What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(tagged with 'agents')

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: agents, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 727
1. Where’s My Agent?

airline travelI’ve been taking a brief hiatus from writing this blog, but will resume regular posts shortly. Meanwhile, I’ve got a post up at Books & Such today. Here’s a preview:
 

Don’t you love it when you send someone an email, only to receive the dreaded auto-reply saying they’re out of the office? It can be frustrating, but the reality is that travel is an important part of many jobs. And when it’s your agent who is “out of the office,” you can be glad they’re getting out from behind their desk to go into the world and nurture important relationships, make new acquaintances, advocate for their clients and give back to the writing community.
 

At Books & Such, we frequently discuss our travel schedules and carefully consider each possible trip. We find we serve our clients best when keep a good balance between office time and important engagements elsewhere. I thought it might be helpful to share what we’re up to this spring, so you’ll have a better idea of what that “auto reply” really means.
 

Click here to read the overview at Books & Such.

 

 

The post Where’s My Agent? appeared first on Rachelle Gardner.

Add a Comment
2. How to Write a Query Letter

The purpose of your short query letter is to attract an agent's interest enough to request more of your work. 

http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2014/03/25/how-to-write-a-query-letter-2/

0 Comments on How to Write a Query Letter as of 4/20/2014 12:35:00 PM
Add a Comment
3. Eight Steps to an Agent, a Publisher, and a Two-Book Deal

Happy Monday, everyone! I know, I know…Mondays. Bleh. Luckily, Donna Galanti is here to cheer you up. When it comes to publishing, she’s done it all: her short story collection is self-published, her debut novel was published through a small press, and she’s recently acquired an agent for her children’s book series. Today, she’s here to share her journey to traditional publication—the lessons she learned and is still learning as a published author. So be encouraged, everyone. IT CAN BE DONE!

2285512104_0e3cb4016d_o

Courtesy of Mark Sebastian @ Creative Commons

Over three years I traveled a writing road to become published. It was challenging, and every step (forward and backward) led me to an agent, a publisher, and a 2-book deal. If you want to become traditionally published, I hope my journey helps you realize that it really does all start with one step, and ALL these steps will benefit you once you get that book deal.

1 step to get out of the comfort zone
Three years ago I crawled out of my writer’s cave and met other writers. I attended workshops, conferences, and networking events. I challenged myself to take a class on how to write in a different genre. Writing is impulsive. Be impulsive and take risks to get outside your comfort zone.

Are you ready for discomfort? Once you have a book deal…you’ll be asked to sign at book expos, present at conferences, do author panels, write blog posts, or present at school assemblies.

2 years submitting to 189 agents
I spent years submitting to agents. Be ready for rejection and combat it with more submissions. Your query letter is your sales tool to get an agent to ask for the full manuscript. Keep getting rejected? It’s time to revise that letter. New agents are prime for querying as they all want to build their client lists. I recommend following the Writer’s Digest Guide to Literary Agents. My friend and agent, Marie Lamba, has a great advice column on getting an agent here on her Agent Mondays.

Are you ready to keep pitching? Once you have a book deal…your agent may need to spend months pitching your book to publishers, and you await more rejection until it finds a home.

2349632625_7c2813f45b_o

Courtesy: Nic McPhee @ Creative Commons

3 rounds with my developmental editor and 3 beta readers’ feedback
Spend the money and use a developmental editor. Frustrated that my manuscript was being rejected, I knew something wasn’t working. My editor at Writing Partner helped me see what I needed to do (three major rewrites over two years) and apply what I’ve learned. Here are 5 things I learned from my editor. Find the right beta readers who know how to decipher fiction and read the genre you write in. Give them a list of questions to help guide them.

Are you ready to take criticism and apply it to make your work better?  Once you have a book deal...you will work with an editor at the publishing house, or your agent as an editor. They will request changes – and expect you to know how to fix them. Will you know how? Be open to changes. Read my friend Kathryn Craft’s editing journey in regards to her book deal.

