What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(tagged with 'Comics for writers')

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
<<August 2015>>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
      01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Comics for writers, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 337
1. Be aware when research and prep become a crutch. At some point, you need to actually start WRITING.

.

0 Comments on Be aware when research and prep become a crutch. At some point, you need to actually start WRITING. as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
2. Am going to try hard NOT to be like these writers while I'm on vacation

Have a great week, everyone!

0 Comments on Am going to try hard NOT to be like these writers while I'm on vacation as of 8/15/2015 4:30:00 PM
Add a Comment
3. A Reminder: Stop comparing yourself to others and focus on enjoying your OWN journey

Writers and illustrators: Resist constantly comparing yourself to others. Instead, focus on appreciating and enjoying your OWN journey.

(I've been gradually working my way through the panels in my own career, so figured it was about time I repost this comic :-))

 

0 Comments on A Reminder: Stop comparing yourself to others and focus on enjoying your OWN journey as of 7/28/2015 9:50:00 AM
Add a Comment
4. Tips for SCBWI-LA conference newbies, second-timers, plus a CHALLENGE for the many-timers

(Updated version of a post I made earlier this year before the SCBWI-NYC conference)

I'm leaving this week for the SCBWI Summer Conference! If you haven't yet registered, you're out of luck....the conference is sold out. However, you can follow along virtually via the #LA15SCBWI hashtag on Twitter as well as the SCBWI conference blog.

Here's my updated SCBWI Conference Advice post for first-timers (as well as a challenge for the many-timers):

If you're a conference newbie who is nervous, I encourage you to browse my SCBWI Conference Newbie comics. I created these when I was a nervous newbie as well! So many people think I'm an extrovert, but I'm actually very much an introvert and was terrified (to the point of sweating palms, pounding heart, hating the idea of having go up and introduce myself over and over) about attending my first regular SCBWI conference back in 2009.

(Edit re: above comic: I did end up meeting Jay at the conference and he was really nice! And he didn't mention his Amazon ranking EVEN ONCE! Heh.)

I've posted advice for first-timers before and will post it again at the end of this piece, but now that I've attended other SCBWI annual conferences (and had my career jumpstarted because of the 2010 SCBWI-LA Conference), here is some additional advice I have for those who have attended more than once:

Don't get offended or disheartened if people you've met before don't remember you.

This is something I've learned from both sides. As a 2nd- and 3rd-timer (and so on), I've sometimes gone up to a person or group I've met and had my confidence deflated when it becomes clear they don't remember me at ALL from the previous year. My inner reactions ranged from embarrassment, humiliation, irritation, frustration and even brief anger ("I guess I'm just NOT IMPORTANT enough for xxx to remember!! Hmph.").

Having attended many times now, I've learned the following:

- I'm terrible at remembering people unless I've had multiple conversations or interactions with the same person.

- Even then, especially if I'm tired or am in a noisy crowd (remember what I said earlier about being an introvert?) or have met many new people in a row just before, I may still forget having met someone before.

I still accidentally re-introduce myself to people whom I've met before, sometimes whom I've met EARLIER IN THE CONVENTION. I'm always horribly embarrassed when this happens. 

Make sure your name badge is easily visible.

As Lee Wind points out in his helpful SCBWI blog post, having your name badge visible even at dinner or drinks afterward is an obvious visual clue to others that you're part of the tribe, and helps them remember your name as well. You can stash a few business cards in the back so they're handy.

Also, when I approach someone whom I've met before but with whom I don't have constant contact, I usually try saying something that will help remind them of our mutual context, or remind them of having met at xxx. Until I'm sure they actually do remember me, I try very hard NOT to put them on the spot (e.g. I don't say, "So, what did you think of my most recent post?" etc.).

When someone does this to me (subtly or unsubtly :-) setting the context and helping me remember), I immediately feel more at ease with them and am more likely to want to chat with them in the future.

Another tip: if someone DOES remember you, never assume that they're up-to-date on all your exciting news. I've had the occasional person react badly when they realize I'm not aware of their new book ("?? But I posted it all over Facebook!") I never assume anyone reads all my posts or keeps up with all my news. People have busy lives and different priorities.

Something else I've learned: even so-called Big Name authors, illustrators, editors, art directors and agents can be insecure. I am faaaar from being a Big Name, but having had a bit more experience at conference-going now, I also realize how some of the Big Name types who seemed standoffish to me actually weren't.

Be gracious, be forgiving and try very hard to assume the best about a person rather than the worst.

And I apologize ahead of time if I don't remember your name or re-introduce myself. :-\

And here some tips for first-timers who feel nervous about attending for the first time, or are normally very shy or introverted and dread the idea of having to meet a lot of new people:

1. Be brave and make the first move. You'd be surprised at how many other attendees feel exactly the same way as you do. Introduce yourself to people you sit beside, stand in line with, notice standing alone.

2. TAKE BUSINESS CARDS. Yes, even if you aren't published yet. We're all going to meet a lot of people over the weekend, and taking away a business card from an encounter or introduction will help the people you meet remember you. If you're an illustrator, take postcards or make sure a sample of illustration style is on your business card.

3. Be sociable. Don't just attend the keynotes and scheduled workshops. Check out the informal activities listed in your program, like Yoga with Lori Snyder, the LGBTQ Q&A, the Illustrator Social, Nonfiction Social, International Member Social, Peer Group Critiques with Jim Averbeck, and Saturday night "Sparkle & Shine" gala. Also keep an eye on conference Twitter chat, where some meetup planning might happen ("Hey, who wants to chat? I'm in the lobby").

4. Have realistic expectations. Don't expect to be "discovered" at the conference. Instead, set achievable goals. These can be as specific as "I'm going to introduce myself to agent xxxx sometime during the weekend" or as vague as "I'm looking for inspiration to get back on track with my book" or even just "To try having some fun at the conference and then see what happens." I think of this type of event as planting seeds. There's no guaranteed outcome, but you never know what might come out of all those seeds you're planting as you meet people, attend talks, watching and listening and chatting. 

My own conference seeds have blossomed, directly or indirectly, into: friendships, invitations to speak at events, book contracts, publishing industry info that helped guide my career decisions, learning about new techniques and tools, helping others get published, and SO much more. I continue to plant seeds, because I want to keep growing as a writer and illustrator, plus I'm also well aware how quickly the industry can change.

5. In my experience, you're much more likely to meet new people if you're alone. If you're always chatting and hanging out with the same person or people, you're not as approachable. I'm not saying that you SHOULDN'T hang out with people you like, of course! Just keep in mind that as a group, you're probably not going to meet as many new people as someone who is by themselves.

6. If you're on Twitter, write your Twitter handle on your name badge somewhere.

But most of all: TRY TO HAVE FUN. 

***** A CHALLENGE TO THE "MANY-TIMERS" OUT THERE ****

Try to remember what it was like when you attended your very first event, or how insecure you felt in the beginning. Then make it a personal challenge to find at least one lost-looking or nervous conference newbie who is sitting or standing alone. Introduce yourself, chat with them, find out what they're working on, perhaps (if appropriate) offer some advice.

Give good karma and it WILL come back to you.

RELATED POSTS AND RESOURCES:

Are You Entering The SCBWI-LA Illustration Portfolio Showcase? Here Are Tips For Before And During The Conference: my post on KidLitArtists.com last month

On SCBWI, Advice For Authors and Illustrators: from art director, Giuseppe Castellano.

Your Conference THRIVE-al Guide: A Dozen Tips For Four Days Made Of Awesome: by Lee Wind, on the SCBWI blog. 

Tips For Attending A Writing Conference: from YA writer, Valerie Lawson.

SCBWI Conference Tips For Newbies: from children's book illustrator, Heather Powers

Surviving Your First SCBWI Conference - by A.J. Cosmo

Tips For First-Time Conference-Goers: Children's Writers Edition: from McIntosh and Otis agent, Christa Heschke.

 

0 Comments on Tips for SCBWI-LA conference newbies, second-timers, plus a CHALLENGE for the many-timers as of 7/28/2015 9:50:00 AM
Add a Comment
5. For those of you who said my previous image should have had to cat lying ON the writer's papers, not beside :-)

Posting this comic for my friend Joanne Levy and others who just told me that the image at the top of my previous post should have had the cat lying on TOP of the writer's papers, not beside. You cat people! ;-)

0 Comments on For those of you who said my previous image should have had to cat lying ON the writer's papers, not beside :-) as of 8/4/2015 1:47:00 PM
Add a Comment
6. Updated: Will Write For Chocolate

I figure it's time I add a children's book illustrator to my Will Write For Chocolate household.

You can browse older strips in the Will Write For Chocolate archives.

0 Comments on Updated: Will Write For Chocolate as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
7. Comic: The Book Sniffer

0 Comments on Comic: The Book Sniffer as of 4/28/2015 6:17:00 PM
Add a Comment
8. Stop comparing yourself to others and find your own journey

Constantly comparing yourself to others can suck joy out of creating. Find your own pace and savor the journey.

0 Comments on Stop comparing yourself to others and find your own journey as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
9. Aspiring writers: Before worrying too much about networking/promo, FINISH WRITING YOUR BOOK.

0 Comments on Aspiring writers: Before worrying too much about networking/promo, FINISH WRITING YOUR BOOK. as of 5/22/2015 8:49:00 AM
Add a Comment
10. Comic: Plot For Sale

0 Comments on Comic: Plot For Sale as of 5/24/2015 10:17:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. The Scrabble Addict

In honour of my friend John Chew's birthday today:

0 Comments on The Scrabble Addict as of 6/2/2015 3:17:00 PM
Add a Comment
12. Comic: What NOT to say to a picture book writer on a first date

0 Comments on Comic: What NOT to say to a picture book writer on a first date as of 7/13/2015 11:46:00 AM
Add a Comment
13. Comic: The Search

0 Comments on Comic: The Search as of 7/14/2015 2:48:00 PM
Add a Comment
14. Writer Tip: Set Realistic Goals

Theresa MacPhail has some great tips for A Realistic Summer Writing Schedule with which you can be productive AND relax.

0 Comments on Writer Tip: Set Realistic Goals as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
15. Comic: First Step Is Admitting You Have A Problem

0 Comments on Comic: First Step Is Admitting You Have A Problem as of 1/31/2015 5:24:00 PM
Add a Comment
16. Comic: Snowman Writer

0 Comments on Comic: Snowman Writer as of 2/18/2015 8:13:00 AM
Add a Comment
17. Comic: Taking Punctuation Personally

0 Comments on Comic: Taking Punctuation Personally as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
18. KEIKO: The First Time

Anyone else purposely slow down near the end of a really, really good book?

Also see my previous Keiko comics.

0 Comments on KEIKO: The First Time as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
19. Keiko: Wild Rumpus

For more Keiko, see my Keiko comic archives.

0 Comments on Keiko: Wild Rumpus as of 3/7/2015 12:50:00 PM
Add a Comment
20. A Fine Line

0 Comments on A Fine Line as of 3/13/2015 12:42:00 PM
Add a Comment
21. Comic: One of the dangers of apostrophe abuse

0 Comments on Comic: One of the dangers of apostrophe abuse as of 3/18/2015 10:39:00 AM
Add a Comment
22. Comic: Books Or Me

And once again, I am out of bookshelf shelf. AUGH. Gradually converting my favourite print books to ebooks (by giving away the print books, buying the digital versions) to make more room.

Except for picture books, which I still strongly prefer in print.

WILL SOMEONE PLEASE INVENT A BOOKSHELF TARDIS?

0 Comments on Comic: Books Or Me as of 4/21/2015 10:45:00 AM
Add a Comment
23. It's easy to write a picture book. It's much harder to write a picture book that will sell.

So many people think that short = easy, especially when it comes to picture books.

And while yes, it's easy to crank out a picture book manuscript in terms of wordcount, writing a picture book story that a publisher will want to acquire is an entirely different animal.

At this point, I can imagine a number of you leaping up and saying, "You shouldn't worry about the market! Just write the story that you were meant to write!"  I partly agree.

However, if your goal is to be published, then I strongly advise you to go to local children's bookstore and "new children's book" section of your library; I guarantee you will save yourself much heartache and wasted effort. Familiarise yourself with what's being published. Let yourself fall in love with some of these picture books and then ask yourself why you enjoy them so much.

A few common mistakes that new picture book writers make:

- Talking down to kids, using a style and language that comes across as awkward and lecture-y.

- Writing what is basically a short story rather than a picture book text. If you don't know the difference, you need to read more picture books.

- Assuming that a picture book story HAS to rhyme. Writing a good rhyming picture book is very difficult. Dont use rhyme as a crutch.

- Not reading their story out loud to make sure it IS fun to read out loud.

- Automatically writing in the style of picture books that they remember reading as a child.

------

Do you disagree with any of the above? Do you have anything to add? Feel free to share in the comments section.

0 Comments on It's easy to write a picture book. It's much harder to write a picture book that will sell. as of 4/22/2015 9:13:00 AM
Add a Comment
24. Comic: Mystery Solved

0 Comments on Comic: Mystery Solved as of 4/23/2015 9:39:00 AM
Add a Comment
25. Comic: The Paperless Office

 

I recently received an Apple Watch for my birthday, which I am loving. Not because it keeps me in touch with the digital world -- in fact, I've turned off notifications for most social media and have decided NOT to check Twitter or FB via my Watch. I mainly plan to use it for fitness tracking as well as tactile reminders (it taps me on the wrist if I sit in my office chair too long) to get up and move around every once in a while.

As I hunted around for a place to put the charger, I couldn't help but think how ironic it is that the so-called paperless office often turns into a wire-laden office instead. In my case, I have lots of paper AND wires!

0 Comments on Comic: The Paperless Office as of 4/27/2015 7:51:00 AM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts