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73726. 1 Year

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Last week my husband and I celebrated our 1 year anniversary!  It’s hard to believe that a year ago I was immersed in mini-wedding planning.  We had dinner at the very same place where my husband proposed.  I,  finally, got one of our wedding pictures properly framed.  And I even bought a beloved cookbook to honor the occasion (because paper is the traditional first anniversary gift, right?).

Anyway, I remembered that I was going to post some post-wedding, “non-reception” celebratory photos.  Looking through them, I don’t have very many with actual people; I think I was too busy having a blast to take many photos which often happens!  So, I’m just going to post some of my more craft-related ones.

These pics are from non-reception #1 which took place at our home last October.  Rather, they were taken during preparations before anyone showed up.

Since it was October I wanted a slightly spooky theme but not in a costume-party kind of way (see our party invitations here).  The colors were black, white, silver, pink and orange.  In the photo, above, you can see our pretty bunting crafted with paper doilies, silver glitter card stock letters and black & white striped twine.  The wee cake is pre-wedding topper, silvery glitter initials much like the ones used in the bunting.  Originally I wanted to make a larger 2-tiered cake but became petrified by the thought as I’ve never made one.  But a sweet little cake plus cupcakes galore did the trick.  (By the way, the frosting was pearly and marshmallow-y, while the cake was yellow with chocolate chips.  So good!)

My lovely friend Kara, who came down for the weekend, was very kind and totally game for any party-decorating ideas I threw her way including decorating our high ceilings with paper streamers.

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The mantle was decorated with various pumpkins, candles and a fabric-covered accordion-style scrapbook filled with photos from the wedding, backed with craft paper I printed and designed myself.  The plastic cauldron on the coffee table was later filled with candy for the young and young at heart.  (We did have real food, I swear, like cheese and dip and charcuterie, but those things were set out just before people arrived.)

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Kara and I spent the previous night making these fun cupcake toppers with Victorian clip art butterflies in October-ish colors.  We (and by we, I mean Kara) put that scalloped paper punch to good use!

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73727. EYEWITNESS REPORTS at Gallery Nucleus August 14th

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73728. International Year of Youth: Dialogue and Mutual Understanding

International Year of Youth- logoOn December 2009, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming the year commencing today, August 12th 2010, and ending on August 11th 2011, as the International Year of Youth (IYY). Under the theme “Dialogue and Mutual Understanding,” the Year aims to promote the ideals of peace, respect for human rights and solidarity across generations, cultures, religions and civilizations. The Year also coincides with the 25th anniversary of the first International Youth Year in 1985, when a framework and guidelines for national action and international support to improve the situation of young people were first put into place.

For an overview of the importance of the Year for young people, take a look at this brochure, which soon will be available in all UN official languages.

If you are planning to hold an event in celebration of the International Year of Youth and would like to officially register it, you may do so here.

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73729. EXPOSICIÓN: Tres Pintores [Lima]

PEDRO-DE-..[1]

Exposición "Tres Pintiores"
Juan Carlos Zeballos, José Luis Carranza y Guillermo Chávez Arroyo
Galería de Arte temporal del Museo Pedro de Osma
(Av. Pedro de Osma 423, Barranco. Lima)
Del 19 de agosto al 20 de septiembre del 2010
INGRESO LIBRE


A continuación copiamos un extracto de la entrevista que realizaron a Miriam Mainardi consultora y curadora de esta muestra. El artículo titulado "Jóvenes maestros" pertenece al espacio de Cultura del diario Expreso de Lima.


–¿Qué es lo que se viene presentando en la muestra “Tres pintores”?
Se presentan los trabajos de tres artistas con estilos marcadamente diferentes y de primera línea en la calidad de su pintura, cuyo denominador común es su juventud. Estos tres artistas son José Luis Carranza, pintor limeño, cuyo trabajo se ubica en el expresionismo; Guillermo Chávez, chiclayano, en el surrealismo, y Juan Carlos Zeballos, pintor arequipeño, en el plano abstracto.

–¿Cuáles son las características de estos pintores?
Son pintores exponentes de la vanguardia de la pintura peruana. Todos ellos egresaron de sus centros de estudios con las mejores notas. El empuje mostrado desde el comienzo y la fuerza con la que han entrado al mercado de arte en Lima me hizo notar que eran serios artistas y que estaban seguros que esta es su carrera.

–¿Cómo fue el proceso de selección? ¿Cuánto tiempo le llevó realizarlo?
Yo conocía la pintura de estos jóvenes desde hace doce o catorce años atrás y, desde allí, he visto el proceso de su ingreso al mercado del arte y el avance que han tenido en cuanto a su evolución como artistas. La idea de juntarlos surgió en mi cabeza hace diez años atrás, pero empezó a concretarse en setiembre del año pasado, momento en el que nos juntamos a trabajar para sacar adelante esta muestra con lo mejor de su pintura. Realizar esto no ha sido un proceso difícil y la elección de los trabajos me parece estupenda, lo cual puede es evidente si uno visita la galería.

–¿Qué le pareció la experiencia en esta curaduría?

Como nos conocemos desde hace bastante tiempo, ellos han colaborado conmigo y todo ha fluido perfectamente. Incluso, Eduardo Moll ha visitado esta muestra y los ha calificado de “jóvenes maestros”. Justamente fue que, trabajando con Moll, llegué a conocer la obra de estos muchachos, cuya juventud y fuerza con la que llegaban al público me hizo sentir que debía hacerse una muestra de estos tres buenos pintores. Luego de casi diez años, este es el resultado.


Para leer el artículo entero, dirigirse a esta dirección:
http://www.expreso.com.pe/

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73730. So you think you know Disneyland...

So I'm doing another post about Disneyland. That's because it's amazing.
This picture is awesome and you know it.

I went on a camera rampage. I love all the hidden corners and details that place has--what a work of art. Le sigh. So. Since I know a lot of the people who visit my blog--all three of you--love Disneyland, here's another guessing game!

Can you guess what lands these pictures were taken in?

Bonus points if you can guess where exactly they were taken.

And no, there is no prize. Not this time. One day I'll have a real prize. Like a drink of water or a handful of grass maybe. Good luck!

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73731. Armor Of God

Here's another commission based on the bible. This time, the armor of God.
Sketched on the iPad, inked with my Kuretake brush pen on paper.

iPad Sketchbook pro sketch

Kuretake brush pen inked on paper

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73732. I


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73733. August Break: August 12th

A photo of the same statue as here, but during the summer. And at night.

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73734. "Champ's Story" gets 5-Star review on Amazon.com!

I have received such an overwhelming response ever since the release of my new book "Champ's Story: Dogs Get Cancer Too!", I can barely keep up. I wanted to share with you this customer review I saw posted at Amazon.com today. It made my day:
_______

This review is from: Champ's Story: Dogs Get Cancer Too! (Hardcover)
I do wish there were more books of this ilk and this quality available for children.

For adults, "cancer" has become one of the most terrifying words in our language. Most adults have some understanding of this disease, and after the initial shock of the diagnosis, can rely on knowledge, maturity and practiced emotions to deal with it...on some level at least. Children on the other hand know from a very early age that fear is involved but so often do not know why. They not only have fear of something they know is "not good," but they also have a fear of the unknown, which is indeed just as traumatic.

The author, Sherry North has used the story of a young boy and his beloved pet dog to inform the younger set just what it is they are dealing with when cancer; either of a family member, loved one, friend or pet, enters their life.

Cody and his pet Champ are preparing for an agility show and Champ is running through her paces. While petting Champ, Cody discovers a lump on her side. Cody makes a good choice in telling Champ she needs to see a doctor. Cody knows there is something wrong.

The author and illustrator, Kathleen Rietz then take us upon a journey; a journey of a victim of cancer. From the visit to the doctor's office, testing and on to the diagnosis of cancer and the treatment, the reader follows step by step. The child learns what to expect and when to expect it. The young boy shows the typical emotions of a child in this situation; shares his thoughts with his friends, and above all, becomes Champ's caregiver. You can see the care and love radiating out form the illustrations and words.

The author has used straight forward simply language to tell a complex story. Her tone is matter of fact but extremely tender, loving and understanding throughout the entire work. There is nothing scary or heart wrenchingly sad about the story; it just explains in a very understandable way what a child might well face. Information will quite often take away a lot of fear and the author certainly supplies quite a lot of good and valid facts in a relatively short book. Truthfully, I was amazed at just how much information she was able to pack into so few pages.

The last four pages of the book are sort of a "cancer fact primer" for adults to use in teaching children of this subject. Facts are given so that the reader can understand just what cancer is, how it is treated, fact and fiction surrounding this disease, coping with cancer and chemo and a page on what you can do to prevent cancer as you grow up.

The art work in this book by Kathleen Rietz is extremely well executed. Each of the frames, which cover two pages each, are done in mellow and soothing colors. Each illustration fits the text perfectly. The artist has captured the mood of each picture perfectly on the face of the dog without overly anthropomorphizing her subject...I like this...it adds much to the overall message of the book. This is a very skillful writer and skillful artist that have teamed up here!

This is an ideal work to be used in a classroom. Giving children knowledge of this disease before he or she has to actually face it, as many, many will, gives them a bit of a head start in the process of learning to deal with the many issues they will be faced.

Don Blankenship
The Ozarks

2 Comments on "Champ's Story" gets 5-Star review on Amazon.com!, last added: 8/12/2010
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73735. Report from Disney Feature studio: “Grim”

According to Local 839 business rep Steve Hulett, who visited Disney Feature Animation a few hours ago, “morale is lower than a dachshund’s belly, since most of the artists and technicians were given their notices in July, and layoffs now loom.” He also writes on the union blog that “Disney Feature Animation’s atmosphere, in fact, is a lot like it was in 2001, when hand-drawn animation was imploding and everybody working on Home on the Range knew they had four months before they got to go stand in the unemployment line: Grim.”

Tangled will surely turn things around.

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73736. HOW-TO: Combining Handmade Models + After Effects

Tiny Inventions

Ru Kuwahata and Max Porter, the cute animation couple who runs Tiny Inventions, created this video explaining their quirky work process that combines handmade models with After Effects puppetry. They applied this technique most recently to the short film Something Left, Something Taken, which is their most elaborate work to date.

(via Motionographer)

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73737. Girls Girls Girls

The funny thing is I don't even remember drawing this....

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73738. Two caramels done

4 x 4 inches, Polychromos on Stonehenge


This is an espresso caramel. The one in the last post is a ginger caramel - I had it wrong before. Hence the difference in colors. They're by the same company, and come in the same little package, but are different. (and they're both really yummy!)

I'm having as much fun with the shadows on these as I am with the candy itself. My original plan was to do some unwrapped, then just the wrappers - now I'm not sure. I may just keep going with the candies like this. I have some that are plain ordinary caramels in a different sort of wrapper - may do one of those next.

I will put these up for sale at some point. I would love to do one a day, and would, if I didn't have anything else to do!

Right now I'm going to go look at my yarn - the knitting bug has hit me again after a long hiatus. Have to keep my hands busy while I watch Project Runway so I don't feel quite so couch-potato-like.

4 Comments on Two caramels done, last added: 8/14/2010
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73739. Amazing Blog Giveaway!


Lately my son has been spending quite a bit of his time scribbling at his toddler friendly art easel with wax crayons and too-short-pencil-stubs (left overs from sketching sprees). Maybe that means he will one day become an artist, like his mother, or maybe that just means he likes spending time in my studio because I'm in there too. Either way, it keeps him busy just long enough for me to catch up on my emails.

One recent email had an intriguing offer for my blog... a giveaway - just for my readers! And the kicker - I got to pick the prize! I wondered, do I give away something useful and beautiful like a Dutch oven (oh the ridiculously elegant meals I could attempt to create in one of those), or maybe something that might inspire other young children to be creative while giving their parents some time to themselves, like the Creativity Desk and Easel? Eureka!

Entering is so easy, you could even attempt to allow your toddler to do it for you. Leave a comment on this blog post before Friday, August 20th at 1pm MST. I'll contact the winner that day and we'll set up how to get this fabulous prize to you, even the shipping is free (*I'm so sorry but international readers - that is people not living in Canada and the USA will have to pay for their own shipping).

A great big thank you to CSN stores for sponsoring this fantastic giveaway.

18 Comments on Amazing Blog Giveaway!, last added: 8/16/2010
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73740. beachfront

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73741. Soooooo Distracted!!

I skipped yoga to do some work, and ended up working a lil and playing a lot. My business is suffering, Mr. Dresher!
But does it count as work when the conversation consists of animation and art and misc. geekery? I should re-evaluate... Oh, but on another note, I bumped into the lovely Ernie Duque. He told me Scott Pilgrim was amazing... YES!
We sat outside sketching kiddies playing in the fountains by Music in the Park. Sooooo hilarious.
Here's a video because I couldn't resist capturing the playful silliness :)
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73742. hypercomics at battersea park

Here's Sean Azzopardi and me taking in the wonder of the new comics exhibition at the Pumphouse Gallery. (Sean's posted a bunch of photos here.)



A whole bunch of comic artists got together to put on this fab show in a gorgeous location in a beautifully restored pumphouse overlooking a pond, curated by Paul Gravett. Here's the floor featuring Dave McKean's very site-specific work. He arranged it so there were lots of places you could see something cool just if you looked at it from an exact perspective. One view was through this mask:



Here's the dude wot made it:




And one of the window views where, if I bend my knees quite a lot and pretend I'm Dave's height, the trees in the picture exactly line up with the trees I see through the window.



Speaking of site specific, I've been invited to lead a HyperComics family workshop right there in the gallery space! It's on Sunday, 19 Aug from 1:30-3:30, and booking details are here.

Masked Adventures in Comics!
Draw inspiration from the Hypercomic exhibition and Dave McKean's masked characters to design your own story's masked heroes and villains. Get behind their masks to discover your characters' unique personalities, then use the Pumphouse setting to bring them to life in a gripping story. At the end, you'll come away with your own self-published comic book!
Suitable for both children and adults.


I told Dave McKean we'd be very careful while we run around his artwork and stab pencils into the air.
This comic panel reads, He seemed nervous.



Multi-directional comics by Daniel Merlin Goodbrey:



The ever-marvelous John Miers and Megan Donnolley:



A red-lined mask really begs to be looked through.





I actually missed a lot of the exhibition because it does demand a bit of concentration and quiet contemplation. I was riding a weird wave of being buzzed and knackered by a full day in Birmingham at the the Peters Bookselling Services. Basically it's this massive storeroom full of children's and young adult books that sell to libraries in vast quantities. All three of my publishers were there, but I was officially with Oxford University Press and doing my shpeil for my upcoming adventure picture book When Titus Took the Train. It was such a funny format... Librarian Speed Dating! The two OUP publicists and I had five minutes at our booth to say our bit to a group of about five librarians. At the end of the time, The Archers theme tune would play and the next group of librarians would pile in and we'd do it all over again. Fortunately we also got a nice lunch and I got to meet Facebo

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73743. Guest Blogger – David Caruba

Caruba Coughs Up the Cuisinart!

You’re probably wondering what this has to do with children’s publishing? Well, nothing. If that’s a problem, kindly move along to the next blog, a fascinating exploration of the solitary asparagus and its influence on creating picture book characters that matter. It’s by Mildred Honeydew, a favorite of many in the chapter.

Still with me? Lovely. About a month ago, in a fit of writer’s block madness (for more about my guest blog on the subject, click here), I fell in love with a New Orleans Jazz Fest print by artist Terrance Osborne. Here it is:   

My wife was a good sport about it—even with the framing bill that was a mortgage payment in and of itself (because what the hell, if you’re going to do it, do it right!).

The poster had a twin, done by the artist three years earlier, and completely sold out. AND I HAD TO HAVE IT!!! What good is writer’s block if you can’t plead insanity and drop nose-bleed amounts of greenbacks to score a sudden must-have. And what price is art, I ask.

I skipped a car payment, reconsidered the need for groceries for a month, and bought poster #2 from the after-market. You can see my now reposed car here. Here’s poster #2,

safely hanging in my bedroom, here. Which would you pay for?

I stalled telling my wife for two weeks. News like this does not go over well. Eventually, though, I had to fess up. Which brings us to my sudden interest in Cuisinarts. According to my wife, a brand new food processor deluxe might just save my new poster and my marriage. Though I could ill afford it, into Bed, Bath & Beyond I jogged (three miles there, three miles home—sucks not having a car!).

Cuisinart food processors and I have an illustrious history, much like the institution of marriage. Back in the late’80s, and foodies out there might recall this, Cuisinart introduced the first non-professional, for home model. It was slender and sleek, easily recognizable in a wrapped gift box. What it lacked in sheer size (it handled maybe a half cup!), it contained in horse power and TSIC (time saved in chopping).

And lucky me, I received a wedding invitation from my friend, Michael. I arrived at the blessed affair, Cuisinart in hand; I proudly presented my gift at an appropriate moment during the reception. Michael’s response: a cross between a frown and a look of disbelief. “It’s a *censored by K. Temean* Cuisinart,” I sputtered. Like, idiot, isn’t the shape of the box obvious enough? Show me the joy.

Turns out it was (obvious enough). Michael gestured to the gift table. My Cuisinart was #15. They were all nicely lined up in a row—like handsome, tasteful, toy soldiers. “Thanks so much,” Michael said through gritted teeth. What he meant was: thanks for the enema, ass*censored by D. Caruba, seconds before K. Temean*.

A year or two later Michael was divorced, and as a testament to my generosity, his ex took the Cuisinart (along with the house, half the bank account and both tickets to a Caribbean cruise—not bitter was she). Not that it was a problem; Michael had 14 more (Cuisinarts, that is, post-divorce he was too broke to afford a vacation).

Michael landed on his feet, in part because what single woman doesn’t appreciate a man with a Cuisinart (14 of them, to be precise), and soon rem

5 Comments on Guest Blogger – David Caruba, last added: 8/16/2010
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73744. "Champ's Story" Gets 5-Star Review on Amazon.com!

Since the release of my latest book "Champ's Story: Dogs Get Cancer Too!" last week, the response has been overwhelming.  Check out this review I found today on Amazon.com.  It made my day!
________


This review is from: Champ's Story: Dogs Get Cancer Too! (Hardcover)

I do wish there were more books of this ilk and this quality available for children.

For adults, "cancer" has become one of the most terrifying words in our language. Most adults have some understanding of this disease, and after the initial shock of the diagnosis, can rely on knowledge, maturity and practiced emotions to deal with it...on some level at least. Children on the other hand know from a very early age that fear is involved but so often do not know why. They not only have fear of something they know is "not good," but they also have a fear of the unknown, which is indeed just as traumatic.

The author, Sherry North has used the story of a young boy and his beloved pet dog to inform the younger set just what it is they are dealing with when cancer; either of a family member, loved one, friend or pet, enters their life.

Cody and his pet Champ are preparing for an agility show and Champ is running through her paces. While petting Champ, Cody discovers a lump on her side. Cody makes a good choice in telling Champ she needs to see a doctor. Cody knows there is something wrong.

The author and illustrator, Kathleen Rietz then take us upon a journey; a journey of a victim of cancer. From the visit to the doctor's office, testing and on to the diagnosis of cancer and the treatment, the reader follows step by step. The child learns what to expect and when to expect it. The young boy shows the typical emotions of a child in this situation; shares his thoughts with his friends, and above all, becomes Champ's caregiver. You can see the care and love radiating out form the illustrations and words.

The author has used straight forward simply language to tell a complex story. Her tone is matter of fact but extremely tender, loving and understanding throughout the entire work. There is nothing scary or heart wrenchingly sad about the story; it just explains in a very understandable way what a child might well face. Information will quite often take away a lot of fear and the author certainly supplies quite a lot of good and valid facts in a relatively short book. Truthfully, I was amazed at just how much information she was able to pack into so few pages.

The last four pages of the book are sort of a "cancer fact primer" for adults to use in teaching children of this subject. Facts are given so that the reader can understand just what cancer is, how it is treated, fa

2 Comments on "Champ's Story" Gets 5-Star Review on Amazon.com!, last added: 8/12/2010
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73745. Girls Girls Girls! - Day 4 of 7

Day four, let's jump right in! Hey kids, get your library cards out because...


"Excuse me, young man. You have some overdue books!" Librarians. What can I tell you? I'm a book worm and it's a fantasy.
"Hola, Papi. Venga aquí!" Latinas. I don't think I even need to explain this one.
"Anyone for scuba?" Girls, guns, wet suits. Is it hot in here?

Back tomorrow with more girls!

Best,
Nathanael
My Blog

1 Comments on Girls Girls Girls! - Day 4 of 7, last added: 8/13/2010
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73746. More Fabric Tags!

I can't believe I used up the 40+ I made in March!

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73747. Help a lady out?

I’m sad to report that the phenomenally talented, Ignatz award winning and dear friend to people and pets alike, Laura Park, is in sore need of emergency back surgery (specifically, a discectomy). Even with insurance, she still needs to raise $3500 which she hasn’t got, and that’s where you, Drawn’s faithful and charitable readers, can help.

She has set up a donation page to help offset the cost of the surgery and any amount you can spare will be greatly appreciated. And in return, you will be highly rewarded knowing you’ve helped out an extremely gifted artist return to the craft she loves; creating comics and paintings that are sure to slap a crooked smile on your face and plant an olde tyme song in your heart.

Oddly enough, Laura was featured on Drawn! nearly three years ago to the day, regarding the subject of artists and lower-back pain.


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73748. A Stinky Old Man

old-man-cartoonthere certainly are no shortage of colorful characters that live in my apartment complex and good old Alfred is definitely one of them. there are those that age gracefully, who are quick as a whip, and still shower regularly as they reach those golden years...sadly Alfred has missed the boat on all three and more. u can accuse me of being insensitive to what is clearly a few screws missing, but because he has crossed the line to full on creeper status on more than one occasion i don't feel any guilt at poking fun. to get back to the cartoon, Alfred does in fact sit on the stoop of the main complex building in full on suit attire, (gloves, hat, and all) day in and day out. why the gloves? why the hat? and why does he pair the 'classy' suit with a cotton purple turtle neck? these are all questions to ponder, as well as when was the last time he actually took a shower and laundered said clothes? i've tallied him wearing the same duds for well over a month and it is a fact he's been asked on more than one occasion to take a shower by the management for the simple reason that he smells. oh Alfred.

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73749. Like Silver Ribbons Across The Earth


Julie, Henry and myself all packed in the car and drove out of Toronto to the David Dunlap Observatory on Richmond Hill this evening to watch the Perseid meteor shower. They were amazing, the whole night was amazing. Hundreds of people laying on their backs in total darkness on a grassy hill in front of a sprawling observatory. Every time a bright silver ribbon flashed across the sky the crowd would ooh and aah and then laugh. I didn't have the best camera and couldn't figure out how to take night time photos with it so I took these shots in and around one of the observatories. Henry slept through the whole thing but I was glad he was there in any case.

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73750. A Stinky Old Man

old-man-cartoon
there certainly are no shortage of colorful characters that live in my apartment complex and good old Alfred is definitely one of them. there are those that age gracefully, who are quick as a whip, and still shower regularly as they reach those golden years...sadly Alfred has missed the boat on all three and more. u can accuse me of being insensitive to what is clearly a few screws missing, but because he has crossed the line to full on creeper status on more than one occasion i don't feel any guilt at poking fun. to get back to the cartoon, Alfred does in fact sit on the stoop of the main complex building in full on suit attire, (gloves, hat, and all) day in and day out. why the gloves? why the hat? and why does he pair the 'classy' suit with a cotton purple turtle neck? these are all questions to ponder, as well as when was the last time he actually took a shower and laundered said clothes? i've tallied him wearing the same duds for well over a month and it is a fact he's been asked on more than one occasion to take a shower by the management for the simple reason that he smells. oh Alfred.


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