4 (and a half) months waiting for an offer
It takes a long time to hear back from agents and publishers who have your manuscript under consideration. While you wait, keep revising and submitting your work and getting feedback. Study the publishing market. Get free e-newsletters to Publishers Weekly and Publishers Marketplace. Read in your genre. Purchase books on how to write. See my writing resource list here. And keep coming up with new book ideas. Why? Because an agent doesn’t just want you for a one book deal, they want you for a long term relationship. When you get a call from an agent, they will want to know what other projects you’re working on. Have those ideas shaped into short pitches. I had mine on hand to seal the deal.

Are you ready to think about agents the same way? Once you have a book deal…On your new career path you need to prove you are serious about being an author, that you know your genre, and youre self-motivated to create a portfolio of writing. You want an agent who will guide and champion you. Research them before querying and talking with them and have your own interview questions ready. Here’s a great article I referenced before talking with my agent.

5 writing conferences and 5 novels read in an internship
As a writer you need to learn the writing craft, the business of writing, and how to build relationships in a writing community. I’ve been lucky to have met many folks through the Philadelphia Liars Club and their Writer’s Coffeehouse. Through an agent friend there, I was offered an internship with the Jennifer De Chiara Literary Agency. In this role I evaluated manuscripts. I learned how to deconstruct a novel. And I learned to see similar problems in my own writing and how to avoid them. I’ve also befriended many bestselling authors, online and at conferences, who want to help new writers. They’ve advised me, allowed me to guest post on their blogs, and have written blurbs for my work. They pay it forward. Someday you will too.

Are you ready to keep learning from your peers and apply what you’ve learned? Once you have a book deal…you will be elevated as a writer in a new partnership that requires you to be professional and knowledgeable in your craft – and you need to continue networking to build those valuable relationships that will boost your career.

6 in-person agent pitches
I’ve pitched my book to agents at conferences and at social gatherings. Think of it as a conversation. Agents need writers as much as we need them. Always be ready to talk about your book. Always have a business card on hand and ask for theirs in return.

Are you ready to pitch at a moment’s notice? Once you have a book deal…you will be promoting your book everywhere, formally at signings and informally in the grocery store. Have your book’s one-line pitch ready to share with that potential customer. Remember, YOU are the one person most passionate about your book.

7 months to write the first draft
I almost gave up. Remember, I challenged myself to write in a new genre? It was hard. I didn’t always enjoy it. I felt outside my comfort zone, but I gave myself a deadline to finish, and I stuck to it. And here are six things I learned about writing a children’s book during this process.

Are you challenging yourself to finish your book on a deadline? Once you have a book deal…you will be expected to meet many deadlines. You will be given an editorial calendar and go a few editing rounds on the manuscript, each time with a deadline. Got a two-book deal? You will be given deadlines to deliver a manuscript proposal and the manuscript on book two. You will have deadlines to meet for blog tours and other events. Keep a good reputation and make deadlines.

4495072850_efe4ba8a40_o

Courtesy: Sean MacEntee @ Creative Commons

8 agents who had the full manuscript and rejected it
The biggest reason agents rejected my book? They didn’t like the voice—and that’s a personal choice. Your voice is your natural, unique expression. Wait for that someone who will love your voice. It can be the agent that helps you launch a career, like my agent, Bill Contardi with Brandt & Hochman. It can be the publisher, like Month9Books, who fell in love with my middle grade novel. If they love your voice in one book, they most likely will love it in others you write.

Are you ready to take rejection and keep persevering? Once you have a book deal…your changes to the story may be rejected. Your title may be rejected. Your next book idea for the second book in the deal may be rejected. Get used to rejection and think of it as positive traction.

And now it all comes down to one. One agent. One publisher. One deal.

I spent years preparing to publish my book and when it happened, it happened fast. Within a month I had an agent, a publisher, and a two-book deal. But look at the number of steps (and missteps) I took along the way to get to that ONE. Going through all these steps may be disheartening at times, but doing so prepares you to step into the authorial role and work with your agent to build a career. Because you will encounter these same steps as a published author.

Are you ready to take these steps again? And again?

What’s my next step? The challenge of transitioning my brand from an author of dark adult fiction to children’s fiction. That may be a post here for another time–once I figure it out. ☺

Galanti,DonnaABOUT DONNA:
Donna Galanti writes suspense, young adult, and middle grade fiction and is represented by Bill Contardi of Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents, Inc. She is an International Thriller Writers (ITW) Debut Author of the paranormal suspense novel A HUMAN ELEMENT (Echelon Press) and its sequel, A HIDDEN ELEMENT (Imajin Books), which releases summer 2014. Book one and two of her middle grade series, JOSHUA AND THE LIGHTNING ROAD, debuts in 2015 (Month9Books). She lives in Pennsylvania with her family in an old farmhouse that has lots of writing nooks, fireplaces, and stink bugs but sadly no ghosts.

Visit her at:
www.donnagalanti.com
Twitter
Facebook
Goodreads

The post Eight Steps to an Agent, a Publisher, and a Two-Book Deal appeared first on WRITERS HELPING WRITERS.

0 Comments on Eight Steps to an Agent, a Publisher, and a Two-Book Deal as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
4. KidLit Events April 1-8…and Beyond

Spring is moving fast, and the big events for readers and writers of children’s and YA literature are speeding toward us. If you haven’t yet signed up for at least one of the two big conferences, do not delay! On April 12, at the Houston Writers’ Guild Conference, Nikki Loftin—author of NIGHTINGALE’S NEST and THE SINISTER SWEETNESS OF SPLENDID ACADEMY—will be delivering the keynote address. Other Houston children’s or YA writers who will be on the staff are Joy Preble, Jessica Cappelle, Sharon Morse and Elizabeth White, as well as literary agents Pooja Menon and Eddie Schneider.

SCBWI Houston Conference (art by Diandra Mae)The biggest event in Texas this year for children’s and young adult writers is the Houston Chapter of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators 25th Anniversary Conference, taking place April 26-27. If you write or illustrate for young readers or have ever dreamed of doing so, register now! We will have agents from three agencies:

Stephen BarrWriters House
Stephen Fraser—Jennifer DeChiara Literacy Agency
Natalie LakosilBradford Literary Agency

Plus three editors from closed houses (this means they do not accept unsolicited manuscripts or queries to submit manuscripts) who will accept submissions from attendees of the Houston SCBWI Conference:

Kendra Levin—Viking Books for Children
Jocelyn Davies—HarperCollins
Julie Ham—Charlesbridge

PLUS, Jim Hoover, Associate Art Director at Viking Children’s Books.

And to top it off, two-time Newbery Honor winning author Gary Schmidt of THE WEDNESDAY WARS, OKAY FOR NOW and LIZZIE BRIGHT AND THE BUCKMINSTER BOY will be delivering our keynote address! If you love youth literature, you will love this conference! Register now!

If for some reason you can’t make it to the Houston SCBWI Conference (say, for instance you are under eighteen), there is another fantastic event that day that will make you roll out of bed before noon—the Greater HoustonTeen Book Convention. Too many fabulous authors will be attending for me to mention here, but go to their website and check it out!

Now for this week’s events—the first event is not strictly a children’s author/illustrator event, but it is an event for some very special children who illustrate, so I wanted to share this news with you.

April 2, Wednesday, 10:00 a.m. MD Anderson Children's Art Project
Cornelius Nursery, Voss Rd.
Fundraiser Event for MD Anderson Children’s Art Project

Cornelius Nursery on Voss Rd is holding a painting party for pediatric patients of the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Please come by and join in the fun, enjoy the artwork, and be inspired, plus view wonderful new designs from The Children’s Art Project that are perfect for your garden. The newest collaboration is between Children’s Art Project and the Round Top Collection, which produces unique metal artwork for the garden based on the artwork from children in the Children’s Art Project. Shannon A. Murray, ED of Children’s Art Project and Jeff Krause the founder of Round Top will be on hand to celebrate and highlight this newest collection.

April 4, Friday, 6:30 p.m. KNIGHTLY AND SON by Rohan Gavin
Murder By The Book
Rohan Gavin, YA Author

In author/screenwriter Rohan Gavin’s new YA novel KNIGHTLY AND SON, the once highly in-demand detective Alan Knightley has just woken up after an unexplained incident kept him asleep for four years. While he was out cold, his son, Darkus, took it upon himself to read of all his dad’s old cases, and he’s learned “a lot” about the art of detection. It’s a good thing too–because suddenly the duo find themselves caught up in a crazy conspiracy that involves a group of villainous masterminds (who keep appearing and then vanishing), some high-speed car chases (that will have everyone fastening their seat belts), and a national, bestselling book with the power to make people do terrible, terrible things. But because Alan is still suffering the effects of his coma, he tends to, well, fall asleep at the worst possible moments, Meaning that young Darkus might just have to solve this mystery . . . by himself.

April 5, Saturday, 2:00 p.m.  SUGAR BUG ON THE TOOTH by Dr. Linda Sturrup
Barnes & Noble, Vanderbilt Square
Dr. Linda Sturrup, Dentist/Author

Dr. Linda Sturrup presents A SUGAR BUG ON MY TOOTH, a great read for that first dentist visit for little ones. Natalie Jean’s visit to the dentist seems a little scary, but with help from Dr. Cork, she learns that a dentist checkup can actually be fun! Kirkus  says it’s “An approachable tale of a first dental visit with pictures and a tone that will provide a reassuring beginning lesson to preschool-aged readers.”

April 5, Saturday, 2:00 THE SCREAMING STAIRCASE by Jonathan Stroud
Blue Willow Bookshop
Jonathan Stroud, MG Author

Jonathan Stroud, author of the New York Times best-selling Bartimaeus Trilogy, visits to introduce his new series for middle grade readers. If you like ghost stories that are scary but not too scary, this is for you!  A sinister Problem has occurred in London: all nature of ghosts, haunts, spirits, and specters are appearing throughout the city, and they aren’t exactly friendly. Only young people have the psychic abilities required to see—and eradicate—these supernatural foes. Many different Psychic Detection Agencies have cropped up to handle the dangerous work, and they are in fierce competition for business.

In THE SCREAMING STAIRCASE, the plucky and talented Lucy Carlyle teams up with Anthony Lockwood, the charismatic leader of Lockwood & Co, a small agency that runs independent of any adult supervision. After an assignment leads to both a grisly discovery and a disastrous end, Lucy, Anthony, and their sarcastic colleague, George, are forced to take part in the perilous investigation of Combe Carey Hall, one of the most haunted houses in England. Will Lockwood & Co. survive the Hall’s legendary Screaming Staircase and Red Room to see another day?

Add a Comment
5. Agents and Sales

Just because you have an agent, that doesn't mean your manuscript will always sell. 

http://scotteagan.blogspot.com/2014/03/having-agent-does-not-mean-automatic.html

0 Comments on Agents and Sales as of 3/30/2014 2:29:00 PM
Add a Comment
6. Your Online Presence

What do literary agents want to see when they Google you?

http://thewritelife.com/what-does-a-literary-agent-want-to-see-when-they-google-you/

0 Comments on Your Online Presence as of 8/17/2013 11:22:00 AM
Add a Comment
7. Finding the Right Agent

When looking for an agent, make sure he/she is the agent that matches your needs. 

http://scotteagan.blogspot.com/2013/08/finding-right-agent.html

0 Comments on Finding the Right Agent as of 8/23/2013 1:54:00 PM
Add a Comment
8. Verbal Pitch

There are some advantages to giving your pitch in person, 

http://www.booksandsuch.biz/blog/advantages-of-a-verbal-pitch/

0 Comments on Verbal Pitch as of 8/25/2013 1:42:00 PM
Add a Comment
9. Researching Literary Agents

Industry Life

by

Susan Dennard

Susan DennardWhen it comes to finding a literary agent, the most important step (yes, even more important than a snappy query letter) is researching which agents you intend to approach.

Think about it: your wonderful query and kick-butt manuscript will all be for naught if you’re reaching out to the wrong agents. And remember that the fastest way to get a rejection is to query an agent who doesn’t represent your genre or isn’t even open to new submissions.  And those are such easy mistakes to avoid!

So let’s lay out the important things to find out about an agent before you query:

  1. The genre the agent represents (e.g. cozy mysteries, science fictions, spy thrillers, etc.)
  2. The reading level the agent represents (e.g. young adult, adult, picture book, etc.)
  3. The submission guidelines (e.g. how to send the query letter, how many pages to attach, etc.)
  4. What the agent is currently seeking (e.g. “I want a futuristic thriller featuring clones”)
  5. Editorial input (i.e. the agent offers lots of editorial feedback on your manuscript or perhaps offers none)
  6. Agency size (i.e. is the agent alone? Part of a small boutique agency? In a large agency with tons of clients?)
  7. Experience (i.e. how long the agent has been in the biz?)
  8. Query response time (e.g. days to respond, weeks to respond, possibly no response at all)

That seems like a lot to find out, right? And in all likelihood, there are other things you might want to find out about a literary agent before you query–but this list is a good start for your researching endeavors. You always want to find out AS MUCH AS YOU CAN before you send out your query letters.

Now where do you even find all this information? Well, you’re best friend will always be Google. Once you have an agent’s name, doing a basic search on the agent can yield all sorts of valuable information. But then where do you even find agents’ names? Many people swear by Query Tracker or AgentQuery, and one amazing resource I swear by is Casey McCormick’s super helpful Agent Spotlight.  This is an amazing tool and saved me hours of scouring the internet (Thanks, Casey!).

I suggest, as you uncover new info, that you keep track of it and stay organized. I personally kept a list of agents in an excel spreadsheet, and every time I heard of an agent who repped YA, I opened an excel spreadsheet and popped in the name, submission guidelines, and links to relevant info.

Okay, Sooz, you say. I have  have a lot of agents listed and all the information I want on each one, so what comes next? Well, now you need to figure out which agents are the ones you really-really-REALLY want to query. So for example, before I sent my queries, I spent a few days going through all the agents on my list and evaluating who I felt I would best jive with. I picked 10 agents to be the first queries I would send, 10 to be my second round, and 10 to be my third round. And keep in mind–these 30 agents were my top 30, so everyone I queried was someone I really wanted to work with.

For every single agent I contacted, I organized all the interviews/articles/bios/etc. I had already found, and then I tailored my query letter to each specific agent. I mean, think about it: if you know what an agent is looking for and it fits what you HAVE, then that will make your query letter much easier to fine-tune.

Here–I’ll give you an example. This is the opening paragraph in the query I sent to the agent I ultimately signed with (our very own Joanna Volpe!):

I read in an interview that you seek strong female leads as well as steampunk.  As such, I thought you might enjoy my 90,000 word young adult novel, THE SPIRIT-HUNTERS.

Notice that I opened with reference to an interview that was relevant to my own story, and I suggest YOU do something similar–because:

  1. It shows you’ve done your research — instantly making you shine in the slush pile.
  2. It shows you are approaching this query in a professional manner.
  3. It shows that what you’ve written is actually something the agent is looking for!  Right off the bat, the agent knows it’s something he/she’ll be interested in.

Of course, some agents prefer you to start with the hook, so be sure to read interviews/articles/blogs to find out!  If an agent I contacted preferred a hook, then you can bet I started with a hook. :)

All in all, though, the key to a finding the right agent and making a stellar query letter is to do your research and to start researching early in the game. That way, by the time you reach the query stage, you’ll have a big list of potential agents and you’ll be ready to dive into the querying fray right away.

You tell me: How do YOU research agents or suggest other people go about it?

Susan Dennard is a reader, writer, lover of animals, and eater of cookies. You can learn more about her on her blog or twitterHer debut Something Strange and Deadly is now available from HarperTeen–as is the prequel, A Dawn Most Wicked and the sequel, A Darkness Strange and Lovely.

Add a Comment
10. Researching an Agent

You need to do your homework in doing an agent search. 

http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2013/08/28/homework-list-when-researching-an-agent/

0 Comments on Researching an Agent as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
11. Nonfiction Query That Survived 75 Submissions

How many times has your query letter been rejected? Authors Pamela Jane and Deborah Guyol submitted Pride and Prejudice and Kitties 75 times before literary agent James McGinniss decided to represent the book.

We’ve embedded their simple query letter below. Once you find an agent you would like to represent your book, the pitch letter is the next step in the traditional publishing process.

You should also check out our collection of 12 Agent Query Letters That Actually Worked for Nonfiction. If you write fiction, check out our collection of 23 fiction query letter that actually worked.

continued…

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Add a Comment
12. Martin Literary & Media Management Launches Children’s Division

clelia-bio-picMartin Literary & Media Management has opened a new children’s division, helmed by Clelia Gore.

Before working in publishing, Gore practiced law as a corporate litigator in New York City. Since then, she interned at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Oxford University Press. She also writes a blog about the books she loved as a kid during the 1990s, Tween at 28. Here’s more about the kind of books she seeks:

Clelia is very interested in the emerging New Adult genre. Having faced an early life career crisis, she really relates to characters who are confronted with the challenges of entering adulthood. She is also interested in young adult and middle grade books. She is seeking to represent writers whose protagonists have strong voices and whose plots are original. Clelia never wants to let go of her favorite characters, so she particularly loves trilogies and series that can be adapted to the screen. Clelia has a special spot in her heart for picture books. She especially loves ones that are funny or quirky, ones that feature minority and multi-cultural characters, and ones parents won’t mind reading over and over again to their children.

(Via Aubrey Joy Photography)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Add a Comment
13. Agent Questions

Links to posts about questions to ask a prospective agent. 

http://accrispin.blogspot.com/2014/02/questions-to-ask-your-prospective.html

0 Comments on Agent Questions as of 3/10/2014 12:18:00 PM
Add a Comment
14. Want to learn how to write picture books?

Want to learn how to write picture books? I'll be teaching a week-long workshop at the Writing and Illustrating for Young Readers (WIFYR) conference in June. It's hands-down, the best writer's conference in Utah, and one of the best in the U.S.  In addition  to my morning PB workshop, as well as other writing workshops, there will be afternoon presentations from editors, literary agents, and bestselling authors.


Check out the website for more info http://www.wifyr.com/.

0 Comments on Want to learn how to write picture books? as of 3/11/2014 5:44:00 PM
Add a Comment
15. What to Look For In an Agent

You have to understand your own needs before you can decide whether or not an agent will be a good fit. 

http://scotteagan.blogspot.com/2014/01/what-to-look-for-in-agent.html

0 Comments on What to Look For In an Agent as of 3/16/2014 12:49:00 PM
Add a Comment
16. How to Fire Your Agent

What to do when it's time to part ways with your agent? 

http://jennybent.blogspot.com/2013/05/how-to-fire-your-agent-post-by-jenny.html

0 Comments on How to Fire Your Agent as of 6/27/2013 4:55:00 PM
Add a Comment
17. Agent Warning Signs

Watch out for these red flags when you're choosing an agent. 

http://dailydahlia.wordpress.com/2013/05/13/when-agents-wave-the-red-flag/

0 Comments on Agent Warning Signs as of 6/29/2013 5:15:00 PM
Add a Comment
18. Foreign Rights Agents

Do you need an agent to negotiate your foreign rights? 

http://scotteagan.blogspot.com/2013/06/should-i-write-series.html

0 Comments on Foreign Rights Agents as of 7/3/2013 4:29:00 PM
Add a Comment
19. Agented Manuscripts That Don't Sell

What happens to the manuscript your agent can't sell? 

http://scotteagan.blogspot.com/2013/06/question-from-writer-what-if-your-agent.html

0 Comments on Agented Manuscripts That Don't Sell as of 7/9/2013 3:56:00 PM
Add a Comment
20. Who Does Your Prospective Agent Represent

Agents have to work for all their clients, so they often need to balance who they represent. 

http://scotteagan.blogspot.com/2013/07/who-does-your-prospective-agent.html

0 Comments on Who Does Your Prospective Agent Represent as of 7/31/2013 6:00:00 PM
Add a Comment
21. Getting an Agent

Thirteen tips to convince a literary agent to take you on as a client. 

http://thewritelife.com/13-ways-to-convince-a-literary-agent-to-represent-you/

0 Comments on Getting an Agent as of 8/2/2013 5:40:00 PM
Add a Comment
22. Picture Book Agents

Not all children's book agents represent picture books, but here's a list of some that do. 

http://wwwpamcalvert.blogspot.com/p/picture-book-agents.html

0 Comments on Picture Book Agents as of 8/3/2013 5:32:00 PM
Add a Comment
23. Questions for a Prospective Agent

Be excited when you get "the call," but don't forget to ask questions. 

http://theblabbermouthblog.com/2013/04/08/guest-post-10-questions-to-ask-an-agent-when-you-get-the-call/

0 Comments on Questions for a Prospective Agent as of 8/12/2013 11:56:00 AM
Add a Comment
24. Exciting News!

120605_6779_INGRIDI want to take a moment to celebrate life’s little big moments!

I’m super happy to announce that I have just signed with the brilliant and wonderful Melissa Sarver at Folio Literary Agency! Yes, I have an agent! It’s amazing to find someone who loves my novel. Someone who is truly passionate about my writing and has a vision for it! (Yup, I’ve pretty much looked like the image to the right for the past week!).

Of course, this hasn’t been an easy road. Getting an agent has been many years in the making. Not only is the querying process long and painful, but there’s all the time before querying. Time spent writing and revising my book, getting my MFA, going to conferences and workshops, querying (and getting rejected) with that other book (which I can now admit wasn’t ready). You know … all the many pieces of the puzzle that add up to simply learning how to tell a good story!

I know there’s plenty of hard work ahead, but I’m ready for it. And it’s so exciting to have an agent in my camp ready to be an advocate for my work!

I want to thank all of you as well! Thank you for reading my blog and sharing in this writing journey with me. I can’t wait to hear about when you sign your agent and sell your books, so I can celebrate with you!

Now everyone, get up from your computer, toss your hands in the air, and happy dance!

calvin_hobbes_dancing

Are you in the process of querying and finding an agent? I’ve compiled all the links and helpful articles I used in this process. You can find them here:

logo_FolioLitMgmtLearn more about the marvelous Melissa and Folio Literary Agency with these links:

Thanks again for celebrating with me!


12 Comments on Exciting News!, last added: 8/15/2013
Display Comments Add a Comment
25. Exciting News!

120605_6779_INGRIDI want to take a moment to celebrate life’s little big moments!

I’m super happy to announce that I have just signed with the brilliant and wonderful Melissa Sarver at Folio Literary Agency! Yes, I have an agent! It’s amazing to find someone who loves my novel. Someone who is truly passionate about my writing and has a vision for it! (Yup, I’ve pretty much looked like the image to the right for the past week!).

Of course, this hasn’t been an easy road. Getting an agent has been many years in the making. Not only is the querying process long and painful, but there’s all the time before querying. Time spent writing and revising my book, getting my MFA, going to conferences and workshops, querying (and getting rejected) with that other book (which I can now admit wasn’t ready). You know … all the many pieces of the puzzle that add up to simply learning how to tell a good story!

I know there’s plenty of hard work ahead, but I’m ready for it. And it’s so exciting to have an agent in my camp ready to be an advocate for my work!

I want to thank all of you as well! Thank you for reading my blog and sharing in this writing journey with me. I can’t wait to hear about when you sign your agent and sell your books, so I can celebrate with you!

Now everyone, get up from your computer, toss your hands in the air, and happy dance!

calvin_hobbes_dancing

Are you in the process of querying and finding an agent? I’ve compiled all the links and helpful articles I used in this process. You can find them here:

logo_FolioLitMgmtLearn more about the marvelous Melissa and Folio Literary Agency with these links:

Thanks again for celebrating with me!


0 Comments on Exciting News! as of 8/14/2013 9:26:00 AM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts