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1. Warren Adler Discusses the Future of Publishing

Warren Adler, author of the bestselling novel and film The War of the Roses, has been self-publishing through his imprint Stonehouse Productions for years and has found it quite successful.

He is currently developing the Hollywood sequel to The War of the RosesThe War of the Roses: The Children, along with other projects including: Capitol Crimes, a television series based on Adler’s Fiona Fitzgerald mystery novels, as well as a feature film based on Adler and James Humes’ WWII thriller, Target Churchill, in association with Myles Nestel and Lisa Wilson of The Solution Entertainment Group.

GalleyCat caught up with Adler to discuss how publishing has been evolving and where it is going.

GC: How has self-publishing evolved?
WA: The Internet has opened up an arena in which people’s latent desire to be noticed, and to communicate their thoughts, opinions and alleged talents to others, has spawned an explosion of creative expression of epic proportions.

Publishing technology led by Amazon has blasted open those gates, and any writer who can put words on a screen can, with little effort and expense, offer a book for publication, joining an endless cyber shelf along with every popular and classical author on the planet.

Some few in various categories have found a market for their efforts. The overwhelming majority has not, except for sales to devoted friends and relatives. For some, this is satisfaction enough. For those who have fantasized of achieving instant fame and fortune, it has been an exercise in disappointment and frustration. Nevertheless, like the impossible odds of winning the lottery, a very few have exceeded beyond their wildest dreams, and have encouraged more and more to enter the fray.

GC: Is the market-oversaturated?

WA: As long as there are no limits on the offerings, and there is infinite cyberspace to accommodate anyone who chooses to create a book, the market will expand exponentially. Indeed, no eBook will ever go out of print and the numbers will continue upward.

Amazon is clearly able to profitably absorb the flow, and as others like Apple, Kobo, and perhaps Nook expand their capacity, the market will proliferate endlessly. Screening attempts, meaning subjectively picking the wheat from the chaff, which was once exclusively the work of selected print publications and reviewers is now in the hands of a vast array of self-appointed recommenders and critics who have collectively become \"the screeners.\" They offer milliseconds of opinion plucked from the infinite swamp of review offerings.

GC: What do you think of Amazon reviews?
WA: There is the phenomenon of the starred review, which has become, despite being dubious, largely an unreliable and non-transparent source, a kind of pop standard critique of a book’s worth. I often wonder how the Bible might score on this standard. \"A bit wordy, too many names and undefined characters and plot lines.\" One star.

The opposite of infinite is finite. Need I discuss the fact that the readers of books are finite and, by most accounts, shrinking.

GC: How can authors get noticed in this landscape?

WA: A cottage industry has grown up around the premise of authors getting noticed, all of which advocate the same basic ideas. Engage with potential readers, blog frequently, create a fan base, stay in touch, seek speaking engagements, attempt to get into readers clubs, send press releases, engage professionals for PR and advertising, try for television and radio interviews, send postcards, do videos and podcasts, find creative ways to keep your name out there. These ideas work for notoriety, although sales are never guaranteed.

Of course, for many the grand prize is to get your book adapted for television and film, the longest shot of all. If the adaptation is an enduring hit, then it will be very helpful to book sales. If it is a flop, it won’t be much help. Besides, if you’re lucky enough to get a production, the chances are that it will happen long after your book is launched – this has certainly been my own experience.
The secret to all this advice is consistency and repetition, requiring a serious commitment of time, effort, and money.

GC: What do you expect in the future of book publishing?

WA: With shelf space diminishing in brick and mortar stores, and infinite cyber book \"shelves\" proliferating with endless books in all categories, a number of scenarios suggest themselves:

1. Random House or a competing company, in self-defense, could buy up Barnes and Noble’s stores and other chains still existent around the world and set up their own combination of brick and mortar and cyber stores.

2. Amazon could buy Barnes and Noble to complement its already formidable hold on the market.

3. Amazon could set up its own bricks-and-mortar chains and create some creative ways to use its POD operation in some shelving mechanism yet to be developed.

4. Authors with some recognition and respectable output in the past and with some subjective compatibility will form their own publishing companies as individuals or collectives and pool their resources in an effort to market their work, not only in books, but in all media worldwide.

Authors are particularly at risk in this new environment and, as one of that tough and irascible breed, I wish I could offer a comforting look into the future. Writing is our calling. No matter how conditions change in the marketplace we will soldier on no matter what.

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2. Andrew Solomon Named PEN American Center President

Andrew SolomonAward-winning writer Andrew Solomon has been named the president of the PEN American Center.

Here’s more from the press release: “This is an urgent time for issues of free expression, and a critical time for PEN. In the wake of Charlie Hebdo, revelations about surveillance in the United States, international assaults on open dialogue for gay people, and restrictions on press and Internet in many countries worldwide, our mission could not be more clear: free speech is under siege and its defenders cannot rest.”

Solomon will be succeeding journalist Peter Godwin who has taken on this role for the past three years. Follow these links to watch Solomon’s TED talks on hardship, love, and depression.

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3. Peter H. Reynolds Lands 3-Book Deal With Scholastic

scholasticlogo082310Peter H. Reynolds has signed a three-book deal with Scholastic.

Liza Baker, the executive editorial director at Cartwheel and Orchard Books, negotiated the terms of the agreement with Holly McGhee, the founder of Pippin Properties. The first book, entitled Happy Dreamer, will be published in 2016.

Reynolds had this statement in the press release: “Happy Dreamer is inspired by my own creative journey. I want readers to say ‘Hey, that’s me!’ and realize that their daydreaming, their wild energy—and even their challenges—are all good. I want to encourage kids—and grownup kids—to be happy with who they are, and to be confident about what lies ahead.”

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4. Harper Lee Responds to a Letter From a Journalist

HarperLeeHarper Lee recently made headlines with the announcement of her To Kill a Mockingbird sequelGo Set a Watchman. Many questions have been raised about this forthcoming title especially in light of the fact that in the past, Lee had made it clear that she did not intend to ever publish another book.

As a result, several members of the press have been trying to get in touch with the author in an attempt to uncover some answers. In spite of Lee’s tendency to shy away from publicity, one person succeeded in making contact.

According to AL.com, Connor Sheets, an investigative reporter from the Birmingham News, persistently pursued Lee through her lawyer, her publisher, and a two-page letter sent by snail mail. Lee surprised him with her response to a letter; she mailed back the document and hand wrote the following four words: “Go away! Harper Lee.” What do you think? (via The Huffington Post)

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5. Navigating a Debut Year: Writing Life

                  The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time The Autobiography of Henry VIII: With Notes by His Fool, Will Somers The Name of the Rose The Crimson Petal and the White Crossing to Safety Sophie's World

I first ran this series five months after May B. hit the shelves. With Blue Birds releasing next week (!), it feels like the right time for me to revisit my Writer’s Manifesto — a list of things I’d like to focus on in my public, private, and writing life. 

This is not in any way meant to be preachy or condemning (please notice I’m directing all of this to myself). I have yet to figure everything out and am in many ways a pro at doing the exact opposite of what I know is best. Yet these are ideas I’ve circled back to again and again, things I know will ultimately benefit my career, my friendships, my writing and my life. I’d love to hear your thoughts below.

In my writing life I will…
  • Write the stories that speak to me: I will continue to write what nourishes and interests me first and worry about the market second.
  • Seek guidance, support, and direction when needed: I will ask questions of my agent and editor when I’m unsure or need help. I will go to other writers in the same life phase or those older and wiser when I need assistance.

