus, meaning <em>east wind</em>. She pronounced it “air-us.”

“But the winds here blow from the west,” Haakon had asked his father once—before Dad was King James. That was when it was okay to ask questions. When curiosity wasn’t an imposition.

“That’s right, Haakon,” his father had replied, straw between his teeth. They’d gone on a walk together. The sun was setting on an easy day. His dad had pointed toward the eastern horizon. “The wind here does primarily blow from the west, but our founders blew in from the east. That day, the wind changed directions.”

Haakon frowned away the memory of days never to return, and refocused on the trees. He walked as soundlessly as he could in his camo fleece jacket and vintage Levi’s, his rifle nestled in the crook of his left arm, a round in the chamber. He was on the left edge of the group, three rows behind his father. Evenly spaced gaps between them, the men were like migrating geese, locked in formation.

Geese hunting deer.

“Were you drinking last night?” Haakon’s father had demanded on the way to the meeting point that morning. “Is that why you’re so tired?”

“I’m tired because it’s so early that the birds aren’t even awake yet.”

“Good. Because you know what the consequences will be if you start drinking again.” They’d shared the backseat of the armored SUV; Haakon had done his best to preoccupy himself with his cell phone.

“Yes, sir, I know.”

“You need to turn that thing off before we arrive. And when’s your next haircut? You look slovenly.”

Will you just get off my back. Haakon had thought at the top of his lungs. What he’d said, though, was simply, “Yes, sir.”

There, in the forest, Haakon toyed with the idea of raising his gun and shooting King James square in the back of the head. Right there under his hat, just above the rise of his custom down hunting vest. He could do it. Even with the others present, he knew there’d be no trial, no trip to Corby. But offing his father wouldn’t solve anything. In fact, it would make life a lot worse. Because with his father gone, Haakon would be in charge.

Haakon would become the King of Eurus.

The thought made him want to puke.

 court_teaser1  

 

  About Cat Patrick:

Cat PatrickCat Patrick is an author of books for teens. Her debut novel, FORGOTTEN (available now), is about a girl who can remember the future instead of the past, and was praised by NYT bestselling author of Thirteen Reasons Why, Jay Asher, as a “mindbending,” one-sitting read. The book is being translated into 21 languages and Paramount bought the movie rights, with True Grit’s Hailee Steinfeld attached to star as the main character, London Lane.

Patrick’s second (unrelated) novel, REVIVED, is about a girl who’s part of a secret government program to test a drug that brings people back from the dead. REVIVED will be available in the US May 2012, and in the UK and Australia Summer 2012.

Patrick lives near Seattle with her husband and twin 3-year-olds, and is afraid of zombies, planes, and zombies on planes.

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads 

 

 a Rafflecopter giveaway      

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13. Reread #43 Grave Mercy

Grave Mercy. Robin LaFevers. 2012. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 560 pages. [Source: Review copy]

I have now read Grave Mercy by Robin LaFevers three times. (The first review; the second review.) It is a book that is a pleasure to reread. (Not every book is.) I enjoy Grave Mercy because it is intriguing and compelling.

It is set in Brittany in the late 1480s. You can read more about the time period in which this historical novel is set. One of the central characters is Anne of Brittany. Some might feel it is heavy on politics, but, I enjoyed the politics and the tension.

I wish the author had included more, at the very least more real names. For example, instead of "king of England" or "England's king" I wish she'd named him: Henry VII. There were places she could have been more specific, grounded the book more into history. I'd have LOVED an author's note. I'd have also loved an indication of which characters were historical people and which weren't. 

Grave Mercy is not your traditional historical romance. (Well, now that I think about it. If Philippa Gregory can have witches and curses in her Cousins' War series, and be considered "historical" romance, then Grave Mercy might rightly be included as well.) For those that love, love, love romance, I think there is plenty of it in Grave Mercy. I think that is one of its most satisfying features. For those that love fantasy and/or mythology, I think it has some appeal as well. The heroine, Ismae, is Death's daughter and his handmaiden. She lives in a convent, of sorts, dedicated to serving Death. She is a trained assassin. She kills those that her lord (Death) has marked for death.

One of her assignments brings her close to Duval, the half-brother of Anne of Brittany. They share a common goal: to protect Anne, to protect Brittany. But she's been taught--trained--to trust no one, to love no one. So this assignment will test her certainly!

The book has plenty of action, drama, mystery, and politics.
"Are you drunk?" I try to put as much scorn into my words as he did.
"No. Yes. Perhaps a little. Definitely not enough." The bleakness is back and he turns to stare into the flames.
I am torn between wanting to leave him to wallow in his despair and wanting to rush to his side and chase that look from his eyes. That I long to do this appalls me, sets panic fluttering against my ribs.
"I suggest you return to your room," Duval says, his gaze still fixed woodenly on the fire. "Unless you have come to practice your lessons of seduction on me?" His mouth twists in bitter amusement. "That could well entertain me till sunrise."
I jerk my head back as if I have been slapped. "No, milord. I had thought only to pray for your soul if Madame Hivern had seen fit to poison you. Nothing more." And with that, I turn and flee the room, then bolt the door against the disturbing glimpse of both his soul and mine. Whatever games are being played here, he is master at them, and I will do well to remember that. (155)
"What is my fair assassin so afraid of? I wonder."
"I'm not afraid."
Duval tilts his head to the side. "No?" He studies me a long moment, then rises out of his chair. I hold my breath as he crosses to my bed. "Are you afraid I will draw closer, perhaps?" His voice is pitched low, little more than a purr. My breath catches in my throat, trapped by something I long to call fear but that doesn't feel like fear at all. (174)
His smile flashes, quick and surprising in the darkness. "When one consorts with assassins, one must expect to dance along the edge of a knife once or twice. I bid you good night." (218)

© 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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14. Meet David Shannon

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15. My Anti-Bully Dear Teen Me letter. #OneVoice Against Bullying

OneVoice-EntTeen-webbanner-ad8-STATIC(476x286)

Dear Teen Me,

I know you have no safe place—not at home being abused, and not at school being bullied. You are an easy target: shy, scared, jumping at touch, not looking people in the eyes—the marks of someone who’s been hurt. You’re afraid all the time. You hate yourself instead of your abusers and tormentors. You cut to cope. You think about killing yourself. But you keep hanging in there. You’re stronger than you know.

I know you think you’re weak. All the terrible things that happen to you at home. The way you struggle to stand up to your own bullies. But do you remember that Spring day on the way home from school when those boys were running after a girl with coke-bottle glasses and ill-fitting clothes, hooting and hollering at her, calling her names, throwing things? Do you remember how you ran after them, shouting at them to leave her alone? How angry and protective you felt? And how when the boys turned and saw you they ran away?

Do you remember the look in the girl’s eyes—the surprise and the relief that someone cared enough to stand up for her? Or how you walked her home even though it was out of your way just so she’d stay safe? And how you listened to all the horrible things she’d been through and told her she didn’t deserve any of it? That wasn’t weakness, Cheryl. That was strength. I am so very proud of you for standing up to those boys. For helping that girl find a small pocket of safety.

So what if you couldn’t do that for yourself yet? You were still being abused at home. You had victim tortured into you. But still you stood up for others. And you did it over and over again—with that same girl on other walks home, with a girl being harassed by a drunk man on the streetcar, with another girl being sexually harassed, with children being hit by their parents. You tried to protect other kids and teens the way you needed to have someone protect you. You were brave, even though you didn’t feel like you were.

I know you still feel ashamed for some of the bullying you endured, for the way you couldn’t protect yourself. Like the time you were wearily leaning against your girlfriend’s shoulder on the bus and the driver stopped the bus and told you to separate or you’d have to get off. You argued with him, but he was enraged and in authority, and you were too tired and scared so you pulled away from your girlfriend and sat there, feeling humiliated and ashamed and later angry at yourself, wishing you’d written down his number and reported him. Or like the boys in school who would poke you and then hoot and laugh when you jumped—over and over again. You were so angry and ashamed because you couldn’t stop yourself from jumping, couldn’t fight back. Or like the time that man said that he should have sex with you so you wouldn’t be queer—suggesting rape would “fix” you. You froze when he and the other men laughed, fear gripping you, and it took you long moments to tell them that that wasn’t okay. You still feel ashamed that you didn’t stand up to them more strongly. To all your bullies. But you don’t deserve that shame or the anger you turn on yourself. It belongs to the people who hurt you.

And you know what? You often did stand up for yourself, even though it felt like they won. Sometimes it’s okay to not challenge too hard for your own safety. And the other times? Come on, you were a traumatized, bullied kid. Have more compassion for yourself. Yes, you wish you’d done more. Or that someone else had stood up for you. But it’s time to let that go, and to recognize your own strength.
I know you’re hurting—so badly that you don’t want to be here. That every day feels like another day you can’t endure. But I’m glad you’re here. You have a place in this world. Never forget that. And there are good people, even if you haven’t met many of them yet. Just keep hanging on. You will find more and more people with love in their hearts instead of hate.

I want you to be proud of who you are. You’re a survivor, a strong, gentle soul who doesn’t hurt others even though most others hurt you. You have compassion and kindness for others even though you don’t experience that yourself. And you will put even more goodness into the world with your writing. Yes, you will publish books! So be gentle with yourself. Let yourself love yourself, just a little. Let go of the hate and shame that aren’t yours. And know that things will get better. You will find true friends, kindness, love. You will find hope. And one day you will be glad that you are here, making a difference in the world.

I pledge to speak out against bullying when I see it & try to make a positive difference in this world, always. #OneVoice


I hope you’ll join us all in taking a stand against bullying. Share the #OneVoice hashtag and let’s let people know that bullying has to stop!

The fantastic YA authors who are taking part in the #OneVoice Campaign all this month include:
Oct. 1- Cole Gibsen
Oct. 2- Ellen Hopkins
Oct. 3- Ann Aguirre
Oct. 4-5- weekend/open
Oct.. 6- Anna Banks
Oct. 7- Shannon Lee Alexander
Oct. 8- Julie Cross
Oct. 9- Alyssa Day writing as Lucy Connors
Oct. 10- Jus Accardo
Oct. 11- D.R. Rosensteel
Oct. 12- Sunday/open
Oct. 13- Rebekah Purdy
Oct. 14- Mary Lindsey
Oct. 15- Tracy Clark
Oct. 16- Chantele Sedgwick
Oct.17- Francesca Zappia and Rachel Caine’s post (Rachel in the morning, Francia in the afternoon)
Oct. 18- Lisa Brown Roberts
Oct. 19- Victoria Scott
Oct. 20- Trinity Faegan
Oct. 21- Tiffany Truitt
Oct. 22- Tara Fuller
Oct. 23-Jennifer Bosworth
Oct. 24- Cheryl Rainfield
Oct. 25- Chloe Jacobs
Oct. 26- Sunday/open
Oct. 27- Carrie Jones
Oct. 28- Sarah Bomley
Oct. 29- Sarah Darer Littman
Oct. 30- Tonya Kuper
Oct. 31- Nikki Urang

I hope you’ll check in (you can go back to look at any post), leave comments, and help spread the word!

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16. My Big Fast Car Book

My Big Fast Car Book
Publisher: Ticktock Books
Genre: Children / Cars
ISBN: 978-1-78325-046-2
Pages: 24
Price: $9.99

Buy it at Amazon

Do you know the top speed of the fastest car ever made? Or the most popular pace car at NASCAR races? Or the car that won every racing competition it entered in 1965? My Big Fast Car Book details these fun facts and more with large, full-color pictures.

Kids who love playing with cars will find themselves drawn to the real thing, as they imagine driving at top speeds on open roads. Formula One, NASCAR, the Autobahn, or drag racing, kids can live them all through these pictures.

Reviewer: Alice Berger

The most popular


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17. Diverse? More Multicultural Than I Look

My life is busy and FULL!
My many hats include children’s book author & publisher, reading & play advocate, reading activist who is committed to diversity in children’s books. I am also co-founder of a very important event call Multicultural Children’s Book Day (1/27/2015) which is now approaching it’s second year. Co-founder Mia Wenjen of Pragmatic Mom is raising children in a 1/4 Japanese-American, 1/4 Chinese-American and 1/2 Korean American home. At first glance, my multicultural roots are not obvious, but I can assure you they are there.
val2
On any given day, you may hear as many as six different languages spoken in my home.
My life and household has been diverse and multicultural for as long as I can remember. As the daughter of parents who emigrated from Sweden, I have been immersed in Nordic culture since childhood. As a child I attended German/English schools and as an adult I continued learning even more languages for a grand total of six (English, Swedish, French, Arabic, German, Japanese, plus working knowledge in a few others.)
I am also a wife to a Lebanese/Muslim man and am raising Lebanese-American children post 9/11. I may look like an All-American girl, but my multicultural roots run deep and I have been committed to raising my children as global citizens since the day they were born.  As a family we speak Arabic, French, and English in our home and travel often to give our children exposure to people and various cultures on the globe.
Literacy has played a huge roll in my family. We are a family of avid book readers, however it has been very difficult to find books that have characters who are like my children, global citizens with a diverse and varied background.
Other tidbits of information about my life includes the fact that I am passionate about making kid’s books come alive on my website Jump into a Book where we creating moments for adults and children to share together while bringing the books they’re reading to life. I am the author of The Fox Diaries: The Year the Foxes Came to our Garden, The Ultimate Guide To Charlie and The Chocolate Factory, and most recently A Year in The Secret Garden. In fact, the hard cover of this book was just delivered this week and to say I am giddy with glee is an understatement! You can view more details about my latest book here and I’d live if you connected with me!
A Year in the Secret garden

The post Diverse? More Multicultural Than I Look appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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18. Exclamation Mark - a book review


Punctuation Marks
The period is a busy man.
A small round traffic cop. 
He blocks the helter-skelter words 
And brings them to a stop. 

The question mark's a tiny girl, 
She's small but very wise; 
She asks too many questions 
For a person of her size. 

Of all the punctuation folk, 
I like the comma best. 
For when I'm getting out of breath 
He lets me take a rest. 

Quotation marks are curious. 
When friendly talk begins 
You'll always find these little marks 
Are busy listening in. 

The exclamation mark's an elf, 
Who is easily excited. 
When children laugh or cry or scream 
It's then he's most delighted. 


Whenever you come to the end of a thought,
You sign it off with a polka dot.


Today's featured book:


Title: Exclamation Mark

Author: Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Illustrator:  Tom Lichtenheld


Let's take a peek inside shall we?


























About the book:

Exclamation Mark is a sweet picture book about a punctuation symbol that cannot find his place in the grammar world.  No matter what he does or where he goes he feels he is a misfit.  He bends and contorts and tries to blend in like everyone else but to no avail.  He is just too different from the others around him, causing him great anxiety, confusion and stress.  Why?  Why can't he be like everyone else and have purpose and meaning in his life? 

He befriends the Question Mark who can only (you guessed it) ask questions.  Finally getting overwhelmed by the constant barrage of rapid-fired questions he yells, "Stop!" With that one word his whole world comes into focus and he discovers why he is created and why he is important to the word world around him. His difference offers Exclamation Mark the potential to be exciting, wonderful, and expressive.  "He broke free from his life sentence."


Question Mark found his voice because the world IS full of bold statements and exclamations!  This clever, humorous book teaches you to like yourself, be yourself and be proud of who you are. This splendid and important metaphor is for anyone who feels they don't fit in.  No matter who you are, what you do, or where you go ....you are important and you belong.  Go shout it from the rooftops...... "I am me! I am significant! Period!"

