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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: ILLUSTRATION, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 5,376
1. Houston SCBWI Conference

Whose ready to paint the town red?
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See you there!

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2. Presents for the Earth

Earth Day 2014 450


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3. Longform stories from Storybird

I have loved the idea of Storybird ever since I first heard of it. If you haven't, it's essentially a site where illustrators could contribute a number of images, whatever they liked, and users (mostly kids and students) would get on and write their own stories using those illustrations. That, in and of itself, was a big hit with educators.

Then, Storybird made it possible for you to create printed versions of the stories you made (the illustrators receiving a certain royalty) which was also cool.

Now, the good folk at Storybird are introducing a whole new concept—not just to their site, but to the publishing world in general—longform books.

I happen to be fortunate enough to participate in their initial go of it, and have been working on illustrating a fun YA mystery by Eliza Osborn called "The Mystery of Dogwood Cross."



Four chapters are up now, with more to come!

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4. The new work table set up.





The new work table set up.




Original post by Brian Bowes via Emergent Ideas: http://ift.tt/1rksAXI


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5. EARTH DAY ! …can’t be ignored…

from CAT artist: Michelle Henninger….earth day_email (3).jpgHenninger


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6. Paula: April '14--Fresh Off the Drawing Board

I had some big illustration projects lately, and below is a little snip of one of the finished illustrations. Can you guess where the scene takes place? I think I made it too easy. : )

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7. Ten Things I'd Have Done Differently

"With the benefit of hindsight we can all see things which we would wish had been done differently or not at all." 
Queen Elizabeth II 

Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor, b. 88 years ago today,
April 21, 1926, exactly, by the way, 90 years after Sam Houston,
that tough old buster, led forces of theRepublic of Texas, 
(yelling 'Remember the Alamo!') in their defeat of those led by
 General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, another tough old buster, at the decisive Battle of San Jacinto
What better time than a round-numbered anniversary (30 years ago this coming summer since I started my climb into the world of books for young readers), to ponder all those roads not taken? 

1. Don't we all have a drawer of file full of nonfiction book ideas, each of which at first seemed glorious? But we set them aside, figuring no editor with two market-savvy brain cells to rub together would ever buy the projects? Andrew Jackson? Too obscure!'  'Victoria, Teenaged Queen? Whose overdressed, over-privileged, eccentric grandchildren populated the thrones of Europe - and ended up blowing it up. Or, in the case of Russia's weird, shy last czarina, shot in a basement? Who cares?' 'Savvy, bosomy politician Dolley Madison? How many times do kids want to read about her saving GW's portrait?' In hindsight, I figure we humans are a story-loving species and there's always an appetite for a good story well told - and illustrated. Maybe I wish I'd followed through.  

2. Speaking of which, I should have followed through with all the wisdom offered by inspiring, INK colleague, author/teacher/blogger, Vicki Cobb and learned to do video conferencing/presentations and availing myself of the MANY technological means and opportunities to make my presence known in the world in this here 21st century. ['21st century? Bah! I could pick a better century out of a hat!' I paraphrase: a quote from the good version of Sabrina, i.e. the one with Humphrey Bogart in it, the one where he says, 'I wish I were dead with my back broken.' Jeez, I can't be the only one who gets movie lines stuck in her head, can I?]  You know who else has lots of good ideas on teaching/self-promotion? Katie Davis.  They all make me tired. I mean, when it comes to self-promotion, doing all there is to be done, it's like what Erma Bombeck said: "Housework, if you do it right, will kill you." So, I figure, pick a few things and do them well, huh? And stick with them.

3. In further hindsight, I wish I hadn't been born into a family with such a wide streak of melancholy, backward-looking nostalgia and everybody so danged sensitive. Speaking of which, do check out this LINK. It'll take you to a story about what wonderful author Natalie Kinsey-Warnock is doing up in Vermont, encouraging young Vermonters to learn and record their families' stories, thus learning the stories of their neighborhood, their Green Mountainous state, and their nation. Did I ever tell you that my great-aunt Rebecca Amelia Brown volunteered her time to work with her eastern Pennsylvania neighbors on the Underground Railroad? Or that ancestors of mine, in the mid-1700s, made it their business to skedaddle for shelter from furious Native American raiders, in a forest stockade known as Fort Harness? Well, they did.

4. I'd have overcome my shyness and solitary nature and made myself network with other authors and illustrators in the SCBWI. So. I've re-upped my membership and we'll see.

5. I'd have updated my website more often, like, once in a while even. Offered a really snappy school visit packet, for instance and taken the time to check out other authors' sites. What works? What doesn't, so much? I'd be thinking about getting it properly, professionally redesigned if it hasn't been done since, say, Bill Clinton was in office. By golly, this - or some of this – I'm moving to the top of my TBD list.

6. Had I had the sense God gave a cuckoo clock and the discipline of HE/SHE gave a Canada Goose (quite a lot, actually, flying all that way here and there), I'd have saved ALL of the addresses of the wonderful people I've met over the years.

7. I'd have educated myself more deeply, made myself more aware of the glorious art that is being done in our world of books for young readers, really, the last great showcase for the art and craft of illustration. Should you have time and wish to treat yourself to a journey, do pay a visit to the Mazza Collection, on the campus of the University of Findlay [OH].  It is, I believe, America's largest repository of original art done for children's books. 
  And another thing, I'd have put more pieces on my portfolio, worked harder and more sensibly to make those with choosing power SEE it. 

8. Had I to do all of this over again, I'd have begun earlier. Too soon old. Too late smart. 

9. Okay, seriously, I'd have spent less time at this computer and exercised more. Spent more time outside with my dog(s), as Queen Elizabeth does.
My dog, Mimi.
Spent time with people in person. As Marvin Gaye (I think), once said, 'As long as you're alive, you might as well live.'


10. Definitely, I'd have read more books, but unless I get pasted by a bus or run off the road on my way to school visits down in Pittsburg, KS, later this week, by sine  lovelorn, world-weary white-tailed deer, I figure I have time. 

As long as I do, I reckon I'll pull up my socks, make a list, and get down to work on all that remains to be done, taking care of that which I can control, saying 'never mind' to that which I cannot, and cultivating the wisdom to know the difference. I wish you all the same, Dear Readers.

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8. Eddie Red Undercover: Mystery on Museum Mile: Marcia Wells

Book: Eddie Red Undercover: Mystery on Museum Mile
Author: Marcia Wells
Illustrator: Marcos Calo
Pages: 256
Age Range: 9-12 (lightly illustrated middle grade)

Mystery of the Museum Mile is the first book of the new Eddie Red Undercover series by Marcia Wells. Eddie Red is a code name for Edmund Xavier Lonnrot, a sixth grader with a photographic memory and the ability to draw (well) anyone he has seen. When Eddie's talents are inadvertently discovered by the New York Police Department, he is hired to help on a special case involving art theft. He's only supposed to visit some museums and draw the people he sees, under the guidance of a grouchy but protective cop named Bovano. But of course things get more complicated, and more dangerous, than that. 

So, ok, there are a couple of points here requiring suspension of disbelief. The NYPD hiring an 11-year-old? Said 11-year-old's parents going along with it? The photographic memory AND drawing skill? But personally, I found it well worth letting those points go and enjoying the ride.

Edmund (or Eddie Red, as you may prefer to think of him) is a solid character. Smart, sure, but realistically insecure about it. Loyal to his best friend, who has pretty serious OCD. Eddie breaks the rules in order to learn more about the case, but he's nervous about that. He's not your young James Bond, able to do everything. He's more your regular kid who has one particular skill. He desperately wants to solve the case so that he can make enough money to remain in his private school. 

Eddie is also pretty matter-of-fact about being a young African-American male in the city. The color of his skin isn't a big deal, but it's not glossed over, either. It's an integral part of who he is, and who his parents are. This, together with his white friend Jonah's quirks, makes this a mystery that should feel relevant to a wider range of kids than many. Eddie does have a very mild love interest, which didn't really feel necessary to me, but there's not enough to it to be off-putting for younger kids. 

The mystery involves following clues, putting things together, and applying a bit of geometry (Jonah is helpful here). A fair number of scenes take place in Jonah and Eddie's school for gifted kids, which I found interesting. 

Here are a few snippets, to give you a feel for Wells' writing:

"People always ask how to spell my name. It's European and looks pretty unusual, but it's easy to pronounce: Lawn-rot. Some family down south owned my ancestors back in the slave days, and the name stuck." (Page 16)

"I try to follow. Sadie, our cat-who-may-be-an-evil-overlord-in-disguise, heads me off. Leaping in front of the kitchen door, she arches her back in a ripple of fur and hisses." (Page 39)

"He remains standing, staring out the window. He has quite a pasta/beer belly packed onto his tall body. This man is what my mother would call a touch cookie. Only he's more like a tough loaf of old and angry Italian break, with too much garlic mixed in." (Page 53)

There are also occasional full-page illustrations, representing Eddie's drawings of important characters in the story. Calo's pencil (charcoal?) sketches are a bit professional to actually be created by a sixth grader, but they are a nice addition to book, fleshing out Eddie's talent and giving readers a glimpse of the characters. 

All in all, Eddie Red Undercover: Mystery on Museum Mile is a nice addition to the ranks of middle grade mysteries. I look forward to Eddie's further adventures. Recommended!

Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers (@HMHBooks)
Publication Date: April 1, 2014
Source of Book: Review copy from the publisher

FTC Required Disclosure:

This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through Amazon links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).

© 2014 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook

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9. the ladies of the bench

You know when a project takes over your life? Yeah? Well, that's exactly what has happened here.
Here's an update on the Books About Town / Wild In Art book bench project that I am working on. Last time, I posted about it, I had just received this giant open book that has now become part of the furniture in my living room.
Stage 1 was to prime the bench. I wanted a clean white background for my drawing - so a friend came around to help with that. That friend was not Dexter, despite it looking that way from the photo above. We just got over enthusiastic with the dust sheets.
That was the easy bit. Stage 2 is to transfer my drawings, which I originally made on A4 paper (20 x 30cm ish) onto the bench. It's not just enlarging the drawing, to such a scale, that's difficult. No. It's that the bench is not a flat piece of paper. Working the drawing around all the curves is tricky. But, I've started.
And, I did so whilst watching back to back Columbo over this Easter weekend.
Many people have said that this must be a daunting task. People often talk about the fear of drawing in a new sketchbook. The fear of the blank page. And, this is such a large blank page. But, I've never had the issue. In fact, I'm quite the opposite I love starting a new sketchbook with all the possibilities that brings. Procrastination is my issue.
So, I'm pleased that I've got going, whilst being watched over, and inspired by, my ladies over the bench; the Lady of Shalott; my teenage self; and, of course, Sue Townsend whose recent death has made choosing her Adrian Mole book as my theme for the bench even more poignant.
It also fills me with pride to be honoured to pay tribute to her, and Adrian, in this way.
You can read about how I got involved in this project HERE. I'll see you soon with some drawings, I hope. Although this has taken over my life. And my living room.although

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10. well, it's so good to be here

Nice of Dexter to come and help paint the bench.

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11. Surtex Flyer

I am not sure if I will be attending, but my work will be at Surtex -





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12. Malki Sushestva


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13. Still Hip to be Blair




Nice article about the incredible Mary Blair. Check it out here - I was interviewed for the article along with some of my favorite artists.


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14. Sharing Ideas with Julia Jarman


Generally speaking, authors and illustrators don't get together to chat through new book projects. I get the text from the publisher, not the author and, as I work on my illustrations, I talk with the art director and designer, not the author, sending my ideas, roughs and eventually my artwork to the publisher, never once having had any contact with the author. It surprises people, but that's quite normal.


It's a bit different though with Julia Jarman. When an author and illustrator team up for several books, they can become friends and often start to work more closely, certainly at the start of a project. Julia and I have done 5 books together now and are a good match - we think alike and we laugh at the same things. Which is why we work so easily together and why we get on so well too.

Julia often emails me stories she is working on and would like me to illustrate, asking for my input. Julia's writing is very visual: as I read one of her texts, I can immediately see illustrations in my head. This gives me a slightly different perspective to Julia and my take on things can help her to fine-tune the wording, before she sends it to the publisher. 


We were working on a new story last week and several drafts of it went back and forth between us by email. I'm not actually drawing anything at this stage, but Julia knows my work so well, it only takes a few words for me to paint a picture for her of what's in my head. 

I can't tell you anything specific, but I think it's going to be a good one and am really crossing my fingers that the publisher takes it. 

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15. AND SPRING IS…..

Wanting to wish EVERYONE a very happy Spring/Easter week and weekend! Do believe it Spring is finally here…. in most places anyway.  (sorry Cleveland!)  Even The Cat has his ears on for the occasion!

easter blast


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16. Cardinal #6 with Video




 
I felt like I had to do at least one more cardinal.  And since yesterday's cardinal was biking, I thought we should go old-school and have a cardinal flying today. I think this guy is enjoying the last of the warm weather before the snow moved in tomorrow. :(


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17. A Tribute to Dr.Seuss

10157135_745109572189776_4832996927197458277_n

I’m super excited to be apart of this years Children’s Book Art Silent Auctions at the BEA this May, 28th! This years auction has a special showcase tribute on everyones beloved storyteller Dr. Seuss.

DrSuess

This 8×8 print which is printed on Premium Giclee Paper is on its way to the ABFFE offices and ready for its new home! If you’re interested in participating in this years auction which supports the fight against book censorship please visit the ABFFE website more information about attending this years showcase. {www.abffe.org}

Excited to see you at the show!

 

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18. Tourist Season: Drawings from the Big Rodeo

bigrodeo

Drawings I did around town some time ago.


Tagged: Allen Capoferri, Art, Illustration, International, people sketches, quick sketch, rodeo, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing, USA

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19. Spring


http://leglessmermaid.blogspot.com/

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20. Spring Fling

pig ballernia redo 450

Fa la la la la!

Such a beautiful spring day like today makes me want to dance like a… um… a ballerina… ahhhh, pig.

That’s a thing, right?

Why not.

I want to dance like a ballerina pig!


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21. BABETTE LA BALLERINA


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22. Drupaljam artwork donation

3D artwork donated to the Dutch Drupaljam organization, to raise money for the event.

(sevensheaven.nl)

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23. What is the SATs looked like this?

cartoon, doctor, bob ostrom,

Doctor Cartoon  – By Bob Ostrom Studio

I was just thinking… What the fill in the blank questions on the SATs looked like this?
(Feel free to answer in the comments section. You will receive your test scores in the mail in about 3 weeks)

The post What is the SATs looked like this? appeared first on Illustration.

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24. CAT TALE SERIES : D.I.Y. SMARTPHONE CASE







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25. HIP


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