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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: poems, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 452
1. Back through the Prickle Hedge

As an ex-bookseller, one of the things I miss is helping to reconnect people with “long lost” books. I still get the occasional request for help, and always enjoy the buzz of pointing someone in the direction of a book that has eluded them for years. This request from a couple of years ago was a little different;

When I was little my Mother used to read me a poem called "Through the Prickle Hedge" I found out after much searching that it was written by a lady called, Marion St. John Webb and that you are listed as someone who stocks her books so my question is this "How can I find the words to this poem" as I have forgotten all but the first line.


The Littlest One Marion St John Adcock Webb
Luckily, I recognised the poem and had the very book in stock. It’s from The Littlest-One by Marion St. John Adcock (Webb). It took but a minute to photocopy the words and send them by return mail. I wrote a blog post about it (here) and quickly received more requests for copies of the words. I was happy to oblige and continued copying and sharing until…disaster struck…the book sold. 



In hindsight, I should have shared the entire poem on my blog while I had the chance, but hindsight is a wonderful thing. Having found the book again, I can now do what I should have done then. I don’t sell books any more, but that doesn't mean I can’t share some of those in my collection. I hope you enjoy these words as much as I do. Some of the spelling might seem a little odd, but it is exactly as it appears in the book. 


Through the prickle hedge by Marion St. John Adcock (Webb)

While all the grown-up people sat an’ talked upon the lawn, we scrambled through the prickle hedge – and one of us got torn. 

And out into the lane we went, an’ passed the willow tree, Aunt Matilda’s child’en, Mr Peter Dog, an’ me.

Sue, Barbara and Tony Flitney with Peggy the dog
Me (the Littlest One), my sister Sue, brother Tony and Peggy our dog. 

We’d played about the garden all the kind of games we could, and so we went along the lane an’ down into the wood. But jus’ as we had got inside an’ one of us looked round – a little girl we didn't know had followed us, we found. 

Her hair was black an’ straggly, an’ her dress was old and worn, and she on’y had one stocking on, and that was very torn. 
And who she was, and where she came from, none of us could tell; and when we stopped and stared at her, she stopped and stared as well.

And one of Aunt Matilda's child'en shouted "Hullo, Kid" but she never answered anything, but stood and stared, she did. 
And Aunt Matilda's child'en said "perhaps she is a witch. Let's make a fire and burn her, like they used to, in this ditch!"

And they laughed and started picking sticks, an' threw them in a pile, and kept on singing, "Burn old Witch!" an' shouting all the while. I whispered, "Not a really fire? Of course it's on'y play?" But they shouted, "Yes, a really fire! Don't let her run away".

Sue and Barbara Flitney
My sister is the tall girl in the centre. I'm on her left-hand side (right of the photo as you look at it). Sadly, I can’t recall the names of our two playmates. 

Then she pulled a nugly face at us, and said "You'd better 'ad. My mother is a Gypsy, and she'd be most awful mad. And if I call, she'll her me - she lives inside this wood."  

Aunt Matilda's child'en whispered "let us run away. We mustn't talk to Gipsies they'll steal you if you stay." But the little girl was watchin', and she said "Oh no, you won't or else I'll call, now what you going to give me if I don't?"

And all of us were quiet again. Then some thing made a squeak so we gave her someone's brooch. An' then we heard the bushes creak and so she took a coat, a hat, an' Mr Peter's collar. "And now," she said, "You mustn't tell you promise - or I'll ollar." Then Aunt Matilda's child'en cried "It isn't fair a bit!" And snatched their things away an' said "Come on, let's run for it."

An' all of us began to run as quickly as we could. And as we ran she started shouting, shouting through the wood. And some of us fell over - scrambled up, and on again. And the wood was full of creaking's - but at last we found the lane. On'y some of us were crying', and we kept on looking round; But the Gypsies didn't follow, and we couldn't hear a sound.

Back through the prickle hedge
Me with my Grandad and Aunt Gladys. Could that be the Prickle Hedge?

Till nearly home - we heard the grown-ups talking on the lawn, so we scrambled through the prickle hedge - and two of us got torn. And out into the garden jus' as quickly as could be, Aunt Matilda's child'en, Mr. Peter Dog, an' me. 

Disclaimer!  The photographs in this post are from my own childhood. I have no connection to Marion St John Adcock (Webb). The photographs are simply for decoration. I’m happy to say my sister, brother and I were not involved in any of the incidents in the poem, although we often got ‘torn’ while climbing through hedges. Furthermore, burning of witches is not something we recommend!  Have a fun week...


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2. An Ekphrastic Poem for WONDER

  You know how much I love house plants and greenery of all kinds. I don't have a green thumb, and my plants don't always do well, but I am stubborn and don't give up easily. My office is full of plants. sometimes they get those really annoying fungus gnats, so I am continually in a battle of control.  There was an outbreak the same week that my Poetry Sister Sara shared her photos of the art

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3. 25 Books From 25 Years: Confetti: Poems For Children

Lee_Low_25th_Anniversary_Poster_2_LEE & LOW BOOKS celebrates its 25th anniversary this year! To recognize how far the company has come, we are featuring one title a week to see how it is being used in classrooms today and hear from the authors and illustrators.

Today, we’re celebrating one of our favorite poetry titles: Confetti: Poems for Children. This book celebrates the vivid Southwestern landscape of the United States through poems about the natural world. Featuring words from award-winning author Pat Mora and fine artist Enrique O. Sanchez, Confetti is an anthem to the power of a child’s imagination and pride.

confettiFeatured title: Confetti: Poems for Children

Author: Pat Mora

Illustrator:Enrique O. Sanchez

Synopsis: In this joyful and spirited collection, award-winning poet Pat Mora and fine artist Enrique O. Sanchez celebrate the vivid landscape of the Southwest and the delightful rapport that children share with the natural world.

Awards and honors:

  • Children’s Books Mean Business, Children’s Book Council (CBC)
  • Choices, Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC)

Other Editions: Did you know that Confetti: Poems for Children also comes in a Spanish edition?

Confeti: Poemas para niños

 

 

 

 

 

Confeti: Poemas para niños

Purchase a copy of Confetti: Poems for Children here.

Resources for teaching with Confetti: Poems for Children:

Other Recommended Picture Books for Teaching About Poetry:

water rolls water rises

 

 

 

 

 

Water Rolls, Water Rises/El agua rueda, el agua subeby Pat Mora, illus. by Meilo So

Lend a Hand

Lend a Hand: Poems About Giving by John Frank, illus. by London Ladd

the palm of my heart

 

 

 

 

 

The Palm of My Heart: Poetry by African American Children, by Davida Adedjoua, illus. by R. Gregory Christie

in daddy's arms i am tall

 

 

 

 

In Daddy’s Arms I Am Tall: African Americans Celebrating Fathers, by various poets, illus. by Javaka Steptoe

Have you used Confetti: Poems for Children? Let us know!

Celebrate with us! Check out our 25 Years Anniversary Collection.

1 Comments on 25 Books From 25 Years: Confetti: Poems For Children, last added: 6/30/2016
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4. Poetry Friday: Animal Poems of the Iguazú/Animalario del Iguazú


April
 is National Poetry Month! All month long we’ll be celebrating by posting some of our favorite poems for Poetry Friday. To celebrate Earth Day, for today’s Poetry Friday, we chose a poem from Animal Poems of the Iguazú/Animalario del Iguazú, written by Francisco X. Alarcón and illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez.

Same Green Fate

let’s listen to

the green voice

of the rainforest

the colorful chorus

of so many flowers

trees and birds

let’s learn

the distinct

living alphabets

of so many species

so many insects

and butterflies

let’s be part

of the clamor and

song of this land:

you all belong

to us and we all

belong to you

protect all of us

for the Earth’s fate

for your own sake

let’s make the world

a true Ybirá Retá—

a Land of the TreesAnimal Poems of the Iguazu


Purchase Animal Poems of the Iguazú/Animalario del Iguazú here.

Our Earth Day Poetry Collection is now 25% off! Purchase it here.


Further Resources

Reading for the Earth: Ultimate Earth Day Resource Roundup

Happy Earth Day from LEE & LOW BOOKS

Earth Day: Saving the Pufflings

What We’re Doing to Celebrate Earth Day

Seven Children’s Books to Celebrate World Water Day

Resources for Teaching about Wangari Maathai and Seeds of Change

Turn a Blanket into a Scarf! Book-Inspired DIY Projects

Where in the World: How One Class Used Google Maps to Explore the Vanishing Culture Series

Beyond “Did You Know…”: Teaching Geo-Literacy Using the VANISHING CULTURE Book Series

How to Be an Explorer in Your Own Backyard: The Olinguito Activity Kit and Teacher’s Guide

Twelve Months of Books: April

Poetry Ideas and Resources

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5. Weekend Links: Poetry Booklists for kids (and Activities!)

Welcome to weekend links!

This is my much-anticipated chance to share all sorts of great links and resources that I have encountered during my weekly Internet travels. I have all sorts of goodies for you today!

Did you know that April is National Poetry Month and also Poem in your Pocket Day?

The internet is buzzing with great book ideas and things to do to celebrate a love of poetry and share it with others. Here are a few of my favs:

Unique and Creative Non-Boring Poetry Books to Make You Love Poetry  via What do we do all day

love-poetry-400x567

Celebrate poetry month with author Shel Silverstein! Get poems, activities, and fun all month long.

<p>2016 Poetry Month Activities</p>

This site is so bright and colorful, it just makes me smile! And it has some great book ideas as well. Mrs. Wheeler’s First Grade Tidbits: Poetry Ideas

poetry books for kids

I adore these 28 Must-Share Poem images for Elementary School from WeAreTeachers! Of course, the Roald Dahl one is at the top of my favorites list:) http://stfi.re/jnaldb

roald

Creekside Learning also had a wonderful poetry booklist for kids

poetry booklist

What great poetry finds did you discover this week?

Before you go…
Do you know what Hans Christian Andersen liked as much as his fairy tales?

Paper! He was an addict to paper. He wrote on it, he drew on it and he use to cut in it. Just like a sculptor carves the figure out of stone, Hans Christian Andersen use to cut his stories out of paper. In fact he was a very popular paper cutter. (images courtesy of the Odense Museum)

Hans Christian Andersen

In order to amuse his friends and their children, Hans made his very famous paper cuts. Wherever he would go he would carry his bag filled with paper and these very large monstrous scissors which he used to cut out the most elegant figures.

Would you like to create a very special item that is inspired by the paper cuttings of Hans Christian Andersen?
I’ve made a FREE off the shoulder felt story bag craft and tutorial just for this occasion! This simple craft is something the whole family can participate in creating it will make a delightful gift for the book lover in your life. I hope your little bag of tales holds as many wonders for you as ours has.
Click the image below and get instant access to this Hans Christian Andersen-inspired shoulder bag!
Storyteller-Bag

The post Weekend Links: Poetry Booklists for kids (and Activities!) appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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6. Watching TV in the Presence of Christ

This month my poetry sisters and I are experimenting with Ekphrastic poems. Laura Purdie Salas chose the image for us and we all went off in different directions, responding to the images as we were called. Ekphrasitc poems are written in response to visual art; an image, a painting or a sculpture. The images we are working with this month are photographs of the ceiling frescos of Mark Balma (

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7. ‘When Love Arrives’ Poetry Video Goes Viral

Sarah Kay and Phil Kaye, two spoken word poets and the co-directors of the Project V.O.I.C.E. organization, collaborated on a piece called “When Love Arrives.” The video embedded above features their performance at Inner City Arts in Los Angeles.

For more poems by these two writers, follow these links for to listen to Kay’s “The Type” and Kaye’s “Repetition.” How do you respond when you find romantic love?

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8. Nicki Minaj Recites a Maya Angelou Poem

Rapper Nicki Minaj (pictured, via) recently recited the verses of another: the famous poem “Still I Rise” by the late Maya Angelou. Follow this link to read the poem in its entirety.

The video embedded above features the hip hop artist’s performance at an A&E television special called Shining A Light: A Concert for Progress on Race in America. Click here to watch a video with Angelou’s own reading of “Still I Rise.” (via BuzzFeed)

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9. Sara Brickman Poetry Video Goes Viral

Sara Brickman has crafted a poem called “Talking Shit to Sadness.” The video embedded above features her performance at the 2015 National Poetry Slam.

For more poems by this writer, follow these links to listen to three more of her pieces: “Letter from the Water at Guantanamo Bay,” “Crazy Girls,” and “Mirror.” How do you react in times of sorrow?

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10. Amber Tamblyn Poetry Video Goes Viral

Amber Tamblyn, a Hollywood actress, has crafted a poem called “Untitled Actress.” The video embedded above features her performance at Art Share LA.

In the past, Tamblyn has written and published three poetry books. Follow these links to listen to three more of her pieces: “Dear Demographic,” “Jane Doe,” and “When.”

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11. Rudy Francisco Poetry Video Goes Viral

Do you find it difficult to be truthful with yourself? Rudy Francisco tested this out with a piece he crafted called “My Honest Poem.”

The video embedded above features his performance at a “Button Poetry Live” event. Follow these links to listen to three more of his poems: “Lopsided,” “Complainers,” and “Adrenaline Rush.”

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12. Rachel Wiley Poetry Video Goes Viral

Have you ever encountered issues with body image? Rachel Wiley has crafted a powerful poem to address this topic called “For Fat Girls Who Considered Starvation When Bulimia Wasn’t Enough.”

The video embedded above features Wiley’s performance at the 2015 Individual World Poetry Slam. Follow these links to listen to three more of her poems: “10 Honest Thoughts on Being Loved by a Skinny Boy,” “Dry Cake Wishes and Tap Water Dreams,” and “Mary The Elephant.”

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13. Iain Kohn Poetry Video Goes Viral

How do you deal with moments of loneliness? Iain Kohn has crafted a powerful poem to address this topic called “Terrified of People.”

The video embedded above features Kohn’s recitation at the Get Lit Classic Slam. Click here to watch a collaborative poetry performance featuring Kohn, Pathum Madigapola, and Khamal Iwuanyanwu.

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14. Crystal Valentine Crafts a Poem Inspired By Donald Trump

Have you been following the United States presidential race? Crystal Valentine has crafted a poem called “Crystal Gets Taken in for Interrogation After Assassinating Donald Trump.” The video embedded above features her performance at the 2015 Individual World Poetry Slam.

Click on these links to listen to three more of Valentine’s works: “Black Privilege,” “Tempest,” and ‘A Voter’s Problem.” For more Donald Trump-themed videos, follow these links to watch “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Trump (Grinch Parody)” and “Donald Trump Children’s Book (ghost written by Jimmy Kimmel).” Have you ever created politically-inspired art work?

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15. Melissa Newman-Evans Poetry Video Goes Viral

Melissa Newman-Evans has crafted a powerful poem called “9 Things I Would Like to Tell to Every Teenage Girl.” The video embedded above features Walker’s performance at the 2015 National Poetry Slam.

Follow these links to listen to two more of Newman-Evans’ poems: “Advice From Cosmo” and “The Hurricane.” If you were given the opportunity, what advice and words of wisdom would you pass down to the younger generation?

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16. कविता- अलमारी

(गूगल से साभार चित्र) कविता- अलमारी कमरे मे माँ की अलमारी नही अलमारीनुमा पूरा कमरा है जिसमे मेरे लिए सूट है,साडी है सामी के लिए खिलौना है इनके लिए परफ्यूम है सन्नी के लिए चाकलेट है एक जोडी चप्पल है सेल मे खरीदा आचार,मुरब्बा और मसाला है बर्तनो का सैट है शगुन के लिफाफा है […]

The post कविता- अलमारी appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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17. Sedoka Poems to Bring in Spring

I just realized that March 9, 2016 is my 10 year blogoversary!!! Hard to believe how fast that has flown. Back then I was doing a lot of parent blogging and also reviewing children's books more, as I was an elementary school librarian. I haven't been blogging as much lately, what with a new job since last summer (Reference librarian in a small college close to home = YAY!), but I am still

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18. Monthly Book List: Our Five Favorite Poetry Books

Poetry month banner wo books

April is National Poetry Month! We’ve selected our favorite poetry books for you to share with your readers of meter and rhyme.

From clever poetry favorites and nursery rhymes, to craftily created illustrations and novels in verse, you’ll find poetry for all ages to inspire even the most reluctant future-poets.

If you work with children in need, you can find these books of poetry and many more on the First Book Marketplace.

For Pre-K –K (Ages 3-6):

Neighborhood Mother Goose  Written and illustrated by Nina Crews

Traditional nursery rhymes get a fun, modern treatment in this wonderfully kid-friendly collection. Illustrated with clever photos of diverse kids in a city setting, it’s a fantastic addition to any preschool library!

For 1st and 2nd Grade (Ages 6-8):

sail_away

Sail Away Poems by Langston Hughes illustrated by Ashley Bryan

Legendary illustrator Ashley Bryan pairs the lush language of Langston Hughes with vibrant cut paper collages in this wonderful assortment of poems that celebrate the sea. It’s a read-aloud dream!

 

For 3rd & 4th grade (Ages 8-10):

where_sidewalkWhere the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings Written and illustrated by Shel Silverstein

Generations of readers have laughed themselves silly over the poems in this wildly imaginative collection from a beloved poet. Several members of our staff can recite poems from this book from memory – just ask. Giggles guaranteed!

 


For 5th and 6th Grade (Ages 10-12):

animal_poetryNational Geographic Book of Animal Poetry: 200 Poems with Photographs That Squeak, Soar, and Roar! Edited by J. Patrick Lewis

An incredible gift for any kid, family, or teacher! Stunning National Geographic photos fill the pages of this huge anthology that introduces kids to poems both old and new. It’s a book they’ll never outgrow and will pull of the shelf again and again.

 Grades 7 & up (Ages 13+)

red_pencil_2The Red Pencil Written by Andrea Davis Pinkney, with illustrations by Shane W. Evans

Both heartbreaking and hopeful, this beautiful novel in verse tells the story of a Sudanese refugee whose spirit is wounded by war but reawakened by creativity and inspiration. Readers will be moved by this story of optimism in the face of great obstacles.

The post Monthly Book List: Our Five Favorite Poetry Books appeared first on First Book Blog.

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19. Beverly Slapin reviews SMUGGLING CHEROKEE by Kim Shuck

Editor's Note: Beverly Slapin's review of Smuggling Cherokee may not be used elsewhere without her written permission. All rights reserved. Copyright 2015. Slapin is currently the publisher/editor of De Colores: The Raza Experience in Books for Children.

~~~~~

Shuck, Kim (Tsalagi, Sauk/Fox, Polish), Smuggling Cherokee. Greenfield Review Press, 2005; grades 7-up

Smuggling Cherokee is full of powerful insight: part autobiography, part musing, part outrageous wit, and part punch-in-the-gut startling. Kim Shuck is a visionary: she knows who she is, what she comes from, and what she’s been given to do. Her poems are honest and passionate, and, without polemic, will shatter just about every stereotype about Indians that anyone has ever espoused: The man asks me,/ “Do you speak Cherokee?”/ But it’s all I ever speak/ The end goal of several generations of a/ smuggling project./ We’ve slipped the barriers,/ Evaded border guards./ I smile,/ “Always.”

Some of Kim’s poems are tenderly, achingly beautiful: The water I used to drink spent time/ Inside a pitched basket/ It adopted the internal shape/ Took on the taste of pine/ And changed me forever. And for those who didn’t know, or didn’t care to know, the many faces of depredation:

I call the slave master
Who lost track of my ancestor
A blanket for you
In gratitude.

I call the soldier
With a tired arm
Who didn’t cut deeply enough
Into my great-great grandfather’s chest to kill clean.
I return your axehead
Oiled and sharpened
Wield it against others with equal skill.

Will the boarding school officer come up?
The one who didn’t take my Gram
Because of her crippled leg.
No use as a servant – such a shame with that face…

Finally the shopkeeper’s wife
Who traded spoiled cans of fruit
For baskets that took a year each to make.
Thank you, Faith, for not poisoning
Quite all
Of my
Family.

Blankets for each of you,
And let no one say
That I am not
Grateful for your care.

Smuggling Cherokee, as with all of Kim Shuck’s poems, will resonate with Indian middle and high school readers. Students who are not Indian may not “get” some of them the first time around, but they will, eventually, if given the space to sit with them.

Kim Shuck—a poet, teacher, fine artist and parent of at least three—teaches college courses in Native Short Literature, creates phenomenal beadwork and basketry, curates museum collections, teaches origami to young children as an introduction to geometry, grows vegetables, converses with trees, takes long walks, and meditates while doing piles of laundry. She won the Native Writers of the Americas First Book Award for Smuggling Cherokee, as well as the Diane Decorah Award for Poetry, she has a fierce and gentle heart, and I’m honored to call her “friend.”

—Beverly Slapin

(Note: Smuggling Cherokee can be ordered from kshuck@tsoft.net. Discount for class sets, free shipping.)

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20. Patrick Roche Poetry Video Goes Viral

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21. Olivia Fantini Poetry Video Goes Viral

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22. Brenna Twohy’s Poem on Anxiety Goes Viral

How do you cope with the nervousness and uncertainty that accompanies anxiety? Brenna Twohy crafted a poem in response to this question called “Anxiety: A Ghost Story.”

The video embedded above features Twohy’s performance at the 2015 National Poetry Slam. Click on these links to hear two more of her pieces: “In Which I Do Not Fear Harvey Dent” and “Another Rape Poem.”

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23. Anthony McPherson Poetry Video Goes Viral

How do you sort out your feelings in response to controversial issues? Anthony McPherson decided to create a poem called “All Lives Matter: 1800s Edition.”

The video embedded above features Roche’s performance at the 2015 Individual World Poetry Slam. Follow these links to listen to three more of McPherson’s pieces: “Genesis,” “Checkmate,” and “King TuT.”

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24. Blythe Baird Poetry Video Goes Viral

How do you deal with body image issues? Blythe Baird decided to create a poem called “When the Fat Girl Gets Skinny.”

The video embedded above features Baird’s performance at the 2015 National Poetry Slam. Follow these links to listen to three more of her pieces: “She Doesn’t Need to See the Menu,” “Girl Code 101,” and “Skirt Steak Girls.”

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25. Poem on Paris Attacks by Karuna Ezara Parikh Goes Viral

A photo posted by Karuna E Parikh (@karunaezara) on

In the wake of the tragedy that has struck Paris, one blogger has decided to craft a poem and share her feelings with the world. Karuna Ezara Parikh has written a piece that has gone viral on the internet.

Parikh’s piece expresses criticism for the lack of attention that the tragedies of Beirut and Baghdad has received. She publicized her moving poem on three social media platforms: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We’ve showcased the full piece in the Instagram post embedded above—what do you think?

While Parikh does acknowledge that Paris is a city that is beloved by many people, she also feels that “it’s time to pray for humanity. It is time to make all places beloved. It’s time to pray for the world.” (via The Huffington Post)

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