About the author:  




Amy Krouse Rosenthal is a person who likes to make things. Some things she likes to make:
Children's books.
Grown-up books.
Short videos.
Speeches.
Salads.
Connections with the universe.
Something out of nothing.
Wishes.
According to The New York Times, Amy's award-winning children's books "radiate fun the way tulips radiate spring: they are elegant and spirit-lifting."
Her 20+ books for children include EXCLAMATION MARK, LITTLE PEA, SPOON, CHOPSTICKS, DUCK!RABBIT! and PLANT A KISS.
As for her adult work, Amazon named ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AN ORDINARY LIFE one of the top 10 memoirs of the decade. She is also the creator of a specialty line of keepsake journals.
Her viral videos include THE BECKONING OF LOVELY, THE KINDNESS THOUGHT BUBBLE, and THE MONEY TREE. You can also find the videos of her three TEDx talks online.
In the summer of 2013, she embarked on a year-long project to create and launch a new website every Wednesday (awebsiteaweek.weebly.com)


About the illustrator:





I've always loved to draw pictures and make up stories, and I've been lucky enough to make a living by using my imagination for over 25 years.
My earliest childhood memory is of sitting in the kitchen, drawing pictures of ships and trucks on a blackboard. I also remember spending hours staring at the illustrations in National Geographic and thinking how wonderful it would be to be one of the people who got to make all those incredible pictures.
My venture into children's books was a happy accident. It happened like this:
Back in 1995 I got a letter from my nephew Adam, who LOVED pirates, asking me to draw him a picture of a pirate. I sat down at my drawing board to draw a few pirates and ended up creating 20 pages of silly pictures and nonsense about pirates. It was enough to fill a book, so that's what I did. I called it Everything I Know About Pirates. I sent it off to my nephew and saved a copy for myself. After four years of submitting the idea to editors, it was accepted by Simon & Schuster and published in 2000.
The question I hear most often from readers is "Where do you get your ideas?" I get ideas by keeping my eyes and ears open, especially when I'm around kids. Then I try to see things as a child would and write from their perspective. I always write with a specific child in mind, as if we're just having a fun conversation. I try to remember how smart kids are, which is why my books also appeal to older kids and adults.
For inspiration, I have a bunch of photos of kids on my wall. Whenever I'm stuck for an idea, I look at one of those photographs and think to myself, "What would make THAT kid laugh?"
My books start out as rough doodles. An entire book can come from a simple observation and one drawing. For instance, What Are You So Grumpy About? was inspired by a grumpy guy I was sitting next to on an airplane. I did a few doodles on the spot, sitting next to Mr. Grumpypants, and they eventually became a book.
My illustrations are done in watercolor and colored pencil. The first step is pencil sketches, then I create black line art and print it on watercolor paper. (It's kind of like a home-made coloring book!) Then I paint a layer of watercolor and build up the shapes with colored pencils. I get a lot of help from our cats, who lay on my pencils, my drawings, my hands and anything else that puts them in the way of what I'm trying to do.
I couldn't do any of this without my wonderful wife, Jan. She helps edit my ideas and often comes up with ideas for the endings for my books, which is the hardest part. She also helps keep me organized and on schedule. Thank you, Jan!
Until I come up with a better one, that's my story. Thanks for your support..






Book Review Rating:  9 (Close to perfection!)

Read on and read always.

"The way you live each day is a sentence in the story of your life.  Every day, you make the choice whether the sentence ends with a period, a question mark, or exclamation point."

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19. Guest Post for Elf Killers by Carol Marrs Phipps


RRBC MEMBER OF THE MONTH

OCTOBER, 2014
Carol Marrs Phipps
CAROL MARRS PHIPPS is a teacher turned author. She was born in Missouri, grew up in Illinois and lives on their farm in Illinois with her husband, her menagerie, a parrot, a raven, two cockatiels and her Siberian Forest cats. The books she has written with her husband, Tom Phipps include, Elf Killers which takes place a millennium before the books of the Heart of the Staff series: Good SisterBad Sister, The Collector WitchStone Heart, The Burgeoning andThe Reaper Witch, with the final book, Doom, to be released at the end of 2014. All their books are available as eBook or paperback.
Carol taught with her husband on various Native American Reservations in Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada, where they learned a great deal from their students, the very first fans of their writing. Not long after they married, she discovered to her joy that he also loved to write. They have been writing together full-time ever since.

