What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(tagged with 'Illustration')

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
<<August 2015>>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
      01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Illustration, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 6,094
1. MELISSA SWEET ACCEPTS THE GOLDEN KITE FOR ILLUSTRATION!!!

Our lovely and fantastic Melissa Sweet, author and illustrator of many award-winning picture books, is here accepting the Golden Kite for her illustrations of Peter Mark Roget's life and world in The Right Word: Roget and his Thesaurus.

The research for this book began not far from here in Santa Barbara, where Melissa got to see one of Roget's original word books in a private collection. Melissa has illustrated word-centric biographies before, but unlike being able to pull from the imagery evoked in the words of William Carlos Williams, Melissa had to figure out how to visualize Roget's lists of words. 

For the better part of two weeks, Melissa handlettered Roget's original word list in sepia and had a jolly old time doing it. 
Melissa got to handle original Roget pages
like these—without gloves!

Melissa thanks her publisher Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, her author Jen Bryant, and the SCBWI/Golden Kite committee.



"My hope with this book is that readers will be delighted and informed, but most importantly, always find the right word when they need it."


0 Comments on MELISSA SWEET ACCEPTS THE GOLDEN KITE FOR ILLUSTRATION!!! as of 8/2/2015 6:03:00 PM
Add a Comment
2. Portfolio Showcase Winners!

Honor Awards go to:

Amy Heron (send us your website link!)



and




and the 
Grand
Prize 
Winner
IS
.
.
.

Congratulations, Illustrators!

0 Comments on Portfolio Showcase Winners! as of 8/2/2015 6:03:00 PM
Add a Comment
3. Illustrator Submission :: Nick Bear

Post by Chloe

11825688_1685541338346858_8657043361223744994_n

tumblr_nqquz7Vd281qko8s7o1_1280

11703124_1682308528670139_6580394297467086592_n

tumblr_nmmql1Vfmt1qko8s7o1_1280

Nick Bear is a professional artist with a passion for illustration. His style is bold, colourful and often full of character and humour. This has made him popular among game production companies and his illustrations have featured in some of the world’s most popular games such as Plants vs Zombies 2 and Bejeweled Blitz. If you would like to see more of Nick Bear’s graphic illustrations, please visit his portfolio.

0 Comments on Illustrator Submission :: Nick Bear as of 8/2/2015 10:39:00 AM
Add a Comment
4. SCBWI Retreat 2015: Workshops with Grown-Ups (and FOOD!)



Last weekend I was away from home for 4 days in the historic village of Evesham, near Worcester, doing another of my dream jobs. It involved enormous amounts of eating (best rhubarb crumble I ever tasted), sketching in the sunshine, listening to stories, chatting into the night over glasses of wine... oh, and also delivering workshops and portfolio advice for members of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators.

I knew the SCBWI retreat was to be held in a lovely old house with pretty grounds, but I was completely gob-smacked when my taxi stopped outside a long, Tudor house, all timbers and thatch. I was shown up a big, wooden staircase into a lovely old room, whose floorboards sloped down into one corner. I unpacked with a smile.


We kicked off about an hour later, with a brilliant getting-to-know-you exercise run by fellow author/illustrators, Loretta Schauer and Alexis Deacon. We paired up and had to draw or describe events from each other's past, stimulated by silly questions like: When have you injured yourself as a result of your own stupidity?

Then I ran my first session of the weekend: teaching people how to make concertina sketchbooks. 




SCBWI had provided a big pile of watercolour paper. We set to, cutting and sticking. We cut up old cardboard boxes for the covers - it worked a treat. Then we all filed into the dining room for the first feast of many.



After dinner, we had a book review cum storytelling session, where we each read a favourite picture book to the rest of the group. There were 30 of us, so it took a while, but was a lovely way to spend the evening.

Next morning was a workshop by Alexis. He taught us techniques for making narratives more interesting, looking at the potential for using dishonest characters with hidden motivations. We all tried to create a story, though mine ran out of steam half way through. After coffee and biccies, we had a bit of free time, so I took my newly-minted sketchbook into the grounds:


Then it was lunch (yum), followed by an interesting talk by Andrea MacDonald, Senior Editor at Random House, about what makes a good picture book:


I did a couple of one-to-one advice sessions next. I found a lovely little summer house tucked away at the foot of the garden, which was perfect for a cost chat. people had booked appointments with me and I did my best to be wise and helpful with first an illustrator, then an author:


My 2nd workshop used the sketchbooks we made earlier. I wanted to explore the idea of finding a narrative in a place, of capturing the essence of a particular period of time using words and pictures, but doing it through close observation, recording what we could see, hear and smell. This is of course something which I am very used to doing in my sketchbooks, and I thought it might make a good source of inspiration.

I sat under a big tree and rang a bell. People gathered from around the grounds. Some had been playing croquet on the lawn!


We had expected mostly illustrators to take up the challenge, but a few authors went for it too. I showed the work I'd done since I arrived, as an example, and talked through easy techniques for getting instant results with watercolour (it was a revelation to most people that you could paint with clear water first, to control the colour), then everyone dispersed for an hour or so of experimentation.


After dinner (yum), we gathered in the conference room and, in small groups, talked though our work-in-progress. Each group then chose the strongest 3 pieces of work for each person - a great idea, as your own favourite bits of work are not necessarily your best and a fresh perspective is very useful. All the work was then displayed for everyone to browse and the next thing I knew, it was midnight!


Sunday began with my main workshop (after breakfast of course - yum). I devised a technique for drawing a journey, one piece at a time, to build up the elements of a story. Only, to put a fly in the ointment and get people out of their comfort-zone, many of the components were chosen randomly, by a neighbour. For me, the challenge was making it work, when about a third of the delegates were not illustrators. Still, it seemed to go extremely well. After coffee (and biccies) people took it in turns to pin up their drawing and tell their story.


Some ideas were hilarious, some were quite dark, some narratives were in a bit of a tangle, which the group helped to sort out: the brainstorming of 30 creative minds, all focussed on progressing one story idea was fantastic to watch.


The 'house cat' decided he wanted to join in. He demanded to be let in from the rain through the French windows, jumped up on the tables, walked across people's work, then took at seat near the front to listen:


After this of course, it was time for lunch (yum). Then we had another talk, this time by Emily Lamm, once my editor at Gullane (who worked with me on Swap!), now working as Commissioning Editor at Hachette. She gave some excellent advice on what editors are looking for and things to try / avoid in your writing. I tried to capture her and highlights from what she was saying in the concertina sketchbook:


I had two more mentoring sessions during the afternoon, sadly in the house this time, as rain was still bouncing around outside. Then Alexis did a demo session, showing how he draws with ink, using different kinds of brushes (in various stages of decay): 


I had my final one-to-one session, then at 7pm the gong sounded and it was time for another glorious dinner. I was impressed with the fact that the veggie choice for every meal was just as adventurous and delicious as its meat counterpart. We were all so impressed as a group that we asked for the chef and kitchen staff to come out and gave them a huge round of applause.

After dinner, we took a group photo in the garden:


Then we were all given a postcard, onto which we had to write three achievable goals for the next 3 months. The illustrators decorated the front of their cards. We stuck stamps on and handed them back to Loretta, whose job it was to post them all back to us in three months time. Good idea, or what?

We stayed up chatting and drinking and taking photos of each other until late, a gradually dwindling group. Finally, at 1am, the last dregs gave up the ghost and headed for bed.

Next morning, I packed my suitcase then luxuriated over my final breakfast (yum):


Then gradually, a few at a time, people had to leave (cue hugging...). It had been such a rich weekend, we all felt rather sad to be on our way. I was so sad that I had to buy myself a present from the gift shop (a VERY funky necklace).


Thank you to Loretta and all the team at SCBWI for inviting me to take part. It was a joy. Thanks as well to Sue Eves and Paul Morton, for the photos.

It was lovely to meet everyone, including the rather amazing Alexis Deacon, who's head is just stuffed with crazy story-stuff. And you know the really good news? I get to do it all again next year, as it's a 2-year invitation!

0 Comments on SCBWI Retreat 2015: Workshops with Grown-Ups (and FOOD!) as of 8/2/2015 3:41:00 AM
Add a Comment
5. Adam Rex: Creating Characters with Character

Adam Rex is a ridiculously accomplished illustrator and author. His books range from PB to YA, and his illustration style is a bit like what Norman Rockwell might have produced after a Jolt Cola bender.

In this session, Adam talked about techniques for drawing memorable characters.

He showed us some of his early art, including a decent Rembrandt knock-off (though his Santa is definitely questionable, and arguably looks more like Krampus).

Some best quotes: "I think we can get you one butt." (From his editor regarding The Dirty Cowboy.) His reply: "I didn't even take the butt."

He talked about what it looked like to see his characters from The True Meaning of Smekday as they'd been translated by the Dreamworks team for the adaptation. (The movie Home and the forthcoming TV show were based on the book.) It was disappointing at first to see the changes, but he got used to it quickly and even liked some of the changes, especially the design of the Gorg.

His techniques are so cool—he often builds models of characters and sets he uses for reference.

Some tips:

  • Understand anatomy of character design (the human body is approximately seven heads high, but in character design, this varies);
  • Knowledge of real human and animal anatomy (which have strong similarities) can help you design fantastical creatures; 
  • More stylized and simplistic characters, such as Charlie Brown, sometimes have more universal appeal; and 
  • Letting a body sag into a shape or move somehow makes it seem more like a character and less like a doctor's office illustration.
  • Don't forget draw through. For example, if you have a character holding the shield, make sure the body behind the shield makes sense. 

Follow Adam on Twitter

0 Comments on Adam Rex: Creating Characters with Character as of 8/1/2015 8:57:00 PM
Add a Comment
6. ALL HAIL THE WORLD'S BEST DAN AND CALDECOTT WINNER, DAN SANTAT! Keynote

Dan as Daenerys Targaryen, he is a fan of GoT
Lin says it is a wonderfully satisfying and emotional moment to introduce Dan Santat and I agree, he's the super best.

Dan came here in 2001, this Summer Conference is the first SCBWI conference he ever attended. He worried it was too expensive, but that worry was soon put to rest when his portfolio got noticed by editor Arthur Levine, and because of attending the conference,Dan got his first book contract.

In the many years of attending SCBWI events and conferences, Dan's noticed success stories of authors and illustrators, and some stories of people who are still finding there way. Dan says:

Your time will come, it's not a race to the top of the mountain, everyone finds their time. 

One way to ease your trek on the road to publication is to improve your taste: Do you know if you have good taste? Do you know if what you're writing is good? Dan reads us this Ira Glass quote:



Dan lists some of the stories and genres he likes, and thinks improving your work and taste is due to understanding why you like things, don't censor or bias yourself. Dan likes:

Batman and Akira comics. Movies and TV shows like Moneyball, Game of Thrones, Lost, and Breaking Bad. Podcasts like This American Life and Serial. From all of these he is learning story style and technique, observing different points of view. Immerse yourself in life and culture, take these references, says Dan, and come up with a unique spin on things.

You must do a critical review of your work. Dan reads us some 1 star and 5 star Goodreads reviews for Where the Wild Things Are (which has an overall rating of 4.2, by the way). Compare your opinions with others, there are crazy reviewers and there are good reviewers, the good reviews are useful pieces of critical information that can make your work better.

Study the fundamentals, but don't be rigid.

Learn by imitation, but don't become a clone. In art school, Dan copied Wyeth paintings in class because when you paint the strokes a master painter painted, your hands learn what your head doesn't quite understand yet. But be sure to make your art your own, Dan says, try to make work that is original to yourself once you begin to trust your inner instincts.

The exploration comes by doing: You have to make a lot of lousy paintings before you find one you want to put in your portfolio. Dan was working a full-time job when he decided he wanted to be published, so he started working from 10 pm to 3 am on his illustration work and after weeks and weeks of working like this and honing his craft, he'd made himself an illustration portfolio he could be proud of.

Form follows function. Dan shows us how good stories have things happening for a reason, you see it in everything from Back to the Future to his very own Beekle.


A few of Dan's final thoughts: Do what you love, and the work will find you. Don't think about the money, think about the craft, and working on your craft is the only way to improve. And don't give up!

Thanks, Danders!!!

0 Comments on ALL HAIL THE WORLD'S BEST DAN AND CALDECOTT WINNER, DAN SANTAT! Keynote as of 8/1/2015 1:33:00 PM
Add a Comment
7. GROW by Marijke Buurlage

growgrow

Submitted by Marijke Buurlage for the Illustration Friday topic GROW.

0 Comments on GROW by Marijke Buurlage as of 8/1/2015 11:03:00 AM
Add a Comment
8. Lori Nichols: Success Story Panel

Isn't Lori cute? And so is whoever
is photobombing her.
Lori Nichols, author/illustrator, is asked what was it that broke her through to the other (published) side:

"If I had to break it down to two things, it would definitely be SCBWI, I went to my first conference in 2002, I left two small children at home with the flu and drove five hours to a regional conference (where I then got the flu) but I learned so much. I met my agent at a SCBWI conference, and she's the other thing that's broken me through,  my amazing agent Joanna Volpe."

Lee asks Lori about some craft tips: Lori quotes Kelly Light, "Writing is like punching myself in the face."

Lori says, "That quote really spoke to me, for me, I have to show up every day, and sometimes what I write is going to stink. It's the showing up every day and not waiting for perfection. I think part of what makes a beautiful book are the imperfections, maybe a line is too scratchy, so what! Show up to your paper, your easel, your computer, and stay there, do it daily. Study other writers and illustrators, too."





0 Comments on Lori Nichols: Success Story Panel as of 7/31/2015 10:27:00 PM
Add a Comment
9. 100 Bicycles

Here's another of my current projects and obsessions. I'm not entirely sure where it came from but it's quickly taken over. Bikes, bikes and more bikes.
 It probably really took hold when I visited the Eroica Britannia festival this year. It's a festival and celebration of cycling. The cyclists ride through the gorgeous Peak District on pre 1987 bikes. So lots of wonderful vintage, classic and iconic bikes to look at and draw.
 The thing, I find with bikes is they are not easy to draw. With all their angles and proportions and round wheels and whatnot, they are difficult little blighters. But I love the challenge of something difficult. Once you get to grips with it and start getting it right there's a great feeling of satisfaction.
So, I think that's where this all started. The bike thing. I always remember reading, when I first started drawing, that you've never really got the handle on drawing something until you've drawn it a hundred times. Now I'd probably agree with that.
 And so in September I'll be holding an exhibition, with a friend of mine artist Kate Yorke, called 100 Bicycles. Yes, the title pretty much explains it. We'll be exhibiting one hundred bicycle drawings. Sketches mainly.
I really can't stop. I really mustn't stop. And while I'm loving it why stop? I'm adding some of these sketches to my Etsy shop at very reasonable prices (cheap!) so if you're into bicycles grab yourself a bargain HERE. You'd better hurry though, they're going quick!
 PLUS, for this weekend only, anyone who purchases my Andrea Joseph Bumper Pack will get a FREE bicycle sketch. Check that out HERE.

0 Comments on 100 Bicycles as of 7/31/2015 2:29:00 PM
Add a Comment
10. Pick of the Week for NATURE and This Week’s Topic

naturegrid72nowm

Happy Illustration Friday, fellow creators!

We’re ready to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the wonderful illustration above by Jessica Roux, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of NATURE (you can get a print here). Thanks to everyone who participated with drawings, paintings, sculptures, and more. We love seeing it all!

You can see a gallery of ALL the entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

GROW

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the public Gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

0 Comments on Pick of the Week for NATURE and This Week’s Topic as of 7/31/2015 2:31:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Phil Noto

tumblr_nf8w7d4AcQ1qhyhwto1_500BWIDOW2014020-DC11-c8479

tumblr_ndsypzZcPU1qhyhwto1_500

tumblr_nk2tikmd5J1qhyhwto2_500tumblr_nr85xy5ypn1qhyhwto2_1280

noto-gotgphil_noto_candid_032013geekdraw9

black-widow-2014-013-000tumblr_n2djokGes71qhyhwto2_500

prv14263_pg1thor

p2wpgqvbvtrfmw38yixdtumblr_ni6dqf0Q2v1qhyhwto1_500

tumblr_n7s52gqQMa1qhyhwto1_500tumblr_n7qbds45D31qhyhwto1_500

jonah-hex-kknoto-jux-2

hit-girl-notoFreelancers-1-Cover-A-Phil-Noto-Variant-SOLD-OUT-310499096739

3465883-birds+of+prey+by+phil+noto883115

Birds_of_Prey_Vol_1_48noto2

tumblr_mxpc185KWr1qhyhwto2_500BWIDOW2014002-DC11-LR-71fd5

1990652-1_tumblr_lqw5f1hvyp1qhyhwto1_5001413944_xl

3818232-black_widow_09_coverDeadlyClassCvrNoto

X-23_21-674x1024tumblr_nkhlisJf3N1qhyhwto1_500

Quietly, one of the best current super-hero series being published is Nathan Edmondson & Phil Noto’s run on Black Widow. I first noticed Noto’s work on Marvel’s Uncanny X-Force, a few years back. His work brings a nice combination of fine art & design aesthetics to mainstream comic books. One of Noto’s earliest and most frequent collaborators was writing team extraordinaire Justin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti; starting off with a number of issues on their classic Jonah Hex run in the mid-2000’s, then projects like Superman/Supergirl: Maelstrom and Trigger Girl 6 for Image’s Creator-Owned series.

Phil Noto and writer Gerry Duggan received an Eisner award nomination in 2011 for their original comic series The Infinite Horizon, which tells a post-apocalyptic war story inspired by Homer’s Odyssey.

Phil Noto has worked for Disney Animation, as well as a concept artist for video games, including the mega-hit BioShock. Noto continues to be one of the most sought after cover artists in comics. He recently created a series of classic magazine inspired covers for Marvel.

You can follow the latest Noto news and see the newest art on his tumblr site here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com – Andy Yates

0 Comments on Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Phil Noto as of 7/30/2015 4:41:00 PM
Add a Comment
12. #TBT in B&W






































Maggie meets her grandmother, and Oliver gets a scolding. (From MAGGIE & OLIVER OR A BONE OF ONE'S OWN.)

0 Comments on #TBT in B&W as of 7/30/2015 11:51:00 AM
Add a Comment
13. Sunday Sermon Series: Prodigal Son July 26, 2015

Howdy folks. Today's illustration is another in my Sunday Sermon Series, from this week's sermon at Hockinson Community Church. The sermon was about the prodigal son parable Jesus told and is found in Luke 15:11-32.

I have read this piece of scripture many times, and have heard at least two sermons that I recall on it. Pastor Andy's sermon had a little bit different take(as usual) than the other sermons I had heard. Andy has a terrific knowledge of life/society during Jesus times. I always knew that when the prodigal son asked for his inheritance and the freedom to leave that it was a slap in the face to his father. What I hadn't ever heard before was that it was so much more than that. In those times, and that society it would have been perfectly acceptable for the father to kill his son for the disgrace he had heaped upon him. So, his sin could have, should have, cost the prodigal son his life. But the father saw him coming and ran to him, forgave him, sacrificed the fatted calf for him, welcomed him back with open arms with no questions asked. "For this son of mine was dead, and is alive again; he was lost and is found." (Luke 15:24)

We suffer the same when we try to shake God off, and live for this world. But if we seek repentance God is always there, running towards us. The tag line sums up what I took from this sermon. I think we should routinely stop and look up from our busy, hectic routine. Assess our lives, our direction, what we are doing and saying(and why we are doing and saying it), and see if it aligns with God's will. It's easy to get off track in life, but it's also easy to get back on track. Just turn towards Him.

I did not have time to colorize the drawing this time. With the temperature back in the 90's this week I can spend very little time in my office. Also I have little time these days for work what with Angela, Stella and the boys and the house/chores needing my attention. I like the drawing itself, but am not one hundred percent happy with it. I was going for a more subtle expression of self realization/shock at his predicament for the prodigal son there. More of a "the fog is lifting "What the..." moment. As it is, he looks suspiciously like Marty Feldman if he stuck his finger in a light socket. That's fine because I always liked Mr. Feldman, but it wasn't what I was going for originally. But, with little to no time to rework things what you see is what you get around here these days.

As always I hope you enjoyed this drawing. I hope this post was informative to you and helps you in some way in your walk. Thank you for stopping by. God bless.--Ryan

0 Comments on Sunday Sermon Series: Prodigal Son July 26, 2015 as of 7/30/2015 10:37:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. FREE Webinar: Creative Playgrounds

webinar-ad-newnewnew

While making notes for Salli’s upcoming class – BUILD A FREELANCE ILLUSTRATION BUSINESS – she realized that one topic was worthy of it’s own session: Creative Playgrounds, which Salli and her brother/business partner Nate Padavick believe can energize your career. What IS a Creative Playground and why are they so important? Join us for the FREE webinar August 10th at 4:00 EST (or watch any time after the live class).

Take it from Albert Einstein “Play is the highest form of research.”

0 Comments on FREE Webinar: Creative Playgrounds as of 7/30/2015 6:51:00 AM
Add a Comment
15. Retro Inspired Illustrations by Jennifer Dionisio

judy-garland-A3-jennifer-dionisio-illustration_670

fruit-dove-jungle-revised-low-res_670 Jennifer-Dionisio-High-res-One-Thing-I-Know-copy-illustration Ann-Francis-Jennifer-Dionisio-2015_670 Tomorrowland-Jennifer-Dionisio-Low-res_670

Jennifero Dionisio Website >>

0 Comments on Retro Inspired Illustrations by Jennifer Dionisio as of 7/30/2015 6:51:00 AM
Add a Comment
16. Charlotte Day

PlantHunters_Hooker

Blackbirds_Charlotte_Day_Illustration_Crop 

 1200_CharlotteDay_1

 A2_crop

 BC_5

Charlotte Day specialises in creating botanical inspired illustrations, she combines an historical interest in botany with the decorative arts. Charlottes work has featured on editorials and on products such as tents and teapots! Her clients include Random House, Penguin, Liberty and Anthropologie to name a few. 

To see more fantastic work from Charlotte Day visit her website 

0 Comments on Charlotte Day as of 7/29/2015 1:33:00 PM
Add a Comment
17. come out to play now the light nights are here


A few of my bike drawings here. You know when something kind of unintentionally becomes a theme? Well, that. And when a theme comes knocking on my door I do love to go out to play with it. 
Watch this space if you like bikes, or art, and specifically bike art. 

0 Comments on come out to play now the light nights are here as of 7/28/2015 5:02:00 PM
Add a Comment
18. A House for a Tink

I’ve been working on some readers that have kept me pretty busy.  Mostly fairy tales which I really enjoy creating. But when work is done and I have a few spare minutes, I let my pencil wander. This is where it goes, to the land of little creatures, where fairies collect the things that go missing in the house, and whose friends are the crickets and the mice in the woods. Won’t you join me?snailshell_House_RobertaBaird_72

0 Comments on A House for a Tink as of 7/27/2015 8:20:00 PM
Add a Comment
19. Peek A Boo

Visit My Page to Browse the Store
Lately there has been so much information on how to run a business, so much to read and prepare, that I feel like I'm falling behind while moving ahead. Crazy how it works eh?

I haven't forgotten about my blog or my newsletter, or Facebook for that matter, but working out new schedules, system for what I offer where, and how to find "me" time in it all. Because let's face it, when you can't take care of yourself, what you give out is no where near what you hoped it would be.

Wings are getting a bit clipped over on my end, but all for the better. Thank you for all of your patience and support. :)

0 Comments on Peek A Boo as of 7/20/2015 7:24:00 PM
Add a Comment
20.

Illustration
We're Having a Super Baby
by Abie Longstaff

I have 2 new books coming very soon. We're having a Super baby written by Abie Longstaff and published by Scholastic will be available from 3rd September. Abie has written lots of great books including The Mummy Shop and The Fairy Tale Hairdresser.






'This warm and funny celebration of the bond between siblings is perfect to share with your first-born.'

0 Comments on as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
21. meet blossom....

blossom~original drawing
graphite/tinted graphite on bristol 7x9
©the enchanted easel 2015
second in a series of three summer/flower girls.

the ORIGINAL DRAWING is FOR SALE here. also, sweet little Flora can be found in shop as well...and then for the winter lover like myself, well there are three pristine ice princesses in my shop FOR SALE also. 

with Blossom and Flora complete, there is only lovely Camillia left in the series...COMING SOON! :)

0 Comments on meet blossom.... as of 7/22/2015 10:02:00 PM
Add a Comment
22. Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Eva Cabrera

CAP40008thesandman

at_01Daymares_002

ganondorfzelda

11312620_1010857722258609_8437517378325195576_o

at_02at_03

10985916_988237404520641_4404659090394529400_nel-mavi-pic

cabrera-interview-banner

CAP3000411666224_1029902213687493_8181013613721131371_n

10404866_908575889153460_8569256280219087993_n11011680_1004260332918348_5479784382777467729_n

10995377_986685381342510_3393964576969615735_n11753675_1034774989866882_8953398622574267160_n

Lobo_grises

05_EsaVisita02_1408

Eva Cabrera is one of the exciting new talents to come out of Mexico in recent years, along with her Boudika Comics cohort Claudia Aguirre. I stumbled upon their table of comics a few years ago at San Diego Comic-Con. Boudika Comics has a few collaborative books available now, including The House of Dreams, Daymares, and the brand new Mavi.

Eva recently dipped her toe in the big publisher pool with two variant covers for BOOM! Studios’ Adventure Time comic and Bravest Warriors. She has also worked on various other projects like Esa Visita children’s book and No Entren Al 1408 Stephen King tribute anthology.

You can follow Eva Cabrera and see the latest art on her twitter page here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com – Andy Yates

0 Comments on Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Eva Cabrera as of 7/23/2015 7:42:00 PM
Add a Comment
23. Tonight is the opening of the WB Animation show, hosted by Fan...



Tonight is the opening of the WB Animation show, hosted by Fan Alley and @Dennis Salvatier in Anaheim CA. My Dodo piece can been seen there- I’m super excited for this show, and wish I could be there for the opening. If you can make it, the details are here:http://shopfanalley.com/events/2015/6/16/wb-animation-tribute-gallery-artist-signing

There are a bunch of awesome artists, and from what I’ve seen so far, the artists involved have made some beautiful work!





Add a Comment
24. This is the kind of relaxation I wish I had

Our fat black feline, Moses, spends more time on his back than on his feet.



A few days ago I pondered the possibility that the reason Jim Dear and I feel like the summer has flown by is because through some twist of cat magic Moses actually pulled all the ambient relaxation out of the atmosphere around us. Then he sucked it into his skin and stored it up like a bear stores berries in winter. Therefore we get to spend all summer feeling like we are working hard, chasing kids and yard projects and Moses gets to open one eye and watch us once in a while.

Here's a few slices of work in progress:




0 Comments on This is the kind of relaxation I wish I had as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
25. 20 Pieces of Advice from 20 Art Directors

Screen Shot 2015-07-24 at 2.20.26 PM

In preparation for their upcoming online workshop Building a Freelance Illustration Business, Illustrators Salli Swindell and Nate Padavick followed up their article 20 Pieces of Advice from 20 Illustrators by asking art directors for a brief, top-of-mind response to the following question:

“Why would you hire a freelance illustrator a second time?”

Art Directors are a very busy bunch and we thank them all for their time and thoughtfulness.Read on for their insightful responses. Also be sure to check out Salli and Nate’s educational and inspiring online workshop: Building a Freelance Illustration Business here.

 

HANNAH RAHILL

VP Associate Publisher, Ten Speed Press

“I would hire a freelance illustrator for a second time if they over delivered! Skill, flexibility, patience, and collaboration are what I value most.”

 

KATHY MCCONAUGHY

VP Creative Development , American Greetings

“I would hire someone again based on the quality of work and how hard I had to work to get it.”

 

JULIE GOH

Art Director, Going Places, Malaysian Airlines In-Flight Magazine

“I would hire a freelance illustrator for a second time if he/she was someone who is conscientious and delivered his/her work on time. It’s very likely that he/she would have already been producing the kind of work I like as otherwise I would not have hired him/her in the first place.”

 

CECI BUTLER

Art Director, Design House Greetings

“Well I am assuming that I like their style and art or I would of not have hired them the first time. I will hire them again and again if – I find the artist easy to work with – fun, pleasant, open to feedback. They have to be willing to tweak their designs to fit our needs and art direction. I know that many artists are concerned about their look and their brand but we need to ensure that our product will sell and if that means we need to alter the image we need to have artists who are willing to work with us.

If they provided the above and get their work in on time and in a professional format I would hire them again.”

 

LYNNE SHLONSKY

Senior Art Director New Product Concepts, American Greetings

“Awesome delivery of the goal ON TIME.”

 

CAITLIN WILSON

Associate Product Manager, Mary & Martha

“There are 4 things I look for in every freelance illustrator we work with:

~The illustrator’s raw talent
~Their ability to take a design concept and creatively flush it out
~Effective collaboration and communication with director ~Timeliness.”

 

JEREMY BLACK

Managing Partner, Jasper + Black

“We work with design talent globally and two attributes set apart those we work with again: project management and communication:

Project Management: It’s critical that our collaborators understand the importance of managing against deadlines. There is nothing more frustrating or disappointing than receiving questions about the project a day before it is due. We need our collaborators to set aside time to think, develop, revise, and finalize. Decline a project if you don’t have the time, I’ll respect you more for it.

Communication: From confirming the receipt of a creative brief, providing a timeline and budget, to discussing the creative brief in further detail, communication is critical. Know when the phone is better than email to communicate, and vice versa. If you have specific questions or want to provide an update, use bulleted emails … it helps even the poorest of writers to organize their thoughts.”

 

FOREST EVASHEVSKI

Art Director, Wall Street Journal

“I usually hire an illustrator a second time if they are easy to work with and timely.”

 

TOM VITUJ

Senior Director of Creative, Design Design, Inc.

“I would hire an illustrator a second time if:
~Their designs were current and on trend with what I was looking for.
~They were flexible and easy to work with.
~Their art files were very well organized and complete. ~If I needed additional art to complete a product…such as art for a gusset on a paper gift bag or a border on paper tableware, and they were happy to oblige.
~They used our contract and made few or no revisions to it.

 

COLLETTE KULAK

Senior Creative Planner, Hallmark

“My answer would be that they meet or exceed my main goal of the project (assuming it’s a visual one). They deliver what I’m looking for and hopefully more…over and above would guarantee a second time with them.

Note – deadline also plays into it of course, a fast worker is a dream but the end goal is to get the visual I need. ”

 

MARY ANN HALL

Editorial Director, Quarry Books and Rockport Publishers

“When you get the work, and you just say YES. This nails it. This is finished, perfect, thought-out, ready to sail. Or, if you want a little tweaking, they are flexible and happy to accommodate, explore different options, and just keep trying things until everyone feels it’s right. Either scenario leaves me wanting to work with someone again.”

 

PATTY FLAUTO

Color & Design Consultant

“Low maintenance – they need to prove themselves before asking for this, that and the other.”

 

KRISTEN HEWITT

Design Director, Chronicle Books

“The main thing I would consider before hiring a freelancer for a second time, apart from the quality of their work, would be the experience that I had working with them the first time. Was it a good work experience? Were they pleasant to work with? Were they good communicators (i.e., did they ever go M.I.A. for a period of time and/or never email me back—more people than you would think do this!)? Were they (relatively) on time with their deliveries? These are all questions I would ask myself and the answers would factor into my decision to work with a freelance illustrator again.”

 

LORI PEDRICK

Art Director, Yankee Magazine

“My answer would really be related to collaboration. Of course skill and ingenuity is key but one of the most important things for me when working with freelancers is the ability to collaborate and offer resourceful solutions to problem solving and a collaborative spirit knowing that with editorial there is a team-like atmosphere and remembering that they are working for a client and while they are being hired for their aesthetic and style, there needs to be some level of flexibility.
As a side note, I always tell any creative who asks about how to pitch to a client, you really need to know their brand and their following or their brand identity and who their core readership is. I wouldn’t propose your work unless you really know that brand and feel that your work is suitable. That is the best way to get noticed, show the client how your vision fits into their brand.”

 

MADGE BAIRD

Managing Editor, Gibbs Smith

“I would hire an illustrator for the second time because the first time they were able to creatively respond and adapt to art direction for the first project.”

 

ROGER FRANK

Partner/Creative Director, Little Jacket

“If the working partnership was as remarkable as the work product, then I’d gladly hire a freelance illustrator a second time.”

 

ELIZABETH STUMBO

Art Director, Meredith Corporation

“I would gladly hire an illustrator a second time who has proven that they can be flexible and are not only willing, but happy to make changes to their artwork to better align with editorial content and opinion.”

 

DAWN EIDEN

Studio Director, CSS Industries

“I would hire a freelance illustrator the second time around if they met the deadline, provided organized, user friendly files, understood the product and end user and checked in before the assignment was due for feedback.”

 

SALLY FARR

Art Director, Telegraph Media Group

“If I had had a good experience working with an illustrator before, I will use them again. It’s a given that I like their work for the appropriate job. Keeping to deadlines is key, and where clients are involved, it’s even more important, as with those jobs, we have to take into account various other people and deadlines too.”

 

SALLI S. SWINDELL

Co-founder of They Draw & Cook, Studio SSS

“I would hire an illustrator again and again if I could sense a bit of their personality and joy in the art. Otherwise it feels like assembly line imagery. I like to think the artist enjoyed the project.”

Thanks to Salli Swindell and all the Art Directors who shared their thoughts. Be sure to check out Salli and Nate’s upcoming 3-Day online workshop: Building a Freelance Illustration Business.

0 Comments on 20 Pieces of Advice from 20 Art Directors as of 7/27/2015 6:48:00 AM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts