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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Music, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 1,865
1. Adolescents and adolescence: the glass really is half-full

Recently I was invited to be the guest clinician for a school district’s new young men’s choral festival. The original composition of the festival changed over the course of planning and, long story short, I ended up with a group of 79 fourth- through ninth-grade male singers.

The post Adolescents and adolescence: the glass really is half-full appeared first on OUPblog.

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2. Cornetist memories: A Q&A with Hannah McGuffie

Our instrument of the month for February is the popular and melodic cornet. We sat down with Hannah McGuffie, Senior Marketing Manager for History and Science and lifelong cornetist, to talk about the joys and challenges of the instrument.

The post Cornetist memories: A Q&A with Hannah McGuffie appeared first on OUPblog.

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3. Music therapy and Arts Based Research

Arts Based Research offers a new and diverse method for inquiring about the world around us. Whether examining social sciences or healthcare, this field offers a different approach and establishes an innovative framework for inquiry. We spoke with Professor Jane Edwards, the guest editor for a special issue of the Journal of Music Therapy, about her perspective on this emerging field.

The post Music therapy and Arts Based Research appeared first on OUPblog.

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4. The fortepiano: capturing the sound aesthetic for modern playing

Grappling with performing the music of early Beethoven, Mozart, and Haydn on the modern piano can be a daunting experience. The modern piano is not the instrument for which their music was composed. Beethoven, Mozart, and Haydn all preferred Viennese pianos (today called the fortepiano) and the traits from the inside out are distinctly different than those of the modern piano.

The post The fortepiano: capturing the sound aesthetic for modern playing appeared first on OUPblog.

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5. New Year’s Resolutions for the music classroom

It’s a bright new year and time to shed off the old, but that doesn’t mean we can’t partake in some favored traditions - especially making New Year’s resolutions. If you’re a teacher or professor, the New Year usually means a new semester, and the opportunity to start fresh by teaching a new class, or bring rejuvenation to your students post-holiday.

The post New Year’s Resolutions for the music classroom appeared first on OUPblog.

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6. The truth about “Auld Lang Syne”

"I may say, of myself and Copperfield, in words we have sung together before now, that
'We twa hae run about the braes
And pu’d the gowans fine'
'—in a figurative point of view—on several occasions. I am not exactly aware,' said Mr. Micawber, with the old roll in his voice, and the old indescribable air of saying something genteel, ‘what gowans may be, but I have no doubt that Copperfield and myself would have frequently taken a pull at them, if it had been feasible.'"

Over the years since it was written, many millions must have sung ‘Auld Lang Syne’ (roughly translated as ‘days long past’) while sharing Mr Micawber’s ignorance of what of its words actually mean.

The post The truth about “Auld Lang Syne” appeared first on OUPblog.

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7. David Bowie: Everything has changed, he changed everything

Though David Robert Jones, the boy from Brixton, is no longer with us, David Bowie, the artist, through his music, films, plays, paintings, and explorations of gender, sexuality, religion, love, fear, and death, remains.

The post David Bowie: Everything has changed, he changed everything appeared first on OUPblog.

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8. Grove Music announces its third Spoof Article Contest

It’s that time of year again! We invite you to submit your entry for Grove Music’s Spoof Article Contest, and as usual the winning entry will be announced on April Fool’s Day. Spoof articles have been part of Grove’s history for several decades; it seems that our authors have always had an inclination toward humor.

The post Grove Music announces its third Spoof Article Contest appeared first on OUPblog.

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9. Sounds Like Me: My Life (so far) in Song by Sara Bareilles

In her book Sounds Like Me: My Life (so far) in Song, Sara Bareilles proves to be just as candid and charming on the page as she is on stage. Whether it's talking about her grade school years, her anxieties, or the true story behind her hit Love Song, Sara is frank, funny, and open about her life, her career, her struggles, and her triumphs. Her very naturalistic, conversational writing style makes her comes across like a friend talking to you at the dinner table or over the phone, equal parts self-deprecating, hopeful, grateful, and humble.

Sara relates her stories in nine chapters - or essays, if you prefer - each bearing the title of a song she's written. (The section also begins with that song's lyrics, handwritten, which is a very nice touch.) As one might assume with a biography, the book begins with her childhood and ends with her current work on the musical Waitress and is lightly peppered with photographs. In-between, we get a glimpse into her early songs and shows, the year she spent in Italy in college, and her first love and heartbreak. Fellow performers will enjoy the details of life on the road, the gigs when she was just starting out as well as the times she performed in large arenas or on television shows, and so forth, but moreover, they will find connection and comfort in knowing the difficulties Sara faced breaking into the business (and the continued difficulties staying there) as well as the doubt, worry, and vulnerability she feels when writing new songs, collaborating with others, or trying to express her truest feelings in music and words.

Mid-way through the book, in the chapter Beautiful Girl, Sara writes letters to her younger self. This is possibly my favorite section of the book, and it serves as a reminder to be our own best friends, to stop putting ourselves down and to keep our chins up, because time and experience can truly make things better and clearer.

This book will be treasured by Sara Bareilles's fans. I also hope it reaches people who perhaps haven't heard her music, who find her through this book first, because what an amazing experience that would be, to be moved enough by this book and these words to go pick up her CDs. I only wish this book contained all of her albums - but, wait, I already have those. :)

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10. Lulu at the Met (November 2015): A good thing becomes too much

Alban Berg’s Lulu is generally acknowledged as one of the master pieces of twentieth century opera. However, because of its many musical and theatrical challenges, it is seldom performed. The last time Lulu was seen at the Metropolitan opera was in 1980.

The post Lulu at the Met (November 2015): A good thing becomes too much appeared first on OUPblog.

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11. Let’s look at Doomboy Graphic Novel by Tony Sandoval. A Rockin book!

Doomboy by Tony Sandoval is a story about a metal musician “Doomboy” and how he copes with a loss of a loved one through music and…

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12. In memoriam: Pierre Boulez

I’ve been very struck over the past couple of days listening to the testimony of so many musicians who worked with Pierre Boulez. They all seem to say the same thing. He had a phenomenal understanding of the music (his own and that of others), he had an extraordinary ear, and he was a joy to work with because he gave so much.

The post In memoriam: Pierre Boulez appeared first on OUPblog.

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13. He should have been immortal

Anything I was going to post seems irrelevant in the face of losing David Bowie. Such a great and wondrous talent the world has lost; he was truly irreplaceable.

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14. Poetry Friday: Wait For It from Hamilton

Love doesn't discriminate
Between the sinners
And the saints
It takes and it takes and it takes
And we keep loving anyway
We laugh
And we cry
And we break
And we make our mistakes
And if there's a reason I'm by her side
When so many have tried
Then I'm willing to wait for it
I'm willing to wait for it...

Death doesn't discriminate
Between the sinners
And the saints
It takes and it takes and it takes
And we keep living anyway
We rise
And we fall
And we break
And we make our mistakes
And if there's a reason I'm still alive
When everyone who loves me has died
I'm willing to wait for it
I'm willing to wait for it...

I am the one thing in life I can control
I am inimitable
I am an original
I'm not falling behind or running late
I'm not standing still
I am lying in wait

Life doesn't discriminate
Between the sinners and the saints
It takes and it takes and it takes
And we keep living anyway
We rise
And we fall
And we break
And we make our mistakes
And if there's a reason I'm still alive
When so many have died
Then I'm willin' to-
Wait for it.

- selected lyrics from the song Wait For It from the musical Hamilton

View all posts tagged as Poetry Friday at Bildungsroman.

View the roundup schedule at A Year of Reading.

Learn more about Poetry Friday.

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15. Learning from music therapy – Episode 30 – The Oxford Comment

More than ever before, educators around the world are employing innovative methods to nurture growth, creativity, and intelligence in the classroom. Even so, finding groundbreaking ways to get through to students can be an uphill battle, particularly for students with special needs.

The post Learning from music therapy – Episode 30 – The Oxford Comment appeared first on OUPblog.

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16. An interview with oboist Heather Calow

This month we're spotlighting the unique and beautiful oboe. We asked Heather Calow, lifelong oboe player and now an oboe teacher based in Leicester, UK, what first drew her to the instrument.

The post An interview with oboist Heather Calow appeared first on OUPblog.

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17. The music parenting tightrope

Walking the music parenting tightrope isn’t easy for music moms and dads. Figuring out how to be helpful without turning into an overbearing nag can be tricky, especially during a youngster’s early adolescent years. Those often-turbulent years can upend many aspects of a child’s life, including music.

The post The music parenting tightrope appeared first on OUPblog.

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18. Make It Pop Season 2

MAKE IT POP : "The GiftMake It Pop Returns for Season 2

Nickelodeon’s music-infused series, Make It Pop, returns for a 20-episode second season starting Monday, January 4, at 7 p.m. (ET/PT). With all new songs and performances, heightened drama, and lots of laughs, season two will continue to follow social-media maven Sun Hi (Megan Lee), bookish Corki (Erika Tham), fashion-forward Jodi (Louriza Tronco), and DJ Caleb (Dale Whibley) at Mackendrick Prep, who, out of their love of music, formed the band XO-IQ.

MAKE IT POP SEASON 2 Faced with bigger challenges and higher stakes in season two, XO-IQ has yet to reunite after a number of setbacks. Corki is in danger of being removed from Mackendrick Prep by her father, Jodi is deciding if she should pursue her love of fashion, and now that Sun Hi is clashing with hotshot guitarist Linc, it looks like XO-IQ might be over, until a new band competition and rival boy band emerge and change everything.

Will you be watching? Leave a Comment!

Sonja, STACKS Staffer

 

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19. Top 10 Christmas carols countdown

Christmas is the busiest time of year by far for the Oxford Music Hire Library. Oxford University Press publishes most of the carols the world knows and loves – the one that has just popped into your head is probably one of ours – with newly-composed Christmas titles added every year. Carol orders come in as early as August and keep rolling in until worryingly close to the big day itself.

The post Top 10 Christmas carols countdown appeared first on OUPblog.

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20. Cookies, Carols, Movies, Santa, Jigsaw Jones, and Holiday Greetings

die_hard_christmas

 

Well, we’re getting to that time of year again, when I accept the challenge and attempt to prove that man can live by cookies alone.

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Also, for our family, there’s Christmas and all the good that comes with it. Yes, the songs, the songs, the songs. I’ve long collected “cool yule” tracks and dutifully compile new playlists every holiday season. This year’s favorite, among so many strong contenders, is Robert Earl Keen’s “Merry Christmas from the Family.”

Of course, I love the movies, too. Elf, the Grinch, Charlie Brown, A Christmas Story (my favorite), Rudolph, and Die Hard.

Because . . .

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Even so, a writer still has to make a living. And believe me, I’m still typing!

51poJdDWQNL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_In The Case of the Santa Claus Mystery, I gave Jigsaw the toughest case of his career — Sally Ann Simms wants proof that there’s a Santa Claus. And I gave myself a tough assignment, too. I attempted to write a truly heartfelt, entertaining Christmas story with soul, soul, soul. It’s out of print now, like all books Jigsaw, and honestly I’m not sure anyone noticed at the time, but I still like book a lot. It captures a fleeting something of holiday spirit. Who knows? Maybe it’ll come around again.

 

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Here’s a quick moment that still makes me smile, ten years later:

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Happy holidays, one and all!

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21. Carol: a “touching” love story both literally and musically

Todd Haynes' new film Carol is an adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s semi-autobiographical novel The Price of Salt, first published in 1952 under the pseudonym Claire Morgan. Daring for its time, the novel depicts a passionate lesbian romance between Carol Aird (Cate Blanchett), a well-off middle-aged New Jersey housewife divorcing her husband, and nineteen-year-old Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara), who works as a department store salesclerk.

The post Carol: a “touching” love story both literally and musically appeared first on OUPblog.

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22. Handbells: a festive instrument

Handbells aren't just ringing for the Salvation Army this holiday season. If you've ever tuned in to a holiday music special, you've probably seen a handbell choir playing the Christmas standards. Handbells have been a part of the holiday landscape for hundreds of years.

The post Handbells: a festive instrument appeared first on OUPblog.

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23. Highlights from Oxford Music in 2015

It's hard to believe, but another busy year at Oxford University Press has gone by. Join our music team as we take a look back at the year that was 2015, from new scholarship to new faces, with a combination of computers, cake, and chicken.

The post Highlights from Oxford Music in 2015 appeared first on OUPblog.

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24. Can one hear the corners of a drum?

Why is the head of a drum usually shaped like a circle? How would it sound if it were shaped like a square instead? Or a triangle? If you closed your eyes and listened, could you tell the difference? The mathematics used to prove that “one can hear the corners of a drum” are founded on […]

The post Can one hear the corners of a drum? appeared first on OUPblog.

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25. School of Rock

Scholastic News Kids Press CorpsSchool of Rock by Adedayo Perkovich

On December 6, New York City’s Broadway was rocking out for the opening night of School of Rock. The new musical, which is playing at the Winter Garden Theatre, is based on the 2003 hit movie starring Jack Black.

“The central message of the story,” the show’s composer, Andrew Lloyd Webber, told NPR recently, “is about the empowering force of music.” Lloyd Webber, who is behind such Broadway hits as Phantom of the Opera and Cats, runs a music education foundation. He is allowing schools to license the musical while it’s still on Broadway.

MUSIC EMPOWERS KIDS

school of rock

Adedayo with cast members from School of Rock

School of Rock tells the story of Dewey Finn, an aspiring rock star played by Alex Brightman. When Finn’s musical career hits a dead end, he impersonates his roommate to get a job as a substitute teacher at a prestigious prep school. While in the classroom, he inspires his fifth graders to form a rock band.

“Music empowered me as a young kid,” Brightman said on opening night. “It helped me think creatively on every level. Music and the arts inspire kids to think way outside the box.”

Twelve-year-old Brandon Niederauer, who plays Zach, the band’s lead guitarist, agrees. “No matter what language you speak,” he says, “everybody knows music.”

“YOU CAN DO IT”

All of the actors play their own instruments during the performance. “If you say that you can do it, and you work hard enough, then you can do it,” says Evie Dolan, 11, who learned to play bass for the role of Katie.

While the musical is very similar to the movie, lyricist Glenn Slater added new songs, including “You’re in the Band” and “Stick It to the Man.”

“I really love ‘You’re in the Band,’” says the musical’s director, Laurence Connor. “I love that moment when the audience sees the children pick up their instruments for the first time and really play, and find rock music for the first time.”

Ten-year-old Bobbi Mackenzie, who plays Tomika, says that the experience of expressing herself through music has been a rewarding one. When asked what advice she has for aspiring musicians, she said: “If it’s really what you want to do, go for it. Work as hard as you can.”

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