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<<October 2016>>
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Results 51 - 75 of 156,300
51. WALL ART - lu west

Print & Pattern has a new sponsor this week in the shape of Lu West Fine Art Prints. Many of you will know Lu's work from her previous shop 'Mengsel'. Lu is now concentrating on limited edition silkscreen prints (plus continuing her freelance illustration work). Here are some examples of Lu's lovely prints. including her well known bigger boat design at the bottom of the post. Lu also has an

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52. Books are Always in Fashion at Killerton House

killerton House, Devon
Killerton House
If you are a regular reader of my blog, you may remember a previous visit to Killerton House here. That first visit was rather fleeting, but this time we enjoyed a more leisurely look around. Killerton is an 18th-century house and estate in Broadclyst, Devon, owned by the National Trust since 1944.

School children dressed in Victorian clothing on the lawn at Killerton

The house feels very much like a family home, and we were delighted to discover that removing books from library shelves is actively encouraged! We were kindly invited to sit a while, read and enjoy the ambience. I have to say we were more than a little surprised because in most National Trust properties, touching anything is strictly forbidden. It was a privilege to handle the books but some; especially those in the children’s section are suffering at the hands of less than careful visitors.  

Killerton House, Devon, Library
A corner of the library
Enid Blyton The Caravan Family The library at Killerton house
Enid Blyton, Noddy and Beatrix Potter
Trudi and Hansel in the library at Killerton House
Trudi and Hansel A story of the Austrian Tyrol

Books and family photographs at Killerton House
More books and family photographs

The Doyle Diary - the last great Conan Doyle Mystery
The Doyle Diary - the last great Conan Doyle Mystery 

Library at Killerton Vintage Children's books
A small selection from the many children's books in the library 

After spending a considerable amount of time drooling over and photographing books, we moved on to the 'fashion to dye' for exhibition.

Specially selected pieces from Killerton's collection brings to life how colour can reveal much about the wearer and also looks into the origins, status and function of colour in fashion. These are some of my personal favourites;
Afternoon dress from the early 1860s - Chine Silk with woven satin stripe

fashion to dye for Killerton House
1840s Evening dress - Silk brocade with woven satin stripe and floral sprigs 

1920s evening dress - Silk Crepe de Chine, beaded with crystals and diamante

Two highlights from a large display of hats, shoes and accessories

The exhibition includes over 100 pieces of work by Diploma Art and Design Foundation students, from Exeter College. Students were asked to design an outfit inspired by the colours at Killerton. Their brief included using paper patterns rather than fabric. The patterns were strengthened by using iron on Vilene. As many of you know I have a fondness for paper patterns (see a previous post here) so I found this part of the exhibition fascinating. 

Fashion to Dye for is on until Sunday 30th October. If you get a chance to visit you won’t be disappointed.   You will find full details of the exhibition here and this is a link to Killerton House

We ended our visit with a stroll through the gardens.  I took lots of photographs but in the interest of keeping this post as brief as possible, I will share just one. I was trying out the macro lens on my camera. I didn't see the greenfly (on the bud stem) until I got home, same with the tiny insect on the flower. I saw the larger one but had no idea the tiny one was there. I guess the lens works!

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53. DESIGNER - stephani stilwell

Stephani Stilwell is a US based designer who studied for a BFA in Illustration at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Steph works as a freelancer and creates illustrations for editorial to narrative, hand-lettering and food illustration. But her true passion is for pattern design. She likes to inject jokes and humour into her work and previous clients have included American Greetings. 

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54. VIDEO: Just Some Motion

I love the sheer joy of Parov Stelar dancing in his living room - Just Some Motion. I dare you not to join him. Click the image to dance along.

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55. GIFT WRAP - winter's moon

Vintage and Mid Century store Winter's Moon have introduced a new range of wrapping and craft papers. The FSC matte paper is the perfect weight for wrapping gifts and is printed in the UK. They are also of archiving quality and made use eco-friendly 100% vegetable based inks. The lovely pattern papers are available in two colour sets : either 'Pink & Orange' or 'Green, Mustard & Blue' and can

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56. Juliette Oberndorfer

Juliette Oberndorfer

By mixing bristled textures with vibrant neon colors, concept artist, Juliette Oberndorfer, creates woodland landscapes that glow with mysticism. The enchanting, yet mysterious air of her work stems from her stark contrasting of darks and lights as well as the distance she places between her characters and her audience. To take a look at her storyboards and animated work, check out her Vimeo and Tumblr.

Juliette Oberndorfer

Juliette Oberndorfer

Juliette Oberndorfer

Juliette Oberndorfer


Also worth viewing:

Veronica Grech

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Thanks to this week's Sponsor // Foto Sushi

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57. Rizzle Kicks Slurp Video

 Rizzle Kicks
"Slurp" Video
Directed by Dom Joly (Trigger Happy) & Matt Campion
Produced by Spirit Media

I illustrated the celebrity masks throughout the video.
Also performed in the video as right-side Trump, Boris Johnson and dancing gorilla
(all basically the same character)!

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58. A drawing a day

Keeps the doctor away?

How about them apples

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59. ‘Space Jam’ Is Returning to Theaters For Its 20th Anniversary

It's for only 2 days, but hand-drawn Looney Tunes are headed back to the bigscreen!

The post ‘Space Jam’ Is Returning to Theaters For Its 20th Anniversary appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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60. Art for Autumn

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Watercoloring Fall

Andrew Wyeth, Maine Door, watercolor on paper, 1970, Private Collection

There is something about the fall season that makes for appealing art.  I love a good pumpkin painting or an autumn tree.  I've gathered some paintings, mostly watercolors, that depict the season.  Let's start with a few works by the incredibly skilled and talented Andrew Wyeth from Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. Happy fall!

Artwork by Andrew Wyeth, Picking Apples, Made of watercolor and charcoal on paper laid down on board
Andrew Wyeth, Picking Apples, watercolor and charcoal on paper on board, 1945

Artwork by Andrew Wyeth, Pumpkin Hill, Made of watercolor and drybrush on paper laid down on board
Andrew Wyeth, Pumpkin Hill, watercolor and drybrush on paper on board, 1977, Private Collection

Theses spooky scenes, by Andrew Wyeth, are perfect for Halloween.
Watercolor and ink on paper painting by Andrew Wyeth (PA/ME, 1917-2009) featured at Thomaston Place Auction Galleries' Summer 2015 Fine Art & Antiques Auction on August 29 & 30
Andrew Wyeth, Bert's Cabin, watercolor and ink on paper, 1947, Private Collection

Artwork by Andrew Wyeth, After Lunch, Made of watercolor, drybrush and pencil on paper
Andrew Wyeth, After Lunch, watercolor, drybrush and pencil on paper, c.1991, Private Collection

Wyeth may or may not shown fall in the painting below.  It definitely captures what it can look like after an autumn rainstorm. Isn't the texture lovely?
Andrew Wyeth, Waldboro Woods, watercolor and gouache on paper, 1947, Private Collection

Artwork by Andrew Wyeth, Carrying Corn, Made of watercolor with traces of pencil on paper
Andrew Wyeth, Carrying Corn, watercolor and pencil on paper, 1933

Corn Shocks and Jump Mountain, 1950 - Pierre Daura
Pierre Daura, Corn Shocks and Jump Mountain, 1950

Autumn Trees, possibly Rockbridge County, Virginia - Pierre Daura
Pierre Daura(1896 -1976)Autumn Trees, possibly Rockbridge County, Virginia

AJ Casson (1898 -1992), a Canadian and part of the group of seven, created these next works of art, some in oils, others in watercolor.  Their graphic quality is similar to that of other artists from the group of seven, artists who worked to capture the beauty of the Canadian landscape. His simplified forms and color palette remind me of Georgia O'Keeffe fall paintings.

AJ Casson, Road at Yantha Lake

Does anyone else think these clouds are pretty spectacular?
AJ Casson, October Storm

Can you believe all the color in this nearly monochromatic painting? 
AJ Casson, Autumn on the York River

AJ Casson, Near Nobel

AJ Casson, Morning Mist- Rouge River

AJ Casson, Tea Lake, Algonquin Park

AJ Casson, Hazy October Morning

Prints of the AJ Casson artworks are available for purchase here.  I am not affiliated with the site or have any experience ordering through it, just thought the images looked interesting.

Hope you enjoyed the fall images.  I've collected a few more-
Another Canadian who worked with the group of seven-

Can you tell I like fall?  I hope you do too.

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61. This Saturday in Buenos Aires: Bit Bang Fest

Bit Bang Fest is a free one-day festival dedicated to animation, video games, and digital art.

The post This Saturday in Buenos Aires: Bit Bang Fest appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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62. Inktober Day 16: Tree

Day 15 of #Inktober2016. Last night's sketchbook while half-watching the telly.

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63. Watch: Dreamworks Unveils ‘The Boss Baby’ Teaser Trailer

Alec Baldwin is a businessman-baby in "The Boss Baby."

The post Watch: Dreamworks Unveils ‘The Boss Baby’ Teaser Trailer appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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64. ‘Borrowed Time’ by Andrew Coats and Lou Hamou-Lhadj

A weathered sheriff returns to the remains of an accident he has spent a lifetime trying to forget.

The post ‘Borrowed Time’ by Andrew Coats and Lou Hamou-Lhadj appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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65. Inktober Day 17: Autumn

Autumn. Day 17 of #Inktober2016.

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66. Inktober Day 15: Little Emperor

Day 15 of #Inktober2016.

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67. April...A Lot Has Happened Since.

In the last three years, there has been very little time for reflection- we have always been on the move. Even before the three years, just before we made the decision for us to start a new company on the podunk island I had never heard of before- Mauritius, we had been in constant flux- constantly adjusting. 

When we bought the Hermosa House we were in a very different place in our lives. We thought that we would retire there- even though at the time we bought it we were both in our early 40's . I was 41 and actually, Fred was still in his late 30's.  When we walked into the house for the first time it was after having gone house hunting up in Washington State. We had both caught some awful respiratory thing and had gotten back to SLO and climbed into my old 92 Nissan Sentra with the dent in the door and saw an open house sign on the way back to our apartment. The realator no doubt looked to the car and us and thought that there was no way these two could afford this house here by the sea. We walked in and instantly loved it and then we put in an offer. 

 We had so much fun remodeling it. People said it would ruin our relationship - that remodeling was one of the most stressful things a couple could do. Years later I heard the story of just such a case down the street where a twenty-some year marriage went kaput over a remodel. We made that faux-cape cod bungalow into something pretty amazing and we loved it. We traced out names into the concrete on the garden wall after we built it. 

After we moved to MRU, I would fly back four times a year for my work, to see friends and to connect with something familiar. Mauritius had not been so fun for me. A male dominated Hindu culture with nerve shattering driving conditions, an over-spraying of pesticides (ah yes, did I mention my next book is about Rachel Carson?) and a disconnect from nature facilitated by the compounds that ex-pats live surrounded by walls- both to keep things out and in. My trips were about a month or longer in duration and would time  with Tristam's school needs and once a year, with the SCBWI conference in LA to meet with the tribe. This last year it became clear that we were not going to return to Hermosa for another 10 years or so. I hadn't realized it, but being there was starting to depress me. On the one hand, I loved it- the sound of the waves at night from our bedroom , the smell of the ocean air , the comfort of being in a place that is yours and familiar to you. But it was becoming a ghost of an idea that had been laid out as a couple and here I was alone. 

So...we sold it. Our wonderful realtor put up the sign and I remember the pang in my heart and our amazing neighbors and dear friends helped us to keep the place up while it was on the market- and it sold quickly. And we are building a place in Sarasota, Florida- on the other side of the county, but still on the west coast of that state just down the street from my parents. 

I packed up the Hermosa house and then movers (Meathead Movers- would not recommend FYI) came and put our stuff into a box. It waits somewhere in California for word to have it shipped out to Florida. 

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68. Fireworks!

I was stumped what to share with you today, dear readers, because I have been laid up in bed sick for most of this week. PAH! But no worries, this is Edinburgh. Sometimes, the wonder of this town comes to you. I started to feel a little better so had moved to the couch. After dinner, we heard an odd noise outside. And then again, and again.
     "That sounds like fireworks?"
     Indeed it was.
     Turns out the end of the 2016 Edinburgh International Festival was being celebrated with a Virgin Money Fireworks Concert on Calton Hill...which is right up the hill from our flat. This was our view. We got to see the whole thing. The ball of light on the left side of 'our tree' is the moon. The ball of light on the right is the fireworks show getting going.

     The show got bigger and higher - we really did get to see the whole thing from our living room window. But this shot with the moon was the coolest of them all! In all the nearby flats we could see our neighbors enjoying the show too. Any excuse to celebrate - that's Edinburgh. I love it here. :)

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69. Seems like forever....

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70. Painting...

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71. Some Shameless Self Promotion

via Temple of the Seven Golden Camels http://ift.tt/2cq3c66

Sometimes people ask me if I'll ever write a book about storyboarding. I would never want to do that...I enjoy sharing what little I know for free, and I've always felt that the whole point of having knowledge is to share it with others. So I'm glad people have found my posts helpful over the years. It's been very gratifying and you have all been a great audience.

Over the past six years I have been working on a book, however...I've been writing and drawing a graphic novel that i'm planning on releasing next year, and now I need your help (don't worry, it's easy). In a shameless and transparent ploy to seem relevant and like I have an audience, I'm trying to get followers on social media. So if you wouldn't mind following me on Twitter, Tumblr and/or Instagram, I'd really, really appreciate it. I'm going to start posting a bunch of artwork from my graphic novel as well as other stuff I've done, so I promise to make it interesting.

Twitter link: https://twitter.com/Mark_D_Kennedy

Tumblr link: http://ift.tt/2dfxFW1

Instagram link: http://ift.tt/2dfzbY7

Thanks to everyone who still visits and thanks for all the nice things you've said over the years. I will continue to write posts here and I hope you'll continue to come!

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72. Cheltenham Literature Festival

I went to Cheltenham Literature Festival and read HOW TO FIND GOLD.
The kids were amazing! They drew beautiful crocodiles...

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73. Raymond Chandler on Character

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I often talk about how creating distinct and interesting characters with unique personalities is one of the most important parts of our trade. I'm warning you now, this is another one of those posts!

Raymond Chandler was a writer of detective novels and the creator of the iconic hard boiled detective Philip Marlowe. Towards the end of his career, he sat down for an interview with Ian Fleming, the writer of the James Bond novels.

If you Google something like "Raymond Chandler Ian Fleming interviews", you'll be able to find transcriptions and youtube excerpts so you can read it, or listen to it, or both. The entire thing is in a SoundCloud file that can be heard here.

Here's the passage that I thought was the most interesting and relevant to this particular topic:

Ian Fleming: I wonder what the basic ingredients of a good thriller really are. Of course, you should have pace; it should start on the first page and carry you straight through. And I think you've got to have violence, I think you've got to have a certain amount of sex, you've got to have a basic plot, people have got to want to know what's going to happen by the end of it.

Raymond Chandler: Yes, I agree. There has to be an element of mystery, in fact there has to be a mysterious situation. The detective doesn't know what it's all about, he knows that there's something strange about it, but he doesn't know just what it's all about. It seems to me that the real mystery is not who killed Sir John in his study, but what the situation really was, what the people were after, what sort of people they were.

Ian Fleming: That's exactly what you write about, of course - you develop your characters very much more than I do, and the thriller element it seems to me in your books is in the people, the character building, and to a considerable extent in the dialogue, which of course I think is some of the finest dialogue written in any prose today.

The part I found the most interesting was this one:

It seems to me that the real mystery is not who killed Sir John in his study, but what the situation really was, what the people were after, what sort of people they were. 

I think there's a lot of truth in this sentence and shows what made Chandler such a popular writer. I think many people are convinced that the elements that make a good mystery story are things like an intricate plot, twists and turns and startling surprises.  

Similarly, I also think that many people--when they're writing about a movie or a TV show that they like--will focus on the most tangible and obvious elements to judge whether a story works or fails. They will point to things like clever foreshadowing or visuals that contain powerful symbolism. I read so many articles online that focus on these things to explain why a film is powerful and why it appeals to a wide audience. 

I think these elements can really benefit a film and give a film depth and emotional resonance, but without great, well developed characters at the heart of a story, that story will ultimately fall short.

Characters are important because they're our avatars in the movie. The way we watch movies is by relating to the characters and projecting ourselves onto them and experiencing the stories through their shoes. So as Chandler is saying here, I think the most important aspect of any story is who the characters are, what they want, and why they are doing what they are doing.

I've seen articles online where people talk about stories like "Harry Potter", "Lord of the Rings" or "Game of Thrones", and these articles tend to focus on what wonderful worlds those authors have created. People marvel at the imagination of J. K. Rowling and how she's thought through every nuance of the world that Harry Potter lives in.

That's undoubtable true, but it's not why those stories speak to people, in my opinion. I think Rowling is actually really good at writing characters that we can relate to. Her characters are so wonderfully universal and yet feel specific and not at all generic. We've all met the kinds of students she describes when we were in school. We've all had teachers like the ones she describes. They may be wizards but they are full of real human qualities, both good and bad. They're very rich characters. And Rowling does a really good job of always letting us know why they're doing what they're doing. Some are motivated by greed, some by fear, some by good intentions, some by guilt, etc.

As Chandler says, in Rowling's stories we always know "what the people were after". Knowing what drives a character and how far they will go to get what they want is as much a part of their personality as anything else. We're all driven by different wants and needs at different times and we can relate to characters who are driven by similar wants and needs. Once we can relate to characters, then you can really get an audience to feel empathy for a character and worry about them, or feel full of dread for them, or feel sorry for them or feel happy for that character.

If we create characters that feel false, then the viewer can never really relate to them and it becomes impossible to get the audience to feel anything for that character. We've all seen movies where something terrible happens to the hero, and we should feel awful about it, but instead we're sneaking a peek at our phone to see how much longer until the movie's over.

Yes, the magical world Rowling created is amazing, but imagine if, instead of writing the Harry potter novels, Rowling had simply written a book describing the world of Hogwarts as though it were a catalog for prospective students. Or if she had written a book describing all the locales in Harry's world as though it were an Encyclopedia for wizards. There's no way that book would have ever become as popular as her novels. So the world itself--no matter how interesting--is not the core of the story. An imaginative world is not enough to enthrall an audience. Great characters are key.

The Star Wars universe is another example. There are many, many books describing all the planets and aliens of the Star Wars universe. I'm sure they're imaginative and interesting. But they aren't read an enjoyed nearly as much as the films are watched and enjoyed by audiences. Because the atlases and alien encyclopedias don't have the compelling characters that the films do.

Creating a fascinating world with lots of imagination is a great way to appeal to the intellect of an audience. The audience says to themselves "wow, that's clever." They can admire how interesting the world is, but they're not feeling anything yet. Once you create characters and give them human traits and foibles and problems, then you can appeal to the emotions of an audience, and that's when you can truly get them to invest in your movie and get them to feel joy or despair.

To sum up...don't get me wrong, great characters aren't the only thing that a story needs. Of course a great world for the story to take place in is important. A plot that makes sense is important as well. I just find that--in my opinion--many critics, bloggers and online posters focus too much on plot mechanics and visuals when they're judging a film. I think this happens because those are the most obvious and tangible elements when you're watching a film. Character is deeper and more difficult to talk about, and when it's done well, it can seem so natural that it seems effortless and obvious. But it's not.

Part of why I discuss this stuff all the time is because of my personal experience. People who write films and work in story tend to fall into the trap of focusing too much on plot and the mechanics of the story. We're guilty of the same thing that many critics and bloggers fall into. Plot elements are very tangible and easy to talk about. There's a logic and a concrete nature to the plot events of a story that make them easier to wrestle with and define than character.

Creating unique and interesting characters and digging deep into the psychology of those characters and figuring out why they are driven to do what they do is much, much more challenging. Creating characters that feel real and that are doing things out of real motivation is much harder than just creating a plot and manipulating characters into doing what they need to do to service the plot.

Chandler's plots don't always make a lot of sense (at least as I remember them). On his Wikipedia page, there's an excerpt from a reviewer that described his work as "rambling at best and incoherent at worst". That's about how I remember his books. But his well-defined characters and wonderful sense of atmosphere outshine the weakness of his plots and have kept his work popular with readers.

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74. ‘Power Hungry’ by Benjy Brooke

When a futurist traveler’s electric car runs out of batteries, she ventures out across a barren desert in search of more power.

The post ‘Power Hungry’ by Benjy Brooke appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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75. Japanese Artist Builds Custom Cintiq-Embedded Desk

An inspiring DIY project for anyone who creates digital art on a tablet.

The post Japanese Artist Builds Custom Cintiq-Embedded Desk appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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