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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Videos, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 854
1. ScreenJunkies Creates an ‘Honest Trailer’ For ‘Divergent’

Have you ever confused two dystopian stories with one another?

The team behind the ScreenJunkies YouTube channel created a hilarious “Honest Trailer” for the first installment of the Divergent film franchise.

Th video embedded above includes mentions of The Hunger Games, Harry Potter, The Fault in Our Stars, Twilight, and The Spectacular Now. (via Entertainment Weekly)

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2. Video Sunday: “Leave out that Oxford comma”

I had the pleasure of seeing just the most delightful show the other day.  The Snow Queen’s run is ending, but you can at least enjoy this little number from it.  It’s been caught in my head all week.  I bestow that honor now upon you.

New York News

And the award for best set design in a book trailer goes to . . .

Mildly miffed that this trailer came out in February but that I only found it now, though.

And now the Weird Al video that shall outlive him thanks to English teachers around the world.  They shall play it from now until the internet burns down to a dark, black piece of coal.

Just when you think they’ve done absolutely everything one can do with the physical book, they turn around and come up with something COMPLETELY NEW!  Trust the Japanese to come up with something this lovey.  More information can be found here.

MOTION SILHOUETTE from KYOT∆® on Vimeo.

Thanks to Marci for the link.

Finally, I was shocked that some friends of mine had forgotten this old Italian video where a fellow performs fake English.  So here we go.  Fake English for one and all.  Love this.

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3 Comments on Video Sunday: “Leave out that Oxford comma”, last added: 7/22/2014
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3. Pixels: When 80′s video games take over the world

New York invasion by 8-bits creatures !
PIXELS is Patrick Jean’ latest short film, shot on location in New York.

Written, directed by : Patrick Jean
Director of Photograhy : Matias Boucard
SFX by Patrick Jean and Onemoreprod

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4. Awesome Animted show coming in 2016 Master Jiang and the Six Kingdoms

A new animated show is coming to China in 2016… and it looks awesome.

Master-Jiang-and-the-Six-Kingdoms-2 Master-Jiang-and-the-Six-Kingdoms tumblr_n8cc3x8CXr1rb1rgoo2_1280 tumblr_n8cc3x8CXr1rb1rgoo4_1280 tumblr_n8cc3x8CXr1rb1rgoo6_1280

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5. I enjoyed Weird Al Yankovic's WORD CRIMES video much more than the original song

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6. Weird Al Yankovic Releases the ‘Word Crimes’ Music Video

What are your grammar pet peeves? Grammy Award-winning musician and picture book author Weird Al Yankovic has released a new music video for his song “Word Crimes” (a parody of Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”).

The video (embedded above), the second of eight being released from July 14th to July 21st, was unleashed earlier this afternoon and has already attracted more than 7,900 “thumbs ups” on YouTube. An announcement on Facebook has drawn more than 11,000 “likes.”

In an interview with NPR, Yankovic explained that he wrote this parody partly because of his personal obsession with grammar. The song itself discusses conjugation, contractions, spelling, homophones, proper word usage, and more. It can be found on Yankovic’s 14th studio album, “Mandatory Fun.” Follow this link to check out the lyrics.

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7. ‘Alive at 5′ Book Trailer

Journalist Linda Bond has written her first book, a romantic thriller called Alive at 5, which is out today from Entangled Publishing. The book is inspired by her experience as a journalist and even draws on real newsroom personalities. Check it out:

TV news reporter Samantha Steele is one panic attack away from losing her job. Future on the line, she sets up an easy feature story — following her mentor on an exhilarating adventure vacation. When her mentor dies while skydiving, Samantha suspects he was murdered, and her investigative instincts lead her to gorgeous thrill-seeker Zack Hunter.

To help promote the book, Bond wrote, produced and directed an ambitious six-minute book trailer. The high-action video features scuba diving, sky diving and motorcycle rides. We’ve embedded the video above for you to check out.

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8. Calder's circus

Getting ready for another week of art camp...


I don't think I'll ever get tired of this video.

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9. Book Trailer Premiere – Muddy Max: The Mystery of Marsh Creek by Elizabeth Rusch

Occasionally I’ll premiere a book trailer here or there.  Particularly when it’s from a children’s author whose work I admire.  If the name “Elizabeth Rusch” is ringing some bells, there may be a reason for that.  Back in the day I was a huge fan of her The Mighty Mars Rovers as well as that gorgeous Volcano Rising and For the Love of Music : the remarkable story of Maria Anna Mozart.  Now she’s debuting her middle-grade graphic novel Muddy Max: The Mystery of Marsh Creek August 5 with Andrews McMeel/AMP for Kids. Her tech savvy 13-year-old son made her book trailer, which is sweet.

Enjoy!

share save 171 16 Book Trailer Premiere   Muddy Max: The Mystery of Marsh Creek by Elizabeth Rusch

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10. What Books Have Given You a ‘Hangover’?

How do you feel when you finish reading a really good book? The Epic Reads team has posted a video about “Book Hangovers” on their YouTube channel.

The video embedded above features Johnna Scrabis, Riley Soloner, and Abby Holland discussing the effects of “book hangovers.” These bibliphiles feel that endings can sometimes lead to an unpleasant “void” as a consequence.

Do you agree? Which books have made you suffer through “hangovers” in the past?

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11. Free speech, reputation, and the Defamation Act 2013

Freedom of expression is a central tenet of almost every modern society. This freedom however often comes into conflict with other rights, and can be misused and exploited. New media – especially on the internet – and new forms of media intrusion bring added complexity to old tensions between the individual’s rights to reputation and privacy on the one hand, and freedom of expression and the freedom of the press on the other.

How should free speech be balanced with the right to reputation? This question lies at the heart of defamation law. In the following videos, Lord Neuberger and Dr Matthew Collins QC discuss current challenges in defamation law, and the implications of recent changes to legislation enacted in the Defamation Act 2013. Lord Neuberger highlights urgent issues including privacy, confidentiality, data protection, freedom of information, and the Internet.

In this video, he draws attention to recent high-profile events such as the Leveson Inquiry and the phone-hacking trials, and points up key features of the new legislation.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Dr Matthew Collins QC outlines his perspective on the likely long-term impact of the 2013 Act.

Click here to view the embedded video.

The Rt Hon the Lord Neuberger of Abbotsbury Kt PC is President of the Supreme Court of the United Court of the United Kingdom. Dr Matthew Collins QC is a barrister based in Melbourne, Australia. He is also a Senior Fellow at the University of Melbourne, a door tenant at One Brick Court chambers in London, and the author of Collins on Defamation.

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The post Free speech, reputation, and the Defamation Act 2013 appeared first on OUPblog.

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12. Gods and men in The Iliad and The Odyssey

The Ancient Greek gods are all the things that humans are — full of emotions, constantly making mistakes — with the exception of their immortality. It makes their lives and actions often comical or superficial — a sharp contrast to the humans that are often at their mercy. The gods can show their favor, or displeasure; men and women are puppets in their world. Barry B. Powell, author of a new free verse translation of Homer’s The Odyssey, examines the gods, fate, divine interventions, and what it means in the classic epic poem.

Fate and free in The Iliad and The Odyssey

Click here to view the embedded video.

What role do the Gods play in The Iliad and The Odyssey?

Click here to view the embedded video.

Who is Hercules and how does he play a role in The Odyssey?

Click here to view the embedded video.

Greek Gods versus modern omnibenevolent God

Click here to view the embedded video.

Barry B. Powell is Halls-Bascom Professor of Classics Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His new free verse translation of The Odyssey was published by Oxford University Press in 2014. His translation of The Iliad was published by Oxford University Press in 2013.

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13. What can poetry teach us about war?

There can be no area of human experience that has generated a wider range of powerful feelings than war. Jon Stallworthy’s celebrated anthology The New Oxford Book of War Poetry spans from Homer’s Iliad, through the First and Second World Wars, the Vietnam War, and the wars fought since. The new edition, published to mark the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, includes a new introduction and additional poems from David Harsent and Peter Wyton amongst others. In the three videos below Jon Stallworthy discusses the significance and endurance of war poetry. He also talks through his updated selection of poems for the second edition, thirty years after the first.

Jon Stallworthy examines why Britain and America responded very differently through poetry to the outbreak of the Iraq War.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Jon Stallworthy on his favourite war poems, from Thomas Hardy to John Balaban.

Click here to view the embedded video.

As The New Oxford Book of War Poetry enters its second edition, editor Jon Stallworthy talks about his reasons for updating it.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Jon Stallworthy is a poet and Professor Emeritus of English Literature at Oxford University. He is also a Fellow of the British Academy. He is the author of many distinguished works of poetry, criticism, and translation. Among his books are critical studies of Yeats’s poetry, and prize-winning biographies of Louis MacNiece and Wilfred Owen (hailed by Graham Greene as ‘one of the finest biographies of our time’). He has edited and co-edited numerous anthologies, including the second edition of The New Oxford Book of War Poetry.

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14. Call for Submissions: Blue Skirt Productions and Blue Skirt Press

We have three calls for submissions right now. One is for our website: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, visual art, video and audio. The second is for our Microfiction magazine. Those are ongoing at this point.

And the final one is for an anthology on the theme of the loss of a parent. Deadline for the anthology: Sep. 30, 2014

For more information, please visit our official submissions page. Thank you!

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15. Poet Argues She Speaks English in Three Different Ways

How many ways can one speak the English language?

In a spoken word piece delivered at TED Salon NY 2014, poet Jamila Lyiscott argues that she speaks her native tongue in three different ways. We’ve embedded a video showcasing the entire performance above.

According to the TED blog, Lyiscott calls herself a trilingual orator. She speaks “fluently at home, with Caribbean parents, at school in ‘proper English,’ and with her friends in a language that is as formal and rules-based as the other two.”

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16. Sovereign debt in the light of eternity

From Greece to the United States, across Europe and in South America – sovereign debt and the shadow of sovereign debt crisis have loomed over states across the world in recent decades. Why is sovereign debt such a pressing problem for modern democracies? And what are the alternatives? In this video Lee Buchheit discusses the emergence of sovereign debt as a global economic reality. He critiques the relatively recent reliance of governments on sovereign debt as a way to manage budget deficits. Buchheit highlights in particular the problems inherent in expecting judges to solve sovereign debt issues through restructuring. As he explores the legal, financial and political dimensions of sovereign debt management, Buchheit draws a provocative conclusion about the long-term implications of sovereign debt, arguing that “what we have done is to effectively preclude the succeeding generations from their own capacity to borrow”.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Buchheit speaks at the launch of Sovereign Debt Management, edited by Rosa M. Lastra and Lee C. Buchheit.

Lee C. Buchheit is a partner based in the New York office of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. Dr Rosa María Lastra, who introduces Buchheit’s lecture, is Professor in International Financial and Monetary Law at the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS), Queen Mary, University of London.

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17. Video Sunday: MIT’s Faculty Lounge and Other Mysteries

No time to dilly-dally, people! We’ve most of our peers and betters living it up in Las Vegas. Let’s soothe our sorrows of not attending ourselves in some lovely videos then, eh whot?

First off, you may have known that there was a recent Boston Children’s Book Trivia Night. But did you know there was video from the event as well? Indeedy.  Just LOOK at that turnout!  That’s Jack Gantos moderating.  The only trouble with this vid is that it doesn’t contain the answer to his trivia question.  Um . . . anyone want to tell it to me?

In other news, Eoin Colfer.  Not that his existence is news exactly.  It’s just worth making your day brighter to watch him talk a little about . . . well, pretty much anything.  In this case, on getting a literary agent.  Granted, he looks a bit like a great big blue floating head, but I care not.

In movie news, The True Meaning of Smekday by Adam Rex is finally finding itself in film form.  Retitled Home, it has made some interesting changes. The title, for one.   J-Lo is now just O. And  Tip is a teenager (one suspects the film executives thought kids would start picking up their own parents’ car keys if they saw a kid in a movie driving).  We shall see.

Awwww.  A Harry Potter rap!  It’s never too late folks (and note the complete and utter lack of snark in the lyrics).

Thanks to bookshelves of doom for the link.

And for our off-topic video, this one actually mentions Hagrid at one point (continuing our Harry Potter theme).  So we’re awfully close to being on-topic.  It’s one woman, seventeen different British accents, and one rocking pair of fantastically 1985 glasses.

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18. ‘Epic Rap Battles of History’ Video Pits Stephen King Vs. Edgar Allan Poe

A new video on the “Epic Rap Battles of History” YouTube channel pits two horror masters against one another: The Shining author Stephen King vs. The Raven poet Edgar Allan Poe. In your opinion, who’s the winner?

Comedian Zach Sherwin plays King and writer George Watsky plays Poe. Both Sherwin and Watsky contributed to writing the rap song itself along with two of the web series creators, Nice Peter and epicLLOYD. Which authors would you nominate to appear in future rap battles?

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19. Video Sunday: Not that anyone doubed LeVar’s godlike qualities

A couple thoughts on that video. First off, it is sung by author Deborah Underwood (whatta pretty pretty voice, eh?) and editor Arthur A. Levine (whatta pretty pretty voice, eh?) at what Vimeo calls an “agency retreat in Brandon, Vermont”. So I had to wonder what precisely an “agency retreat” really is.  Well, there’s a perfectly logical explanation for it right here.  I wouldn’t mind having the chance to go on a retreat but what I really want is to be in a band.  Anyone wanna start one with me?  I can’t play any instruments but I do know all the word to “Shoop” by Salt n’ Pepa.  Does that count for anything?

And now, ladies and gentlemen . . . . why we love LeVar Burton.

ReadingRainbow 500x307 Video Sunday: Not that anyone doubed LeVars godlike qualities

Thanks to Jules for the link!

Our Kickstarter video of the day (since we always have at least one per Video Sunday these days) is a good one.  Remember the Slate article that came out earlier this year called “This Is What a Librarian Looks Like”?  Well the fellow behind the piece wants to go to ALA and do something with a huge swath of librarians.  And for a modest sum of $3,000 too.  Granted he’s already doubled his goal, but no reason why he shouldn’t triple it, eh?

AlexandriaStillBurns 500x375 Video Sunday: Not that anyone doubed LeVars godlike qualities

 

Oh my! A hat tip as well as a big thank you to Travis Jonker for locating this video of author/illustrator John Hendrix. As a big time fan of his work, I found this a real treat.

Thanks to 100 Scope Notes for the link.

I wasn’t able to make Book Expo this year and, by extension, wasn’t able to attend the BEA Children’s Breakfast.  So this Mem Fox speech at said breakfast is NOT persuading me that I wasn’t missing anything, people.  Doggone it.

And for your off-topic video of the day, ain’t nothing hotter than women who make classical musical funny and incredibly difficult all at the same time.  Love this stuff.

 

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20. Haruki Murakami Celebrated in an Animated Video

Dr. Ilana Simons has created a short animated film celebrating Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. In a Psychology Today blog post, Simons calls him her "favorite living writer" and credits him for inspiring "grand journeys of imagination without using too many adjectives." We’ve embedded the entire film, About Haruki Murakami, above--what do you think? continued...

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21. Is the Clickhole Calvin and Hobbes Cartoon Illegal Child Porn?

Clickhole, the Onion’s answer to Buzzfeed and Clickhole, has posted an audacious NSFW video parody, “If You Grew Up With ‘Calvin and Hobbes,’ You Need to Watch This Now.” Spoilers below for those of you who aren’t already in custody haven’t seen it yet:

Clickhole’s video of Calvin and Hobbes having sex pretty much nukes anything an art critic has ever described as transgressive, but in so doing it also raises a serious legal concern. As you may recall, under 18 U.S. Code Sec. 1466A, U.S. law banning child pornography is not limited to visual depictions of real children.  This has already led to prosecutions for possession of comics or cartoons – in fact, animated child sex is reportedly being used as, well, clickbait by law enforcement.

Could watching the Clickhole Calvin and Hobbes video get you sent to jail?

Let’s go exploring!

One key aspect of current U.S. law — setting aside other countries that may have more expansive prohibitions – is that it reflects an adaptive response to the Supreme Court’s conclusion that earlier versions were too broad in ways that violated the First Amendment. As a result Section 1466A only bans non-realistic visual depictions such as the Calvin and Hobbes video if they are obscene or lack serious artistic, literary, political or scientific value.

Here, in brief, is why Congress went with that language. In a series of decisions several decades ago, the Supreme Court came up with a standard for obscenity that, it believes, passes constitutional muster. The standard is known as the Miller test for determining obscenity, and it has three key components: the material appeals to prurient interest, is patently offensive and lacks serious literary, artistic, political or scientific value. By echoing this language, Congress hoped – and so far has mostly succeeded – in establishing a standard for visual depictions of minors in drawings, cartoons, sculptures or paintings that would survive a constitutional challenge.

1466A(a)(2) and (b)(2) ban, among other things, graphic images of a minor engaging in actual or simulated bestiality that lack serious artistic, literary, political or scientific value. Before we get to the question of value, it’s worth noting that the statute goes on to define “graphic” to refer to images in which “a viewer can observe any part of the genitals or pubic area of any depicted person or animal.” In essence, these sections take a shortcut past the prurient and patently offensive elements of the obscenity test, which are determined by community standards, by providing an absolute bright-line standard.

Watch the Clickhole Calvin and Hobbes video carefully and you’ll see that it arguably does not portray the genitals or pubic area of either character – the very sort of thing that a strategic company lawyer might tell a company producing such a video to do if it was determined to post it. That’s not a slam-dunk conclusion, though. Calvin is drawn in a way that resembles the iconic “Love Is …” one-panel cartoon, the product of a time before contemporary anti-child-porn laws as well as a strip that does not depict minors in sexual situations, at least in authorized versions.

Section 1466A(a)(1) and (b)(1) are somewhat more expansive. These provisions prohibit an obscene depiction of sexually explicit conduct, which extends to simulated bestiality and other sexual activity whether or not the genitals or pubic area appear.

What makes determining whether material is obscene particularly hard to determine is that the test looks to community standards – technically in regard to determining whether material appeals to the prurient interest or is patently offensive, but the community sensibility also tends to come into play in assessing whether a reasonable person would find that the material lacks socially redeeming value. This applies not only to a federal statute such as Section 1466A, but any state anti-obscenity or anti-child pornography laws under which the Calvin and Hobbes cartoon could be assessed.

This reliance on community standards has had the effect of balkanizing U.S. obscenity law. What is obscene in one jurisdiction can be perfectly legal in another. Case in point: the Christopher Handley case, which involved a manga collector. The Iowa district judge in that case concluded that 1466(a)(2) and (b)(2) are unconstitutional, but the 11th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals, which covers Florida, Georgia, and Alabama, expressly disagreed.

In short, if the science of law is, to quote Oliver Wendell Holmes, an art of prediction, the current constitutional definition of obscenity is a Magic 8 Ball.

Which also brings us to 18 USC 2252C, a related provision that prohibits knowingly embedding words or digital images into the source code of a website with the intent (a) to deceive a person into viewing material constituting obscenity or (b) to deceive a minor into viewing material harmful to minors on the Internet. If one is dealing with a judge or jury likely to conclude that the Calvin and Hobbes cartoon is obscene, there is an equally significant risk of being found guilty of using misleading words (the clickbait headline) and images (the still frame before playing) to trick either an adult or a minor into clicking play.

So to answer the question of whether Clickhole’s Calvin and Hobbes Cartoon is illegal, I’d have to say it depends – on the jurisdiction, on the prosecutor, the judge, the jury and the case presented by the defendant’s lawyers. And again, the rest of the world is not bound by our First Amendment jurisprudence and its definition of obscene, so there could be a greater risk elsewhere. There’s a substantial possibility, of course, that nothing will ever happen to Clickhole or any viewers of this video, but it’s not a risk that many lawyers would want their clients to take.

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22. Anna Curzan Questions “What Makes a Word ‘Real’?”

Do you consider “hangry” to be a genuine English word?

Anne Curzan, an English professor and language historian, gave a talk (embedded above) at a TEDx conference on “What makes a word ‘real’?” During her presentation, she mentioned several slang words including “defriend,” “adorkable,” and “YOLO.”

Here’s an excerpt from her talk: “So how does a word get into a dictionary? It gets in because we use it and we keep using it, and dictionary editors are paying attention to us. If you’re thinking, ‘But that lets all of us decide what words mean,’ I would say, ‘Yes it does, and it always has.’”

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23. The Beige Planet Podcast Kickstarter Recap for Talbot Toluca

A month ago I launched a Kickstarter campaign for my new comic puzzle book, “Talbot Toluca.”

After sleepless days and nights, I’m happy to report that it ended on a great note with the campaign exceeding its goal. Here’s a quick podcast recap with Al and Paul from the Beige Planet podcast talking about the experience and things that I’ve learned from it.

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24. Video: Tarik and the Roots performs a Harry Potter Rap on the Jimmy Fallon Show

Tarik and The Roots performed a Harry Potter-themed rap on the Jimmy Fallon show. Love. :-)

(Thanks to Mediabistro)

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25. Short Animation About An Adorable But Self-Obsessed Robot

A small robot is born and sets out into the world, happily performing his simple tasks. Suddenly, in a small but profound way, the world as he knows it changes. What follows is a downward spiral of jealousy, resentment and unrestrained desire.

This animated musical short features Rob Fetters’ pop-rock gem, “Desire.” Story, Direction and Animation by Scott Thierauf. Sound Design and Creative Collaboration by Grant Kattmann, Editorial by Theresa Bruce, and Color Grade by Chris Joecken. ©2014 Red Echo Post redechopost.com robfetters.net

“Desire” from the album “Saint Ain’t” available on iTunes:
itunes.apple.com/us/album/saint-aint/id774318896
itunes.apple.com/us/album/desire/id774318896?i=774319030

 

DESIRE – The Animated Musical Short from Scott Thierauf on Vimeo.

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