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1. Want to Put an End to Name Calling ? Never Say a Mean Word Again

Inspired by a medieval legend about the Jewish poet Samuel Ha-Nagid, “never say a Mean Word Again” by Jacqueline Jules, and Durga Yael Bernhard, is a wonderfully crafted story about two little boys, one Jewish and one Muslim, who try to settle their differences.

Never Say a Mean Word again

This light-hearted look at a very serious problem of name calling. After a series of accidental events, Hamza (the muslim boy), calls Saumuel, (the jewish boy) some very unkind names.

Samuel’s father, the grand vizier, noticed this and mentioned that Hama said some very unkind things. Samuel wanted his father to punish Hamza but the wise Vizier said, “No, I’ll let you punish him yourself. Make sure he never says a mean word to you again.”

As Samuel laid in his bed he thought of several very unkind things he could do to Hamza to punish him for his unkind words.

Settling on one punishment in particular, Samuel arrives at Hamza’s door with a lemon. Mahza thinking Samuel had come to help clean his shirt clearly stated that the lemon wouldn’t help so they ended up playing catch with it instead.

The next day Samuel arrived at Hamza’s house with a pen and paper. He would make him write a formal apology then he would have something to show his father the Vizier. But then they just ended up coloring instead.

Day after day this continued. Each time Samuel thought up a “new punishment”, the ended up playing together. This created a great dilemma for Samuel. What was he going to do to show his father that he had punished Hamza and that he would never say a mean word to him again ?

The entire story as well as the ending of this book is completely charming and engaging on many levels. The art is beautiful and deepens the story with it’s beautiful colors. The print is big and easy to follow and the whole feel of the book is welcoming. The best thing of this book is it’s message. Though the intention to do something unkind to Hamza to return his unkindness was clearly there, Hamza never say any unkindness coming towards him. He only say a new friend instead. It is a beautiful story of conflict resolution perfectly told. This book is out on the coffee table where it is picked up often by family and visitors alike. I’m so glad this book exist. It is an invaluable tool to teaching children how to deal with conflict in kind ways.

Never Say a Mean Word again

Something to Do:

The problem starts when Hamza views Samuel’s clumsy actions as mean intended. So to return Samuel’s unkindness, Hamza calls him mean names. Samuel then feels its his turn to show unkindness but it always unfolds into kindness. How can we do this in our own lives? How can we turn unkindness into kindness.

Let’s start with the way we speak. Here’s a few nice things to say to people whenever you should encounter them.

  • Hi my name is______ what’s yours?
  • Can I help you?
  • What’s your favorite color?
  • Say thank-you
  • I’m sorry.
  • I forgive you
  • Please
  • I’m glad you’re my friend.
  • You’re awesome
  • I like you
  • That’s Incredible !!
  • Want to play?
  • Want to play: Charades, hop scotch,board game, cards, Hide & Seek, Simon Says, 20 questions, I spy, Catch?
  • Awesome

Along with kind words, we can also choose not to view someone’s unkindness as unkindness but an invitation to play. If someone should say something unkind, compliment them on something and then include them in an activity.

Please note that I’m referring to simple childhood disagreements and not full on bullying which is a much bigger problem and is dealt with differently. It’s my hope that simple kind actions when children are small will provide them with the tools they need to deal with conflicts in a kind way as they grow as opposed to aggression.

Along the same lines of this whole post is a free gift I would like to offer my readers! “Conditions of the Heart” is a FREE kids activity book filled with fun activities & crafts that teaches values and conduct. Grab your copy HERE:

Conditions of the Heart

Need gift ideas for Christmas? Give the gift of education and guidance with Donna Ashton’s The Waldorf Homeschool Handbook Now available through Audrey Press Books!

The Waldorf Homeschool Handbook

 

The post Want to Put an End to Name Calling ? Never Say a Mean Word Again appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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2. We Like What We Like

When he was little, one of my husband’s favorite Christmas movies was “Santa Claus Conquers the Martians.” I laughed out loud the first time he told me the title, sure he was making it up. But no, it’s a real movie starring a young Pia Zadora as a martian child. The acting is terrible, the […]

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3. The Paper Cowboy

Levine, Kristin. 2014. The Paper Cowboy. New York: Putnam.

In the seemingly idyllic, 1950s, town of Downers Grove, Illinois, handsome and popular 12-year-old Tommy Roberts appears to be a typical kid.  He lives with his parents, older sister Mary Lou, younger sisters Pinky and Susie, and a devoted family dog. He and his older sister attend Catholic school, his father works for Western Electric, and his mother stays at home with the younger girls.

Amidst the backdrop of the Red Scare and McCarthyism, Tommy's discovery of a Communist newspaper in the town's paper drive truck, and a horrific burn accident to Mary Lou, begin a chain of events that uncovers secrets, truths, and lies in his small town populated with many Eastern European immigrants.

Perhaps the biggest lie is Tommy's own life.  Though he never gets caught, Tommy is a bully, picking on kids at school, especially Little Skinny. When he plants the Communist newspaper in a store owned by Little Skinny's immigrant father, he's gone too far - and he knows it.  Now it's time to act like his cowboy hero, The Lone Ranger, and make everything right, but where can he turn for help?  His mother is "moody" and beats him relentlessly while his father turns a blind eye. His older sister will be hospitalized for months. He has his chores and schoolwork to do, and Mary Lou's paper route, and if Mom's in a mood, he's caretaker for Pinky and Susie as well.

It's hard to understand a bully, even harder to like one, but readers will come to understand Tommy and root for redemption for him and his family.  He will find help where he least expects it.

     I couldn't tell Mrs. Glazov about the dinner party. Or planting the paper.  But maybe I could tell her about taking the candy.  Maybe that would help.  "There's this boy at school, I said slowly, "Little Skinny."
.....
     "I didn't like him.  I don't like him.  Sometimes, Eddie and I and the choirboys, we tease him."
     "Ahh," she said again.  "He laugh too?"
     I shook my head.  I knew what Mary Lou would say.  Shame on you, Tommy! Picking on that poor boy.  And now she would have scars just like him.  How would I feel if someone picked on her?
     "What did you do?" Mrs. Glazov asked, her voice soft, like a priest at confession.  It surprised me. I'd never heard her sound so gentle.
     "I took some candy from him," I admitted.
     "You stole it."
     I shrugged.
     "Ahh."
     "It's not my fault! If Mary Lou had been there, I never would have done it!"
     Mrs. Glazov laughed.  "You don't need sister.  You need conscience."
     I had the horrible feeling that she was right.  I wasn't a cowboy at all. I was an outlaw.
Author Kristin Levine gives credit to her father and many 1950s residents of Downers Grove who shared their personal stories with her for The Paper Cowboy. Armed with their honesty and openness, she has crafted an intensely personal story that accurately reflects the mores of the 1950s.  We seldom have the opportunity (or the desire) to know everything that goes on behind the doors of our neighbors' houses.  Levine opens the doors of Downers Grove to reveal alcoholism, mental illness, abuse, disease, sorrow, and loneliness. It is this stark realism that makes the conclusion so satisfying.  This is not a breezy read with a tidy and miraculous wrap-up.  It is instead, a tribute to community, to ordinary people faced with extraordinary problems, to the human ability to survive and overcome and change.

Give this book to your good readers - the ones who want a book to stay with them a while after they've finished it.


Kristin Levine is also the author of The Lions of Little Rock (2012, Putnam) which I reviewed here.

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4. Days of Blood & Starlight Book Review

Title: Days of Blood & Starlight Author: Laini Taylor Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers Publication Date: November 6, 2012 ISBN-13: 978-0316133975 528 pp. Reading copy via public library I didn't do a review for the first book in this series, Daughter of Smoke and Bone, which introduces the reader to Karou. Karou is an art student in Prague. She has blue hair and portfolios

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5. Book Review: To All the Boys I've Loved Before by Jenny Han

Book: To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before
Author: Jenny Han
Published: 2014
Source: Local Library

Lara Jean Song has loved many boys, but never one who’s loved her back. She formed a habit of writing a goodbye letter to each boy and hiding it in her treasured hatbox as she gets over them.

Suddenly the letters disappear, sent out to the boys who were never supposed to see them. Lara Jean finds herself facing the consequences of her own emotions for the first time.

The most horrifying consequence is that one of the letters went out to Josh, her next-door neighbor, and also her big sister’s recent ex. Desperate to stop him from thinking she still likes him (although she sort of does), she begs one of the other crushes, Peter, to pretend to be her boyfriend. He’s amenable because he’s trying to make an ex jealous. They embark on a fake relationship, but as it goes on, Lara Jean gets more and more mixed up about what she wants. Is it Josh? Or Peter? Or neither?

It’s everyone’s worst nightmare - your old crushes suddenly discovering the feelings you hid so deeply! Okay, not the worst nightmare. Zombies and public nudity are probably worse, but this is right up there. Han explores this situation by having Lara Jean encounter all her old crushes again in the course of trying to get the letters back. Some are great, some are horrifying, some are, “What did I ever see in him?!”

Lara Jean starts off the book childish and impulsive, almost slappably so. But as the story goes on, you can see her maturing. Is this because she’s having to face the consequences of the letters? She always crushed on boys silently before, never giving any indication of her feelings. Is it because she is having to step into her older sister’s Margot’s place as the caretaker of the family, or possibly coming out from under Margot’s shadow? Is it because she gets the opportunity to see how she herself has changed over the years, through the lens of the boys she once crushed on? For me, it was a mixture of all those things.

I was a little disappointed in the end because it left us dangling as to the resolution of Peter and Lara Jean’s story. Although Lara Jean had made a decision, we didn’t get to see the effects of it. Luckily, according to the author’s blog, there will be a second book called P.S. I Still Love You due out in the spring.

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6. KidLit Book Review - Ashlynn's Dreams by Julie C. Gilbert

   

Ashlynn’s Dreams
Written by Julie C. Gilbert


Julie C. Gilbert has created and delivered a fantasy adventure like no other. From the onset the reader is immersed into Jillian Blairington’s world told from the perspective of those closest to her as well as Jillian’s inner most thoughts. Using the technique of diary/letter entries shared from each perspective person, the reader is carried through a journey of unexpected twists and turns. Jillian longs for the days of her predictable life after her kidnapping. What she learns about her existence and the plans Dr. Deyva has for her newfound capabilities shatters Jillian’s every waking thought and dream state. Will she figure out all the components to save herself, Danielle and her “new siblings” in time? Or will Jillian succumb to the treachery of Dr. Deyva and the so-called capability of shaping a person’s dreams?
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Best wishes,
Donna M. McDine
Multi Award-winning Children's Author

Ignite curiosity in your child through reading!

Connect with
A Sandy Grave ~ January 2014 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ 2014 Purple Dragonfly 1st Place Picture Books 6+, Story Monster Approved, Beach Book Festival Honorable Mention 2014, Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

Powder Monkey ~ May 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Story Monster Approved and Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

Hockey Agony ~ January 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Story Monster Approved and Reader's Farvorite Five Star Review

The Golden Pathway ~ August 2010 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.
~ Literary Classics Silver Award and Seal of Approval, Readers Favorite 2012 International Book Awards Honorable Mention and Dan Poynter's Global e-Book Awards Finalist

0 Comments on KidLit Book Review - Ashlynn's Dreams by Julie C. Gilbert as of 11/13/2014 10:29:00 AM
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7. What tastes like home to you ?

When author Christine Ieronimo saw her adopted Ethiopian daughter drinking from a puddle of water in their driveway, it inspired her to look how water connects us to the places we live and ultimately call home.

A Thirst for Home: A Story of Water Across the World is a poignant and heartfelt story about Eva Alemitu and how water connects her to Emaye, the mother she left behind in Africa.

A Thirst for Home

This is a story about the bleakness of poverty. Having to walk miles every day to get water, Emaye didn’t have enough food to feed her daughter Eva. In an act of love, she gives Eva up for adoption, knowing that giving her up means saving Eva’s life.

Through tears, rain, and puddles, water is what keeps Eva connected to her mother. The exquisite illustrations by Eric Velasquez capture the dignity and the drastic reality of poverty facing millions of people every day on this planet.

thirst1

Eva faces balancing the security of her new American life with the longing for her biological mother back in Ethiopia.

This is one of these books that stays with you long after you read it. It creates a great opportunity to discuss poverty, the importance of food and water, sacrifice, and all of our connections to home.

Something To Do

Living in America we simply do not understand what not having water means. Everyday millions of people all over the world walk miles every day on empty stomachs just to seek out water they can drink and use to survive.

Here are some incredible and through provoking exercises that can be done to get a true view of the importance of water.

The Water Project: Help Solve the Water Crisis

Water Lesson Plans

Book Discussions

K-1

2nd & 3rd

4th & 5th

Let’s Learn About Ethiopia

Guide to Ethiopian Food

Kid World Citizen 

Behind the Story of A Thirst for Home

This is a beautiful film made by the author about adopting her daughter from Ethiopia and the inspiration for the book A Thirst for Home. A must see !!

 

Don’ miss the A Year in the Secret Garden Book Launch Blog Tour and your to enter to win our Amazon $100 Gift Card!!!! Go HERE for more details!

blogtour

The post What tastes like home to you ? appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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8. Audio book reviews - recent fantasy favorites

*
I'm back from vacation and have some catching up to do!  If you're a frequent reader, you'll know that I review books for AudioFile Magazine.  Once submitted, I cannot reprint my reviews here, but I can offer a quick rundown, and link to the reviews as they appeared for AudioFile.


I am smitten with the unflappable Jennifer Strange, protagonist of Jasper Fforde's Chronicles of Kazam series. I recently reviewed the second book in the series, The Song of the Quarkbeast. A quirky, funny, and smartly-written fantasy series.  Book 3, The Eye of Zoltar just published last month, so get reading!  Read my review of The Song of the Quarkbeast here.  Suggested for ages 10-14. (I think older readers may enjoy it as well.)

I love Cornelia Funke's dark fantasy titles.  The Inkheart trilogy is a favorite series, and I thoroughly enjoyed Reckless, the first in the Mirrorworld series. I was thrilled when offered an opportunity to review her new early chapter book fantasy, Emma and the Blue Genie, especially when I discovered that she is the narrator.  My review of Emma and the Blue Genie is here.  Suggested for ages 7-10.
 (I only reviewed the audio copy, but the print copy is lovely - small and special and delightfully illustrated)




* Headphone image courtesy of Openclipart.org.

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9. “Memory of an Elephant?” It’s True!

The Memory of an Elephant: An Unforgettable Journey by Sophie Strady {Guest post by Hannah Rials}
elephant
Marcel is a very old elephant. He has done and seen a lot in his many years, and as he begins his day, the day of his birth, he is reminded of all the things he has done. We get to travel with him as he remembers his tuba-playing years, also called the helicon. You can tell how much he has traveled by the variety of foods set out at his table. Through Marcel’s amazing memory, we learn about his days in “Marcel’s Magical Tour.” He traveled all over the world by becoming a mariner on a ship that traveled to Asia and then the rest of the way around the world! He now retires in Paris, a beautiful city. He experienced the worker strikes and unrest throughout the country. And now, he is celebrating his birthday with all of the friends he has met along his amazing life journey.
elephant1
The Memory of an Elephant is an amazing picture book! I’ve never seen anything quite like it! Along with Marcel’s wonderful story, we also are treated by HUNDREDS of facts that pertain to Marcel’s life. Facts about elephants, animals, foods, ships, plants—everything under the sun! For instance, did you know that Elephants are actually afraid of bees, not mice? I didn’t! The back of the book also shares a crepe recipe along with tons of more fun facts to fill your mind with!
elephant2
Something to Do
1. Buy the book and make “La Crepe Marcelette” (with bananas) from the recipe that is included in the book. It’s a great way to educate young connoisseurs about the delicious definitions of things like crème caramel, brioche, dôme au chocolat and floating island!  I’m sure you won’t regret it.
2. Make a towel elephant to help you remember your stories! Check out this fun activity from TwentyTwoWords.
elephant3
3. Make a Memory Box so you’ll never forget anything!
You’ll need:
What to do:
-Paint the chest/case your base color and let it dry overnight.
-The next day, come up with what you want to label the chest as. I went to Austria, Germany, and Switzerland this summer, so I would label it as such.
-Line your stencils up straight, you might want to use a ruler.
-Paint your letters and let dry!
*You can add decorations if you want, just let everything dry first.
-Throw every memory for this particular occasion into the box—ticket stubs, pamphlets, pictures, posters, anything! Now you’ll never forget.
**some of these links are affiliate links**

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
(The Ultimate Guide)

header

Do you remember the first time you read Charlie and
The Chocolate Factory as a child?

 

Do you recall the thrill of discovering that magical gateway into Willy Wonka’s world inside the pages of a book?

A world with geese that laid golden eggs, squirrels that could sort nuts, and colorful little people called Oompa Loompas? Would you like to re-live that experience with one of the greatest children’s books of all time like never before?

Then come along on a magical adventure into The Ultimate Guide to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory!
Chapter by chapter we explore all of the wonders of Willy Wonka’s World and give you all the tools you need to play along!

Want to know more and get your copy?

clickhere

The post “Memory of an Elephant?” It’s True! appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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10. Review: The Universe of Things

Austin Roberts reviews Steven Shaviro's The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism:

One of the most interesting trends in recent philosophy is what is sometimes called Speculative Realism. The name comes from a conference in 2007 at the University of London that brought together four very different philosophers who nevertheless were united in their efforts to resurrect realist metaphysics: Quentin Meillassoux, Ray Brassier, Graham Harman, and Iain Hamilton Grant. Each of them hold quite different metaphysical positions, but all four critique what they name "philosophies of correlation." As a theologian and not a philosopher, I can't help but make a connection to my field here. Just as the Radical Orthodox movement identifies a key moment in the history of philosophy (for RO, this is Duns Scotus' univocity) that leads to its destructive decline, the Speculative Realists point back to Kant's apparently disastrous argument that the thing-in-itself is unknowable. MORE...

I've just started this myself. Lots of Whitehead, and lots of good sense so far...

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11. Rotters Audiobook Review

Title: Rotters Author: Daniel Kraus Narrated by: Kirby Heyborne Publisher: Listening Library Publication Date: March 27, 2012 ISBN-13: 978-0449014950 Listening copy via Sync I know it's past Halloween, but seriously, Rotters by Daniel Kraus is pretty much the perfect Halloween read (or in this case, listen). Joey Crouch lives in Chicago with his mom. He's somewhere on the autistic spectrum,

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12. A Heroine’s Life…or a dog’s?

  ” Blow it all,” thought Deborah…”he’ll just have to kill me if he’s going to.” In fact at this point it’s a slavering guard dog, not the villain of the piece that she’s worried about – there are still a choice of three or four contenders for top villain, so at this point it’s […]

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13. The Contemporary Spanish-American Novel

From World Literature Today, review of The Contemporary Spanish-American Novel: Bolaño and After:

This unique collection of essays by fifty scholars and writers on the work of sixty-nine contemporary novelists from Spanish America is a valuable resource for scholars and readers alike. The authors included for discussion were born between 1949 and the early 1970s and have published the bulk of their work since 1996. The essays on individual writers are organized in six chapters based on their point of origin from one of the following geographical and cultural regions: Mexico, Central America, the Spanish speaking Caribbean and Venezuela, the Greater Andean region, the Southern Cone, or the United States. Although much of US Latino literature is currently being written in English, the editors conclude that the influence of these writers and their works on Spanish American letters, both in English and in Spanish translation, merits their inclusion in this volume. For readers who do not read Spanish, information is provided on recent novels that have been translated into English, and, for film aficionados, cinematic adaptations of novels by the authors studied are also cited. MORE...

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14. Review: Maurice Blanchot and Fragmentary Writing

It is not too surprising that of all the singular voices in modern French literature Maurice Blanchot (1907-2003) is still relatively unknown to an English readership. Despite the indelible mark that he has left on the strand of 20th century French literary criticism and philosophy that continues to enjoy popularity in translation today—from Roland Barthes to Jacques Derrida and Michel Foucault—we have only recently begun to learn how to read Blanchot. This is at least in part because the reclusive author has remained enigmatic, even in France. Blanchot never held a University position, nor did he give lectures or frequent the many literary cafes and salons in Paris. Instead, he retreated from the spectacle of public life and made a living strictly off his vocation as a writer. More...

Maurice Blanchot and Fragmentary Writing by Leslie Hill reviewed by Michael Krimper in MakeMag.

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15. Book Review: The Name of the Blade by Zoe Marriott



The Name of the Blade
by Zoë Marriott

Mio Yamato has a secret sword hidden in the attic. Her grandfather, Ojiichan, showed it to her when she was nine years old, He told her that the sword would be hers when she turns 16, but he made her promise not to touch it before then. Ojiichan planned to teach her about the katana, but he never got a chance, because the next day he died from a massive stroke.

All these years, Mio has avoided the sword as she promised her ojiichan, and kept it hidden away, even from the rest of her family. But when she needs a katana to complete her costume for a costume party a few days before her sixteenth birthday, she figures that she's close enough to 16 to take it. As soon as she touches the sword, though, strange things start happening. She feels an immediate connection to the sword; it's almost as if the sword is alive and speaking to her. Then a giant, catlike, many-tailed monster called the Nekomata appears. The Nekomata claims the katana, and threatens to kill everyone that Mio cares about to get it.

With a distinctive teen voice and an action-packed plot full of Japanese monsters, sword battles, Kitsune, and a super-hot 500 year old Japanese dude, The Name of the Blade is loaded with teen appeal. It should especially appeal to anyone who likes anime, Japanese folklore or culture, but there's so much Japanese influence in pop culture today that its appeal should be much broader than that.

The characters are interesting, well-rounded, and authentic teens. Mio is ethnically Japanese, but culturally she's a Londoner. Her ojiichan taught her Kendo and some Japanese folklore when he was still alive, but her father eschews his Japanese heritage, and Mio knows very little about Japan except for Kendo and anime. Mio's impulsiveness in taking the sword and her other early behavior show an immaturity that she starts to grow out of throughout the book, as she begins to take responsibility for the consequences.

Her best friend Jack (Jacqueline) is a bit of a rebel, with pink and purple streaked hair and black fingernails. Both girls get along with their families, although Mio's relationship with her father is somewhat strained. Shinobu, the 500-year-old Japanese boy, is mostly a one-note character, but his hotness more than makes up for that. He looks out for Mio, and yet I found it refreshing that he doesn't try to take the sword from her, even though they both have a claim to it, and he lets her take the lead in battle. (Although he does teach her a few things about combat).

There is also a young Kitsune (fox spirit) named Hikaru. The Kitsune are one of my favorite parts of this book. Apparently, there's a London court of Kitsune; how cool is that? Mio, Jack, and Shinobu get caught up in Kitsune politics when they visit the court to ask for assistance.

The plot is exciting but well-paced. The story alternates the big battle scenes with quieter moments and other challenges. It's quite an enjoyable read.

There are a few things that weren't explained, but since this is the first book in a trilogy, I hope that everything will be explained fully before the end.

Diversity?

The Name of the Blade does well on diversity. Besides Mio's Japanese heritage, Jack and her sister Rachel had a grandmother who came from Barbados, and they have brown skin. Jack is also a lesbian, which comes up a few times, but doesn't really play a role in the story, except when Jack has to tell a Kitsune who is sweet on her that he isn't her type. The girls are multifaceted personalities that are not defined by their ethnicity or sexuality.

Who would like this book:

Anyone with an interest in Japanese folklore, culture, martial arts, or anime. Anyone who likes stories where the contemporary world intersects with the fantastic.

FTC required disclosure: Review copy sent by the publisher to enable me to write this review. The bookstore links above are affiliate links, and I earn a very small percentage of any sales made through the links. Neither of these things influenced my review.

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16. Ready for a Traveling Girl’s Next Adventure?

Lately Lily: The Adventures of a Travelling Girl by Micah Player {guest post from Hannah Rials}

Lately Lily: The Adventures of a Travelling Girl by Micah Player

Lately Lily

 

Lily is a traveling maniac! Thanks to her parents, this lucky little girl has the opportunity to travel her all over the world. Recently, Lily has been exploring the exciting city of Paris, France. She loves documenting every second of her journey in her notebook, dragging her best friend Zeborah with her everywhere, and writing to her friends about all of her exciting journeys!

laetlylily

Come learn how to be an excellent travel with Lily and Zeborah and keep an eye out for the traveling girl’s next adventure!
I love the unique illustrations in Lately Lily. The story is very cute and meant to inspire a love of traveling in young children. Lily exemplifies a great traveller—documents everything, sees everything, and always chooses the window seat (they’re the best!). I can’t wait to see what’s in store for Lily and Zeborah next!
Lately Lily
Grab your copy of Lately Lily HERE.
**some of these links are affiliate links.

Something To Do

Make Your Own Travel ID:Early Activities & Project
secret-agent-lead2-1024x768
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Bp8jiVjF7xk/TrMUtZZw7MI/AAAAAAAATuE/HgmRlk2_wyM/s1600/untitledfsdfdf.png
Always Make a Checklist!!
I always make a travel check list at least a week in advance (and sometimes even pack early). This way, I know that I don’t forget anything. You have the typical categories: clothing, toiletries, electronics, , entertainment, and miscellaneous for anything else you can think to throw in there. Make sure everything on your list is checked off before your departure, and safe travels!
Sights to See Around the World:
Here’s a few dream destination points: make a point to take your kids here—
  1. Antelope Canyon, Arizona, US
  2. Glowworm Caves: Waitomo, New Zealand
  3. Eiffel Tower: Paris, France
  4. London, England
  5. Alhambra Palace: Granada, Spain
  6. C.S. Lewis Memorial Mural: Belfast, Northern Ireland
  7. Neuschwanstein Castle: Germany
  8. Mozart’s birthplace: Salzburg, Austria
  9. Pantheon: Rome, Italy
  10. The Acropolis: Athens, Greece

What travel tips would you like to share?

Need to get a jump on Holiday Gift Giving? Books are always a great choice! If your family would like an interactive, activity and wonder-filled that is inspired by the class tale, check out The Ultimate Guide to Charlie and The Chocolate Factory

The Ultimate Guide to Charlie

The post Ready for a Traveling Girl’s Next Adventure? appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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17. The North Pole Penguin by Christopher Payne

The North Pole Penguin

Title: The North Pole Penguin

Author: Christopher Payne

Illustrator: Lorena Soriano

Publisher/Year: CreateSpace/2014

Now that Halloween is over, my thoughts have turned to Christmas. It’s less than two months away after all. I’m already thinking about the decorating, shopping, and visiting that make up part of the hustle and bustle of the holiday season. You may be too. But are you also thinking about Christmas books? If not, I have the perfect one to get you started: The North Pole Penguin. 

This book has the potential to be a Christmastime classic. With its clever rhyme and bright, put-you-in-the-spirit illustrations, The North Pole Penguin begs to be read over and over again. The story is about Parker Preston, a penguin from the South Pole, who loves Christmas and longs to thank Santa Claus in person for stopping at his igloo every year. So he sets off for the North Pole with a gift for Santa and meets new animal friends along the way who also want to give gifts to Santa. Some even accompany him on his journey. Here’s a sample from the book:

Upon some thinking long and hard, he knew his Christmas cause

To cross the globe and go and see the man called Santa Claus.

He’d bring him gifts and change the roles before the winter’s thaws

To give back to the special man whose kindness had no flaws.

If you’re searching for a sweet Christmas story with amazing illustrations and the strong possibility of becoming a holiday tradition, The North Pole Penguin is a perfect choice.


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18. The Broken Hearted by Amelia Kahaney

HarperCollins, 2013

Anthem Fleet has it all.  She lives in a penthouse overlooking the city of Bedlam where her father is a premier real estate investor.  She is on the prestigious ballet corps as one of the prima ballerinas, and she goes to Cathedral Day School, a private school for the wealthy.  Her boyfriend, Will, is the best-looking guy in school and Zahra, her best friend, absolutely despises him.  And whereever she needs to go, Serge will take her there in her family's private car, a beautiful and expensive Seraph.  But one event will change her life and make her see the city she loves a completely different way.

Anthem has always colored between the lines but one night she and Zahra go to the Southside to party.  Never having been there before, Anthem is filled with anxiety until she meets Gavin.  He's beautiful,attentive protective.  Anthem loves the way he treats her as a normal person, like casually going by school to pick her up on his motorcycle to take her to secluded and beautiful spots on an otherwise ugly Southside.  They are in love...then Alicia Roach comes calling.

In an instant, Gavin is abducted and Anthem has a few days to come up with a ransom for his release or he dies. She's desperate and devastated and while crossing the Bridge of Sighs, she get thrown into the bubbly chemical-ridden river and dies...only to wake up in a makeshift hospital with stitches running down her chest...

With days lost and a chimeric mechanical heart keeping her alive, Anthem has to beat the clock to save Gavin from the Syndic8 before it's too late.  Or is it already?  The city has gotten derelict and dangerous since The Hope disappeared.  No one knows why he did, but they're ready for a hero comeback..someone to take the city to expose the darkness and bring it to light.  But who will it be and how is Anthem, a beautiful rich girl from the city, involved in all of it?

Kahaney writes a beautifully descriptive steampunk novel that will draw the reader in with imagery, the societies within Bedlam and the dark underbelly of crime.  With street names like Hemlock, Catechism and Oleander and places like Morass Bluffs, Fleet Tower and Hades, the reader will feel like a comic book went rogue and became a  novel based on the grandiose world, characters and plots Kahaney weaves. The citizens of Bedlam can read everything going on through the Daily Dilemma or feed their addiction with drugs like Dreamazine, rollies, and Zenithin.  It doesn't matter which side of the Bridge to Nowhere you live, most lives are the same - duplicitous, carefully covered over and never what they seem.

Best of all?  JUST picked up the sequel this past weekend!  Highly recommended for upper junior high and high school.




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19. Children's Picture Book Review - The Adventures of Wally and Warren: The Reluctant Penguin



The Adventures of Wally and Warren Series: The Reluctant Penguin by Lise Chase

The Adventures of Wally and Warren continue wit their love of books. Hunkering down for bedtime, Warren is determined to read a bedtime story. Remembering how mom taught him how to sound out the words he is confident he can do it. Not to be thwarted by Wally’s negativity of anything Warren wants to try himself, Warren puts his best foot forward to each task Warren’s attempts are admirable. Does Wally ever learn that one must try new things to expand their horizons or does Wally remain wrapped up in his self-doubt?

<!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]-->
Lise Chase expertly creates a world of positive outlook of doing versus others negativity.

Visit the author/illustrator at https://www.facebook.com/lise.chase.9?fref=ts

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Best wishes,
Donna M. McDine
Multi Award-winning Children's Author

Ignite curiosity in your child through reading!

Connect with
A Sandy Grave ~ January 2014 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ 2014 Purple Dragonfly 1st Place Picture Books 6+, Story Monster Approved, Beach Book Festival Honorable Mention 2014, Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

Powder Monkey ~ May 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Story Monster Approved and Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

Hockey Agony ~ January 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Story Monster Approved and Reader's Farvorite Five Star Review

The Golden Pathway ~ August 2010 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.
~ Literary Classics Silver Award and Seal of Approval, Readers Favorite 2012 International Book Awards Honorable Mention and Dan Poynter's Global e-Book Awards Finalist

0 Comments on Children's Picture Book Review - The Adventures of Wally and Warren: The Reluctant Penguin as of 10/24/2014 8:28:00 AM
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20. Book Review- Tanith Low in the Maleficent Seven by Derek Landy

Title: Tanith Low in The Maleficent Seven
 Author:  Derek Landy
Series:  Skullduggery Pleasant 7.5
Published:  8 May 2014 by Harper
Length: 283 pages
Source: publisher
Other info: Landy has also written a lot of Skullduggery Pleasant novels, the world of which this book is set.
Summary : This time, the bad guys take the stage. Tanith Low, now possessed by a remnant, recruits a gang of villains – many of whom will be familiar from previous Skulduggery adventures – in order to track down and steal the four God-Killer level weapons that could hurt Darquesse when she eventually emerges. Also on the trail of the weapons is a secret group of Sanctuary sorcerers, and doing his best to keep up and keep Tanith alive is one Mister Ghastly Bespoke. When the villains around her are lying and scheming and plotting, Tanith needs to stay two steps ahead of her teammates and her enemies. After all, she's got her own double-crosses to plan – and she’s a villain herself.

Review: Tanith Low has a remnant inside of her, which made her stronger and more powerful and more suited to . Two teams of seven want a set of God Killers, and
I was very excited to read this. I've been recommended Skullduggery Pleasant for years, (and apologies, I still haven't read it) and one of the key things I’ve noticed people like is the world. This being sent to me for review, and this being set in the same world, I was looking forwards to this.
The world building lives up to its hype, incorporating a mix of the folk tales, and more traditional fantasy staples.
I liked Tanith's backstory and the meaning for her name. I l liked all the major characters, especially Tanith, Sabine and Jack, and they were well fleshed out,  and I'm looking forwards to seeing more of them when I (eventually) get round to reading the Skullduggery Pleasant books.
The book is short (well, nearly 300 pages, but it feels short) and pacy, and I feel the overall story was quite simple, but I liked fact that the characters and their views on what they were doing add conflict and interest. I thought the  dialogue felt quite samey, sassy, and funny, in some places, especially  when comparing the two teams' interactions, but I liked the characters too much to mind. 

Overall:  Strength 4 tea to an action led novel in a world I’d love to return to one day.

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21. Netgalley & Edelweiss Reading Challenge 2014: Status Update


When I saw this challenge back in December I decideed to enroll in it. The other day I went back and re-read the rules and realized that I could include books I added in 2014 as well. To, I've updated my lists with everything that is in my TBR pilesit was one I was glad to take. I decided to go for the Gold challenge (50 Books). 

To read the reviews for the books I've conquered so far, please visit here. Occasionally, I don't post reviews to my blog but I do post them to Amazon, LibraryThing, Smashwords, Shelfari and Goodreads.

2013 Netgalley TBR list:
  1. Dead Sexy Dragon
  2. Expecting a Bolton Baby
  3. Vampires Need Not...Apply
  4. Mistress of the Solstice
  5. A Shimmer of Angels
  6. Awakening the Warriors
  7. Broken Forest
  8. Compliance
  9. Dark Wolf Running
  10. Dead Beautiful
  11. Defy
  12. Dragonwitch
  13. Dream Girl
  14. Echo Prophecy
  15. Endless
  16. Escaping Reality
  17. External Forces
  18. Forbidden to Love
  19. Hereafter
  20. Hero's Lot, The - Patrick W. Carr
  21. King Hall
  22. Mage Fire - C. Aubrey Hall
  23. Mind Bond
  24. Night Creatures
  25. Rebels Divided
  26. Rival
  27. Runes (book one) - Ednah Walters
  28. Safe in His Arms
  29. Scrap - Emory Sharplin
  30. Sekret
  31. Shadow Allegiance
  32. She Is Not Invisible
  33. Spirit - Brigid Kemmerer
  34. Stargazing from Nowhere
  35. The Bane - Keary Taylor
  36. The Dominant - Tara Sue Me
  37. The Naturals
  38. The Silver Chain
  39. The Trials of the Core
  40. The Waking Dreamer
  41. Tin Star
  42. Turned
  43. Unspoken
  44. Will in Scarlet - Matthew Cody
  45. Winds of Purgatory
  46. A December Bride
  47. A January Bride
  48. A February Bride
  49. Elfin

2014 Netgalley TBR List

  1. The Millionaire Affair
  2. Sheikh's Scandal
  3. The Billion Dollar Bachelor
  4. Only With You
  5. Alex + Ada volume 1
  6. Waking up Pregnant
  7. Wrecked
  8. Catch Me When I Fall
  9. A Secret Colton Baby
  10. Black Rook
  11. Blind Faith
  12. Blood Orange Soda
  13. Clipped Wings
  14. Darkness
  15. Dark Wolf Returning
  16. Desired
  17. Divided
  18. Don't Judge a Lizard by His Scales
  19. Dragon Defender
  20. Fire Heart
  21. Forbidden
  22. Freed
  23. Lingering Echoes
  24. Longing
  25. Love's Paradox
  26. One is Enough
  27. On Her Watch
  28. Outshine
  29. Raytara - Judgement of the Stars
  30. Shadow Heart
  31. Star Trek: Khan
  32. Stitching Snow
  33. Street Fighter Origins: Akuma
  34. Tales from OZ
  35. The Circle
  36. The Fifth Vertex
  37. The Mark of the Dragonfly
  38. The One
  39. The Professional
  40. The Thirteenth Tower
  41. We are the Goldens
  42. Worth the Fall

Books that have been completed and/or reviewed
15/50 goal
35 to reach goal
  1. The Millionaire Affair
  2. Sheikh's Scandal
  3. The Billion Dollar Bachelor
  4. Only With You
  5. Dead Sexy Dragon
  6. A December Bride
  7. A January Bride
  8. A February Bride
  9. Expecting a Bolton Baby
  10. Vampires Need Not...Apply
  11. Dark Wolf Running
  12. Awakening the Warriors
  13. Dead Beautiful
  14. Mind Bond
  15. Sheikh's Scandal

0 Comments on Netgalley & Edelweiss Reading Challenge 2014: Status Update as of 10/25/2014 2:00:00 PM
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22. Free ebooks Review: Cinder & Ella by Kelly Oram

I just joined the Free eBooks for an Honest Review team. Here is my first review and the first 5-star review of the year for me.



Disclaimer: I received no compensation from the author or publisher for this honest review.


About the Book

It’s been almost a year since eighteen-year-old Ella Rodriguez was in a car accident that left her crippled, scarred, and without a mother. After a very difficult recovery, she’s been uprooted across the country and forced into the custody of a father that abandoned her when she was a young child. If Ella wants to escape her father’s home and her awful new stepfamily, she must convince her doctors that she’s capable, both physically and emotionally, of living on her own. The problem is, she’s not ready yet. The only way she can think of to start healing is by reconnecting with the one person left in the world who’s ever meant anything to her—her anonymous Internet best friend, Cinder.

Hollywood sensation Brian Oliver has a reputation for being trouble. There’s major buzz around his performance in his upcoming film The Druid Prince, but his management team says he won’t make the transition from teen heartthrob to serious A-list actor unless he can prove he’s left his wild days behind and become a mature adult. In order to douse the flames on Brian’s bad-boy reputation, his management stages a fake engagement for him to his co-star Kaylee. Brian isn’t thrilled with the arrangement—or his fake fiancée—but decides he’ll suffer through it if it means he’ll get an Oscar nomination. Then a surprise email from an old Internet friend changes everything.

Buy the Book


Here's what I'm giving it:

Rating: 5 stars

Here's why:

At the risk of gushing over how great this book is, I'm going to take a breath and try to hit the highlights without spoiling anything for you.

I'm a big fan of fairy tales and Kelly Oram has managed to combine two (Cinderella/Beauty & the Beast) into one awesome book.

Ella & Brian are definitely my two favorite characters at the moment because they were HUMAN and very much likeable as well as believable as people. You got to see their fears, hopes, and a host of other emotions as the story went along. I found myself crying, laughing, ranting and falling in love with both of them and I know that I would, if they existed, be friends with the pair.

The secondary characters had just as much depth and feeling as the main pair. Not once did I feel that a character was in there just to take up space.

The plot and pacing made it hard for me to stop to take a break, I was that invested in what was happening with Ella & Brian. When I got to the end I was firmly in their corner and I hope that maybe the author will write a sequel *hint, hint* Well, I can dream, can't I?

Would I recommend this book? That would be a huge, almighty YES, YES, YES!


0 Comments on Free ebooks Review: Cinder & Ella by Kelly Oram as of 10/26/2014 8:41:00 PM
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23. Review: We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler

It would not have surprised me if this had won this year’s Man Booker Prize. My heart was supporting Richard Flanagan’s magnificent The Narrow Road To The Deep North but I had a feeling this was going to get the nod. In the end it didn’t win but it would have been a deserving winner […]

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24. Would You Like You Like a Look into the Every Day Lives of Lakota Indians?

Horse Raid: The Making of a Warrior by Paul Goble shared great insight into the every day lives of Lakota Indians.

This book is not only beautiful to look at but is well researched, giving a lot of information on a topic I had no knowledge. Giving us a front row seat of a horse raid from the view point of the main character Lone Bull, we learn of his first horse raid when he was fourteen years old. Horse Raiding was a time honored tradition and a right of passage for every young boy. Lone Bull’s father was the chief of the Lakota tribe. Calling on 9 other great hunters, the chief holds a meeting in their teepee to make plans to raid the crow horses. This is where Lone Bull hears of the horse raid plan and then comes up with one of his own to join his father and the other brave men. Lone Bull and his friend decided that they would follow the men quietly. When it was too late to send them home, they would unveil themselves and join the horse raiding party. Lone Bull’s grandfather knew about the plan and prepared the supplies and horses for the soon to be horse raiders.

paulgoble

More than this I cannot tell you. You’ll have to read it for yourself. Told with vivid words and exciting moments of the raid , Paul Goble brings to life the story of Lone Bull through his magnificent painting and his ledger book style. Lovely browns, blacks, blues, and reds. walk us through the plains of a pre-reservation life where horse raiding was a chance for men to show their courage and bravery in battle.  No one can become brave by sitting at home. As Lone Bull’s grandfather reminds us , ” No man can help another to be brave, but through brave deeds you many become a leader one day. ”

Hosre Raid

This newly revised edition features digitally enhanced artwork for vivid colors, a completely revised text, a brand new layout which makes for incredible story telling, and an interesting foreword from one of the world’s more famous storytellers Joseph Bruchac.

Horse Raid

This book lends itself nicely to a look at the buffalo days and life on the plains. Beautifully written.

This book was given for review by the publisher Wisdom Tales Press.

Something to Do

A Song for the Horse Nation

This site shares the history and relationship between the Native American people and the horse. On this site they have a couple of examples of “horse charms” used in actual horse raids.

Horse charms

Draw a Horse Raid

Story teller and artist Paul Goble uses a style of art known as ledger book art. During the 1800′s Native American’s used what they could find. Oftentimes the paper they would find to draw on would be found in ledger books. Here’s a couple of ideas to get you started. Also be sure to use some examples from Paul Goble’s book Horse Raid as well.

Picture

 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
(The Ultimate Guide)

header

Do you remember the first time you read Charlie and
The Chocolate Factory as a child?

 

Do you recall the thrill of discovering that magical gateway into Willy Wonka’s world inside the pages of a book?

A world with geese that laid golden eggs, squirrels that could sort nuts, and colorful little people called Oompa Loompas? Would you like to re-live that experience with one of the greatest children’s books of all time like never before?

Then come along on a magical adventure into The Ultimate Guide to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory!
Chapter by chapter we explore all of the wonders of Willy Wonka’s World and give you all the tools you need to play along!

Want to know more and get your copy?

clickhere

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25. Blog Tour Launch & $100 Giveaway: A Year in the Secret Garden by Valarie Budayr and Marilyn Scott-Waters

The Blog Tour has begun!

A Year in the Secret Garden

Just this week our delight was compounded when Valarie announced that the physical version of the book had arrived, just in time for the upcoming launch and blog tour.

A Year in the Secret Garden

This book was a labor of love between two creative people (Valarie and Marilyn) who not only wanted to bring a classic children’s tale to life, but encourage families to step away from the computer and into the garden, craft room and kitchen.

Title: A Year in the Life of the Secret Garden | Author: Valarie Budayr | Illustrator: Marilyn Scott-Waters | Publication Date: November, 2014 | Publisher: Audrey Press | Pages: 144 | Recommended Ages: 5 to 99

Book Description: Award-winning authors Valarie Budayr and Marilyn Scott-Waters have co-created A Year in the Secret Garden to introduce the beloved children’s classic, The Secret Garden to a new generation of families. This guide uses over two hundred full color illustrations and photos to bring the magical story to life, with fascinating historical information, monthly gardening activities, easy-to-make recipes, and step-by-step crafts, designed to enchant readers of all ages. Each month your family will unlock the mysteries of a Secret Garden character, as well as have fun together creating the original crafts and activities based on the book.Over 140 pages, with 200 original color illustrations and 48 activities for your family and friends to enjoy, learn, discover and play with together. A Year In the Secret Garden is our opportunity to introduce new generations of families to the magic of this classic tale in a modern and innovative way that creates special learning and play times outside in nature. This book encourages families to step away from technology and into the kitchen, garden, reading nook and craft room.

Amazon * Audrey Press * Goodreads

 

buy1

A Year in the Secret Garden provides the perfect companion to the original story.  The book is divided into major sections by months of the year.  For each month, a character from the book (e.g., Mary Lennox, Dickon, Colin) is introduced and their role in the story is described.  Each month also features a number of activities including planting activities, crafts, recipes, children’s games, as well as snippets of information about some of the themes covered in the story (e.g., death in Victorian England, language spoken in Yorkshire), and so much more!’-Renee @Mother/Daughter Book Reviews

In honor of this exciting new release,  there will be a special blog tour that will run from November 1 to 30, 2014. We encourage our readers to stop by and experience the magic of A Year in The Secret Garden through book reviews, author interviews, guest posts and excerpts from this activity-packed book.  The blog tour will include a shared giveaway for a $100 Amazon gift card or PayPal cash prize, open worldwide.

To get a snapshot of A Year in the Secret Garden book month-by-month AND a sneak peek at the blog tour schedule, go HERE.

For a chance to enter to win our Amazon $100 Gift Card, Go HERE

A Year in the Secret Garden Blog Tour Schedule

A Year in the Secret Garden blog tour

EXPLORING SEPTEMBER

November 1

Mother Daughter Book Reviews (Launch)

Coffee Books & Art (Guest Post)

WS Momma Readers Nook (Book Review)

November 2

Cherry Mischievous (Excerpt)

Hope to Read (Excerpt)

November 3

Eloquent Articulation (Book Review)

Enter Here Canada (Excerpt)

 

EXPLORING OCTOBER

November 4

BeachBoundBooks (Excerpt)

Books, Babies and Bows (Book Review)

November 5

Monique’s Musings (Book Review)

November 6

SOS-Supply (Book Review)

 

EXPLORING NOVEMBER

November 7

Randomly Reading (Book Review)

November 8

Adalinc to Life (Book Review)

 

EXPLORING DECEMBER

November 9

100 Pages a Day (Book Review)

November 10

Edventures With Kids (Book Review)

 

EXPLORING JANUARY

November 11

Icefairy’s Treasure Chest (Book Review)

November 12

Girl of 1000 Wonders (Book Review)

 

EXPLORING FEBRUARY

November 13

Seraphina Reads (Guest Post)

November 14

Juggling Act Mama (Book Review)

 

EXPLORING MARCH

November 15

Pragmatic Mom (Author/Illustrator Interview)

Purple Monster Coupons (Book Review)

November 16

Stacking Books (Book Review)

 

EXPLORING APRIL

November 17

Oh My Bookness (Book Review)

November 18

Crystal’s Tiny Treasures (Book Review)

 

EXPLORING MAY

November 19

The Blended Blog (Book Review)

November 20

All Done Monkey (Book Review)

November 21

Geo Librarian (Book Review)

Grandbooking (Author/Illustrator Interview)

 

JUNE

November 22

My Tangled Skeins Book Reviews (Book Review)

November 23

Christy’s Cozy Corners (Book Review)

My Life, Loves and Passions (Book Review)

November 24

Bookaholic Chick (Excerpt)

Hide-N-(Sensory)-Seeking (Book Review)

JULY

November 25

Ninja Librarian (Guest Post)

November 26

Jane Ritz (Book Review)

Rockin’ Book Reviews (Book Review)

November 27

I’d Rather Be Reading At The Beach (Book Review)

 

EXPLORING AUGUST

November 28

Deal Sharing Aunt (Book Review)

November 29

Mommynificent (Book Review)

November 30

This Kid Reviews Books (Book Review)

Java John Z’s (Author/Illustrator Interview)

Visit our A Year in The Secret Garden page to learn more about this one-of-a-kind unique keepsake book for children and families.

PicMonkey Collage

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