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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Poetry, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 3,640
1. Poetry Blogger’s Collection Becomes a Bestseller

chaser of the lightTyler Knott Gregson’s new poetry anthology has become a bestseller. The collection, entitled Chasers of the Light: Poems from the Typewriter Series, has appeared on the hardcover nonfiction lists at The Chicago Tribune and The Wall Street Journal.

Gregson regularly posts pieces for the “Daily Haiku on Love” series and the “Typewriter Series” on his blog. The book features poems exclusively from the ”Typewriter Series.” Since launching his blog , Gregson has amassed 259,000 followers on Tumblr, 184,000 followers on Instagram, and 31,000 followers on Twitter.

Here’s more from The Wall Street Journal: “According to the publisher, there are 50,000 copies in print, with more in the works. Soon, the book will be sold at the women’s clothing chain, Anthropologie. The author’s social-media audience—heavily skewed toward young women—was important for Perigee, which last published a book of poetry four decades ago.”

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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2. Poetry Monday: Trees

A nice poem to start off your week! Today, we’ve chosen a poem from our new fall title, Lend a Hand: Poems About Givingto share with you:

Trees

I doubt

many people

will pay much attention

to a few scrawny saplings

on this harsh city street.

But if any of these people

are here years from now,

enjoying the shade

in the heat of the summer

or the dazzle of color

on the branches in fall,

maybe they’ll remember

what this street once looked like

and go to a place

in need of some trees,

and plant a few saplings

like I’m doing today.

Lend a Hand

If you’re interested in planting trees in your area, check out some of these great organizations:

TreePeople (Based in Los Angeles)

Million Trees NYC (Based in New York City)

The Nature Conservancy – Plant a Billion Trees (National)


Filed under: New Releases Tagged: books, lend a hand, planting trees, poetry, poetry Monday, trees

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3. Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems

Before we start chatting about specific 2014 picture books, take a moment to read the Caldecott criteria. They’re posted over there on the right, but I will help you find the important parts. Here they are, in part:

In identifying a “distinguished American picture book for children,” defined as illustration, committee members need to consider:
  1. Excellence of execution in the artistic technique employed;
  2. Excellence of pictorial interpretation of story, theme, or concept;
  3. Appropriateness of style of illustration to the story, theme or concept;
  4. Delineation of plot, theme, characters, setting, mood or information through the pictures;
  5. Excellence of presentation in recognition of a child audience.

Tattoo those categories onto the inside of your eyelids so you will understand why, when we talk about books, we stick to the same points over and over. We have to. The committee discusses all books in light of the published criteria, and the chair keeps everyone close to these five main ideas. 

janeczko firefly july2 Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems It’s tricky to start our discussion this year with a collection of poems, because it brings up the age-old question of whether this is a picture book or an illustrated book. I refer you to the definitions. Let’s just agree (for the moment, at least) that this fits the definition of a picture book as it is essentially a visual experience. Feel free to say otherwise in the comments. That’s just not where I want to go at the moment.

This handsome volume presents 8 to 10 poems per season and, just as the subtitle says (“A Year of Very Short Poems”), each poem is very short. This gives the volume a clear arc and allows the illustrations to gently explore how color and line might change over the course of a year, as the seasons unfold. The paper cover and the case cover are the same, and the endpapers are a lovely muted blue. Though I am generally a fan of flashy endpapers, it makes sense that these are calm, given the energy that illustrator Melissa Sweet brings to each spread.

Spring is the first season, and the first page is a celebration of spring things, including a robin, which I love. There are also daffodils and other early-spring bulbs blooming. The small poems march on, but it is the illustrations that hold them together. As we move to summer, the Langston Hughes poem “Subway Rush Hour” is made summery by the bouquet of daisies that accompanies it. Summer moves on and the colors change as the leaves fall. The transition is seamless; indeed, the divisions between the seasons are subtle and easy to miss, much like the artificial dates on the calendar that mark the change. By wintertime, the hues have completely changed–darkened by the lack of sun, yet whitened by the presence of snow.

Sweet’s art, a joyous combination of watercolor, gouache, and mixed-media collage, tells each poem’s story while allowing the young reader to consider each poem for herself. Her use of color and line build each illustration, sometimes joining two poems (such as” Fog” and “Uses for Fog”) together on a double-page spread, other times allowing the gutter to divide the scenes. The art is completely appropriate to the collection; indeed, it’s her illustrations that make these poems accessible to the child audience (and here the audience could be as young as 3 and as old as an appreciative adult). The mood is set by the illustrations, and Sweet does not bore the reader with trite homages to each season–she requires the reader to look deeper at each spread and think about the connection to the words.

I just looked up the part of the definitions about the term “distinguished,” and here that is:

  1. “Distinguished” is defined as:
    1. Marked by eminence and distinction; noted for significant achievement.
    2. Marked by excellence in quality.
    3. Marked by conspicuous excellence or eminence.
    4. Individually distinct.

Most of the books we will talk about this fall and winter are distinguished, and this one certainly is. Each spread is filled with emotion and care, with design meshing seamlessly with color and line. There are many places to look, but it never looks busy or overdone, as each page turn creates its own little world.

Though the real committee can (and will) compare this book to Sweet’s other 2014 title (The Right Word), I have found it difficult to do that in a single blog post. So, feel free to compare if you wish, but know that Martha will be talking about that one soon. For me, I cannot choose between these two very special books. Perhaps Sweet will “pull a Klassen” and receive two phone calls from Chicago in January.

 

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The post Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems appeared first on The Horn Book.

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4. Call for Submissions: Glassworks

Glassworks, the literary magazine of Rowan University’s Master of Arts in Writing graduate program, invites writers to submit work to be considered for publication.

Glassworks publishes nonfiction, fiction, poetry, hybrid pieces, craft essays, new media, and art both digitally and in print. We are currently reading until December 15, 2014.


More information about the magazine, sample issues, and our submission manager can be found at our website.


Submissions link.

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5. Call for Submissions: Sun and Sandstone

Sun & Sandstone, a national literary journal of undergraduate writing published annually by Rocky Mountain College, is now accepting submissions for its 2015 issue. Publishable genres include poetry, creative nonfiction, short fiction, and one act plays.

For complete submission guidelines, please visit our website.

Deadline: February 28, 2015

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6. Call for Submissions: Cooper Street Journal

Cooper Street, an online publication sponsored by the Rutgers University Camden MFA program’s student organization, is looking for fiction and poetry for our second issue, slated for a January release. All interested writers are welcome. Please send work as word documents (.doc or .docx) via email to:

ru.cooperstreetATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

using the following format for the Subject: “Last name – Genre.” We’re interested in stories and poems about cities, particularly those set in the Northeast. But we’ll consider all subjects if the work is interesting and strong. If you have creative non-fiction, we ask that you please save it for an upcoming issue.

Additional guidelines

Fiction: Send either one story of no more than 5,000 words (although stories of 3,000 words or less are especially welcome) or send up to three flash fiction pieces of no more than 600 words each.

Poetry: Send three to five poems as a single attachment, one poem per page.

Submitters may view our May 2014 issue at our website.

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7. Science Literacy Moments #alsc14

“Pretend the window is a screen,” said poet Susan Blackaby at this morning’s #alsc14 session “The Poetry of Science.” People spend so much time with their eyes glued to their electronic devices that they’re liable to miss what’s going on in their environment. Imagine if people gave as much concentration to nature as they give to their computer screens. How many hawks would they see? What other wonders would they encounter?

Author Margarita Engle joined today’s panel, discussing how she uses both poetry and her science background to advocate for animal and environment conservation. As a child, Engle said, “No curiosity was too small for concentration.” She made the point that the phrase “the spirit of wonder” is applicable to both science and poetry. Because of this commonality, it’s possible to interest poetry loving kids in science phenomena and give science fans the chance to experiment with language.

Poet Janet Wong said that it’s easy–and vital–to create science literacy moments in the classroom and at the library. The key is to be bold. “Science and technology are accessible to people if they’re not afraid.” As gatekeepers of information, teachers and librarians should embrace the responsibility to expose kids to all subjects. Linking language and science may be a key way to make science more approachable. It doesn’t even have to be an elaborate lesson: just a few science literacy moments a week will have a lasting impact on children’s lives.

Check out these great resources:

Jill’s post about Thursday’s edition of “The Science of Poetry”

Presenter Sylvia Vardell’s Poetry for Children blog

Sylvia Vardell and Janet Wong’s blog and book, The Poetry Friday Anthology.

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8. Poetry with kids, Storified

Today on Twitter Sally Thomas wondered aloud what a ‘poetry-centered curriculum’ would look like, and a marvelous discussion ensued. Kortney of One Deep Drawer went to the trouble of Storifying the conversation—what a gem she is! Do hasten to her blog and enjoy it. (This link goes to her intro post, which links in turn to the Storify.)

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9. Poetry Competition: Gemini Magazine

Gemini Magazine is now accepting entries for its fifth annual Poetry Open competition.

Details at our website.

The grand prize is $1,000. Second place wins $100 and four honorable mentions will each receive $25. All six finalists will be published online in the March 2015 issue of Gemini.


The entry fee is $5 for each batch of three poems. 


Email and postmark deadline: January 2, 2015.

We are open to any type of poetry, any subject matter, any length. Scroll down the Poetry Open page to see the broad range of work from previous winners and finalists.

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10. 2015 Summer Poetry Residency: Poetry Center, University of Arizona

2015 Summer Residency Contest

Judge: Eduardo C. Corral

Since 1994, the Poetry Center’s Residency Program has offered writers an opportunity to develop their work. Beginning in Summer 2014, the Poetry Center will award one residency each summer for one poet to spend two weeks in Tucson, Arizona developing his/her work. The residency includes a $500 stipend and a two week stay in a studio apartment located within steps of the Center’s renowned library of contemporary poetry. The residency is offered between June 1 and August 31.


Deadline: December 15, 2015

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11. Writing Competition for Anthology: Stories of Resilience

Family Shelter Service Writing Contest: "Stories of Resilience"

Wheaton, IL -- Family Shelter Service recently published a new book entitled Hope Grows Here, a compilation of stories and artwork by survivors of domestic abuse, available online through Amazon and CreateSpace.

In recognition of October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the greater community is invited to add their voices to this exploration through the "Stories of Resilience" contest. Submissions are being sought that reflect the broad impact of abuse — through stories, personal essays or poems. Submissions will be considered for Volume II of Hope Grows Here.

Bestselling author Adriana Trigiani, whose best-known books include The Shoemaker's Wife and Big Stone Gap, will judge the contest submissions.

The "Stories of Resilience" contest will offer a first prize of $500 and two second prizes of $100. Entries will be accepted through October 20th, 2014 and winners will be announced at an event on November 6th, 2014. For submissions and contest details, please visit our website.

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12. The Science of Poetry @ #ALSC14

I love science, and I love poetry, so attending this session was a slam-dunk decision for me! This program was hosted by Sylvia Vardell and featured the poets Alma Flor Ada, Susan Blackaby, F. Isabel Campoy, & Janet Wong

Sylvia Vardell started us off by reading a poem call ed “Recycling” by Susan Blackaby, then walked us through the steps of “Take 5 with Poetry & Science:”
1. Read the poem aloud
2. Read again, inviting kids to participate in the reading
3. Discuss and research the poem and its topic
4. Connect the poem to a specific science topic with a demonstration or hands-on activity
5. Share more, related poems & other readings

Susan Blackaby shared some of her lovely poems and discussed the connections and similarities between poetry and science. Both science and poetry require precision, careful use of language, trying and trying again, and making revisions. Both use observation and description. Both are beautiful.
She also told us how, when her book Nest, Nook, & Cranny was reviewed by a biologist to make sure she had all the science right in her animal poems, there were no problems with the simple poems… but she had a wrong fact about beavers that forced her to make a change to her villanelle, a poetry form so complicated that “it can just reduce a poet to tears.”

Alma Flor Ada talked about the importance of children seeing “people like them” reflected in the people and subjects they read and study about. She said, “I think every child needs to know the richness and diversity of everyone who contributes to culture and science.” Ms. Ada read us a lovely essay from her and Isabel Campoy’s book Yes! We Are Latinos. Isabel Campoy followed with another moving essay from the book.

Janet Wong shared her insight on the value of reading poetry aloud with children, not just studying poems on the page. Reading aloud together, discussing poems, joining in and making connections with the poetry are much more engaging then dissecting them as a written assignment. She also talked about something that disturbs Janet Wong: at teacher conferences, her general poetry anthology sells out quickly, & some teachers say “Oh, you only have the science book left? I don’t do science.” That’s not responsible, Janet says, because teachers model their attitudes towards science to their students.

All of the poets talked about the ways that science poetry can be both a way into science for kids who think science isn’t for them… and a way into poetry for kids who think they aren’t poets.

The excellent handout from this session lists the books these poets have written, lots more books of science poetry, and a long list of websites to suppor science learning (and link to science poetry):

http://www.ala.org/alsc/sites/ala.org.alsc/files/content/NI14Handouts/ALSCHandoutScienceofPoetry.pdf

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13. Scots wha play: an English Shakespikedian Scottish independence referendum mashup

THE DATE: 18 September 2014, Fateful Day of Scotland’s Independence Referendum

THE PLACE: A Sceptred Isle

DRAMATIS PERSONAE:
Alexander the Great, First Minister of Scotland
Daveheart, Prime Minister of the Britons
Assorted Other Ministers, Attendant Lords, Lordlings, Politicos, and Camp Followers
Three Witches
A Botnet of Midges
The Internet (A Sprite)
A Helicopter
Dame Scotia
St George of Osborne
Boris de Balliol, Mayor of Londres
UKIP (An Acronym)
Chorus

ACT I: A Blasted Heath.

Enter THREE WITCHES

When shall we three meet again,
In thunder, lightning, or in rain?

When the referendum’s done,
When the battle’s lost and won.

That will be when Salmond’s gone.

Where the place?

Hampstead Heath.

Better Together unto death!

Is that your phone?

Daveheart calls: anon! –
Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
Hover through the plebs and filthy air.

[WITCHES vanish.]

ACT II: The Scottish Camp (Voters at Dawn)

Enter a SMALL FOLKS’ CHORUS, Botnet Midges,
Who flap their wings, and then commence this chant:

See here assembled in the Scottish Camp
The Thane of Yes, Lord Naw-Naw, Doctor Spin.
Old folk forget; yet all shall be forgot,
But we’ll remember, with advantages,
This Referendum Day. Then shall that name
And date, familiar as our household words –
Alex the Great, the eighteenth of September –
And many, many here who cast their votes,
A true sorority, a band of brothers,
Long be remembered — long as “Auld Lang Syne” –
For she or he who votes along with me
Shall be my sibling; be they curt or harsh
This day shall gentle their condition:
Scots students down in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed, they were not here,
Casting their votes in this our referendum.

ACT III: On Arthur’s Seat, a Mount Olympus
Near the Scots’ Parliament at Holyrood

Proud Edward Milibrand, Daveheart, Nicholas Clegg,
And Anthony a Blair perch on the crags
With English Exiles. Now Lord Devomax speaks:

Stands England where it did? Alas, poor country,
Almost afraid to know itself, a stateless
Nation, post-imperial, undevolved;
Still sadly lacking its own Parliament,
It commandeers to deal with its affairs
The British Parliament, whose time it wastes
With talk of what pertains to England only,
And so abuses that quaint institution
As if it were its own, not for these islands
Set in a silver sea from Sark to Shetland.

[Exit, pursued by A. Blair]

ACT IV: The Archipelago (High Noon)

Enter THE INTERNET, A Sprite, who sings:

Full fathom five Westminster lies;
Democracy begins to fade;
Stout, undevolved, John Bull still eyes
Imperial power so long mislaid;
England must suffer a sea-change
Into something small and strange,
MPs hourly clang Big Ben:

DING-DONG!

Come, John Bull, and toll Big Ben.

ACT V: South London: top floor of the Shard

Boris de Balliol, St George of Osborne,
Attendant Lords, and Chorus Bankerorum,
Et Nympharum Tamesis et Parliamentorum

Sheet lightnings flash offstage while clashing cymbals
Crescendo in a thunderous night’s farrage.

ST GEORGE: Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage! Blow!
Ye exit polls and hurricanoes spout!
Come, Boris, here’s the place. Stand still.

How fearful

And dizzy ’tis, to cast one’s eyes so low!
The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air
Seem gross as bankers’ apps: here from this Shard
See floors of smug short-sellers, dreadful traders
Inside a giant gherkin, and the City
Fraternity of inegalite
Spread out around us while its denizens
Appear like lice.

ATTENDANT LORDS: Scotia and Boris, hail!

BORIS: O Bella, Bella Caledonia,
Hic Boris Maior, Londinii Imperator,
Ego –

Fanfare of hautboys, bagpipes, and a tucket.

ST GEORGE: A tucket!

BORIS:                             Tempus fugit.

CHORUS:                                                    Fuckaduckit!

Pipers, desist! Your music from this height
Has calmed the storm, and, blithely, while we wait
For the result to come from Holyrood,
So charms the ear that, clad in English tartans –
The Hunting Cholmondesley, the Royal Agincourt,
And chic crisscrosses of the National Trust –
Our city here, ravished by this fair sound
Of tweeted pibroch, YouTubed from the Shard
To Wapping, Westminster, and Heathrow’s tarmac,
While gazing up from bingo and Big Macs,
Brooding upon our disunited kingdom,
Stands all agog to hear Dame Scotia speak.

Scotia descends, ex machina helecopteris

HELICOPTER: Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.

SCOTIA: O England, England, your tight cabinet’s
Sly Oxbridge public-schoolboy millionaires
Fight while your country sinks beneath their yoke;
It weeps, it bleeds; and each new day a gash
Is added to those wounds: new Europhiles
Repulsed, the world repelled; England whose riots
Failed to stop students’ fees for your own folk
Or to contain their escalating cost.
Sad, catastrophic, calculating drones
Miscalculating loans, kicking the arts,
England betrayed by Scoto-Anglish Blair
Into wrong wars and then to Gordon Brown,
Jowled lord of loss and light-touch regulation.
O England, England! Rise and be a nation
United under your own Parliament!
Methinks I am a prophet now inspired
And thus, inspiring, do foretell of you:
Your Europhobia must not endure,
For violent fires must soon burn out themselves;
Small showers last long, but sudden storms are short.
Learn from the Scots: plant windfarms, make yourself
A Saudi Arabia of tidal power,
Though not of gender; learn, too, from the French,
There is no need to stay a sceptred isle,
Scuffed other Eden, demi-paradise;
No fortress, built by UKIP for themselves,
Against infection in their Brussels wars;
Be happy as a nation on an island
That’s not England’s alone, a little world,
This precious stone set in a silver sea,
Which serves to link it now with all the globe,
Or as the front door to a happy home,
Be, still, the envy of less happier lands,
And set up soon an English Parliament,
Maybe in London, Britain’s other eye,
Maybe in Yorkshire, so you may become
A better friend to Scotland whose folk love
This blessed plot, this earth, and independence.

She zooms northwards.

Heading image: Macbeth by John Martin (1789–1854). Scottish National Gallery. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

The post Scots wha play: an English Shakespikedian Scottish independence referendum mashup appeared first on OUPblog.

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14. Review: Poisoned Apples

Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty by Christine Heppermann. HarperCollins. 2014. Reviewed from electronic galley.

The Plot: Fairy tale retellings, in poetry and photographs.

The Good: Seriously, I just adore retellings. Whether it's looking into the historical origins of fairy tales, modernizing them, twisting them -- I just love what people can do with the familiar and the unknown, making them new and fresh.

Poisoned Apples approaches fairy tales with a particular question: what do they say about what it means to be a woman? What does it mean in today's world?

"The action's always there
Where are the fairy tales about gym class
or the doctor's office of the back of the bus
where bad things can also happen?"

Where bad things happen. There, right there, it shows that the darkness of the fairy tales is what will be examined.

So many good, tight poems, and each is independent, so it's hard to write about because how to select just one or two.

Some are cynical -- the "Prince Charming" who is charming to parents but says to the girlfriend
"Girl,
you look amazing. That sweater
makes your boobs look
way bigger."

Others are not. "
Retelling" says, "What the miller's daughter should have said
from the start
or at any point down the line is,
no."

And then offers a better solution:
"Once upon a time
there was a miller's daughter
who got a studio apartment
took classes during the day."

"Retelling" may be my favorite because it says, you can say no. You can put yourself first. And that means a happier ending for everyone.

Poisoned Apples is a short book but not a quick read. There is a lot here to discuss; a lot to think about it; a lot to question. And the questions are not just about fairy tales and the poems. It's about what it is to be a woman, what that means, what society and family and friends say it means.

I reviewed this from an electronic galley; and let me say, I want to get my hands on the final print version because I think it's going to be an even more intimate reading.

Other reviews: Sense and Sensibilities and Stories; Kirkus Reviews.

Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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15. The Story of the Giant Sequoia + a Giveaway

Tony Johnston and Wendell Minor's new book, Sequoia, will be published later this month. Recently, both of them were gracious with their time and granted me interviews. Hear what they have to say about writing and illustrating. Get a sneak peek at this exquisite text you can use to infuse your students' informational writing with poetry.

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16. Call for Submissions: 2016 Writer's Market and 2016 Poet's Market

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: 2016 WRITER'S MARKET

Until 11:59 p.m. (Atlanta, Georgia time) on October 20, 2014, I'll be accepting pitches for articles in the 2016 Writer's Market. Sometime in the end of October, I'll start making assignments. If you're interested in pitching an article idea or three, read on.

What I Like
So, what do I prefer? The best way to figure that out is to read a recent edition or two of Writer's Market. (Order the 2015 Writer's Market here). Anyone familiar with the book will know that I'm looking for articles that will help freelancers find more success from a business perspective.

Previous articles have tackled queries, book proposals, taxes, record keeping, business management, and more. If you're an experienced source and can interview other sources, that is ideal. However, I'm unlikely to assign featured interviews with writers (as I tend to tackle those myself).

I'm also not interested in articles on the craft of writing. While I think those pieces are extremely valuable, they're just not a good fit for Writer's Market. If you're in doubt, go ahead and pitch it. Read the full guidelines to learn how.


CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: 2016 POET'S MARKET

 
Running until 11:59 p.m. (Atlanta, Georgia time) on October 15, 2014, I'll be accepting pitches for articles and original poems in the 2016 Poet's Market. Sometime in the end of October, I'll start making assignments. If you're interested in pitching an article idea or three-or submitting original poems, read on.

What I Like
As with Writer's Market, the best way to figure out why I like is to read a recent edition or two of Poet's Market. (Order the 2015 Poet's Market here). Anyone familiar with the book will know that I'm looking for articles that will help poets find more success, including articles on business, promotion, and the craft of poetry-which is one major difference between the two books.

Here's another major difference: I'm seeking previously unpublished poems! Yes, I want article pitches, but I also want poems. I will choose between 10 and 20 to publish.

So get together your article ideas, dust off your previously unpublished poems, and start submitting. But first, read the full guidelines to learn how.

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17. Writing Competition: Center for Women Writers International Literary Awards


The Center for Women Writers is excited about the opportunity to discover and encourage writers through our International Literary Awards. Our 2014 winners were Brandel France de Bravo (Penelope Niven Creative Nonfiction Award), Joseph Bathanti (Rita Dove Poetry Award), and Bushra Rehman (Reynolds Price Short Fiction Award).  
 
For the 2015 contest, the Reynolds Price Short Fiction Award for a short story up to 5,000 words will be judged by award-winning author Kris Saknussemm, the Penelope Niven Creative Nonfiction Award for a work of creative nonfiction (including personal essay and memoir) up to 5,000 words will be judged by our 2014 winner, Brandel France de Bravo, and the Rita Dove Poetry Award for a poem of any style (3 poems per entry) will be judged by National Poetry Series winner, Lee Ann Roripaugh.  
 
The awards are open to any person who writes in English, excluding current Salem employees and students. The Postmark deadline for mailed submissions is 15 November 2014; and the postmarked deadline for our online submissions (via Submittable) will be 31 December 2014. The winner in each genre will receive $1,000, and an Honorable Mention in each category will receive $150
 
The contest entry fee is $15. Announcements will be made on our website on 1 May 2015.
If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact me by email:
 
cwwATsalemDOTedu Change AT to @ and DOT to . ) 
 
You can also visit our website.

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18. Call for Submissions and Chapbook Competition: Mohave River Review

Our fall 2014 issue features our very first chapbook contest! Our illustrious chapbook finalist judges panel includes Susan Tepper, Matthew Burnside, Allie Marini Batts, and Michael Dwayne Smith. You can read the judges' bios (and our previous issues) on our fall masthead.

MRR will publish four small chaps (20-25 pages each) within the fall issue of MRR; categories are poetry, flash fiction, hybrid, and flash non-fiction. Our issues are typically 220+ pages, so the plan is to publish four winning chaps within the issue, along with 100+ pages of general submissions, art, and interviews. Fun!

All entries will be read by MRR staff, and final determination of contest winning submissions will be made by our panel of judges: Allie Marini Batts, Matthew Burnside, Susan Tepper, and Michael Dwayne Smith. The chapbook guidelines and contest entry fee for each genre are on the Submissions page. 


Entry Fee: $5.00 per category

Contest entries close 10/1.

Here's the info about the general submissions:

In February, June, and October we publish poetry, fiction, non-fiction, hybrid works, chap/book reviews, plus articles or interviews relevant to arts and letters in the southwestern USofA. Please reference below the specific parameters for each category (max length, etcetera). And remember: if you wish to submit quality creative work that doesn't fit guidelines, we're always open to conversation about innovative goodness; please do contact us at:


mojaveriverpressATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

We're genuinely eclectic, open to all styles and topics, but are especially interested in poets, writers, and works related to southwest/desert culture(s). Read issues of Mojave River Review and dig for yourself. They're online and free. Works deemed by MRR as hateful and/or mean-spirited (misogynistic, racist, etc.) will be rejected without further consideration.

Simultaneous submissions are fine. Previously published work is not.

Here's the submissions website.

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19. Call for Submissions: The Citron Review

Submissions link.

The Citron Review is now accepting submissions for our Winter 2014 Issue. The Citron Review is an online literary journal edited by alumni of the esteemed Antioch University Los Angeles Creative Writing Program.

We seek submissions of resonant beauty in the form of micro-fiction, flash fiction, poetry, and flash creative non-fiction. We accept submissions on a rolling basis. We encourage you to review our full guidelines on our website at The Citron Review before submitting via our submissions manager. Simultaneous submissions are accepted, but it is expected authors notify us immediately if their work is accepted elsewhere.

 
 

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20. Poetry Friday: Puppy

It’s Friday everyone, and you know what that means! Poetry Friday! Today, we’ve chosen a poem from our new fall title, Lend a Hand: Poems About Givingto share with you:

Puppy

The puppy we’re raising

is the cutest I’ve ever seen

cuddly and playful,

with floppy ears

and a wagging tail

and a look on his face that says,

“Please hold me and love me.

I want to be yours forever,”

and before long

we’re going to give

him away.

He’ll be someone’s eyes

one day.

puppy poem

If you’re interested in working with puppies and training them to become guide dogs, you can check out a few of these great organizations:

Guide Dogs for the Blind (based on the West Coast)

The Seeing Eye (based on the East Coast)

OccuPaw Guide Dog Association (based in Wisconsin)


Filed under: Lee & Low Likes Tagged: guide dogs, lend a hand, poetry, poetry Friday, puppies, puppy, service dog

0 Comments on Poetry Friday: Puppy as of 9/12/2014 2:20:00 PM
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21. Call for Submissions: Watershed Review

Watershed Review has a fall (August 1st through September 30th) and spring (January 15th through March 15th) submission period . We welcome submissions of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and art.

One poem or prose excerpt will be chosen from each issue to be made into a broadside print by the Quoin Letterpress Collective.


No previously published works are accepted.
Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but please alert Watershed Review to a piece's potential publication elsewhere.


Watershed Review acquires one-time rights. All rights subsequently revert to author.


Submit here.

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22. Poetry Competition: Everett Southwest Literary Award


Poetry Contest: $5,000 Everett Southwest Literary Award
 
The fifth bi-annual Everett Southwest Literary Award open October 5th, 2014 and accepts unpublished poetry manuscripts of 75+ pages through December 5th, 2014. American Book Award winner Allison Hedge Coke to judge. Poets living in or writing about Oklahoma, New Mexico, or Texas are eligible. The winner will be announced in spring 2015.
 
Please send your manuscript, with your name appearing only on a separate title page, along with a $15.00 submission fee and SASE for notification of contest results to:

The Everett Southwest Literary Prize
c/o English Department
University of Central Oklahoma
100 N. University Drive
Edmond, OK 73034 

See our website for information about the award and for full contest details.

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23. Call for Anthology Submissions: Family Blessings: Prayers, Poems, and Traditions

FAMILY BLESSINGS: Prayers, Poems, and Traditions by June Cotner & Nancy Tupper Ling.

All submissions for this book only should be emailed to:

submitATfinelinepoetsDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

Viva Editions is publishing Family Blessings in Spring 2016. Family Blessings consists of prayers, poems, toasts, traditions, rituals, and blessings for family gatherings. Your submissions should be inspiring, uplifting, and fitting for most faith traditions. The selections in Family Blessings will cultivate gratefulness for family life while nurturing and enriching the family bond. Each one should be universal (applicable to other families) and suitable to be read aloud at family gatherings.

Preliminary chapters include: 1) All-Occasion Toasts; 2) Graces & Mealtimes; 3) Birthdays; 4) Weddings; 5) Babies & Christenings; 6) Anniversaries; 7) Graduations; 8) Housewarmings; 9) Family Reunions; 10) Memorial Services; 11) Prayers & Blessings; 12) Holidays; 13) Appreciating Siblings; 14) Family Traditions; 15) Everyday Joys; 16) Special (misc. category to include Retirement, Bon Voyage, New Job, Move, and other family-related topics); 17) Legacies; and 18) Benedictions.

Please email no more than three submissions, each as a separate Word document and within one email message. Please use "FAMILY BLESSINGS" + your last name as your subject line and suggest a chapter from the headings above for each of your submissions. If your submissions are exactly what we are seeking, you will be invited to submit more.

All submissions must be single-spaced in Times New Roman 12 with all of your contact info in the upper left corner. For desired spiritual tone, refer to my book, Baby Blessings, or you may request guidelines and samples as a Word document by emailing:

submitATfinelinepoetsDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

Payment is one copy of the book for each published selection for non-exclusive rights. Submissions close: November 30, 2014.

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24. Calll for Submissions: Weave Magazine


Weave Magazine is now open for submissions through May 31, 2015. We are a print publication dedicated to promoting cultural diversity, accepting the best works of literary fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, drama, and visual art that transfix, transport, and inspire. Currently, we are seeking more submissions for the genres listed below. More information about how to submit can be found on our submissions page.  
 
Deadline: May 31, 2015  
 
Poetry: 3-5 poems
Flash Fiction: 1-3 stories, each 1000 words or less
Fiction: 3,000 words or less
Nonfiction: 3,000 words or less
Drama: less than 4,000 words
Reviews: 500-800 words
Comics/Illustrations/Visual Essays/Stories/Poems: Black and white only
 
 
More about Weave at our website.

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25. Call for Submissions: The Nassau Review

The Nassau Review: Call For Submissions

Please visit our website for all questions and queries regarding this call for work. 

You can also email:

 nassaureviewATnccDOTedu (Change AT to @ and DOT to . ) 

if you can't find the answer to your question, or you can tweet at us @nassaureview

Submit your work between September 1 and December 10. All literary work submitted during this period will be under consideration for the Writer Awards. You do not have to send any separate submissions for the contest. Submission is FREE.


The THEME for the submission period of 2014-2015 is The Post-Human: Our Other Selves. With rapid advances in electronics and technology, and our willingness to accept and follow, human beings have changed in mind and body. Please submit works inspired by your observation or experience with the changing concept of what is self—or how many selves do we have—and what is human in our new realm of hyper-connectivity and convenience.

Visit our website for all submission guidelines and to submit through our online system. We do not accept work outside of our online system.

We welcome submissions of many genres, preferring work that is innovative, captivating, well-crafted, and unique, work that crosses boundaries of genres and tradition. You may be serious. You may be humorous. You may be somewhere in between. We are looking simply for quality. New writers and seasoned writers are both welcome. All work must be in English.

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