What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Tag

In the past 7 days

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: illustration, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 6,460
1. In Memory: Yumi Heo

By Cynthia Leitich Smith
for Cynsations

Obituary: Yumi Heo by Shannon Maughan from Publishers Weekly. Peek: "[Henry] Holt’s Laura Godwin shared this remembrance:

'Yumi was extremely gracious, enthusiastic, and inquisitive,' she said. 'I loved the way she incorporated ‘mistakes’ into her art rather than erasing or deleting them.
"If she drew a squiggle where she hadn’t intended, it would show up in the final art as a tree or a rabbit or whatever struck her fancy. She was part artist, part magician—and always an inspiration.'"
Yumi Heo Memorial Fund from Go Fund Me. Peek:

"Please show your support in honor of internationally loved children’s book author and Illustrator and creator of Polka Dot Penguin Pottery, Yumi Heo.
"Your support will help continue two of Yumi’s dreams, the steady training of her daughter as a professional figure skater and the founding of a scholarship program to help students in Korea who have big dreams and little resources."

Add a Comment
2. If you had a crumhorn would you bake it in a pie?

Some added puzzle pages for my kindle ebook If You Have a Hat:

question about purpose of crumhorn

illustration of person playing a crumhorn

0 Comments on If you had a crumhorn would you bake it in a pie? as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
3. ‘Mucha Lucha’ Co-Creator Lili Chin Files Copyright Infringement Suit Against Kohl’s

What does an indie artist do when America's second-largest department store won't stop stealing your work?

The post ‘Mucha Lucha’ Co-Creator Lili Chin Files Copyright Infringement Suit Against Kohl’s appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

0 Comments on ‘Mucha Lucha’ Co-Creator Lili Chin Files Copyright Infringement Suit Against Kohl’s as of 11/4/2016 4:53:00 PM
Add a Comment
4. Give Please a Chance!

I am excited to announce that my artwork, along with several other illustrators from MB Artists, will be featured in Bill O'Reilly and James Patterson's new book "Give Please a Chance."  My illustration is the one shown here at the bottom, with the girl and the trampoline.  This title will be released on November 21st.


0 Comments on Give Please a Chance! as of 10/25/2016 11:14:00 PM
Add a Comment
5. Author-Illustrator Interview: Ambelin Kwaymullina on Justice, Hope & Her Creative Family

Sample chapter from Candlewick Press
By Cynthia Leitich Smith
for Cynsations

The second of a four-installment dialogue with Ambelin and Cynthia.  

Our focus is on the creative life and process, speculative fiction, diversity, privilege, indigenous literature, and books for young readers.

Yesterday, Ambelin spoke on ethics, the writing process and own voices.

We have children’s-YA literature and the law in common. That’s actually a pretty common combination here in the states. Why do you think there are so many people involved in both?

Well, I’ve had some of my law students suggest the law is so horribly dry that it drives people to being creative in order to escape its clutches (these are generally the students who are studying law because their parents thought it was a good idea).

But for me at least, I think the reason I studied law and the reason I write are the same. In both realms, I am seeking justice – and justice, in Aboriginal societies, generally equates to balance, not just between human beings but between all forms of life (and everything lives).

I write speculative fiction because I want to write about the possibility of defeating injustice; to write about the terrible things that were (and are) while imagining what could be.

The oppressive law I wrote about in the Tribe series divides people into three categories: those without an ability (Citizens); those with an ability (Illegals); and those whose ability is considered benign (Exempts).

This is not an invented law. It is based on the Western Australian Natives (Citizenship Rights) Act 1944, a piece of legislation that purported to offer Aboriginal people ‘citizenship’ by exempting us from racially-based restrictions that only applied to my ancestors in the first place because they were Aboriginal.

In the Tribe series, this law is ultimately defeated by an alliance of the marginalised and the privileged, and by a heroine whose power is to identify and sustain the connections between all life.

And in writing of connections, I am writing of something that is central to the law in Aboriginal legal systems where (at its broadest) law is the processes of living in the world that sustain the world.

You clearly articulate the impact of white privilege on writing and writers, noting the negative impact on the work of Native voices and POC voices. What would you say to those Native and POC writers who may find themselves angry, frustrated, hurt or discouraged by these dynamics?

First: it’s not you. Exclusion is not something you are inventing in your head and you are neither unlucky nor unworthy.

It helps in this context to form connections with other Indigenous writers as well as with writers of colour, LGBTI writers, and writers with a disability.

You are likely to hear stories of authors getting similar comments across different contexts (e.g: you’re not writing to the Indigenous experience … this story is too Asian … gay books don’t sell … we’ve already published a ‘disability book’ this year).

It matters to have a network of people with whom to share both the good and bad experiences; and perhaps most importantly, to understand that you are not alone.

Second, never forget how to laugh. Some of the comments I’ve listed above have been part of the experience of other writers that they’ve laughed about with me – not because these comments are not discriminatory and hurtful, but because laughter has always been one of the ways in which marginalised peoples have dealt with pain.

Third, define success in your own terms. We all know what ‘success’ is supposed to be in literary industry terms: book sales and/or critical acclaim (preferably both). I’m not saying we shouldn’t aspire to that. But I also think that if marginalised writers define our success solely in the terms set by an industry that consistently privileges white, straight, cis-gendered people who don’t have a disability, we are also buying into an underlying lie.

The lie is that if we can just prove we are good enough we will be treated equally. But once equality has to be earned, it is no longer equality.

So I think it’s important that each of us define success according to what matters to us – and for me, it’s being a person that my ancestors would be proud of.

Book sales wouldn’t overly interest them. But honouring who they were, and who I am; treating cultural knowledge with respect; helping other Indigenous writers whenever and wherever I can – these are the kinds of things they’d be concerned about.

Fourth: be hopeful. I am. I locate my hope in people, and there are many, many people working towards a world in which all voices have an equal opportunity to speak and all stories are equally heard.

I think change will come, and in the meantime, I’m proud to be a part of a global community of voices, marginalised and privilege alike, that are speaking out for justice.

While you don’t feel it’s appropriate for non-Indigenous writers to reflect your community in first person or deep third, you are open to them writing secondary characters. Why does your opinion differ depending on how centered the character’s perspective is in the story?

Ambelin's desk
I don’t think it’s appropriate for non-Indigenous people to speak as if they are Indigenous, especially given the operation of privilege which means that non-Indigenous voices will be heard in a way that Indigenous voices are not.

For me, writing from an ‘outsider’ perspective (so not in first or deep third) is to respect boundaries; to accept there are limits on what we can know of others and how we should represent others in our own work.

When I write of experiences of marginalisation not my own, I do it from an outsider perspective – reflecting that this is much as I can understand and that understanding may of course be wrong; I am not suggesting that I know what it is to see the world from an ‘insider’ view of a group to which I don’t belong. I think the spaces must be created for everyone to speak to their own worlds, and I want to be part of making those spaces a reality.

What advice do you have for non-Indigenous writers in crafting those secondary characters?

I think something you’ve said is the best place to start – you’ve spoken of the need for writers to read 100 books by Indigenous people before writing about us.

I agree. No one should be writing an Indigenous character without being familiar with Indigenous stories (not the ones told about us but the ones told by us).

It’s also important to ensure that any stories people are reading are ethically published because there is a vast body of Indigenous stories that were taken by anthropologists and others and are now in the public domain without the informed consent (or sometimes even the knowledge) of the Indigenous peoples concerned.

The easiest way to check that a story is appropriately published is to see who holds the copyright; where Indigenous peoples hold copyright in their own stories it is at least some indication that they control the text.

In addition to reading stories, I’d say, become familiar with representation issues. Engage with the online dialogue happening around representation and children’s literature as it relates to Indigenous peoples. There are no shortage of voices speaking in this space.

And finally: words spoken about marginalised peoples have a weight and a cost. But if you are not a member of that group, then it’s a weight that you don’t carry and a cost that you don’t pay.

So don’t measure the impact of your words by how they will be read by people like you. Measure them by how they’ll be read by the people you’re writing about.

How did you learn your craft as a writer and illustrator?

By doing! I have no formal training in writing or illustration. But nor do a lot of Australian Indigenous writers and illustrators, and we have been storytellers for thousands of years.

So to learn craft I look to the work of Indigenous writers and artists, both within Australia and elsewhere, as well as to the ancient teachings of my people.

What inspired you to direct your talents toward creating stories for young readers?

In my YA series, I was writing about a superhero, so it had to be about a teenager. I don’t believe grown ups have it in us to save the world, because we are spectacularly failing to do so.

But in the young I see all the hope for the future – they are more interconnected, quick to embrace new ideas, and passionate about fighting anything they perceive as an injustice.

They’re also more honest, especially the children for whom I write picture books. When they like a book, they write me lovely letters telling me how they sleep with the book under their pillow and begging me to write more. When they don’t like it they’re equally forthright.

People ask sometimes whether its difficult as an author to deal with bad reviews, to which I say: try writing for six-year-olds. Every once in a while, children send me letters about one or the other of my picture books that begin something like this: “My teacher made me read your book. I didn’t like it.”

I’ve had a few of these letters that went on for ten pages or more, and since that length is like War and Peace from a six-year-old, it means I’ve had kids hate my work enough to send me the child equivalent of Tolstoy.

Adverse reviews from grown-ups are nothing in comparison.

What was your initial inspiration for The Tribe series?

Sample chapter from Candlewick Press
My brother Blaze. He came up to me one day and said, “I’ve got an awesome title for a book. It’s called The Interrogation of Ashala Wolf.”

I said, “That’s a pretty good title – what’s the story?’

To which Blaze replied, “Oh, there’s no story. Just the name, and I can’t be bothered writing it so I’m giving to you.”

Having bestowed the title of the novel upon me, he wandered off, leaving me to start thinking about the story. (And for anyone who’s read any of the Tribe series, the character of Jaz is very like my brother Blaze).

What were the challenges—literary, research, psychological and logistical—of bringing the stories to life?

I think the primary challenge is this: in so many ways, I wasn’t writing fiction. A post-apocalyptic world is not a fantasy for Indigenous peoples; the colonial apocalypse has already happened and much of The Tribe series is drawn from Australian colonial history.

Much of it too is drawn from the experiences of my ancestors and that is why hope runs so strongly through the narrative. They held on to hope through hard, cruel times when all their choices were taken away from them.

Indigenous peoples are so often spoken of as victims and I certainly don’t wish to minimise the suffering and the multi-generational trauma inflicted upon us by the colonial project. But the very fact that the Indigenous peoples of the world survived determined efforts to destroy us demonstrates our great strength.

I think the ability to hold onto hope is part of that strength and its something I try to honour.

You’ve created several picture books with Sally Morgan. Could you tell us about your work together?

Ambelin with her creative family
So, Sally is my mum. I’ve also done books with my two brothers, Blaze and Zeke, and the four of us have written together as a family. We’re all authors and artists, and we always give each other an honest opinion – sometimes this results in one of us storming off (usually me or Zeke, we’re both excellent stormers).

Generally, once we’ve had a chance to think about the criticism we come creeping sheepishly back and agree that yes, actually, that particular portion of the narrative (which we were previously so proud of) does indeed need more work.

I think from the outside our working process probably looks chaotic; we all talk at the same time and over each other; generally, the person with the best story gets to hold the floor until they get boring and someone else interrupts. If you want a place in the conversation in my family, you have to be prepared to earn it.

What can your readers look forward to next?

I’m working on three YA novels right now, but the one I’ll finish first is a book I’m writing with my brother Zeke.

It’s a mystery with fantasy elements that’s told from the perspective of three Indigenous female protagonists. It’s been a difficult book to write in places because terrible things happen in it, but its ultimately a story about the power of young Indigenous women and how they find their way home.

Add a Comment
6. ILLUSTRATION - paul farrell book

Illustrator, graphic designer and print-maker Paul Farrell's debut book 'Great Britain in Colour', was published on 22 September by Boxtree and Pan Macmillan. The 166 full page colour illustrations are one years' work and the book was completed almost two years from the start. It is a personal journey full of memories and travels from the last 45 years or so. There are hidden gems, familiar

0 Comments on ILLUSTRATION - paul farrell book as of 10/24/2016 4:12:00 AM
Add a Comment
7. Photo





Add a Comment
8. ILLUSTRATION - ben newman

Staying on the subject of cool graphic illustrators this is the work of Ben Newman. I discovered Ben through his latest book 'Professor Astro Cat's Atomic Adventure' which I had snapped in Bologna back in September. Ben is based in London where he works as a freelance illustrator and lectures on illustration. His graphic geometric style has been described as 'Bauhaus fuzzy felt' and his clients

0 Comments on ILLUSTRATION - ben newman as of 10/21/2016 4:33:00 AM
Add a Comment
9. DESIGNER - kat uno

Kat Uno is an illustrator based in Hawaii. After working for about 6 years as a graphic designer for a government agency Kat decided to strike out on her own in 2015. She is currently represented by the Astound Agency and has been illustrating books for going on 2 years. Although her agency work is her bread and butter, Kat also really loves designing cute characters and patterns. You can find

0 Comments on DESIGNER - kat uno as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
10. Fall


0 Comments on Fall as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
11. DESIGNER - jason ansell

Our second designer today is London based Jason Ansell who worked in Fashion for 15 years creating womenswear for the high end and high street. But for the last 2 years Jason has been busy redirecting himself towards his love of illustration. He has taken MATS (Make Art That Sells) classes and has been busy building up a portfolio. Here are some lovely examples that show Jason's style and he is

0 Comments on DESIGNER - jason ansell as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
12. WALL ART - lu west

Print & Pattern has a new sponsor this week in the shape of Lu West Fine Art Prints. Many of you will know Lu's work from her previous shop 'Mengsel'. Lu is now concentrating on limited edition silkscreen prints (plus continuing her freelance illustration work). Here are some examples of Lu's lovely prints. including her well known bigger boat design at the bottom of the post. Lu also has an

0 Comments on WALL ART - lu west as of 10/17/2016 4:38:00 AM
Add a Comment
13. BOOK DESIGN - penguin

Today we have some snaps I took in my local branch of Waterstones. They had some lovely patterned book covers for Nancy Mitford novels laid out on a table. It turns out they were released by Penguin last year to celebrate 70 years since the first publication of her novel 'The Pursuit of Love'. The covers featured painted geometrics by New York based artist Lourdes Sanchez. The in-house design

0 Comments on BOOK DESIGN - penguin as of 10/14/2016 4:05:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. ILLUSTRATION - wide eyed

Also spotted whilst book shopping recently was this lovely children's book "What do grown Ups Do All Day?" published by Wide Eyed. Illustrated by Paris based artist Virgine Morgand this large picture book features over 100 professions to inspire and educate little ones. Virgine is well known for her illustrations of people and can be found online here for commissions, or you can find the book

0 Comments on ILLUSTRATION - wide eyed as of 10/14/2016 4:05:00 AM
Add a Comment
15. ILLUSTRATION - hector dexet

I came across the work of French artist Hector Dexet again (after featuring a print back in 2013) whilst on holiday in Bologna last month. I saw his books in many of the city's bookshops and they looked fabulous with their simple graphic images. Hector is based in Paris and has been working in design and illustration since graduating 2009. He has produced lots of great children's books largely

0 Comments on ILLUSTRATION - hector dexet as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16. DESIGNER - striped pear studio

Kirsten Sevig is an artist /designer/ illustrator/ pattern painter based in Minneapolis, MN where she works in a stripey studio that she has dubbed the 'Striped Pear Studio'. Kirsten loves creating patterns and products and has recently designed and produced a couple of notecard sets for her new Striped Pear Studio brand. Featuring her lovely hand painted patterns they are now available in her

0 Comments on DESIGNER - striped pear studio as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
17. WALL ART - marks & spencer

We finish the week as we began it, with a look at some of the latest arrivals at Marks & Spencer. Here we have a selection of prints from their wall art department starting with these striking prints : bright birdie bouquet and painted butterfly, sadly by an unnamed artist. Also shown are colourful abstracts plus some smart type and geomtrics from Marks & Spencer's collaboration with Conran.

0 Comments on WALL ART - marks & spencer as of 10/7/2016 4:36:00 AM
Add a Comment
18. DESIGNER - louise lockhart sale

Super talented designer and illustrator Louise Lockhart has 10% off of everything in her shop throughout October so this gives me a lovely excuse  to showcase some her wonderful work. Louise produces her designs under the label The Printed Peanut all goods are proudly made n the UK. Products in her online shop include notebooks, cards, mugs, plates, books and bags. Use the coupon code '

0 Comments on DESIGNER - louise lockhart sale as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
19. Flood Warning

I received a "flood" of books this week. Flood Warning published by Harper Collins.



And here are a couple of peeks inside the book.




0 Comments on Flood Warning as of 9/21/2016 7:36:00 PM
Add a Comment
20. How Animation Artists See Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

The animation community has been creating fantastic cartoons and caricatures of this year's goofball presidential candidates.

The post How Animation Artists See Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

0 Comments on How Animation Artists See Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton as of 9/28/2016 6:14:00 PM
Add a Comment
21. Ladybug Magazine

Check out my artwork in the newest issue of "Ladybug" magazine!  I had so much fun imagining the details for these illustrations.


0 Comments on Ladybug Magazine as of 9/30/2016 2:16:00 PM
Add a Comment
22.

It's a good news day! My artwork for this past July cover for Cricket Magazine was chosen for their 2017 calendar! Woo hoo! #grateful



0 Comments on as of 10/1/2016 5:14:00 PM
Add a Comment
23. Bowers Blogs about Buddy's Bedtime Battery.

A new book just hit the shelves, last week. Buddy's Bedtime Battery by Chirstina Geist (published by Random House) is my latest book and I want to take you behind the pages to see how the project progressed.


It's always exciting to get the first printed books in the mail. After months of a studio full of art boards in progress, wet paint and gallons of coffee (not part of the painting process but very necessary), the final product is a welcome payoff. Buddy finally arrived!


  

Now, let's look at how Buddy arrived. After reading the story manuscript and creating sketches for the characters, a full length book dummy was created. When the book sketches were finalized, the painting process began. 

I created a production line of boards with images of each page. I taped the edges with low-tac tape to keep that area clean and white. Then, an underpainting with brown acrylic paint was washed (thin layers) onto the boards. I usually do this when the final art is created with oil paint. The acrylic and polymer layers sealed the paper board from the oils and gave me a good (light and dark) value study to follow.

At this stage, the studio was full of artwork covering every flat space to be found. I have a drying rack for storing work in progress but I like to see everything laid, side by side.
     


Here is the title page. The towel area on the left was used for copyright and publishing information. The title was placed on the wall, above the bathtub. Notice the pajamas are visible, just below the towel. I often use elements and story props to hint at what's coming on the following page(s).


Here is one of the illustration spreads. One of my favorite images of the book.


This was my table, somewhere under the shingles of drying illustrations. The images were at various stages of completion so Buddy's hair looks really dark on the bottom image, etc. I worked on several paintings at a time and all art started to finalize toward the end of the process....which is also called..."the deadline" (If all goes as planned). It was a fairly long process and sometimes hard to see the end when spending days painting little parts, adjusting colors and adding detail. But eventually, it all came together and a package with the final art of Buddy's Bedtime Battery traveled to Random House



Then, months later, I get to see the book on NBC, being read to millions of TV viewers. How COOL is that? So exciting! ...So surreal! ...Yay, Buddy! 

...deep breath...now, back to the drawing board. :)

0 Comments on Bowers Blogs about Buddy's Bedtime Battery. as of 10/2/2016 2:32:00 PM
Add a Comment
24. to the moon and stars and back


Aw, I found this a drawing whilst looking for something else.  I made for my Art O Level  many many moons ago. Around thirty years ago. I did this and some studies of denim with blue ballpoints. I'd never have imagined then that I'd become known for drawing with a ballpoint pen. Or that I'd have a drawing of a pair of converse in ballpoint that would go viral. Although, I was a real dreamer so maybe I would have imagined that. Well, not the bit about it going viral. I couldn't have dreamt up the Internet. Even my imagination couldn't have come up with that!

0 Comments on to the moon and stars and back as of 10/5/2016 5:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
25. BOOK DESIGN - aino-maija metsola

This month sees the re-issue of six Virginia Woolf  books by Penguin Classics - all with stunning covers by artist Aino-Maija Metsola. Aino-Maija is best know for her work with Marimekko and for her bold use of colour and painterly patterns. Available from 6th October in good bookshops and see them online here at Amazon.

0 Comments on BOOK DESIGN - aino-maija metsola as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts