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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: California, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 82
1. Camarillo Hosts 5th Annual World Multicultural BookFest

The Fifth Annual Multicultural World BookFest will be held at the Camarillo Community Center on Saturday, November 1, 2014 from 10am-3pm.
I’ve been selected as one of the children’s book authors to present at the event at 11:00 AM, followed by book signings and readings.

• We will have six storytents representing: Asia; Africa; Latin America, North America, Europe, and Australia & New Zealand.

Location: Camarillo Community Center 1605 E. Burnley Street.
Take the 101fwy exit at Carmen Drive. Going north turn right @ light. Going south make 2 left turns; go over fwy. Continue on Carmen past City Hall to 4 way stop which is Burnley. Turn right then left into parking lot. Event will be inside the gated Community Center Room

Please join us for a day of books, readings, food trucks, fun and culture.

Hope to see you there!

Tonia Allen Gould/Author
Samuel T. Moore of Corte Magore

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2. Catching Up with Blogging

peggy sue diner

We ain’t afraid of no dinosaur!

I realized that I have not posted in a while. With all the shows I have been traveling to, I barely had time to keep up with my blog. Since I have posted, I was writing about the Wild West Fest at the Calico Ghost Town in Yermo, California. All around it was a fun show; we stayed with my in-laws at a nice hotel in Barstow for the weekend of the show. It was also my birthday so we all went out to eat the legendary Peggy Sue’s Diner on Sunday night.

Then it was off to Seattle again for Emerald City Comicon.  It was an amazing show, with wonderful people. I have to give a big thank you to Sarah for the help at my booth (allowing me a few moments of rest to stretch my legs). The atmosphere was electric and everyone has my gratitude for making me feel so welcome up there. One of these days I will get Shawn up there so that I can leave him at the booth and go explore the city hehehe.

But that will only happen if the infamous Monsterpalooza does not fall on the same weekend as ECCC, like it did this year. Here is Shawn to tell you more. Shawn here and I have three words: It… was… awesome! I had a great time, though I wished Diana was there so that I could have walked around to check out more things. Oh well, there is always next year. All the fans were amazing and thank you to everyone for supporting Diana. Now back to your regularly scheduled programming.

Beware the Gotham Bunnies

Beware the Gotham Bunnies

Thank you Shawn, so following those two shows was Wondercon. Oh how I love this show and it is one of my favorites. Not only did I get to see all my regular fans from SoCal, but Shawn being there allowed me to leave my booth from time to time to browse the artist alley. I got to catch up with some friends and meet some amazing artist for the first time. This was also the debut of my latest in the Terrible Trio series… the Gotham Bunnies, so cute, yet so evil.

Then I had a rare weekend off, and then it was time to get ready for Texas Frightmare Weekend. I was excited as I had never been to Dallas-Fort Worth, so this was a great opportunity to reach a new fan base. After a less than sterling start of the day (looking at you American Airlines) I made it to the show with only a half hour to set up. But after that it was one of the best weekends I have ever had at a show. It was intense, amazing, overwhelming at times and I can’t wait to go back next year. I may even bring Shawn along for this trip, I think he would enjoy the show very much.

Back to Southern California the following week for the Bat’s Day in the Park Black Market. This is always a fun show to do where I tend to pick up some great little pieces. It is only a one day show, so a bit more laid back and relaxing compared to the multi-day shows. Though being so close to Disney makes me want to go buy a ticket and go on some rides.

Finally last but not least was another trip up to Seattle (seriously, maybe I need to rent a room out there) for Crypticon. This was a great little horror convention with some pretty cool guests. I am starting to recognize a few people that have seen me at some of the area shows and meet some new fans. Thanks once again to Tamara of The Mystical Apothecary for being my traveling buddy once again.

Whoa, I was a bit more behind on this blog than I realized. Mid year resolution, I shall be better about updating my blog in a more timely manner. I have four more shows to do before I take some time off to do some more art and work on some upcoming projects, one of which is a book.

Keep on creating and have fun–

Diana

The post Catching Up with Blogging appeared first on Diana Levin Art.

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3. Seen from a Cafe

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Tagged: Allen Capoferri, America, Art, California, Illustration, people sketches, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing, USA

5 Comments on Seen from a Cafe, last added: 5/31/2014
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4. Chicanonautica: Voyage to a Day of Latino Science Fiction




The one-hour hop from Phoenix Sky Harbor to Ontario International Airport is always sci-fi. The landscape from Arizona to California is mostly naked desert with scattered signs of civilization, like a colonized Mars. Could my character, Paco Cohen, Mariachi of Mars, be down there? I really have to finish that novel . . .

The fabled Santa Ana winds were kicking up dust storms around the airport as we landed. Didn’t I just leave Arizona? Later I heard that the wind flipped a big-rig truck on the freeway.

Suddenly, I was in the Mission Inn in Riverside, a Mexicorama-looking hotel consisting of improvisations on Spanish colonial roots. It’s a cluster of ornate bell towers, festooned with flowers,  ancient Mexican cannons, and squawking caged parrots. There are also supposed to be ghosts. I felt like I was in steampunk alternate universe, waiting for the next Zeppelin to Tenochtitlán. 

All for a Day of Latino Science Fiction.


The hotel had cable, which I’ve been unplugged from for a few years. I channel surfed for signs of  Nueva California Latina. The news looked like it was from another world -- Planet L.A. -- of and about Hollywood androids -- a lot of them still bleach-blondes, but more leaning toward a white-washed version of the Post-Racial America delusion. They reported the NBA firing Donald Sterling for racist comments as if it were a moon landing.


Reality is hard to grasp in California -- often folks have to settle for some kind of kinky sci-fi.

I was relieved when Rudy Ch. Garcia called. He and Mario Acevedo were in a bar down the street. Soon the cerveza and nachos rituals were running full blast, especially when Michael Sedano joined us. That, along with the breakfast the next morning with Jesús Treviño got us loosened up and ready for the panels.


The University of California Riverside is the fifth most diverse campus in the U.S.A. Lots of Latinos, blacks, Asians. This was the Nueva California I was expecting. The audience for the panels were just as diverse. They were also lively and responsive.

On young woman asked if there are any traditions for writing Latino science fiction. I told her that no, it was all too new. It’s up to you to create Latino science fiction, kids.

Rosaura Sanchez and Beatrice Pita, authors of Lunar Braceros 2125-2148 joined us, saving this from looking like an all-boys club. Once again, I’d love to hear from Latinas who are writing science fiction, fantasy, or just far-out fantastico stuff.


I met science fiction writer Nalo Hopkinson, and fellow Mothership:Tales from Afrofutuism and Beyond author Jaymee Goh, and had her sign my copy.

In the afternoon the subject was shifted to media in honor of Jesús Treviño donating his annotated scripts for episodes of Star Trek and Babylon 5 he directed to the university.

As with writing, Latino science fiction in the media is just beginning.

Trailers for two the web mini-series Lost Angeles Ward and Generation Last showed racial conflict in futuristic context and an ecological apocalypse that was shot in Mexico. Both took issues on directly rather than created escapist fantasies. 

One difference between Anglo and Latino science fiction is that making it to the future is something that can’t be ignored. The future isn’t a given, it will have to be fought for. And if you don’t fight for it, you might not get there.

Science fiction can be a strategy for survival. When the going gets tough, release that incredible rasquache/mestizo imagination.


Even silly mid-century movies like Santo Contra Los Marcianos and El Planeta de las Mujeres Invasoras are about surviving in the Atomic Age. How are we going to survive in the Information Age?

A grad student mentioned “future-oriented cognitive estrangement” when dropped into a strange, new reality. We need more visions of more futures. That’s futures, plural. Let the Others in, see from their points-of-view.

Latino science fiction can lead us to this -- and beyond.

Yeah, this one-day event was more productive than a lot of three-day conventions that I’ve been to.

And it was well worth revisiting California, that is still like a surreal, artificial construct designed by Frank Zappa and Philip K. Dick, though now Tezcatlipoca seems to be directing.


Ernest Hogan is juggling crazy projects, and reserializing Brainpan Fallout at Mondo Ernesto.

0 Comments on Chicanonautica: Voyage to a Day of Latino Science Fiction as of 5/15/2014 2:16:00 AM
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5. Today

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Tagged: Allen Capoferri, America, Beach, California, International, Nature, Ocean, Photography, USA

6 Comments on Today, last added: 5/4/2014
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6. Perspective

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This place is just up the street from me, so I wondered why I hadn’t gone more often. I thought I’d have to take a breather a couple of times when I was walking uphill, I’m no spring chicken. When I started I realized I’d guessed right. When I arrived I saw I didn’t remember it this way. I didn’t remember this view here too. It was much better. I’m glad I came and glad I walked this time instead of driving. I guess working to get there gave me some perspective to appreciate it more.


Tagged: About Me, Allen Capoferri, Beach, California, International, Nature, Ocean

7 Comments on Perspective, last added: 4/12/2014
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7. high chaparral

HC

HC1 Anytime I can find a moment to draw is a good one. Here I had a moment to draw the houses perched on the overlooking California hills before my class. As I was drawing, the title of this post came to mind, albeit misspelled on the top image here. Funny how this terminology, here from a TV western remembered from childhood, comes back with a little more significance.


Tagged: Allen Capoferri, America, Art, California, chaparral, Illustration, International, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing, USA

9 Comments on high chaparral, last added: 3/23/2014
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8. 496 Million Women

496 million. That’s how many women in the world can’t read or write even the most simple sentence. Many women never have the opportunity to reach 6th grade, and some don’t get to go to school at all.

Today, we join citizens around the world in celebrating International Women’s Day, and I want to share the stories of Dinah Mwangi and Katie Hendricks, two special women whose lives exemplify the theme of this year’s celebration, “Equality for Women is Progress for All.”

Dinah MwangiDinah makes progress for all in Nairobi, Kenya. While waiting in line at a carwash, Dinah noticed two young boys straining to see what she was reading – a children’s book she had purchased for her niece. When she asked if they would like to join her, the boys lit up.

They read, and laughed and shared stories with Dinah. Then they told her they had no books of their own.

Dinah started buying books with her own salary and recruited volunteers to read and distribute them to kids each Saturday. In less than three months, she had over 500 kids participating. Now she’s pursuing relationships with Kenyan publishers, corporations and funders in order to expand her reach and deepen her impact.

On the other side of the world, Katie makes progress for all by helping girls from low-income families in California’s East Bay bridge the gap between school and home.

Photo from girlsinc-alameda.orgAs a young teacher, Katie yearned to improve all aspects of her students’ lives, inside and outside the classroom. Her holistic approach led her to create Girls Inc. of Alameda County, a program that inspires girls to be strong, smart and bold. Katie and her team reinforce what their girls learn at school, help them become fluent English speakers, provide them with healthy meals and expose them to subjects girls aren’t always encouraged to study, like science, technology and athletics.

By improving the lives of girls in California’s East Bay, Katie also improves the lives of their family members, teachers, friends and classmates.

Dinah and Katie represent what’s possible when women have the education, resources and motivation to make progress for all. Their immediate impact on the kids they serve is immense. Equally powerful, however, is how their spirit and service ripple through entire communities, transform lives and change the future.

In addition to celebrating heroic women like Dinah and Katie, I invite you to join me in recommitting ourselves to becoming a powerful force for equality.

The gender gap has closed significantly over the past few decades, but we still have a long way to go. In some countries, less than a quarter of women finish primary school; 496 million women around the world cannot read or write a simple sentence; and globally, women only reach 93 percent of men’s educational attainment.

I believe the path to equality is through access to quality education. That’s why First Book is equipping educators like Dinah and Katie with brand-new books and resources for the kids they serve, expanding our network to reach women and girls around the globe and lifting up the voices of an unprecedented community of individuals serving children at the base of the economic pyramid.

Please consider a gift to First Book today. Together, we can support the work of heroic women like Dinah and Katie around the world.

The post 496 Million Women appeared first on First Book Blog.

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9. Water from the Moon

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Tagged: Allen Capoferri, Beach, California, dreamy landscape, Ocean, Photography, USA

10 Comments on Water from the Moon, last added: 2/18/2014
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10. Motel California

motelDone in my car after having my brown-bagged lunch. I couldn’t resist the view, it seemed it was from another time in America.


Tagged: About Me, Allen Capoferri, Art, California, Commentary, Eagles, Hotel, Illustration, Motel, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing

11 Comments on Motel California, last added: 1/15/2014
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11. Home by the Sea

beachrentalTook a moment from my class to sketch. Hope you like the title…it’s one of my favorites from Genesis.


Tagged: About Me, Allen Capoferri, America, Art, Beach, California, Genesis, Illustration, International, Ocean, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing

10 Comments on Home by the Sea, last added: 12/12/2013
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12. The Seven Caves & Other Spine-tingling Short Stories

 

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The Seven Caves

Lucia is a small seaside town perched on the cliffs of central California. Discovered by Don Gaspar de Portola and his soldiers late in the 18th century, the town is named after the day of its discovery––December 14, Santa Lucia Day.

On a day not too long ago, a local caretaker of an estate just to the south of Lucia, known only as Point 16, received a visitor. The stranger said he was from The Vatican and inquired as to seven caves that The Vatican had listed in its archives from the manifest of the town’s discovery centuries ago. As he further stated that the caves were sure to be located off the coast of Point 16, the caretaker dismissed the man’s strange way of talking but became obsessed by his manner of dress which included a spectacular sword with rubies inlaid in its handle.

The caretaker scratched his head. He’d kayaked up to the caves a time or two and had paddled inside a little ways. The only person the caretaker knew that ever sailed inside the caves any distance at all, and at that only a quarter of a mile, was long dead. Rumor was that the seven caves all met up in the very center of The Santa Lucia Mountains. The mysterious visitor surprised the caretaker when he knew that the caves were the color of blood and shocked him when he spoke of a great temple with treasure inside.

The caretaker told the stranger that the caves were real enough, but that no one he knew had ever been able to sail deep into the caves to discover any temples or treasure.

The stranger thanked the caretaker and went on his way. The caretaker, uneasy about the stranger, decided to follow. The stranger rode his horse to the beach beside the caves and climbed into a simple dugout canoe. Primitive by any standards. Its oars like branches.

The stranger paddled and paddled. The caretaker could only watch from shore. As the surf drew out to sea more of the cave entrances became exposed. When the great swells crashed into the cliffs the waves churned powerfully in the caves and splashed back out to the open sea. Yet, the stranger didn’t veer from his course, one that would soon place him inside the nearest cave.

The caretaker began to sweat. The stranger had paddled his small canoe in an angry sea yet his navigation, indeed the boat itself, seemed unaffected by it. The caretaker searched the coast close by for a kayak sometimes hidden in the brush by the owner of Point 16.

He longed to paddle into the caves. Make that discovery. For, he knew the sea better than most around these parts. Certainly, he would be able to keep up with the stranger. As luck would have it, he found an abandoned canoe. And so he too paddled out to sea.

The sun disappeared behind a cloud and the chill of the fog invaded the caretaker’s bones. A great cloud river of fog moved from north to south over the Pacific, inching to shore. Upon a great break of an early evening wave the stranger disappeared into the first cave.

The caretaker followed.

The next thing the caretaker remembered was fading in and out of consciousness as Search and Rescue revived him. The caretaker asked about the stranger but was told no other body and no other boat was found, not unusual in the rugged depths of the central coast.

The caretaker’s dreams were filled with the stranger and endless trips into the caves, alive with treasure.

 

When the caretaker came to he was quite inconsolable. Gone mad with a fear of the sea. He tossed back and forth in the sandy soil trying to get away from those that had saved him when he spotted the stranger’s sword, stuck in the sagebrush. The caretaker wrapped his hands around the rubies and pulled the sword out of the brush. Don Gaspar de Portola was engraved in the silver blade, dripping with blood.

 

Get the anthology free for The Nook here.

Happy Halloween!

 

 


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13. 21

21 by 9567
21, a photo by 9567 on Flickr.

Tagged: America, California, California Landscape Painting, Nature, Ocean, Photography, USA

10 Comments on 21, last added: 10/25/2013
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14. Haloween

Haloween1

I was in town watching people and drawing in my sketchbook. I realized I needed spellcheck.


Tagged: About Me, America, Art, California, Humor, Illustration, people sketches, quick sketch, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing

10 Comments on Haloween, last added: 10/6/2013
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15. Haloween

Haloween1

I was in town watching people and drawing in my sketchbook. I realized I needed spellcheck.


Tagged: About Me, Allen Capoferri, America, Art, California, Humor, Illustration, people sketches, quick sketch, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing

0 Comments on Haloween as of 10/7/2013 7:20:00 AM
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16. My Pretty Excellent Adventure

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SB3


Tagged: About Me, America, Beach, California, Fatherhood, International, Nature, Ocean, USA

11 Comments on My Pretty Excellent Adventure, last added: 9/16/2013
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17. At the Market

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Tagged: Art, Beach, California, character design, Humor, Illustration, quick sketch, sketchbook

11 Comments on At the Market, last added: 9/8/2013
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18. New Morning

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Tagged: America, California, Ocean, Photography, USA

10 Comments on New Morning, last added: 1/4/2013
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19. The Winetaster

winetaster by 9567
winetaster, a photo by 9567 on Flickr.

Tagged: Allen Capoferri, Art, California, character design, Commentary, Funny, Humor, people sketches, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing, USA, Wine

11 Comments on The Winetaster, last added: 5/20/2012
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20. Success Stories: Fairy Tales & the Crack Epidemic

Today’s guest blog post is by Teneasha Pierson. Teneasha is a proud alum of Howard University and has recently accepted an invitation to serve as a Health Education volunteer with the Peace Corps in Kenya. Find out more at www.teneashapierson.com.

At six years old, I was the princess of a magic kingdom eponymously named “Teneashaland”. I started my day greeting animals while skipping through the glittery, hot pink paths of the forest. I feasted on cotton candy plucked from the sky, and after a full day of presiding over my kingdom, I slept on a super-sized pillow made of the super soft fluff that fills teddy bears.

Teneasha Pierson

I loved fairy tales. Fairy tales taught me that I could overcome. They taught me that strength of character was a critical factor in my success. Most importantly, they gave me hope that my potential was not limited by my environment or my lack of possessions.

This lesson was priceless and changed the trajectory of my life.

I grew up in Oakland, CA in the eighties when Oakland transitioned from the progressive home of the Black Panthers to a major hub of the crack epidemic. My neighborhood unraveled quickly.

Despite my circumstances, education was always presented as a way to avoid the pitfalls of my community. In my home and in my neighborhood my love of reading was nurtured. I wore wire-framed glasses very similar to Simon the Chipmunk and was equipped with a backpack filled with the greats: Dr. Seuss and a selection of the Disney classics, among others. I was a princess in my mind and in my community I was considered a scholar.

As I grew older, I hung up my tiara but I held tightly to the contents of my backpack.

Education and reading has made good on every promise it made. I was the first college graduate from my family and my community. I have had the opportunity to work in the fields of public policy, public health, intellectual property law and I will soon have the opportunity to serve in Kenya with the Peace Corps.

Books can change lives and inspire hope. I am proof of that.

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21. A Visual Tour of beautiful Los Feliz and Silverlake.

A couple of months ago, Diego Vivanco asked me via a lovely friend we have in common, Leo Sanchez, if he could come over to L.A all the way from Spain, to film me sketching around Los Feliz and Silverlake for few days.
'Oui!' ('Yes!') I replied. He jumped in the first plane available, with only his camera and a toothbrush in his bag, and the adventure started as soon as he landed in L.A.
Here's what Diego and Ian clark at Kauri Multimedia, along with a great musician in London, made out of all the material gathered over a couple of days in this lovely neighborhood.
I truly enjoyed working with Diego, he did a brilliant job, and so did Ian and the musician (I do not know his name, yet, unfortunately).
You can watch it in HD here, or embedded below.


Sketch! A Visual Tour of Silver Lake and Los Feliz from Kauri Multimedia on Vimeo.

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22. Big Sky Country and Beautiful Blogger Award Nomination

This photograph taken some time ago I felt deserved a second look.

Also..I’d like to acknowledge a nomination for the Beautiful Blogger Award. I’m deeply honored by the nomination because it comes from someone who’s photography and intelligently sensitive writings about photography and art set him way above the pack. Here’s a link to Munchow’s Creative Photo Blog. It’s well worth checking out.


Tagged: America, California, Photography, USA

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23. Moby Dick

Surreal by 9567
Surreal, a photo by 9567 on Flickr.

Taken during my morning walk.

Yesterday I had 50 minutes to kill so I went to the nearest beach. I looked out to the ocean and saw a whale leaping out of the ocean, blowing it’s spout, flipping it’s tail and flippers alternately. It’s flipper was nearly all white, brought to mind Moby Dick. I noticed people had gathered on balconies and at the far end of the pier to watch. Someone who’d been watching too stopped to talk to me. He said he’s been living here all his life and had never seen one so close before.


Tagged: America, Aquatic Life, California, Ocean, USA, Whale

10 Comments on Moby Dick, last added: 9/8/2012
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24. At the Art Sale…It’s Crowded

At the Art Sale...It's Crowded by 9567
At the Art Sale…It’s Crowded, a photo by 9567 on Flickr.

I realized I haven’t posted for some time. I wanted to let people know I’m alright despite the necessity of my energy being directed to less than positive things.

Anyway above is a moment I was able to get away and do what I love to do.


Tagged: America, Art, California, character design, Illustration, people sketches, quick sketch, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing, USA

10 Comments on At the Art Sale…It’s Crowded, last added: 9/20/2012
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25. Q&A with Kathleen Rietz, illustrator of Desert Baths

……………………… Kathleen Rietz Illustrator, Desert Baths with author Darcy Pattison ……………….. Please welcome to Kid Lit Reviews a prolific children’s book illustrator and fine artist Kathleen Rietz. She is here to chat with us about herself and her new book with Darcy Pattison titled Desert Baths. Hi, Kathleen, let’s start off with what first interested [...]

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