What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
<<August 2015>>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
      01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Music, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 1,778
1. Who will be singing the next Bond song? Who should be?

Now’s the moment to be a fan of the Bond songs. SPECTRE, the new film, comes out this November. That means we’ll hear an official unofficial leak of the title song sometime this summer. Everybody’s been guessing who the singer is. Twitter says it'll be Sam Smith or Lana Del Rey. Sam Smith says it isn’t him and claims that he “heard Ellie Goulding was going to do it.” The Telegraph wants to know why no one has considered Mumford and Sons (don’t answer that). Even Vegas is paying attention. Who would you put your money on?

The post Who will be singing the next Bond song? Who should be? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Who will be singing the next Bond song? Who should be? as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
2. What’s your go-to summer concert?

It’s that time of year again! Summer concerts are warming up and festivals are in full swing. Cities around the world are putting on some of the best shows for locals and tourists to enjoy. Check out what concerts Oxford University Press employees love attending every year. You just might stumble upon your new favorite band.

The post What’s your go-to summer concert? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on What’s your go-to summer concert? as of 7/21/2015 5:54:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. Poetry Friday: Everyone Sang by Siegfried Sassoon

Everyone suddenly burst out singing;
And I was filled with such delight
As prisoned birds must find in freedom,
Winging wildly across the white
Orchards and dark-green fields; on - on - and out of sight.

Everyone's voice was suddenly lifted;
And beauty came like the setting sun:
My heart was shaken with tears; and horror
Drifted away... O, but Everyone
Was a bird; and the song was wordless; the singing will never be done.

- Everyone Sang by Siegfried Sassoon

View all posts tagged as Poetry Friday at Bildungsroman.

View the roundup schedule at A Year of Reading.

Learn more about Poetry Friday.

Add a Comment
4. This land is your land

Seventy-five years ago folk singer Woody Guthrie penned the initial lyrics to “This Land Is Your Land,” considered by many to be the alternative national anthem. Sung in elementary schools, children’s summer camps, around campfires, at rallies, and during concert encores, “This Land Is Your Land” is the archetypal sing-along song, familiar to generations of Americans. But what most do not know is that Guthrie, the “Oklahoma Cowboy,” actually wrote the song in New York and that its production and dissemination were shaped by the city’s cultural institutions.

The post This land is your land appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on This land is your land as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
5. What stays when everything goes

Imagine the unimaginable. Suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), the person with whom you shared most of your life has forgotten who you are, and even worse, can no longer remember their own experiences, their relationships, and how to behave appropriately in everyday situations. But although most of their long-term memory is heavily impaired, they may continue to relate astonishingly well to autobiographically relevant pieces of music.

The post What stays when everything goes appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on What stays when everything goes as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
6. The British Invasion, orientalism, and the summer of 1965

Fifty years ago, at the height of the British Invasion, The Yardbirds released "Heart Full of Soul" (28 May 1965) and The Kinks, "See My Friends" (30 July 1965). Both attempted to evoke something exotic, mysterious, and distinctly different from the flood of productions competing for consumer attention that summer. Drawing on Britain’s long fascination with “The Orient,” these recordings started sixties British pop down a path that proved both rewarding and problematic.

The post The British Invasion, orientalism, and the summer of 1965 appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The British Invasion, orientalism, and the summer of 1965 as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
7. SDCC ’15: Comics and Pop Music Panel introduces Archie Meets the Ramones

Archie Meets the Ramones (courtesy of Comics Alliance)

Archie Meets the Ramones (courtesy of Comics Alliance)

By Harper W. Harris

Today at the Comics and Pop Music: Making New Noise panel at Comic Con, there was one of the most interesting groups of people on stage: Patrick A. Reed of Comics Alliance moderated Matt Rosenberg, Alex Segura, Amy Chu, and Mix Master Mike of the Beastie Boys as they spoke about the fascinating ways that music and comic books cross paths.

In an SDCC exclusive announcement, Segura and Rosenberg talked about a new miniseries from Archie Comics that they are co-writing: Archie Meets the Ramones, with art by Gisele Lagace. The promo art, seen above from Comics Alliance’s post, looks fun as hell. Rosenberg said that Archie comics are what got him into comics, and Ramones are what got him into punk, so it was a “perfect combination.” Segura says the mini-series will be “fun and a little weird.”

Zoldar by Mix Master Mike and Tony Washington

Zoldar by Mix Master Mike and Tony Washington

Amy Chu, who will be writing Poison Ivy as was recently announced, spoke briefly about the Run DMC comic she is writing, and the legendary Mix Master Mike talked about his Zoldar project with Tony Washington, which is both a comic character and a multimedia experience. There is an Oculus Rift aspect in which you enter the virtual world of Zoldar and experience the music and story in 7.1 surround sound. The music has already been made, and soon we can expect to learn more about the scratch-wielding superhero.

3 Comments on SDCC ’15: Comics and Pop Music Panel introduces Archie Meets the Ramones, last added: 7/13/2015
Display Comments Add a Comment
8. Music and metaphysics: HowTheLightGetsIn 2015

How The Light Gets In (named, aptly, in honour of a Leonard Cohen song) has taken the festival world by storm with its yearly celebration of philosophy and music. We spoke to founder and festival organiser Hilary Lawson, who is a full-time philosopher, Director of the Institute of Art and Ideas, and someone with lots to say about keepings things equal and organising a great party.

The post Music and metaphysics: HowTheLightGetsIn 2015 appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Music and metaphysics: HowTheLightGetsIn 2015 as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
9. The reality of the sweating brow

Many, perhaps most people listen to music with the hope that it permits them to step outside of the world as it usually is, the demands it places on us and the ugliness that so obviously mars it. People gravitate to music’s bright melodies, infectious rhythms, and perhaps especially to lyrics that, whether Beethoven’s or Beyoncé’s, give us some kind of life-raft or a phrase that clarifies our condition.

The post The reality of the sweating brow appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The reality of the sweating brow as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
10. Happy 120th birthday BBC Proms

In celebration of The BBC Proms 120th anniversary we have created a comprehensive reading list of books, journals, and online resources that celebrate the eight- week British summer season of orchestral music, live performances, and late-night music and poetry.

The post Happy 120th birthday BBC Proms appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Happy 120th birthday BBC Proms as of 7/7/2015 8:12:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. A tiny instrument with a tremendous history: the piccolo

Although often overlooked, the piccolo is an important part of the woodwind instrument family. This high-pitched petite woodwind packs a huge punch. Historically, the piccolo had no keys and was an instrument of its own kind.

The post A tiny instrument with a tremendous history: the piccolo appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on A tiny instrument with a tremendous history: the piccolo as of 7/7/2015 5:46:00 AM
Add a Comment
12. The meanings behind the anthems of Fourth of July

On the Fourth of July, Americans will celebrate Independence Day at picnics, concerts, fireworks displays, and gatherings of many kinds, and they almost always sing. “America the Beautiful” will be popular, and so will “Our County, ’Tis of Thee” and of course the national anthem, “Star-Spangled Banner” (despite its notoriously unsingable tune). The words are so familiar that, really, no one pays attention to their meaning. But read them closely and be surprised how the lyrics describe the meaning of America in three very different ways.

The post The meanings behind the anthems of Fourth of July appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The meanings behind the anthems of Fourth of July as of 7/4/2015 5:20:00 AM
Add a Comment
13. 100 years of black music

Celebrate the end of Black Music Month with this timeline highlighting over 100 years of music created and produced by influential African-Americans. Kenny Gamble, Ed Wright, and Dyana Williams developed the idea for Black Music Month back in 1979 as a way to annually show appreciate for black music icons. After lobbying, President Jimmy Carter hosted a reception to formally recognize the month.

The post 100 years of black music appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on 100 years of black music as of 6/30/2015 7:18:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. A West Ender’s stop on Broadway

We’ve got one day here and not another minute…”. Well, not one day exactly, but just five—a short week’s stay in NYC from England, and four nights to catch a few shows. So how to choose? The first choices were easy: two new productions of classic musical comedies, and as it happens, shows by the same team of writers. Betty Comden and Adolph Green were veterans of Broadway by the time they came to write On the Twentieth Century (1978), though merely young starlets when they first scored a hit with On the Town (1944).

The post A West Ender’s stop on Broadway appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on A West Ender’s stop on Broadway as of 6/30/2015 4:58:00 AM
Add a Comment
15. Katie Friedman Gives Up Texting (And Lives to Tell About It)

The first time I saw this title, I have to say I laughed out loud.  I lifted my gaze from the catalog, and surveyed the library to see most middle schoolers faces glued to their phones.  Needless to say, the title struck me even before I got my hands on the book.  While it was on my desk, it drummed up lots of interest from the kids and the adults alike.

Katie Friedman is an expert multitasker.  She's the kind of tech user who would have ALL THE TABS open.  As we begin she is texting her friend Hannah, posting a pic of her dog, receiving some texts from Becca, and sending texts to bff Charlie Joe Jackson. This is all before breakfast.  During breakfast she gets some texts from Nareem, Eliza, Hannah,  and Becca.  Then on the bus ride to school Katie is texting with Charlie Joe, and her mom.  Whew!  Exhausted yet?

The thing is, it's pretty easy to send a text to the wrong person.  Especially if you are texting multiple people at the same time.  Lots of times, it's kind of funny to send the wrong text to the wrong person. But sometimes it's really not.  Especially when you're texting about something personal.  Something like not liking your boyfriend so much anymore...and sending it to your boyfriend.

Hitting send changes everything for Katie.  Not only has she gone and really hurt Nareem's feelings, but she begins to realized how far into their phones her friends are.  She thinks about the fact that it just seems easier to text people instead of actually talk to them.

Inspired by her musical heroine, Jane Plantero, Katie sets out on a quest.  A quest to live without her phone for a while.  And Jane says if Katie can convince 10 of her friends to give up their phones for a week, she will come and play a show for them.  The twist is that Katie is not allowed to dangle to carrot of the concert.

How hard will it be to convince a bunch of middle schoolers to give up their phones?

Tommy Greenwald has tackled the topic of kids and phones without making it seem like a "topic".   Gweenwald nails the voice as usual, and if I didn't know better, I'd say he was a teacher.  Charlie Joe pops up throughout the book to lend his sarcastic wit with segments like, "Charlie Joe Jackson's Guide to Why Texting Is Awesome". Where Greenwald shines is in writing the relationships.   They are messy and fickle and constantly shifting ... totally like in middle school.  Katie isn't all good, just as Charlie Joe isn't all snark.  This is a book that should just show up on library tables, and in living rooms all over the place.  I think this would make a fantastic book club book, and the kind of classroom read that will get kids talking.

0 Comments on Katie Friedman Gives Up Texting (And Lives to Tell About It) as of 6/27/2015 9:08:00 PM
Add a Comment
16. In memoriam: Gunther Schuller

Gunther Schuller (1925-2015) was one of the most influential figures in the musical world of the past century, with a career that crossed and created numerous genres, fields, and institutions. Oxford offers heartfelt condolences to his family, and gratitude for the profound impact his work continues to have on music performance, study, and scholarship.

The post In memoriam: Gunther Schuller appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on In memoriam: Gunther Schuller as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
17. The Dylanologists by David Kinney


So when you ask some of your questions, you're asking them to a person who's long dead. You're asking them to a person that doesn't exist. But people make that mistake about me all the time. 
—Bob Dylan, 2012

If you've ever spent any time around any sort of fan community, most of the people you meet in The Dylanologists will be familiar types. There are the collectors, there are the hermeneuts, there are the true believers and the pilgrims. Some reviewers and readers have derided a lot of the people Kinney writes about as "crazy", but one of the virtues of the book is that it humanizes its subjects and shows that plenty of people who are superfans are not A.J. Weberman. They seem a little passionate, sure, and if you're not especially interested in their passion they may seem a bit weird, but how different are they, really, from denizens of more culturally dominant fandoms — say, devoted sports fans? (Indeed, the term "fan" as we think of it now dates back to 19th century American sports, at least according to the OED.)

Or how different are they from academics? That was the question that kept buzzing through my brain as I read the book. It's no surprise to me that one of the great Milton scholars of our time, Christopher Ricks, would have become a Dylanologist; the fights among the Dylan fans are at least the equal of the fights among the Miltonists, who can be a rather contentious lot... (Speaking of Miltonists, Stanley Fish's invaluable "What Makes an Interpretation Acceptable", a chapter from Is There a Text in This Class?, came to mind again and again as I read.) In so many ways — its esotericism, its gate-keeping, its initiation rites — academia is a collection of high-falutin' fandoms.

Given that I have spent most of my life studying written texts, it's probably predictable that the chapter I found most exciting in The Dylanologists is the one about Scott Warmuth and other researchers who have traced the vast web of references, quotations, echoes, allusions, shadows, and traces of other writings through Dylan's own, particularly in Dylan's work over the last 15 years or so. (See Warmuth's fascinating essay for the New Haven Review about Dylan's Chronicles: Vol. 1.) One of the things that makes Dylan so extraordinary is that he's like a human filter for particular strains of Americana and of musical and literary history. He's like a human cut-up machine. Puritanical squawkers may scream, "Plagiarism!", but for me the effect of, for instance, Warmuth's revelations about Chronicles is that I was in even more awe of Dylan's achievement — the book reveals itself to be not just a memoir, but a more readable cousin to Finnegans Wake. Dylan's references, allusions, echoes, riffs, cut-ups, and copies expand his work and connect it to networks of meaning.


Don Hunstein; Bob Dylan, New York, 1963

(It's worth noting, tangentially, that these references, allusions, echoes, etc. are most effective at the level of language and music. While Dylan certainly has written songs and even entire albums that are explorations of what in fandom get called tropes, he's too great an artist to exert most of his energies at that level.)

(It's also worth noting that there are inevitably differences of power in how such references, allusions, echoes, etc. are perceived and the effect they have, especially in a culture of white supremacy. Dylan's not always great about this, but he's also not always bad, and to castigate him for "appropriation", as some people do, seems to me too reductive to be useful. At the same time, as I pointed out in a review of a book about Charley Patton and Jimmie Rodgers for Rain Taxi's most recent print issue, racism shaped what was possible for even the most talented artists, and the popularity of Patton and Rodgers, for instance, can't be said to be parallel: "The nature of their popularity was significantly different, and no small bit of that difference must be the result of race — both the race of the musicians and the racialized marketing of record companies that offered one set of music to black (and mostly Southern) audiences and another to white (and nation-wide) audiences." Both men were significant to the history of American music, both were hugely talented, and both drew from and played off of similar influences. But Jimmie Rodgers got rich and Charley Patton didn't, even though today it's Patton's name — partly due to Dylan's advocacy and homage — that is probably more likely to be recognized.)

Masks are easy to pick up and just as easy to discard. He's a man of masks, the man of thin wild mercury — the Dylan we know, the Dylan we can know, is a performance. The original image that was sold of Dylan — the earnest protest singer — has been resilient, and people still seem shocked when Dylan does something like a TV commercial. But Dylan was never pure, and it drives purists crazy. Dylan is all poses, all artifice, and he always was. He's not, though, a postmodern ironizer; his earnestness is in the earnestness of his artifice. (His art is real for as long as he performs it.) Many fans fall in love with the earnestness, but hate the artifice.

Fans tend to be both passionate and possessive. This is a bad recipe for Dylan fans, because he seems to take a certain joy in pushing against whatever expectations are set up for him. The history of Dylan fandom is a history of fans denouncing him at every juncture. The "real" Dylan is Dylan before he went electric, Dylan before he went country, Dylan before he went gospel, Dylan before the doldrums of the '80s, Dylan before he did a Victoria's Secret ad, Dylan before... Kinney does a good job of showing the ways that great passion can also lead to great disillusionment and even great hatred. The relationship between fans and celebrities can be pathological and destructive. One of the strengths of Kinney's book is that it shows various ways that pathology may manifest, from the benign to the fatal.

There's a kind of Harry Potter syndrome to a lot of fandom, well expressed by one of Dylan's die-hard followers, an expert at getting to the front of the admission line at concerts. Kinney asked him if he wanted to meet Dylan (not all fans do). Charlie said yes. "I think he would think I was funny. I really believe I could be the one guy who could talk to him without bullshit."

I really believe I could be the one guy — the one guy who understands, the one guy who knows the beloved's soul, the one guy who really gets it. The true fan. Another fan says late in the book:
"He and I have been through a lot together and he doesn't know it," she said. "He doesn't know I exist. Can you see how that would be frustrating? I don't have any grandiose idea that because he's affected me he's going to care. I just think it's not fair that it's a one-way relationship." She wasn't delusional. She didn't think he was going to ask her out on a date, or invite her to his home. But if he did she would have to drop everything and go. "I don't think he's Jesus, I don't think he's the messiah. He's just a human being. But he's filled with poetry."
Or another fan, one that Dylan seemed to occasionally pay some attention to:
"I think it's a wonder he shook my hand. I don't want to speculate," he said. But a few minutes later he stopped midsentence and looked me in the eye. "I take that back. I do have a theory, and I happen to think it's right. I don't think it, I know it. I think he's got a problem similar to my problem: being misunderstood, being misjudged. People take me the wrong way. I suspect it's because they don't listen to the words I say."
Fans may want to distance themselves from religious fanatics, but theirs is still a religious position — fan as worshiper, artist as God — and as various people have pointed out over the years, there's a secular religiosity that such fervent fandom satisfies. The fan is created in the god's image, the god in the fan's. I could be the one guy; He and I have been through a lot together; I think he's got a problem similar to mine. Throughout its history, the word fanatic possesses a religious connotation, and a fan, of course, is a type of fanatic. We don't worship gods that seem alien to us.

I don't say all this to scoff. Personal identification is a fundamental part of any artistic appreciation. It's hard for such identification not to slip toward certain types of fantasy, dreams of contact. I'm a huge fan of some things, and so is Bob Dylan: Kinney tells the story of Dylan's visit to John Lennon's childhood home, and the experience described is that of a fan. Even in academia, at least in my field of literature, one of the things that motivates some of our work (now and then, here and there) is the sense that we can understand a particular text or writer in a way that nobody else can.

And then there are relics. Kinney tells various tales of collectors: people who not only listen to the music, or collect rare recordings, but seek out physical objects somehow related to the singer. As I was most intellectually interested in the hermenauts close reading Dylan's texts, so I felt most sympathy for the people whose lives have been in many ways hindered by their quests for Dylan's stuff. I inherited a collector's personality from my father, though I hope I've also learned from his negative example, because for all the pleasure it sometimes brought him, his quest for the stuff (in his case, militaria, guns, etc.) in so many more ways limited his life. On the other hand, like so much else in fandom, collecting seems to have given the Dylan collectors a sense of purpose as well as a sense of community.

Relics are also religious, a kind of objective correlative for the zeal of worship. The Benjaminian aura becomes for some people even more important in the age of mechanical reproduction. Is anybody who really cares about a work of art impervious to this? I was recently at the Rosenbach Museum and Library in Philadelphia, where a friend works, and getting to see and even hold so many unique items of literary history was overwhelming. "I now know what people mean by 'religious experience'," I said. I understand the impulse to buy the windows of Dylan's childhood home, even as I recognize that such an impulse is absurd. Kinney's book conveys both the attractions of the impulse and the absurdity.

This paragraph toward the end of the final chapter is especially revealing of the complexities that Kinney is able to find in the subject of Dylan and his most passionate fans:
What must it be like to be Dylan, the music writer Paul Williams once wondered, and carry around "the half-formed dreams of millions on your back"? Dylan always had been afraid of his followers, and Williams could understand why. "Their relationship with him is so intense, they expect so much, and more than once over the years they've turned really nasty when he chose to deliver something other than their notion of who 'Bob Dylan' should be." Williams wrote that in the aftermath of the first gospel concerts in 1979, but he just as easily could have said it after Another Side in 1964, Newport in 1966, Nashville Skyline in 1969, Live Aid in 1985, or London in 2009. So many controversies. So much disappointment. Dylan acted entirely unfazed: "Oh, I let you down? Big deal," he said once. "Find somebody else." More than one fan really did wish he had died in the motorcycle wreck in 1966. It would have been better that way. He'd have been frozen in his glory. Instead he got old. He kept putting out new records and doing shows. He kept confounding.
One of the effective choices Kinney makes is to set the book up as a kind of biography. It generally, though not slavishly, follows Dylan's career from the early days to later. The Dylanologists become a kind of cast of characters, moving in and out of the narrative. These two structural choices sometimes can be frustrating or feel a bit strained, but nevertheless give the book a unity and sense of narrative momentum that wouldn't otherwise be available. I expect readers' interests will ebb and flow depending on which types of Dylanologists they themselves find most interesting, and it's also likely lots of people will want to know more about particular people and less about others, making it difficult to say the book is entirely satisfying, but Kinney's interest is not so much in individual manifestations of Dylanology, but in how the idea of Bob Dylan gets kaleidoscoped through the many different ways of hearing him, seeing him, loving him, and hating him. I'm Not There did something similar in a more abstract way, and it might make a good companion piece with The Dylanologists, certainly more so than any conventional biography, which can really only tell us so much, and very little of what truly illuminates the work. Whether The Dylanologists can illuminate the work depends on what you desire for illumination. Certainly, it illuminates the quest for illumination.

0 Comments on The Dylanologists by David Kinney as of 6/20/2015 5:50:00 PM
Add a Comment
18.

There's an Opera Flashmob happening in London, and you can be part of it...



The amazing Katherine Kontz devised a new piece for the Tête à Tête opera festival. I drew the poster for it and I'll be participating in some way or other... will you? Sign up if you want to be come a part of the art.


An invitation to bring your rolling suitcase along and embark on a musical journey of boisterous wheels and beatific voices in sunny King’s Cross. Prepare for a dose of flip-flopping holiday fun!
Read more here... It'll be great.

0 Comments on as of 6/18/2015 4:29:00 PM
Add a Comment
19. Trombone Shorty

Trombone Shorty by Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews illustrated by Bryan Collier Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2015 ISBN: 9781419714658 Grades K-5 The reviewer borrowed a copy of the book from her local library. When I look at the biography section at my school library, it's hard to find a biography of a living musician. We have biographies of Duke Ellington, Josephine Baker, The Beatles, Elvis

0 Comments on Trombone Shorty as of 6/1/2015 2:57:00 AM
Add a Comment
20. The Stones’ “Satisfaction,” June 1965

In the spring of 1965, The Rolling Stones could be forgiven their frustration. Even though they had scored three number-one UK hits in the past year, the American market remained a challenge. Beatles recordings had already thrice dominated the US charts since New Year’s Day and Brits Petula Clark, Herman’s Hermits, Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, and Freddie and the Dreamers had all topped Billboard between January and May.

The post The Stones’ “Satisfaction,” June 1965 appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The Stones’ “Satisfaction,” June 1965 as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
21. It’s time to play the (Broadway) music

Whether you think the Tony Awards is the epitome of Broadway talent or just another marketing device, it’s a night where everyone has a front row seat to the creative, the lively, the emotional moments that have made a home on the Great White Way.

The post It’s time to play the (Broadway) music appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on It’s time to play the (Broadway) music as of 6/6/2015 5:46:00 AM
Add a Comment
22. Funny R5 Interview

r5We met the members of R5, and they are really funny!

We got up-close and personal with the 5-piece band R5 consisting of Ross Lynch, Riker Lynch, Rocky Lynch, Rydel Lynch, and (Ellington) Ratliff. What’s it like touring the world? What are their favorite things about each other? Find out the answers to these questions and more below!

Q: Do you guys have any pets?
Ratliff: I was the only one with pets and I had dogs, cats, and a little bird. I don’t know what kind of bird it was but it was a little bird. I always had pets.
Rocky: I got two baby turtles for my birthday one time and they were really small, and they lived for, like, a year.

Q: Are you guys classically trained musicians?
Ross: No. Actually we’re all self-taught musicians, but being a band for five years, you learn quite a bit.
Riker: We started at a really young age, just performing for basically anyone who would watch. We pretty much grew up doing it. And we were all best friends. We all loved each other’s company and there was really no one else we would rather do it with. And then we moved to California and met Ratliff at a performing arts center, and he fit in quite nicely.
Ratliff: I did.
Riker: So, we started playing gigs around California. One set led to another and now we’re here.

Q: Ratliff, you didn’t even have to change your name.
Ratliff: Yeah. My real first name’s Ellington and my last name is Ratliff. So at first they were like, “No, we can call you Roger…”

Q: Could each say something about another member of the band?
Ratliff: Rydel is . . . we like to call her the secret weapon of R5 because, you know, without her we would just be another boy band and who wants that? But, yeah, she brings the fun. She’s really giggly. She’s really into fashion and things like that. She doesn’t like shopping, but she always looks good.
Rydel: Thanks. Riker is our fearless leader.
Ratliff: Well, he’s afraid of spiders, so he’s not totally fearless!
Rydel: That’s true. I have to kill all the spiders for all of them. But Riker’s captain of the ship and he is a very hard worker. He has the best work ethic ever and he has a really cute nose.
Riker: Thanks, sis. Ross is our awesome front man, and he leads us into every show. Ross is very creative. He’s a total artist. He’s always striving for us to be different and try new things. He definitely keeps it fresh. It’s good.

R5

from left to right: Ross, Riker, Rocky, Rydel, and Ratliff

Q: Ok, Ross, it’s your turn now.
Ross: All right, Rocky can be quiet sometimes. He’s also a thinker. He’s very smart. He always did well in school. He’s the one who taught himself how to play guitar first. So he’s really wise for such a young age, but he’s also somewhat of a realist. Surprisingly, even though he’s all those things, he’s also really funny with a dry sense of humor when it’s appropriate!

Q: All right, Rocky, you do Ratliff.
Rocky: He’s the alien.
Ratliff: I’m the onion?
Rocky: The alien! Ratliff is the UFO in the group, the unidentified object. He’s the only one not related.
Ratliff: I mean, I think we’ve covered that one. What else you got?
Rocky: You probably have the biggest vocabulary in the group, which is helpful for these interviews.
Ratliff: I DO have the biggest vocabulary in the group.
Rocky: Ross is a close second.
Ross: I just make words up. Or I’ll use words without totally knowing what they mean. I’ll learn the meaning soon after if someone tells me I’m stupid.
Rydel: Yeah, he learns really big words and then he just kind of throws them out, and we’re like, “Is that . . . what did he say?”

Q: What’s the best thing about touring?
Ross: I feel like there’s something that you learn from traveling so much.
Rydel: Definitely. Like riding a camel.
Ross: I don’t know how much we learned from that.
Rydel: That they smell really bad.
Ratliff: Well, you learn about the culture. That’s what you really learn about. How people live.
Ross: It opens up your mind to how other people think.

R5

I totally wish I could hang out with R5. They seem like such hilarious, chill people! Of course, it’s not like I’ll show up at their front door asking them to be my friends . . . What do you think? Are you a fan of R5? Be sure to check out our earlier interview with R5, watch this video interview with Ross Lynch, and leave your thoughts in the Comments below!

See ya,

image from kids.scholastic.com — En-Szu, STACKS Staffer

Interview by Marie Morreale
Images courtesy of Disney Channel

Add a Comment
23. Composition, performance, and mashups

What does it mean to create an artwork? For centuries, we thought we knew the answer. In literature, an author recorded words on a page. In the visual arts, an artist put paint to canvas. In music, a composer jotted down tones and rhythms on a staff as the raw material for his/her creations.

The post Composition, performance, and mashups appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Composition, performance, and mashups as of 6/12/2015 6:47:00 AM
Add a Comment
24. My Mandolin & I

The first time I held a mandolin was at a rehearsal for Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni. In the second act, the Don is trying to seduce the maid Zerlina by singing a serenade under her mistress’ window (the canzonetta “Deh, vieni alla finestra”).

The post My Mandolin & I appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on My Mandolin & I as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
25. Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Pipe Dream

The seventh of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s stage works, Pipe Dream came along at a particularly vulnerable time in their partnership. After the revolutionary Oklahoma! (1943) and Carousel (1945)—with, above all, two of the most remarkable scores ever heard to that point—they disappointed many with Allegro (1947).

The post Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Pipe Dream appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Pipe Dream as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts