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Results 1 - 25 of 157,531
1. Spotlight on Just A Few Inches by Tara St. Pierre, Plus Giveaway!

Today we're spotlighting Tara St. Pierre's novel, Just A Few Inches. Read on for more about Leah, her novel, an excerpt, plus a giveaway! Meet Tara St. Pierre!     Tara St. Pierre has been writing for over two decades, but her muse only sporadically provides inspiration. Her laptop is filled...

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2. Buying Time to Make Good Art

© Disney, DuckTales

© Disney, DuckTales

Crowdfunding isn’t a new idea, but we haven’t spent much time discussing it here at Pub Crawl– and I think it’s becoming increasingly relevant to writers today who have more options than ever to publish their work.

Platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo have been around for more than seven years, and by far have become the best known way to finance projects and products by appealing directly to the consumers who want them. In comparison to the old standby of PayPal donations, and its many limitations and hassles, if enough people are interested in your Kickstarter project, you will raise enough money to hopefully deliver on your promises. But if you don’t have enough support, your proposed project usually goes away quietly.

Many authors have successfully used Kickstarter to self-publish books, using the funding to hire editors, proofreaders and artists; distribute them in print and electronic forms, and even market them. Considering one of the largest hurdles for self-published writers is spending the money to make their books as polished and professional as traditionally published books (or perhaps even more so), this is a fascinating and exciting way to get work out to readers, as well as promote books before they’re released.

Slightly newer to the scene is Patreon, which has quickly become “the world’s largest crowdfunding site for artists and creators” since it was established in 2013. In a nutshell, Patreon allows people to provide ongoing support to an individual–not necessarily for a particular project–through a monthly commitment of as little as $1. As implied by its name, it’s evoking the old patron model of enabling creative work, while offering supporters incentives like exclusive content, early access, and sometimes even a voice in what work gets produced.

(Another site that has recently appeared is called ko-fi, basically an online tip jar that lets fans buy you a cup of coffee with the click of a button, perhaps more as a sign of appreciation than a viable, continuous income stream.)

Essentially, what all these crowdfunding services offer is a way for fans to buy time for creators to make more of the thing they enjoy, and let them know their work is valued and in demand. As a writer with a job and a toddler, a sink full of dishes and piles of dirty laundry, I often must be picky about what projects I sign up for and prioritize the paying work — contracted books and stories — over the shiny ideas I want to play with, or the unpaid blogging I might want to do. So getting “paid” by patrons to write a fun short story that I may not be able to sell (or the novel I may not be able to sell, yikes)  has a certain appeal. My friend N.K. Jemisin recently launched a Patreon that will allow her to quit her day job, the dream of many a writer, so far attracting more than $3800 in less than a week as of this writing.

The simple fact is most writers can probably produce more if they only had more time, and 40+ hours a week is a lot of time.

As more writers I know create Patreons with a wide range of success, I’ve been thinking more about this phenomenon. (Interestingly, as far as I can tell, not many YA writers have embraced Patreon, but it seems to be gaining popularity in the science fiction and fantasy community, of which I am also a part.) The truth is, I personally have a difficult time separating the idea of crowdfunding from charity, even though intellectually I know that people are buying something they want or rewarding you for something only you can provide. Part of me also imagines this as creating yet another array of deadlines and expectations and obligation to your supporters, who are basically making an investment in you and your work. You have more time, but on some level you’re also more accountable, potentially to dozens if not hundreds of people. How much do you ultimately owe them for helping make it possible?

But I am also aware that one of my hangups is the fear that I won’t get much support, or that I’ll be “competing” with all the other Patreon creators out there for the same dollars. Who needs an additional metric for comparing their own success to that of others? And before you remind me that you shouldn’t compare yourself to others, and that writing and publishing isn’t really a competition, allow me to suggest that this isn’t an entirely irrational consideration. I think a solid fan base is essential to a successful Kickstarter and Patreon, so your newer writers, less published writers, and debut writers probably won’t benefit from them as much — or at all.

What do you think about crowdfunding creative efforts? Have you supported any Kickstarter or Patreon campaigns? What would get you to donate your money to support a writer beyond buying their published work?

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3. Featured Review: Rescued (Ape Quartet #3) by Eliot Schrefer

About this book: Raja has been raised in captivity. Not behind the bars of a zoo, but within the confines of an American home. He was stolen when he was young to be someone's pet. Now he's grown up . . . and is about to be sent away again, to...

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4. Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books I Feel Differently About After Time Has Passed

Welcome to Young Adult Book Central's Top Ten Tuesday post! Each Tuesday we will be hosting a different theme or topic involving all things bookish!!! The Top Ten Tuesday post was originally created at The Broke and The Bookish so visit there site for all the fun details about this awesome meme!!   This week's...

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5. Review: Harmony, USA by Lewis Bryan

Title: Harmony, USA
Author:  Lewis Bryan 
Publisher: BookLogix
Publication date: April 22, 2015
Stars: 4

Summary: Harmony, USA, the quintessential, idyllic small town, is full of beauty and simplicity. But behind the scenes of this neatly kept town lies a killer, and once you begin to peel back the layers, Harmony has secrets upon secrets. 
Everything you convinced yourself is good and pure about small-town life is challenged. One by one, the secrets of Harmony are revealed. You must decide what is right, as you believed it, and what is justice. 
Will those who have done evil ever pull themselves away from the darkness, or will their past consume them forever? 
Harmony lays in the balance.


Review: Harmony, USA by Lewis Bryan was an interesting book to say the least. You would not expect what happens in this little town. Bryan does a great job with the theory of small towns have their secrets. Harmony sure had plenty. Each page kept me intrigued to find out what happened. I myself am not a big fan of mysteries, I feel like you can pick out the killer in the first few pages. But Bryan’s mystery was one that was hard to break. He wrote it in a way that kept you interested yet you couldn’t name the killer. It took me till almost the end of the book to figure it out and I was still shocked at who it was. Although I did feel like focus of the book was not around the killer so much has around sexual assault. There was something that made me feel uncomfortable at times when every character had been sexually assaulted at some point or another. Regardless of that fact the book was extremely well wrote and I highly recommend it to anyone who wants a fast yet good read. 

-Victoria

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6. Debut Year Tips

You learn so much as a debut author, including many of these tips.

http://blog.liviablackburne.com/2015/06/random-practical-tips-for-your-debut.html

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7. The Breakfast Table Book Club

Today’s post is coming to you live from the breakfast table. We get many books to read and review and the really successful ones, the books that become favorites, are those that get the “The Breakfast Table Book Club” approval!

The Breakfast Table Book Club

This is how is works, I have stacks of books everywhere in this house. Often times there are a few books that have recently come in that just sit on the kitchen table. As the family wanders in for breakfast each morning, they’ll grab a book to read while eating their cereal. I always know a popular read when they ask where the book has gone once I move it to the review crates. “When is it coming back?” they ask.

Today I bring you two such titles that have tried to leave the breakfast table but have been a constant companion since they’ve arrived.

The first book is so appropriate for THIS year of all years because it’s an election year. 50 Things You Should Know About American Presidents published by the QEB publishing.

Breakfast table Book Club

Everything you should know about US presidents is broken down into 50 bite-sized chunks. Every president is covered, from the first person to take office George Washington, to our current US president, Barack Obama. Fascinating facts are included on each page, for example, did you know that Franklin D. Roosevelt is the longest serving president ? There are also details about the US political system, clearly stating the changes that have occurred from the 17th century until today.

50-Things-American-presidents1

This is a very colorful book and perfect for reluctant readers. I say this because reluctant readers love little snippets of information as opposed to chapter books. This book is well suited for ages 8 to 12. It has become a greatly loved edition on our breakfast table.

books about Presidents

Our second Breakfast Book Club selection is 50 Things You Should Know About Wild Weather by QEB Publishing. Who doesn’t love wild weather. My children are obsessed with it so you can imagine that a fun book on the breakfast table about wild weather would be very welcomed.

books about weather

Rain or Shine- the weather impacts everything we do. Packed with facts, diagrams, infographics and photos, 50 Things You Should Know About Wild Weather takes you on a whirlwind of discovery. Covering the earth’s atmosphere and how weather works, you’ll find out all you need to know about weather fronts, heat waves, hurricanes, avalanches, ice storms, climate change and our favorite topic, tornados and much, much, more. Filled with facts, figures and world records for the wildest weather ever documented, you’ll also discover storm chasers and weather scientists who have tried their best to keep the weather in check. Be warned, it’s a stormy ride.

50-things-you-should-know-about-wild-weather-spread

Wild Weather is in full color and grabs the eye, drawing the reader in.

Both of these selections will have your children not only reading but reciting and retaining the fun facts they learn about weather and presidents. I’m so happy these books have found their way to our breakfast table.

Thank you to QED for offering us these fine books to review.We highly recommend them. They are perfect for any library public, home or school.

****Some of these links are affiliate links. That means if you click and buy, I may get a very small commission.
This money goes towards postage and supplies to keep books and ideas in the hands of young readers!

 

The post The Breakfast Table Book Club appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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8. Slump


This is the best I can come up with to summarize my feelings about books and blogging right now.  I've been blogging for almost six years and reading for my entire life and I cannot remember a slump of this magnitude before.  I've given up on about half the books I've started, not because of the book itself but just because I couldn't bring myself to care about it.  Books that I know at another time I'd go nuts for.  It comes up as due at the library or the day passes for its release and I just stop trying.  I can count on my hands the number of really great books that I can truly say I've loved this year.

I've read all the great posts and listicles about breaking a reading rut, but I think really you've just gotta stick it out.  It's probably largely related to having just a somewhat rough year in general.  I've mentioned depression and OCD here in the past and largely it's an issue that I have under control.  My depression particularly is cyclical and not something that affects my life 98% of the time.  The OCD is more constant, but it's not usually out of my control.  It's been about five years since my last episode, so I was due for another bout, and this one has been remarkably mild compared to the past. 

 What I'm trying to say is that things are well under control and I'm not really in need of any sympathy or sorrow, but it has seriously messed with my reading mojo.  In the past I've been incapacitated and I'm super proud that this time around I've got a handle on things and life is continuing as normal.  I'm a lot stronger than I used to be.  But this time a thing that I used to basically revolve my life around has become dry and pointless.  I've spent more time in the last two months playing Cascade and Candy Crush than I have reading and it sucks.  I miss reading.  I miss being excited about learning stuff and hearing stories.  

I've spent a lot of time pouring through Library Journal and making lists of books I'm excited about...until I get my hands on a copy, when it suddenly becomes mundane and uninteresting.  I'm not giving up on reading and I'm definitely not giving up my little blog, but it might be slower here for a while.  It's super hard to make myself write a review for a book that I didn't have strong feelings about - and right now that's almost every book.  If I really hate something, I've got lots to say, and if I love something I want to share it with the world, but it's hard to find the motivation to say "meh" about 40 of the 50 odd books I've read this year.  Especially when I don't think many of them actually deserve the "meh" I'm currently giving them.

All that to say, be patient.  I'll be back more regularly when my reading groove gets back.  I'm taking some steps to try to make it easier to read (like deleting games from my phone and only starting books I have a high likelihood of loving), but if any of you have other suggestions I'd love to hear them!


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9. tuesday muffin

Rilla and Huck and a bug book

A lot of the replies to my blog-topics post asked for more glimpses of our tidal homeschooling days, especially how I work with my teens and my elementary-aged kids at the same time. So here’s a peek at a fairly typical Tuesday morning. The broad strokes—the basic rhythms—of our days stay consistent, four days a week (with one morning given to group piano and [for Beanie] literature classes). The details (what exactly we read, do, discuss, sing) vary, but the shape is the same—sort of like a muffin pan. Yeah, that’s it. Our days are like muffins, alike in shape, but we vary the recipe quite a bit. Make sense?

So—during high tide, we do lessons from 9 to noon, more or less. Noon to 1 is lunch and (often) a read-aloud. From 1-3 the younger kids get gaming time (iPad, Wii) and then they play outside most of the rest of the day. The older girls spend their afternoons reading, writing, gaming, walking, and whatever else they have on tap. I work (write) in the afternoons, and sometimes pop out to teach weekly classes to other homeschoolers. For example, I wrapped up a six-week poetry workshop yesterday with a lively group of boys who always keep me laughing. Love those kids.

Anyway, here’s our Tuesday morning.

9 a.m.
Beanie is outlining her Tempest paper for the weekly literature class I teach to her and a few friends.
Huck is playing with refrigerator magnets.
Rilla has drawn a scene from the story of Elissa of Carthage, and is now writing a description under the drawing, complete with Phoenician letters for the names.
Now Huck is noodling around on the piano.

9:15
Read Stone Soup to Huck. Rose stopped unloading the dishwasher to come listen—she says it’s one of her favorite stories from childhood.
While I read, Rilla finished her Elissa of Carthage passage. Beanie moved to another room for better concentration.

9:30
Rose finished the dishes and began making pretzel rolls for our teatime. Huck, Rilla, and I did our morning stretches and recitations. That word sounds so formal! What we do is quite casual. About four mornings a week, we gather in the living room for some singing, memory work, and movement games. It goes something like this:

—We move through a series of stretches (this is mostly for me) which include two planks. During the first plank, we skip-count by sixes; during the second, by sevens.

—Practice the Shakespeare speech or poem we are currently memorizing. Huck, Rilla, and I learn these all together, and usually the older girls wind up knowing them too, because they’re hearing us recite them all the time. This year, I’ve been using Ken Ludwig’s Midsummer Night’s Dream passages from How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare. I had already had Pucks “merry wanderer” speech in mind for Huck and Rilla to learn this year—I earned a small scholarship for performing that one during college, so I’m extra fond of it—when I read the Ludwig book (last summer) and decided his approach meshes perfectly with mine. So: this year they’ve learned “I know a bank where the wild thyme grows,” the merry wanderer monologue, the “Lord what fools these mortals be” speech, and now we’re working on Puck’s final speech (“If we shadows have offended”).

—Then we sing an assortment of memory songs and folk songs. Today it was: U.S. Presidents song; United States song; Horrible Histories English Monarchs song. Yesterday was the same lineup plus Skye Boat Song—a family favorite. This is an informal (meaning not planned-in-advance) part of our day, and basically I just starting singing things and the kids join in. Our Presidents and States songs come from an old Singin’ Smart cassette (cassette!!) I bought back when Jane was little, circa 1999. I wish I could find the booklet—there were some other useful tunes in there. I remember the melody for the U.S. Capitals song and have been meaning to print up a list so my littles can learn to sing along. I’m a big fan of music for anything requiring rote memory. We lean heavily on Schoolhouse Rock around here. Last year our mornings were dominated by French songs, as you may recall.

—This week I started Huck and Rilla on the Latin vocabulary chants from Latin for Children Primer A. We are not doing the workbook—just the rhythmic vocab chants: amo, amare, amavi, amatum and so on. Again, this was something that worked really well with my older set and is a solid, painless way to implant a bunch of Latin roots. We also enjoy my friend Edith Hope Fine’s Cryptomaniacs workbook (Greek and Latin roots)—Rilla will be using that steadily next year.

10 a.m.
Rose’s rolls are in the oven. She’s playing piano. Beanie is doing German on Duolingo. I send the littles outside with a snack.

10:15
Rose heads to her room to maybe do some math? She’s taking business math this year. Yesterday we slogged through the compound interest chapter together. I know you’re jealous. Beanie’s studying geometry, which I find much more entertaining.

I call Huck and Rilla back inside for some history. I read them the Elizabethan Era chapter from A Child’s History of the World—Walter Raleigh, Roanoke, Shakespeare. Long side-discussion of tobacco was sparked by a mention in the chapter. Also a lot of discussion about Roanoke because who isn’t fascinated by that story? I mention to Rose (who is back, checking on her rolls) that Gwenda Bond has a YA novel about Roanoke she might enjoy. This reminds us we need to return some books to the library.

10:45(ish)
Rilla has done a little Math-U-See, and Huck and I had an impromptu chat about the short E sound. He is reading incredibly well these days, devouring Boxcar Children books with ease. I picked up an easy spelling workbook a couple of weeks ago and pull it out occasionally to talk about sounds with him. Rilla is the first of my kids to need some deliberate, steady spelling instruction (she’s using a Spelling You See book this year and really enjoying it because it came with a set of erasable colored pencils, which (art supply) is the key to her heart. With Huck, age 7, I’m now casually pulling out some light spelling games to help him start making those phonics-y connections.

Okay, so that was going on but only for a few minutes, and now Rose’s pretzel rolls are ready. We hurry to the table to enjoy them while they’re warm. Tuesday mornings are our Poetry Teatime—which for us generally means Something Rose Baked and a glass of milk. I usually grab our battered Favorite Poems Old and New and read six or seven poems. Not a week goes by that they don’t beg for their favorite, To My Son Thomas…some days I have it in me, and other weeks I’m not up to the performance. When you do that poem, you gotta DO that poem. 🙂

11:10
Huck and Rilla have gone off to play together. This usually means I will find my bed turned into a fort later. Last week, it became some kind of Monkey Kingdom and I had stuffed primates hanging from the miniblind cords all week.

Time for some history with Rose and Beanie. Today was a selection from Don’t Know Much About American History, one of several books we rotate through. Charles Lindbergh, mostly.

11:45
I go grab a sweater from my room. Sure enough, every pillow in the house is piled high. I send Huck and Rilla to get their shoes on. Rose and Beanie are at the piano again, working out a duet—Beanie began taking violin lessons a few months ago and likes to try to work out simple accompaniment to the pieces Rose is working on for piano class.

Everyone piles into the minivan for a quick library run. We have a million things to return. Rilla found a new graphic novel, Jellaby: The Lost Monster, that looks fun. Rose recommended Sarah Zettel’s Palace of Spies for Beanie—a YA historical novel I read for the 2014 CYBILs and passed along to Rose when I finished.

12:30
Home for a late lunch. I forgot to read our chapter of From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler! I’ll have to try to squeeze it in after dinner. This is because—in an unprecedented development—I went into Scott’s office (aka our boys’ bedroom) to give him a package that had arrived, and I stretched out on the bed just for a second and fell asleep. I never nap.

1:05
I guess I napped. Scott is amused. I’m totally discombobulated. Wonderboy is just arriving home from school and the littles are already deep into Terraria. Jane is pinging me from college. My afternoon has begun.

Palace of Spies by Sarah Zettel Jellaby The Lost Monster by Kean Soo Greek and Latin for Cryptomaniacs by Edith Hope Fine How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare by Ken Ludwig Blackwood by Gwenda Bond Stone Soup by Marcia Brown Don't Know Much About History by Kenneth C. Davis From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler Favorite Poems Old and New

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10. Pop-Up London - a bookwrap






From Lonely Planet Kids comes a wonderful series of pop-up books. Here they are for you to take a peek at...









Who is Lonely Planets Kids?

From the world's leading travel publisher comes Lonely Planet Kids, a children's imprint that brings the world to life for young explorers everywhere. With a range of beautiful books for children aged 5-12, we're kickstarting the travel bug and showing kids just how amazing our planet can be.
From bright and bold sticker activity books, to beautiful gift titles bursting at the seams with amazing facts, we aim to inspire and delight curious kids, showing them the rich diversity of people, places and cultures that surrounds us. We pledge to share our enthusiasm and love of the world, our sense of humour and continual fascination for what it is that makes the world we live in the diverse and magnificent place it is.

It's going to be a big adventure - come explore!




Unwrapping...





Pop-up London
Ages 8-12



Let's take a peek inside shall we? 











Unwrapping... London!!


Are you all packed?  Have you got the plane tickets?  Let's go.....we are London bound!  I am so glad we read the new pop-up book before we left so that the amazing iconic landmarks can now be included in our visit.  I especially liked the map that was included in the back so we won't get lost.  Great feature. 

The city became animated right before our eyes as we flipped from page to page.  Six 3-D pages popped up and we discovered Buckingham Palace, The Shard, the Tower of London, Trafalgar Square, St. Paul's Cathedral and the London Underground, fondly known as the tube.

Blimey!! A smashing time we are in for.  You are invited to join us as we explore the wonders and magic of London, England. Here's a ticket for you.... Cheerio! Pip! Pip!





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I put hours of work finding the best kid's books to review for you each day.  If you enjoy visiting Storywraps and would like to donate something for my time and effort I would greatly appreciate it.

Go to the top of my blog on the right hand corner (above my photo) and please donate what you feel lead to give.  The amount you donate and the frequency you donate is totally up to you.  I thank you in advance for your support.  I love what I do and appreciate any amount that you may give so I can make our community even better.  Thanks a million! 



 

Read on and read always!


It's a wrap.

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11. Do Your Best Writing: Kick Down the Bumpers by Julie Falatko

Today's post is by picture book author, Julie Falatko.

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12. Author Chat with Melissa Hart, Plus Giveaway!

Today we're excited to chat with Melissa Hart, author of Avenging the Owl! Below  you'll find our interview, more about Melissa and her book, plus a giveaway!     YABC:  What surprised you most while writing your latest book? Melissa Hart: I’m used to writing memoir about my own life, and mostly for adults. What surprised...

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13. Angel Above the Sea

Fr. Seraphim Gascoigne’s Angel Above the Sea brings to life a frightening time and place in 20th Century history. Seen largely through the eyes of two disparate characters, the Japanese occupation of Shanghai holds many intertwining stories. Shanghai street urchin Tien Loi, searching for his sister, crosses paths with Sawabe Tomasu, an idealistic Japanese Imperial officer who is at heart an artist longing to return to his training in Paris.  City crimelords, occupying troops with corrupt officers, student resistance bands, and strange supernatural beings weave their way through the narrative. Western readers may be surprised to find a Russian Orthodox cathedral in the midst of the wartime chaos, where it stands as a haven for the street children and a jewelbox of beauty against the backdrop of death and destruction.  Preteens and young adults will enjoy following Tien Loi on his dangerous and meandering pilgrimage, encountering friends and foes,  close calls and mystical experiences. 

Read the first chapter now on Amazon's First Look feature. 

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14. BURNING by Danielle Rollins | Orange is the New Black Meets Stephen King's Firestarter

 Review by Krista BURNINGby Danielle RollinsHardcover: 352 pagesPublisher: Bloomsbury USA Childrens (April 5, 2016)Language: EnglishGoodreads | Amazon Tucked away, deep in the woods, Brunesfield Correctional Facility's cold walls and empty hallways keep dangerous girls away from the world . . . girls like Angela Davis, whose fate was determined by one bad decision. After a few years in juvie

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15. What's New in YA--May 24, 2016

Are you wondering what's new in YA  today? Check out these wonderful new releases!       Breaking up with her boyfriend is not how Veda planned on starting her summer. When Mark makes it clear that it’s over between them, Veda is heartbroken and humiliated—but, more importantly, she’s inspired. And so she...

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16. Painting with Primaries

Our local school is building a Natural Playground, and they are holding several fundraisers. I was recently asked to be part of a Really Good Idea for a fundraiser, which I think would make a fun library program! The idea, which was hatched and hosted by the owner of our local craft shop, was this: local artists would each lead a classroom in painting a large 2-foot square painting which would then be auctioned off.
IMG_1399
I was happy to find out that I was chosen to work with the Grade Primary class (here in Nova Scotia that translates to Kindergarten). I went with a big flower for them to paint. I had them in groups of 3 — the painting had seven areas to be painted, and I had each group work on a section. I might be biased, but I love our painting the most. I love the colours and the freedom of expression that 4 & 5 year olds are unafraid to exhibit. I really didn’t paint much at all— I gave them tips, and once had to quickly grab a paintbrush from an over-exuberant artist who was about to turn the whole thing into a big smear.

I started in the classroom with a stack of books and talked to them about art in picture books.  I read Viva Frida by Yuyi Morales to them and we talked about the art in that book. Their teacher had been part of some workshops I did earlier in the school year, and she had them looking closely at the art in picture books, so this group of 4-5 year olds were pretty savvy about examining the pictures. We had a lively discussion about the art and how everyone can do art. I was impressed that they were able to determine the medium, and talk a little about shape and colour.

I love to combine literacy with art lessons, and this project – and a Caldecott honour book – allowed me to do that. We also did a really great painting which will help raise money for a playground that will further their learning in the great outdoors. IMG_1401

So— to turn this into a library program, you could buy several large canvases (you can get them for a pretty decent price at dollar stores these days). Draw the outlines on the canvases, and have your program participants paint them in, using acrylic paint (again, a fairly inexpensive investment at dollar stores). These could hang in the children’s area, could be donated for charity fundraisers, or you could auction them as library fundraisers. Add a few books on art and a few art picture books, and you’ve got yourself a fairly simple, low-cost program that kids will remember each time they see those paintings. Host an art show in your library and you’ve got another program that will draw in the families of the kids who did the paintings. Art and literacy. They make good companions.

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17. Romance Novel That Will Touch Your Heart!



Miranda Mayne, the daughter of a notorious pirate, spent most of her life in the hustle and bustle of London society, though her true love was always the sea. Promising her father she will stay away from the life that killed her mother, Miranda accepts the marriage proposal of a man she thinks she can trust—only to discover that his true intentions are to secretly capture her father. Trapped between loyalty and deceit, Miranda’s heart falls prey for her true match only to find that he is out of her reach. Will she lose everything she holds dear or can she save her father, find true love, and most of all—find herself before reality prevails?

What others are saying!

"Wow this book had me captivated with a true romance novel with the heroine, hero, and villain along with innocent bystanders made this story one of a kind yet reminded of a Jane Austin classic with the time period of the story. I chose the marking of some violence and sexual content because there was some but it was all so romantic and intriguing. There were times when it was hot and heavy, ruthless, dangerous, on the edge of the seat kind of relationships that you could really feel and be drawn into the story line. This is a book that is very hard to put down until you finish it! I have read many of Renee Hand's books for her younger audiences and since this is the first adult novel I have read of hers I was pleasantly surprised and very pleased to have been able to read a different genre of Renee's. Kudos for a job well done!! Loved it!"--Missy Mae-Amazon


"Loves' Conqueror is a well developed historical romance that will take the reader on a journey of two characters and their struggle to find true love. Beginning with the most notorious pirate on the seas and the woman who dared to love him. Her death in childbirth caused many changes in the hard core pirate. Forcing his daughter to live a pampered life in London away from him. Knowing that her father would approve, Miranda Mayne accepts a marriage proposal from an accomplished man who has ties with the crown. It isn't until she discovers that her fiance's goal is to find and destroy her father, that she realizes she made a mistake. Forced on a journey where she is used as a pawn, she finds love with the captain of the ship, only to learn that he is out of her reach. Determined to find her father before her fiance does, and wiggle her way into the heart of the man she loves, Miranda digs deep within herself and finds a strength she never knew she possessed.  This is a well written page turner that will capture the hearts of others." Children's Book Reviewer




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18. Next Year's Readers: Three Next-In-The-Series



I believe in the power of series books.

I believe in the power of graphic novels.

Here are three next-in-the-series graphic novels that are on my TBR pile for the first week of June:



Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales: Alamo All-Stars
by Nathan Hale
Amulet Books, 2016

It was fun to sit and listen to a group of girls talk about the merits of this series last week. They are good readers and detail-oriented, so the amount of smaller-font text doesn't put them off. They each have a different favorite in the series, but none of them has read Donner Dinner Party yet (my personal favorite). They talked about how this is the kind of series where it's important to read the first one first so that you understand why Nathan Hale (the historic character) is telling all these stories (to delay his hanging). After that, you can read them in any order.

Thank you, Nathan Hale (the author) for making history fun and accessible!



by Judd Winick
Random House Books for Young Readers, 2016

This is book two. The first book in this series ended on such (SUCH) a cliffhanger that I can't believe I'm not reading this book right now. (And as I typed that, I just guilted myself into taking this copy to school for the last 8 days so that every child who groaned audibly upon finishing it will be able to read book two before going on to middle school.)

HiLo is my new favorite superhero. Read this series; he'll be your favorite, too!




by Mike Maihack
Scholastic GRAPHIX, 2016

I love graphic novels with strong female characters who are cast as adventurers and sheroes. Bring on Cleopatra, Emily (in Amulet), Claudette (Giants Beware and Dragons Beware), and Zita (Spacegirl).

Don't get me wrong. There's a place for Babysitters' Club. I'm just loving these strong, capable girl sheroes.


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19. Preparing for the 2016 ALSC President’s Program

Environments are imbued with ideals and beliefs about the core values of their institutions.  As public libraries move to a more patron-centered approach, library settings become less formal and more available for collaborative and creative practices.  This year, ALSC President Andrew Medlar will share his vision for active and child-centered learning spaces throughout American Libraries at his Charlemae Rollins President’s Program:  Libraries: The Space to Be. 

Chicago Public Library is the home of Charlemae Rollins, and here at CPL, we see it as our role to enliven the spaces in our children’s rooms in order to encourage and promote what Fred Rogers called “the work of childhood” play-based learning. By creating meaningful and child-friendly spaces, we serve children and their families more deeply.  It is our goal to create active learning spaces that are a meaningful educator for our children and our communities.  Our libraries are considered pioneers in incorporating STEAM opportunities for child and parent engagement, and we are designing space across our system to meet the needs of 21st Century children and families.  This means age designated ‘neighborhoods’ areas for creativity, collaboration and lots of ways to encourage moments of sharing.  We believe sharing is learning and we want to encourage that in both formal and informal settings.  As our new flagship main children’s library opens later this year, we will roll out even more ways upon which STEAM, early learning and school-aged families can read, discover and create.

In San Francisco, our libraries are family destinations for discovery and community engagement. As part of the library’s early literacy initiative, we partner with the Burgeon Group to design and embed Play to Learn areas in each location.  These site-specific transformations are beacons of play incorporating colorful interactive panels, multilingual features, developmentally appropriate experiences, fine gross activities, texture and tracing elements all to spark spontaneous conversations and build key literacy skills.  (Stoltz, Conner, & Bradbury, 2014) From nook to cubes and the flagship installation at the Main Library, parents, caregivers and most importantly children know play is welcome at the library.

Successful play spaces are those that engage children’s interest; inspire creativity; allow physical movement; and encourage interaction with both materials in the space and with other children.  Many early childhood spaces are modeled on the Reggio Emilia approach, starting with a welcoming space that is arranged to provide opportunities for children to make choices and discover on their own.  Once children have explored, adults facilitate play around subjects or objects in which the child shows interest. This child-driven model is a natural fit for an active learning setting in a library, where children have free access to a variety of resources from books to toys to art materials.  Research shows that having quality books placed at children’s eye level supports literacy-related activities like those that occur when children play in library spaces. (Neuman, 1999)

The Reggio Emilia approach has also been shown to be equally effective for young children who do not speak English, a situation common in Chicago and San Francisco (Zhang, Fallon & Kim, 2009).  Leslie William and Yvonne DeGaetano note the importance of creating culturally relevant spaces based on children’s own communities in Alerta:  A MultiCultural, Bilingual Approach to Teaching Young Children.

Play is a necessary building block for children’s brain development, along with culture and the creative mindset. (Gauntlett & Thomsen, 2013) It is so essential for life that the United Nations recognizes play as a human right for every child.  Play allows children to explore and experiment with their environments, building synaptic connections in the brain and helping children establish problem solving skills as early as 6 months of age.  The American Library Association-Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) recommends that play be incorporated into library programming, recognizing the direct correlation between play and early literacy.

There are five general types of play that children engage in.  These can all be supported in our libraries, and each type of play supports both children’s general development and literacy in a variety of ways.  These include:

  • sensory play
  • constructive play with objects
  •  symbolic play
  • pretend play
  • rule-based play such as games.

Some of the elements that are shared by both Chicago Public Library and San Francisco Public Library include:

  • Creation of connections and sense of belonging
  • Flexible and open-ended materials
  • Materials that support the ECRR2 practices ( TALK, SING, READ, WRITE, PLAY)
  • Stimulation of wonder, curiosity and intellectual engagement for children and their caregivers
  • Symbolic representations, literacy and visual arts
  • Flexible furniture and arrangements
  • Different levels and heights of displays or tools
  • Nooks to read and/or work
  • Open-ended activities and tools that can be transformed by the child’s interest
  • Places for individuals as well as groups
  • Creation Station and maker areas for encouraging design, exploration and creation
  • Parent and caregiver incubator space
  • Areas and resources for constructive, dramatic and creative play
  • Appealing signage and parent tips to support family learning

As co-chairs, we are eager to have you join us at President Medlar’s Charlemae Rollins President’s Program to learn more about successful elements of library design for 21st Century Kids and hope to see you there!

— Liz McChesney, Director of Children’s Services, Chicago Public Library
— Christy Estrovitz, Manager of Youth Services, San Francisco Public Library

References

  • Stoltz, Dorthy, Marisa Conner, James Bradbury. (2014). The Power of Play: Designing Early Learning Spaces. ALA Editions.
  • Gauntlett, David & Thomsen, Bo Stjerne. (2013). Cultures of Creativity: Nurturing Creative Minds Across Cultures. The LEGO Foundation.
  • Nespeca, Sue McCleaf. (2012) The Importance of Play, Particularly Constructive Play, in Public Library Programming.
  • Zhang, Jie, Fallon, Moira & Kim, Eun-Joo. The Reggio Emilia Curricular Approach for Enhancing Play Development of Young Children.

The post Preparing for the 2016 ALSC President’s Program appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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20. Author Chat with Megan Miranda & Megan Shephard, Plus Giveaway!

Hi, YABC readers! This is Megan “Shep” Shepherd and Megan “MM” Miranda. In case you haven’t noticed, we’ve been staging a YABC takeover all week. This installment is less about an evil plot for world domination and more about all things books: our writing processes, our relationship as critique partners,...

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21. Spotlight on Just A Few Inches by Tara St. Pierre, Plus Giveaway!

Today we're spotlighting Tara St. Pierre's novel, Just A Few Inches! Read on for more about Tara St. Pierre, her novel, an excerpt, plus a giveaway! Meet Tara St. Pierre!     Tara St. Pierre has been writing for over two decades, but her muse only sporadically provides inspiration. Her laptop is...

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22. Dr. Noize Presents... Phineas McBoof Crashes The Symphony - a musicwrap



A tale bristling with zany humour in a glorious symphonic setting

Dr. Noize presents...

'PHINEAS McBOOF CRASHES THE SYMPHONY'

A FUN-FILLED, TWO-ACT MUSICAL FOR FAMILIES

with

GRAMMY WINNING OPERA STARS NATHAN GUNN & ISABEL LEONARD & THE CITY OF PRAUGE PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA







Unwrapping...










"Phineas McBoof Crashes the Symphony"

Release date:  July 15, 2016

Ages: 8+


Running time:  Act 1 (CD #1) 74 minutes
                          Act 2 (CD #2) 77 minutes




Media Buzz...


"Agenda Recommends - This enormously silly CD is perfect for little ones... But it's also educational!  Like Peter and the Wolf  but more fun, this wildly danceable story-album introduces kids to musical instruments, styles, and composition." - New York Magazine/ Vulture



Unwrapping the fun...


Four years after the last Dr. Noize album comes the third installment in the award-winning Phineas McBoof series.  It is a full-length, two act musical about the symphony, friendship and purpose, for adventurers of all ages. It will be released July 15, 2016. Previous Dr. Noise albums include Grammaropolis (2012), The Return of Phineas McBoof (2011), and The Ballad of Phineas McBoof (2010).  

This is a screw-ball musical comedy, complete with fast, zany repartee, where the leading characters have over-the-top dramatic ranges that will mesmerize both young and old.  The plot, which could be an offspring of Monty Python, is backed by the full forces of the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Kyle Pickett, playing a brilliant score whose colourful orchestrations is match by the integrity and sophistication of the musical material.  


Everyone will adore the album's colourful characters as they find themselves engages in a dramatic, mysterious, high-stakes tale of love, friendship, commitment, and self-improvement in which Phineas learns that the real purpose of striving for great art is to share moments, dreams, and emotions with friends.  Along the way Cory Cullinan embeds into this  musical adventure valuable information about orchestration, instrumentation, music history, Beethoven, sonata form, popular song structure and more, illustrated through the rich detail of the musical composition itself.

The CD features: What Kid's Want,  The Bunny Hop, Movin' On, 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 A Song, Beethoven's 5th Symphony, the Title Track and many,many more!



Phineas McBoof is available at Amazon, CDbaby, and iTunes

Check out Doctor Noise website at:

www.doctornoize.com



About Cory Cullinan...


Cory holds degrees in Music and Political Science from Stanford University, where he graduated with Distinction and Honors.  During five years as a high school music teacher in Silicon Valley, Cory conducted youth choirs to major awards and taught a music history elective that became so popular it was made a required freshman course.  In 2010 he released The Ballad of Phineas McBoof, and the rest is history!



Awards and accolades by Doctor Noize...

*Parents Choice
*Doctor Toy
*Grammaropolis was a Top 10 hit son on Sirius XM's Kids Place Live




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23. Hair care for strong, beautiful hair

beautiful-hairEverybody aspires to have beautiful hair that is string and enhances their appearance. However, what many people do not know is that for any beautiful hair that is seen in public, a lot of work has gone into it. Any treatment given to hair makes it to respond by being healthy. Apart from the bad hair days, neglected hair is an embarrassment to the individual. Therefore it is easy to identify hair that is neglected and not taken care of. Therefore everyone should strive at working on their hair apart from the usual grooming of having a good dress. A good dress with neglected hair makes the whole grooming wrong.

 

The Benefit of using Biotin 5000

Biotin has been associated with healthy skin, nails and also for a healthy pregnancy. However it is important to note that biotin 5000 is also useful for the hair. It adds to the health of the hair by strengthening it. It is usually added on most hair products because of this. When one goes for shopping of a hair product and gets one that has this mineral, they should know that their search for a hair strengthening product is over. It is important to note at this point that, it is also available in plenty as a supplement. The doctor or dermatologist can advise one to use it for better skin, strong nails and hair. It is also recommended for pregnant women. One should always strive to take the right quantity of prescription but in case of an overdose, the body will always get rid of it in urine or increased sweating rate. When there is an overdose, it tends to increase the rate of urine since it is also water soluble. The body will always take just what it needs to function and get rid of the rest.

Are there tablets that increase the hair growth rate?

In the hair market today, there are dht blockers. Their existence has enhanced the maintenance of long hair. When one suffers from slow growth rate they can just pop in, these tablets. When one is ready to use them, they can just get more information from the internet and also consult widely before they settle on a particular brand. Use them and once the desired results have been acquired, their usage should be stopped.

The use of the natural hair loss shampoo

One can also improve the care for their hair by washing with natural hair loss shampoo. This has the ability to prevent all hair losses using natural remedies. The most common things to include in the shampoo include cabbage and carrot juice.

The use of argan hair shampoo

When one decides to use the argan hair shampoo, they should be aware that their hair will be conditioned and improve in appearance. Another thing is that the hair is moisturized and protected against harmful conditions like the harsh sunshine.

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24. Flora and the Peacocks by Molly Idle


Molly Idle is the brilliant creator (and choreographer) of the first two books about Flora, an expressive, if not always graceful, little girl who seems to find herself frolicking with birds of all shapes and sizes. Flora, in a swimsuit, swim cap and flippers, has danced with a flamingo. Flora has skated with a penguin. Now, in Flora and the Peacocks, Flora faces her greatest challenge - dancing with not one, but two peacocks.


For this dance, Flora has a fan and two elegant partners. As with the first two books, clever flaps change the plot of these wordless picture books with just a flip. Flora's fan and the tails of the peacocks flip and flap to change the tone as the three try to orchestrate a dance that leaves no one out. 





As you might expect, there are jealous moments, frustrating turns and even some stomping off stage. But, Flora and the peacocks find a way to dance together by the end of the book, which culminates in a magnificent gatefold that opens to a huge 18 by 33 inches. Besides being gorgeously illustrated, all three of Idle's Flora books are examples of masterful design and paper engineering that make these stories so readable and memorable. It's hard to capture all of the magic of the Flora books in words. Happily, Chronicle Books, the publisher of these excellent books, has made a book trailer!


Source: Review Copy

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25. catherine-nicholas: I started a tinyletter!  It’s about the Kardashians (and murder, and women, and...

catherine-nicholas:

I started a tinyletter!  It’s about the Kardashians (and murder, and women, and invisible laws and shadow trials).  I’ve so enjoyed the tinyletters I subscribe to.  Here’s a little list:

Black Cardigan by Carrie Frye: light and clever, earnest and broad.  For people who like Harriet the Spy, Hilary Mantel, and occasionally discovering an archaic word.

when I sing along with you by Zan Romanoff: the complications of accomplishment, the many weirdnesses of publishing, and One Directionitis.  @zanopticon has not one but TWO books coming out, this feels like riding shotgun next to her on the way there.

Like This by Meaghan O’Connell: Love her in NY Mag, love her here.

Reading the Tarot by Jessa Crispin: “Day Five.  Tower again. Fuck off, I think. One time I pulled Temperance 10 days in a row. I was in Budapest and then en route to Timisoara. Things were not going well.“

Coffee & TV by Ruth Curry: if you want to cry about someone else being moved to tears by Orphan Black

Intermittent Theories by Lucy Morris: Lucy Morris can just write the shit out of a newsletter.  “This is perhaps why things I wrote when I was 22 do not particularly embarrass me, as I understand they are supposed to; I fault myself for many things but never my attempts at understanding something in the center of it all, and in the face of that endeavor, it has always been difficult for me to care about the fine-tuning of structure or the making of sentences.“

mmmm, vol 1. by cassiem: She moved to DC, what now?

This is the nicest description of the Black Cardigan newsletter! Also: the other newsletters mentioned here are all wonderful and worth subscribing too.

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