Elf Killers by Carol Marrs Phipps

Carol is one of those uber-supportive members here at Rave Reviews Book Club!  She is very deserving of this award and she will also receive a $10 Amazon Gift Card!  Please support ourMEMBER OF THE MONTH by picking up a copy of either of her books listed below, if you can, supporting her on Social Media and by all means, tweet, re-tweet and share this page thru the month of October in honor of her.
CONGRATULATIONS, Carol on being our October, 2014 MEMBER OF THE MONTH!!!

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20. Black Tower Books On Face Book

Not sure WHO would want this (oh, I am soooooo modest, darlings!) but here is the Face Book page for Black Tower:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Black-Tower-Comics-Books/136656043030326


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21. The Excitement Is Building!!!










Of course, it would not be an event if Black Tower Comics wasn't there!

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22. Legal Drug Manga Review

Name: Legal Drug Genre: Supernatural, Shonen-ai, Mystery Artist: CLAMP Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten (JP),  Dark Horse (US) Serialized In: Monthly Asuka Original Release Date: September 30, 2014 Ah, CLAMP. The doujinshi circle turned all female manga-artist powerhouse and I have an on and off relationship over the years. There’s classic CLAMP that I grew up on ... Read more

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23. We Need Diverse Books Indiegogo Campaign

Shared by Cynthia Leitich Smith
for Cynsations

Be part of the solution!

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24. Not So Horror(ible) YA Books




There are a lot of great horror, but I have a group of students who want to read the genre, but don't care to get scared.  And with that, the birth of this list began.  This is a collaborative list, and I am so thankful to the librarians who helped are out there. Some I've read, some I haven't, but with collective expertise, this could be a helpful list for humorous horror :)





DEVILS AND DEMONS:

Soul Enchilada by David Maccinis Gill

Prom Dates from Hell Rosemary Clement-Moore

Evil Librarian by Michelle Knudsen

Croak by Gina Damico




 









MONSTERS:


Killer Pizza Greg Taylor

Cold Cereal trilogy by Adam Rex




ZOMBIES:

Warm Bodies Isaac Marion

 Eat Brains Love Jeff Hart

 Bad Taste in Boys Carrie Harris

The Infects Sean Beaudoin
Gil’s All Fright Diner by Martinez










WITCHERY AND MAGIC

Hold Me Closer, Necromancer Lish McBride

Hex Hall series by Rachel Hawkins

Rebel Belle by Rachel Hawkins

A Bad Day for Voodoo by Jeff Strand









VAMPIRES:

Jessica’s Guide to Dating on the Dark Side Beth Fantasky

 Thirsty by MT Anderson

Sucks to Be Me by Kimberly Pauley

Fat Vampire by Adam Rex

Reform Vampire Support Group by Jinks













GHOSTS:

School Spirit by Rachel Hawkins

Intertwined by Gena Showalter

The Twelve-Fingered Boy by John Hornor Jacobs
















Other:

The Savages by Matt Whyman
















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25. IT'S THIS WEEKEND!!!


 
Alternative Press Pop-Up / 24th - 26th October 2014 / 139 Greenwich South St  SE10 8NX
 
IT'S THIS WEEKEND!!!
 
DIY Art Show and pop-up zine outlet.
 
Come and see art work, self published
comix, zines, art-books and poetry
pamphlets.
Check out our website here.
Come along over the weekend and,
share ideas, swap zines, buy, sell,
see and do.

Opening times:

Friday, Public View 7 - 11pm
Saturday 11 am - 6pm
(screenprinting workshop 1pm)
Sunday 11am - 6pm
(screenings 1pm)

 
See ya!

 
AP
XX

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