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73726. he's a digger!

now, that's not the proverb i'm using. that's just a line from JURASSIC PARK, you know, when the lawyer is talking to the amber geologist? yeah, right there, in the beginning of the movie, way before we meet alan grant or that chubby, embryo stealing postman from seinfeld."hees like me. hee's a digger!")annnny way, as i was a sayyy-in, i picked ONE MAN'S HOME IS ANOTHER MAN'S CASTLE. but i'm

9 Comments on he's a digger!, last added: 9/13/2010
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73727. IF ~ Proverb

PROVERB
Everyone must row with the oars he has

This was the original double page spread, as submitted and approved by author, used for a book project (Enchanted Tree of Crooked Lake) I completed last year.

When you purchase an item from MY STORE, 10% of your purchase price will be donated to my favorite animal charities; Last Chance Animal Rescue and Horses Haven, both in lower MI. Which charity the donation goes to, will depend on the item purchased and I will love you forever from the bottom of my little black heart. ...and even if you don't purchase anything from me, you can go to their site and make a donation! These animals deserve a chance!

Have a seat in the sun with a tall cold glass of something and browse through the pages of my website ArtQwerks

4 Comments on IF ~ Proverb, last added: 9/13/2010
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73728. i met a friend of spirit

James Alfred William George Galloway McAlistair ('Boston Jim')

Hailing from a small village in bonnie Scotland, James McAlistair, a determined and ambitious young political activist, set sail as a stowaway on a ship bound for the United States of America in 1773. On arriving at his destination he was discovered and thrown overboard, and found himself covered in tea.

After dragging himself ashore, and dusting himself down, McAlistair sneaked past the authorities and protesters and went into hiding. He lived on the streets of Boston for some weeks until he got back on his feet, found himself a place to stay and began work in the ship industry. He worked his way up from a tea boy to foreman. But McAlistair never forgot his roots, or the scenes and protests that met him on his arrival at the port. This, coupled with the way he saw other terriers being treated in the workplace, started him on his new calling.

'Boston Jim', as he was now known, travelled from town to town fighting for the rights of terriers throughout the sate of Massachusetts. He went on to become the founder of the Terriers Union that won the rights to a five day working week, two weeks holiday a year and a Bonio before bed time for terriers everywhere.

Original drawing for sale HERE.

3 Comments on i met a friend of spirit, last added: 9/12/2010
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73729. A Pirates Life equals Treasury!

Oh those two pirates!

Check out the wonderful collection of Pirate Lovin’ at IvyRoad’s  Treasury ! A list of awesome finds. I’m still pretty amazed at the talent that makes Etsy truely one of a kind community.  So proud that our boys made it to the list! THANKS IVY ROAD! Happy Friday!

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73730. Now that's one tough bird...



We were in Central Park a few weeks ago and we were sitting on the benches near Cleopatra's Needle. As we were sitting there a woodpecker flew down and landed on the monument. I didn't actually seem him peck at the granite but I had a vision of him pecking out elaborate hieroglyphics Woody-Woodpecker-style.

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73731. The Sketchbook Project 2011~ Halfway there!

The Sketchbook Project 2011

www.robertabaird.com

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73732. Wiccan And Spider-Ham

2 new sketch card commissions. Wiccan and Spider-Ham. First time drawing both characters.

Full Color Sketch Cards.

$10.00 + $2.00 shipping

$5.00 each additional character

Payment through Paypal only to eric@ericmerced.com

Please email me before making any payments to reserve your spot.

Once your spot is reserved, payment is due to secure the spot. 

 Please help spread the word on Facebook, Twitter and where ever else you are able to. It would greatly appreciate it. 

Posted via email from The Art of Eric Merced

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73733. Zombies!


Someone sent me the link to this anonymous proclamation of undying love; since it references zombies, the operative word would literally be "undying."

I got a big kick out of it, therefore, a quick sketch of the would-be-heroine was definitely in order this morning. Ka-POW!

3 Comments on Zombies!, last added: 9/13/2010
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73734. lawn mower of the stars

Yesterday my brother phoned to tell me he’d visited the British Lawn Mower Museum. He loved it, was the only one there, and described the ‘lawnmowers of the stars’ section which had lawnmowers belonging to celebrities. So I made this small story for him…


Filed under: flying, love, stars

1 Comments on lawn mower of the stars, last added: 9/11/2010
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73735. Skype School Visits

School Library Journal recently did a story called "An Author in Every Classrooom: Kids connecting with authors via Skype. It's the next best thing to being there." Kate Messner did a fantastic wrap-up of the trend more and more educators are taking advantage of as their schools become more comfortable with technology.
     I've personally done two Skype visits (read about them HERE and HERE) and really enjoyed them. No, you don't get the hugs. But you do get to connect with students you wouldn't be able to otherwise because of either budget constraints or pure geography.
     Virtual Visits are becoming more popular, and they're really not that hard to do. Read about my first virtual visit for tips. Or go to:

1 Comments on Skype School Visits, last added: 9/12/2010
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73736. "Banbury Cross"

"Ride a cock horse to Banbury Cross
To see a fine lady upon a white horse..."

New on the Etsy shop are prints of one of my favorite pieces, the pen and ink rendition of Banbury Cross. It is one of a series of black and white illustrations of nursery rhymes, all on a large scale and all of them luxuriant in detail.

In my first year of art studies our required course materials included a set of Staedtler or Ko-Hi-Noor Rapidograph pens. There were four in the box, the nibs ranging in size from 1.0mm to 0.13mm, along with little ink cartridges and a spare bottle of india ink for refills. I remember the transformative delight of trying them out for the first time - the glossy, silky flow of ink as I styled fine leaves, flowers, feathers, curlicues and twisting vines, smaller and smaller with the increasingly finer nibs. It seemed one could approach infinity with fine enough tools. The white of the paper behind the ink sparked like silver filigree and I fell in love with black and white work for quite some time. I still begin paintings by visualizing them in black and white values, and in every series of watercolour classes that I teach there is a lesson in grisaille painting.

The fall term for art classes (two courses at least, possibly four) begins next week so it is well and truly autumn at last. From my one pear tree I have picked bags and basketfuls of fruit to give away. I took one large and overflowing basket to church this week and left it on the narthex table - all gone in minutes at the end of service. The last batch, below, represents one more afternoon of baking and jam making before classes and other painterly obligations resume.

2 Comments on "Banbury Cross", last added: 9/11/2010
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73737.

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73738. Enchanted Reading Part 1.


I recently began reading Maria Tatar's "Enchanted Hunters" a facinating examination of the power of stories in childhood. I'm only about 1/3 of the way through but already feel my understanding of children's literature getting sharper.

So much of what Tatar covers in this book would seem obvious and yet it boggles my mind that no one has yet put it in such well crafted, straightforward, and comprehensive way as she does here. She discuss the evolution from familial hearth-oriented storytelling to bedtime reading to children, which on its own is an interesting topic. She makes many interesting points that in modern times, bedtime reading is essentially a conflict zone between parent and child (parent wanting child to go to sleep, child roused by the stories being told), rather than the sweet, nostalgic and idealized vision we have of story time being a period of quality bonding between parent and child. Beyond that, she also examines the irony between the origin of bedtime stories (many intended to frighten the child into obedience, i.e. The Sandman) and the modern genre of bedtime picture books aimed at lulling a child to sleep (in a word, BORING!).

She goes on to stress that many children will passively endure stories that end with "and now it's time for bed," but that what children really crave are stories of adventure, beauty, intrigue, and peril. It's so obvious to me now. Bedtime books exist because parents WILL buy them, NOT because children actually want to read them. This is the case for many genres of children's books. Up until now I had been feeling overwhelmed at the vastness of the field of kidlit, but now it's more apparent to me that within kidlit is an entire sub section of "adult kidlit", books supposedly aimed at children but actually created out of a nostaligia of an adult perspective on childhood, rather than one sincerely intended for childhood appeal.

This is the key to everything to me. I do NOT want to be a poser of a children's illustrator. I want to aspire to connect directly with children rather than some IDEA of what children should like. Think about it: as children, we are captivated by stories that give us that perfect balance of both beauty AND horror (traditional fairy tales, Wizard of Oz, Alice in Wonderland, Peter Pan, etc). I for one can absolutely remember the types of books I couldn't get enough of: ANYTHING by R.L. Stine!

I plowed through the Goosebump Series all through elementary school. I could not satiate my desire to live in a world where children were constantly at the mercy of their own courage to face dark and terrible things without the aid of adults. To little Courtney, that was as far from reality as it got! I was so close to my family and knew they'd always be there to save me, that the very thought of being alone drew me to those types of stories. I could escape into the pages of R.L. Stine and live in a world that horrified and mesmerized me, all from the comfort and safety of the living room couch.

Even as a child I remember being so THANKFUL that Mr. Stine was AWESOME enough to write those books for us kids---it was like he was saying to us. "Hey, you might be kids, but I know you can handle it." I respected him for respecting us. I didn't want boring, dumbed-down, cutesy and condescending stories---I wanted risk, and the promise that there was no promise of a happy ending. Because even at a young age, I knew that was the harshness of life.

Those early reading experiences were fundamental to me. They

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73739. EXPOSICIÓN: "El corazón de un pájaro" de Nereida Apaza

EL CORAZÓN DE UN PÁJARO

Hace mucho tiempo, porque mucho puede ser un segundo… encontré una pluma de pavo real en un libro de historia, lo que debe significar algo especial para quien se dé cuenta de ello, pude entonces descubrir los secretos de los libros que habitan mi casa.
Revisaba emocionada sus páginas, esperaba encontrar instantes de tiempo, aparecía entonces una carta, una hoja seca, un pedazo de tela, una estampilla de 1979... Todos esos objetos representan la memoria de algo que puedo intuir solamente. Ahora recojo hojas y las abrigo, dibujo cajas para almacenar voces agudas, el viento del sur, sombras de piedras, el reflejo de las estrellas, y para no olvidarlos construyo cuadernos, donde guardo instantes de vida. También me hago vestidos para encerrarme en ellos mientras me crece el pelo y fabrico máquinas para sentir más. (Nereida Apaza M.)



nereida apaza  corazon de un pajaro 2





PALABRA Y VISUALIDAD

El hilo, y la acción de hilar, contienen una calidad simbólica referida a una acción creativa y de vida. Presentes en muchos mitos, leyendas y cuentos, asociado con hadas y brujas (las parcas son hilanderas), pero también sirviendo de nexo o salvavidas, es uno de los símbolos más antiguos, asociado también al cabello. Indica conexión, sea cual sea el plano en el que aparezca: espiritual, biológico, social, etc., y tiene la virtud de ser identificado con estas instancias por la intuición inmediata.

Nereida Apaza ha encontrado en este elemento, el instrumento adecuado para emprender la expresión cabal de una larga travesía introspectiva.

Esos cabellos que parecen prolongarse al infinito, por momentos gobernando la itinerancia de sus personajes, o enredados y apelmazados en laberintos imposibles, como masas-obstáculo que forman una nube oscura, o metaforizados en los cordones que llevan la energía a sus máquinas imaginarias, como un cable a tierra entre la imaginación, el sueño y la realidad.

Hilo que domina y utiliza, a modo de lápiz o pincel, para ilustrar narraciones y espacios de la niñez, a la vez que asoman las nuevas instancias de enfrentar su condición de mujer.

Hasta aquí los elementos de la realización.

Dibujo, pintura y aguja que lleva el hilo. Coser y bordar. Afianzar y atrapar la imagen, encadenándola a la tela y fusionando lo entramado – complejo y casi oculto – con este lazo vital al que dirige y obliga.

Junto a las imágenes así delineadas, la palabra instala su peso, para que no haya duda sobre la significación deseada. Palabra y visualidad ejercidas con estructura poética. Porque también existe en toda esta construcción, un componente poético deseado, quizás el “corazón de un pájaro”.

Apaza acude a la palabra para completar el sentido, no como un adjetivo accesorio, sino como otro elemento constitutivo de cada una de las obras. Sea como título o como componente igualitario, el verbo aparece y se instala, también dibujado o bordado.

El resultado es un largo despliegue de un mundo íntimo. Un diario de la memoria recreada, presente en estos libros de artista que la autora desea compartir e invita a enriquecer.

Entre exorcismo y análisis conmovedor, oscila entre la crítica y un cierto reproche hacia lo real vivenciado. Sentimientos encontrados que buscan perpetuar, retener, guardar y, a la vez, abrir la puerta de la jaula y ofrecer su canto al aire.

Lima, agosto 2010 (ÉLIDA ROMÁN)








Exposición "El corazón de un pájaro"de Nereida Apaza
Galería del Centro Cultural Peruano Norteamericano de Arequipa (Melgar 109)
Pueden visitarlo de lunes a viernes: De 9:00 a 13:00 h. y de 15:30 h. a 19:30 h.
Sábados: De 9:00 h. a 13:00 en sala hasta fines de septiembre.
INGRESO LIBRE


Zulma Roque/Artista plástica
www.zulmaroque.blogspot.com
Puedes ver más información en:
nereida-apaza.blogspot.com
www.nereidaapaza.com

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73740. PIGEON PARTY! in FL & TX

With all of the excitement of the my upcoming Knuffle Bunny Free book tour and the Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical nationwide tour, I've neglected the Pigeon. And he's not happy about it.In October & November, Big Wooden Horse's production of Pigeon Party! will tour in Texas and Florida. The full schedule is here! (BWH is also touring Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! in the UK, but I

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73741. Enchanted Reading Part 1.


I recently began reading Maria Tatar's "Enchanted Hunters" a facinating examination of the power of stories in childhood. I'm only about 1/3 of the way through but already feel my understanding of children's literature getting sharper.

So much of what Tatar covers in this book would seem obvious and yet it boggles my mind that no one has yet put it in such well crafted, straightforward, and comprehensive way as she does here. She discuss the evolution from familial hearth-oriented storytelling to bedtime reading to children, which on its own is an interesting topic. She makes many interesting points that in modern times, bedtime reading is essentially a conflict zone between parent and child (parent wanting child to go to sleep, child roused by the stories being told), rather than the sweet, nostalgic and idealized vision we have of story time being a period of quality bonding between parent and child. Beyond that, she also examines the irony between the origin of bedtime stories (many intended to frighten the child into obedience, i.e. The Sandman) and the modern genre of bedtime picture books aimed at lulling a child to sleep (in a word, BORING!).

She goes on to stress that many children will passively endure stories that end with "and now it's time for bed," but that what children really crave are stories of adventure, beauty, intrigue, and peril. It's so obvious to me now. Bedtime books exist because parents WILL buy them, NOT because children actually want to read them. This is the case for many genres of children's books. Up until now I had been feeling overwhelmed at the vastness of the field of kidlit, but now it's more apparent to me that within kidlit is an entire sub section of "adult kidlit", books supposedly aimed at children but actually created out of a nostaligia of an adult perspective on childhood, rather than one sincerely intended for childhood appeal.

This is the key to everything to me. I do NOT want to be a poser of a children's illustrator. I want to aspire to connect directly with children rather than some IDEA of what children should like. Think about it: as children, we are captivated by stories that give us that perfect balance of both beauty AND horror (traditional fairy tales, Wizard of Oz, Alice in Wonderland, Peter Pan, etc). I for one can absolutely remember the types of books I couldn't get enough of: ANYTHING by R.L. Stine!

I plowed through the Goosebump Series all through elementary school. I could not satiate my desire to live in a world where children were constantly at the mercy of their own courage to face dark and terrible things without the aid of adults. To little Courtney, that was as far from reality as it got! I was so close to my family and knew they'd always be there to save me, that the very thought of being alone drew me to those types of stories. I could escape into the pages of R.L. Stine and live in a world that horrified and mesmerized me, all from the comfort and safety of the living room couch.

Even as a child I remember being so THANKFUL that Mr. Stine was AWESOME enough to write those books for us kids---it was like he was saying to us. "Hey, you might be kids, but I know you can handle it." I respected him for respecting us. I didn't want boring, dumbed-down, cutesy and condescending stories---I wanted risk, and the promise that there was no promise of a happy ending. Because even at a young age, I knew that was the harshness of life.

Those early reading experiences were fundamental to me. They

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73742. bit and run Volume Two, 6


Maybe you're something like me, maybe you played (and loved) Pokémon Red back in 1998 but maybe you fell out of the series for a while, and like me, have recently found your way back in the form of the recent HeartGold or SoulSilver. Probably not, you've played and caught them all, haven't you? See, I spent a long time being intimidated by the overwhelming amount of new Pokémon that came out every generation. Even so, for some reason back a couple months, out the blue, I picked up HG.

I've truly enjoyed my time with it, getting back in, and one of the things I've found that I still get a ton of enjoyment out of is the "_________ has learned a new move!" moment. Every time I feel really excited to try out the absurd and inevitably brutal new move. It's a violent world, Pokémon, but you know that neither we nor our beloved pocket monsters would have it any other way.



Previous,


bit and run Volume Two, 1
bit and run Volume Two, 2
bit and run Volume Two, 3
bit and run Volume Two, 4
bit and run Volume Two, 5+

bit and run Volume One

1 Comments on bit and run Volume Two, 6, last added: 9/10/2010
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73743. Oh, And One More Thing…

6. This Wallpaper

Anthropologie has the hottest book wallpaper… so in case you can’t get enough real books to stack, you can plaster your walls with Penguin paperbacks!!

Happy Friday, everyone…  I’m going to be artsy tonight with some gallery openings, then forgo the cool people at Fashion Week to get my nerd on at the Brooklyn Book Festival instead.  I love Fall!


Filed under: design finds Tagged: anthropologie, home design, paperbacks, penguin classics, penguin uk, wallpaper

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73744. Coffee and Books…

Two of my favorite things!

To quote Sam the Eagle: “If you are like me- and you certainly must be…” you like coffee and books.

 

This Saturday, the 11th of September, bewteen 9 and 11am- you will find coffee, and books,and me- all at Gold Bar Espresso in Tempe.

 

For address and directions check out www.goldbarespresso.com

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73745. "Printed books will never die!" Not so fast...

It's funny how the subject of eBooks rarely fails to spark a debate: will electronic reading devices ever replace good ol' fashioned paper and ink?

Most people I've heard would say no. Definitely no. Especially something like children's picture books, with their large, lush illustrations. People site a number of reasons why traditional books will last forever, but to be honest, so far, I'm not convinced. But I think I have a theory, at any rate, why so many people are skeptical.

Let's take cell phones. A mere 30 years ago, they looked like this:


Now, of course, they look like this:


That first phone could dial. The second phone can take pictures, video, surf the internet, play games, search the news, send email and just about anything else you can think of—including reading a book.

I've heard a number of times that there is more technology in a common laptop computer than was available to all of NASA when we put a man on the moon (and that was a mere 40 years ago). When you take a step back and look at the scope of human history, 30 or 40 years is a blip, a single Charmin commercial during an all-day "Dirty Jobs" Labor Day marathon on Discovery Channel.

Compare that to the invention of movable type, thought to have taken place in China around 1040 AD. The real revolution came along, however, in 1440 when Gutenberg came up with the first printing press (made with metal). Mass produced books didn't start cropping up until the early 1800s. Freya's cats—that's a span of nearly 800 years!

That's a long, long time. Time that let people get used to the idea, to let it soak in. (I wonder if people sat around thinking, "Printed books? Oh, no, I can't imagine giving up my papyrus scrolls.")

Actually, the history of the general public doubting the success of modern technology is as old as the written word itself. Stories abound of business luminaries who doubted a little thing like the "world wide web" would ever take off. From what I understand, people resisted the car when it was invented, much preferring to stick to their old reliable horse and buggies.

But over time, we get used to whatever it was, and now can't imagine living without it. What comes as alien to one generation becomes commonplace to each successive generation. My mother can't turn on a computer to save her life, but my four year old can surf the internet and play games on an iPad.

Although now, the technology is developing much, much faster—drastic changes are happening within a single generation. Which doesn't give us much time to get used to a new idea. And consider this: we're still only in the first stages of what e-readers can do. Going back to the whole cell phone analogy, that puts us roughly about here in the developmental time-line:

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73746. Being Seen

How many of us were not seen as children? Our parents were too busy with their own stuff to really see our talents, our gifts, or who we are. Maybe they had a tough life and were protecting us by thinking we needed to be something else. Some of us were lucky and had that blessing and may be thriving now with that support. But what if you’ve never felt that?

I wrote a book awhile back of children’s stories. One of them was called “The Hair Dog.” In the story, from a day of miracles a dog is made from a pile of dog hair. He spends most of the story quite invisible to his newfound family and maybe even a nuisance, until one day he meets the rest of his kind where he’s truly seen and appreciated. (See the book here.) At the time I wrote it I didn’t know it was coming from a deeper place inside of me. I just had a whimsical story to tell.

The other night I watched one of my favorite movies, Avatar. There’s the romantic love scene when Jake says, “I see you” to Neytiri. We’re blown away by this moment, and can literally feel the deep love he has for her pop off the screen. In healing circles we say “Namaste.” You acknowledge the light/soul you see in another. Empaths see the world at a deeper level. Once we get past our own sh*t, we are able to really see another and the love can feel intense. We see their light in spite of all the other “stuff” in the way. We may even want to run away from it, but we still feel it. Then we get frustrated and upset when they can’t really see us because of their stuff that gets in the way. We’ve been there, we know. You just hope they can get to the other side of it.

Emma Lou, my basset girl, is great at being seen. I could have used her talents growing up. She makes an entrance into the room and if you are too busy to see her, she firmly yet gently pushes your arm and hand onto her back. She knows and is unembarassed by needing to be seen.

I thought recently why I went into the work of animal communication. One of the big reasons was I felt the animals didn’t have a voice. They weren’t seen! I felt huge satisfaction when I could translate the animal’s needs and its life transformed positively.

Bottom line, I think that is what we are all looking for. We want to be deeply loved, honored and seen for who we are, and have it be more than enough. Not that is should be embellished, or changed, or molded, or be something else to please, or to have to compete with anyone else, but to bask in the feeling that we are, just as we are, bright little stars.

Maybe it is as simple as finally being seen by ourselves.  Seeing how deeply special each one of us is.

Namaste dear reader.


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73747. The First Annual Bugs and Bunnies Wonderful Weirdos of Literature Series

I hope you enjoyed Wonderful Weirdos Day yesterday. If you missed it, I don't think anyone would mind if you celebrated today. In fact, I think you could probably celebrate it anytime you wanted, Official Day or not. A true Weirdo doesn't give a fig for official-ness, or expected-ness, or usual-ness. A true Weirdo laughs in the face of Convention, thumbs her (or his) nose at Normal, and dares to be Different.


Two of my favorite Weirdos. They're different. And they're proud of it.


But, it is a process. Weirdos don't attain the joy and freedom of self-acceptance without trials, tribulations, spiritual journeys...and finally, laughter. Lots and lots of laughter - the happy kind, the silly kind, the oh-I'm-so-relieved-you-get-me kind. It feels good to find yourself; to realize that all those things about you that you thought were odd, or stupid, or dumb, or weird? Aren't. They may be different, those things. They may be a little out there. But they're You. And you have friends and family who love you because of your quirks - not in spite of them.

Remember Merriam-Webster's definition of weirdo? "A person who is extraordinarily strange or eccentric." There is a wide range of Weird in this world. Some of us are more so than others. We Weirdos may be different, but always remember: we are extraordinarily so.

- - -

And now, in honor of all the Wonderful Weirdos among us, I am pleased to announce the First Annual Bugs and Bunnies Wonderful Weirdos of Literature Series. Every Friday in September, I'll be posting a round-up of kids' books that I just love, with characters who are, well, characters. You know: the misunderstood, the eccentric, the quirky, the unique, the weird, the wacky.

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73748. Rachel Awes

Do you ever see something that you just love, love? I did and wanted to share...



this artwork is by Rachel Awes...just great. Check out her blog All I Did Was Listen and her Etsy shop for more great art.







Total Fact Randomness...The name Crayola was coined by Alice Binney, wife of company founder
Edwin, and a former school teacher. She combined the words craie, which
is French for chalk, and ola, for oleaginous, because crayons are made
from petroleum based paraffin.


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73749. The Sketchbook Project 2011~ Halfway there!

The Sketchbook Project 2011

www.robertabaird.com

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73750. launching a new comic



Hats off to my studio mate Ellen Lindner, Maartje Schalkx and lots of other very helpful people for putting on a terrific launch party in Hoxton last night for Issue No.5 of Whores of Mensa. Despite its name (which makes it somewhat difficult to rave about on a children's book illustrator's blog), it's full of great comics by Ellen, me, Patrice Aggs, Maartje Schalkx, Tanya Meditsky, Cliodhna Lyons, Francesca Cassavetti, Jeremy Day, Emily Ryan Lerner, Peter Lally, RIchard Cowdry and Howard John Arey. Click over to its website for artists' links.)

There was a lot of running around and last minute cupcake icing before people arrived (that's Jeremy Day in the background setting up the comics table). But I couldn't help grinning like a maniac everytime I'd overhear Peter Lally carrying on a very wandering philosophical phone conversation while ironing artwork onto the WoM t-shirts.



And we had an excellent DJ, one Reginald Frothy. (Thank you, Reginald!) I didn't manage to take many photos, please leave a comment with links if you took any pics, I'd love to link them in!) And if you haven't seen it already, be sure to watch Tony Miles' and Ellen Lindner's excellent promo video over on the Kickstarter page. Thanks so much, Maartje, for hosting!


DJ Reginald Frothy, at your service

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