In my writing life I will not…
  • Lose my love for story, kids, or words: Once you’re published, art becomes commodity. It’s not right or wrong, it just is. I want my motivation and passion to remain firmly in the place it always has been. While there are no guarantees of success in writing this way, their is much joy, and this, in the end, is more important to me.
  • Compare one book against another: I choose not to be paralyzed by comparing my titles to previous books I’ve written. Each deserves to stand alone and has its own merit. The rest of the publishing world has the freedom to compare if they choose. For me to do so is unfair to new stories beginning to form.
  • Despair: If you know me well, you know panic is a part of my writing when I’m drafting something new. I fret that I don’t know how to write or have nothing new to say. But I can’t let that panic lead to despair. Reminding myself that things always start this way keeps things in perspective. Allowing myself to play with language and ideas is much more doable than telling myself I’m writing an entire book. Choosing to nurture rather than berate gives me permission to try.

It’s my hope that holding to what I’ve processed these last few months will keep me grounded, help me grasp the deep satisfaction writing brings, and hold at bay the things that only lead to disappointment.

What about you? What things do you want to uphold in your public, private, and writing lives?

The post Navigating a Debut Year: Writing Life appeared first on Caroline Starr Rose.

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6. Ridgefield Locals Hope to Establish a Maurice Sendak Museum

Maurice Sendak 200A group of locals from Ridgefield hope to build a museum to honor the legendary children’s books creator, Maurice Sendak. Sendak spent forty years of his life as a resident of this small Connecticut town.

Both the Maurice Sendak Foundation and the townspeople have approved the pursuants’ proposal. They hope to build this institution inside a glass building which was notably designed by architect Philip Johnson.

Here’s more from The Associated Press: “The 45-acre campus of the energy services company Schlumberger, including the proposed museum site, was acquired by Ridgefield in 2012 for $7 million. On Tuesday, town voters approved the sale of 10 of the acres for residential construction, returning $4.3 million to the town. The first selectman, Rudy Marconi, said the sale could help the museum proposal by giving planners flexibility on decisions regarding the rest of the property.” (Photo Credit: John Dugdale)

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7. USPS Reveals Maya Angelou Forever Stamp

USPS has released a preview of the upcoming Maya Angelou forever stamp.

The stamp features a  hyper-realistic painting of Angelou by the Atlanta-based artist Ross Rossin. The original painting is currently on display at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery through Nov. 1. The stamp also features a quote from the author:  \"A bird doesn’t sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.\"

The stamp will be issued at a dedication ceremony on Tuesday April 7th. In the meantime, you can preorder the stamps here.

 

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8. George R.R. Martin Gives Away a First-Edition Hobbit

georgerrmartinGame of Thrones author George R.R. Martin has given away a rare, first-edition, copy of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. This particular volume contains illustrations created by Tolkien himself.

The donation was made to Texas A&M University. According to the school’s blog post, the book will be displayed at the Cushing Memorial Library & Archives for a few weeks.

During his visit, Martin explained that “there’s no doubt his effect upon me was profound and I take a strange pleasure in seeing him included in a library like this, to be a 5 millionth book with Cervantes and Walt Whitman. It represents an acceptance of fantasy into the canon of world literature which I think is long overdue, frankly.” Do you agree with Martin’s opinion? (via Chron.com)

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9. Stephen King Story Hits The New Yorker

Author Stephen King has released a new short story in the latest issue of The New Yorker.

The story is called “A Death”. Here is an excerpt:

Jim Trusdale had a shack on the west side of his father’s gone-to-seed ranch, and that was where he was when Sheriff Barclay and half a dozen deputized townsmen found him, sitting in the one chair by the cold stove, wearing a dirty barn coat and reading an old issue of the Black Hills Pioneer by lantern light. Looking at it, anyway.

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10. HBO Seeks Submissions For Writing Fellowships

HBO logoHBO seeks candidates for the HBOAccess Writing Fellowship.

Beginning on March 4th, “emerging writers from diverse backgrounds” can upload a resume, a writing sample, a completed release form, and an essay (500 words or less) “explaining how his/her background has influenced his/her storytelling.” Throughout the months of May and June, applicants will be chosen to take part in a series of interviews. Eight writers will earn a spot in this program.

According to IndieWire, those who are selected will take part in a week of master classes at the company’s Santa Monica campus. These fellows will study story development, pitching ideas, securing an agent, and networking. From there, “each participant will then enter into an 8-month writing phase where he/she will be paired with an HBO development executive and guided through the script development process. At the conclusion of the program, HBO will hold a reception and staged reading for industry professionals where the writers will be introduced to the entertainment industry.” Follow this link to learn more about the rules and details.

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11. Jamie McGuire Explains Return to Self-Publishing

NYT bestselling author Jamie McGuire started her career as a self-published author.

Her fourth book Beautiful Disaster was picked up by Simon & Schuster’s Atria imprint and became an international bestseller. Yet after her contract ran out, she’s decided to go back to self-publishing. In an interview on Smashwords, she explains why. Check it out:

The deciding factor though was realizing that I had signed foreign book deals for five to seven years on average, and my domestic deals were indefinite.  That made sense before ebooks, but because the overhead for digital books is negligible, publishers can make them available indefinitely. Before, authors might have once been able to see rights returned to find new ways to revive their backlists, but now, signing is permanent. Going forward, I knew I could potentially make more money holding on to my digital rights because ebooks are forever.

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12. Children’s Books Authors Protest Against Assigning Genders to Books

I'm just saying. @gayleforman @libbabray @HousingWorksBks pic.twitter.com/Har5rG2w4i

— E. Lockhart (@elockhart) February 28, 2015

Gayle Forman, E. Lockhart, and Libba Bray appeared together at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe last week. The trio of young adult authors were celebrating the release of Forman’s new book, I Was Here. When they first presented themselves to the audience, the three women were wearing fake mustaches.

Forman explained that they were protesting against the act of driving young boys away from titles that are considered to be “girl books.” The group strongly agrees with the sentiments that fellow novelist Shannon Hale expresses in a recent blog post. Hale felt compelled to discuss this because of her recent experience during a school visit where only female students were given permission to meet her. Below, we’ve collected several of the writers’ tweets with their opinions on this subject in a Storify post.

Here’s an excerpt from Hale’s blog post: “Let’s be clear: I do not talk about ‘girl’ stuff. I do not talk about body parts. I do not do a ‘Your Menstrual Cycle and You!’ presentation. I talk about books and writing, reading, rejections and moving through them, how to come up with story ideas. But because I’m a woman, because some of my books have pictures of girls on the cover, because some of my books have ‘princess’ in the title, I’m stamped as ‘for girls only.’ However, the male writers who have boys on their covers speak to the entire school.”

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13. Gene Luen Yang to Write For DC Comics

Gene Luen YangDC Comics announced that graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang has been brought on to write for the Superman series.

The issues with Yang’s stories will feature artwork by artist John Romita Jr. According to a DC Comics blog post, Yang and Romita will aim to present this beloved hero “in a more contemporary light.”

Tor.com reports that Yang’s hiring, along with a number of others, was done in part because the company is pushing “to bring greater diversity to its books.” In an interview with Mercury News, Yang revealed that he feels “it’s an honor to work on a character with such an influential legacy, but it’s also gut-wrenching.”

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14. Veronica Roth Inks Two-Book Deal

Veronica RothVeronica Roth has signed a two-book deal with the Katherine Tegen Books imprint at HarperCollins.

Publisher Katherine Tegen negotiated the deal with Newleaf Literary agent Joanna Volpe. The release date for book one has been scheduled for 2017; book two will follow in 2018.

Here’s more from the press release: “In the untitled first novel of a highly anticipated duology in the vein of Star Wars, Veronica Roth explores—with poise and poignancy—the story of a boy who forms an unlikely alliance with an enemy. Both desperate to escape their oppressive lives, they help each other attain what they most desire: for one, redemption, and the other, revenge.”

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15. Navigating a Debut Year: Public Life

                           All Over But the Shoutin' Wildflowers from Winter: A Novel A Lady Cyclist's Guide to Kashgar Circle of Secrets A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke

I first ran this series five months after May B. hit the shelves. With Blue Birds releasing next week (!), it feels like the right time for me to revisit my Writer’s Manifesto — a list of things I’d like to focus on in my public, private, and writing life. 

This is not in any way meant to be preachy or condemning (please notice I’m directing all of this to myself). I have yet to figure everything out and am in many ways a pro at doing the exact opposite of what I know is best. Yet these are ideas I’ve circled back to again and again, things I know will ultimately benefit my career, my friendships, my writing and my life. I’d love to hear your thoughts below.

In my public life I will…
  • Be generous: In my interactions with others and in the way I conduct myself, I’d love to be known as generous. This doesn’t mean committing to every opportunity or request that comes. It means being warm, friendly, and supportive of the writing community and the publishers, teachers, librarians, booksellers and readers who make it all happen.
  • Speak well of fellow writers: Whether I know them personally or not. Whether I like their work or not. These people are my people. This is enough of a reason to speak kindly or not at all.
  • Conduct myself in a becoming way: While I can’t control what others think of me (more on that below), I can choose to present myself in a way I’m proud of, whether that be in person or through social media. I am in no way perfect, believe me, but I strive not to embarrass myself, the children I write for, or the people who publish my writing.
In my public life I won’t…
  • Add to or perpetuate gossip: In just these few months as a debut, I’ve already heard things about fellow authors that have broken my heart. Whether shared maliciously, as some sort of cautionary tale, or just for fun, it’s been more than I need to know. I refuse to participate in keeping the stories going, and I will ask you not share whatever it is you’ve heard about others with me.
  • Disparage others’ books, genres, or talents but will find value in what they create: For much of my life, I’ve been a self-proclaimed book snob. Many writers talk of becoming more and more critical as readers the longer they write. For me, some sort of weird opposite has happened. Because I know first hand of the hard work the writing life demands, I’m learning to appreciate books, topics, and styles I would have ignored years ago. The books I don’t connect with aren’t really my concern: they weren’t written for me. There is an audience for them somewhere.

The post Navigating a Debut Year: Public Life appeared first on Caroline Starr Rose.

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16. Now You Can Get Your Ebooks Signed and Personalized!

Did you know you can get your ebooks signed and personalized? I didn’t until about an hour ago (thank you, BH!). There’s a service called Authorgraph that allows you to request and collect signatures and messages from your favorite authors.

So cool.

I’m on there now if you’d like one from me. Here’s my page!

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17. Poetry Foundation Seeks Submissions For Fellowships

The Poetry Foundation is opening submissions for poetry fellows on March 1st.

The Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowships will award 5 young U.S. poets with $25,800 each. The fellowship is open to writers between 21 and 31 years of age.

To apply you must share an introduction to your work, ten poems and a publication list. You can apply through April 30th. Finalists will be revealed on August 3rd and winners will be announced on September 1st. Follow this link to apply.

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18. J.K. Rowling: A Bibliography Released

Thinking of doing a PhD on Harry Potter? Bloomsbury Academic has just released the text you’ll need for your studies.

J.K. Rowling: A Bibliography 1997-2013 by Philip Errington is a complete bibliographic text on Rowling’s writing. It includes: “details of each edition of all her books, pamphlets and original contributions to published works, there is detailed information on the publishing history of her work, including fascinating extracts from correspondence.”

“As someone who respects comprehensive research, I am in awe of the level of detail and amount of time Philip Errington has dedicated to this slavishly thorough and somewhat mind-boggling bibliography,” Rowling commented on the book in a statement.

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19. Neil Gaiman Performs His Own Original Song, “I Google You”

Neil Gaiman may be best known as an award-winning writer, but did you also know he sings?

The video embedded above features Gaiman’s original song, “I Google You.” Gaiman and his rocker wife Amanda Palmer performed it together during a recent one-night show in Florida.

Last Summer, Gaiman delivered two readings and his cover of the song “Psycho” on the Carnegie Hall stage. Click here to hear Gaiman’s rendition of that musical number. (via The Mary Sue)

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20. Cover Revealed For The Day The Crayons Came Home

crayons sequel

BookPage.com has unveiled the cover for The Day The Crayons Came Home written by Drew Daywalt and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers.

We’ve embedded the full image above—what do you think? Philomel Books, an imprint at Penguin Young Readers Group, has set the publication date on August 18th.

Daywalt sat for an interview to discuss this sequel project. He explained that he was inspired to write stories about crayons because his own set “told me that if I didn’t bring their plight to the public eye, something terrible might happen to me.” He also revealed that he empathizes the most with the “Neon Red” crayon and the “Glow-in-the-Dark” crayon.

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21. Bertrice Small Has Died

Bertrice SmallAuthor Bertrice Small has died. She was 77 years old.

Throughout her career, Small (pictured, via) wrote more than 50 books. She become well-known for her historical romance, fantasy romance, and erotica novels.

USA Today reports that “her O’Malley Saga and Skye’s Legacy series are especially beloved. Her most recent release, Lucianna, part of her Silk Merchant’s Daughters series, came out in October 2013.”

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22. Kim Gordon’s Book Hits Book Shelves This Week

A memoir by Kim Gordon, founding member of Sonic Youth, is out this week from HarperCollins’ Dey Street Books.

In Girl in a Band: A Memoir, the indie rock icon talks talks about music, being an artist, marriage and motherhood. She also discusses the difficulties of doing a show in South America with her ex-husband/bandmate Thurston Moore. Here is an excerpt:

They say that when a marriage ends that little things you never noticed before practically make your brain split open. All week that had been true for me whenever Thurston was around. Maybe he felt the same, or maybe his head was somewhere else. I didn’t really want to know to be honest.

 

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23. Elizabeth Gilbert to Narrate Big Magic Audiobook

Big Magic CoverElizabeth Gilbert will serve as the narrator for the audiobook edition of Big Magic.

Gilbert shared the news by uploading an audio clip onto her Facebook page. Throughout the past few months, Gilbert has been posting quotes from the book on her social media accounts.

As we previously reported, Gilbert’s internet conversations with her fans inspired her to write about creativity. Riverhead Books will publish this nonfiction title on September 22nd.

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24. Lisa Genova’s New Novel Examines Huntington’s Disease

Inside the O’BriensLisa Genova has written a new novel entitled Inside the O’Briens. The story follows a police officer who is afflicted with Huntington’s disease named Joe O’Brien.

Here’s more from the press release: “Huntington’s is a lethal neurodegenerative disease with no treatment and no cure. Each of Joe’s four children has a 50 percent chance of inheriting their father’s disease, and a simple blood test can reveal their genetic fate. While watching what may be her future in her father’s escalating symptoms, twenty-one-year-old daughter Katie struggles with the questions this test imposes on her young adult life.”

Gallery Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, has set a publication date for April 7th. Genova established her writing career with the 2009 bestseller Still Alice which dealt with the illness of Alzheimer’s disease. Julianne Moore, the star of the Still Alice film adaptation, recently won the Academy Award in the Best Actress category for portraying the character Professor Alice Howland.

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25. Free Online Laura Ingalls Wilder Course: Part 2

2015-02-16 10.57.51Author, teacher, and editor Pamela Smith Hill will begin the second part of Missouri State University’s Laura Ingalls Wilder course on April 6, 2015. The course runs for eight weeks and will cover the second half of Wilder’s Little House series, starting with By the Shores of Silver Lake as well as the second half of Hill’s Laura Ingalls Wilder: A Writer’s Life. Wilder’s recently released autobiography, Pioneer Girl, (edited by Hill) is recommended reading.

If you weren’t part of the 7,000 students who participated in the first course, no matter! Anyone can sign up. Click through to enroll.

 

The post Free Online Laura Ingalls Wilder Course: Part 2 appeared first on Caroline Starr Rose.

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