What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(tagged with 'authors')

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: authors, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 3,473
1. IBM’s Watson Authors Cookbook

IBM’s artificial intelligence machine Watson is taking its computing power to the kitchen.

IBM has partnered with Institute of Culinary Education (ICE) and Sourcebooks to create a new cookbook that comes out of a collaboration between the machine with real life chefs.

Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson presents readers with more than 65 original recipes brought together by man and machine. Chef Watson offered up ideas based on its understanding of compounds and food pairing theories and ICE chefs augmented the suggestions into yummy meals to create recipes.

Add a Comment
2. Most Indie Authors Make Less Than $1K a Year

Self-publishing tools might make it easier to get published, but writing a book is a tough way to make a living. In fact, according to a new survey from Digital Book World, indie authors make about $500-999 a year, much less than traditionally published authors who still only earn an average of $3,000-4,999 a year.

Hybrid authors, writers that take both routes, do better and earn an average of $7,500–$9,999 a year. The survey includes online feedback from 1,879 published authors of which 56 percent are self-published, 13 percent who are traditionally published and 31 percent who do both.

The Guardian has more: “Overall, half of the writers – traditional and independent – surveyed this year earned $1,000– $2,999 or less. At the top end, almost 10% earned $100,000 or more, with 4.1% earning $250,000 or more.”

Add a Comment
3. Buzz Books 2015 Brings First Look at Buzzed-About Spring/Summer Books

Publishers Lunch has two new editions in its free Buzz Books series, buzzed about as the first and best place for passionate readers and publishing insiders to discover and sample some of the most acclaimed books of the year, before they are published. Substantial excerpts from 65 of the most anticipated books coming this spring and summer are gathered in two new ebooks, BUZZ BOOKS 2015: Spring/Summer and BUZZ BOOKS 2015: Young Adult Spring, offered in consumer and trade editions (adult and YA). All are available free through NetGalley.

Book lovers get an early first look at books from actress and activist Maria Bello, \"Morning Joe\" co-host and bestselling author Mika Brzezinski, NPR/Weekend Edition’s Scott Simon, and bestselling fiction writers Dennis Lehane, Ann Packer, Ian Caldwell, and Neal Stephenson, among others. Highly touted debuts include Leslie Parry’s Church of Marvels, Erika Swyler’s The Book of Speculation, J. Ryan Stradal’s Kitchens of the Great Midwest, Christopher Robinson and Gavin Kovite’s War Of The Encyclopaedists, and Jessica Knoll’s Luckiest Girl Alive. From inside publishing, there’s Jonathan Galassi’s debut novel Muse, and George Hodgman’s memoir Bettyville.

The YA edition features the latest from Sarah Dessen, David Levithan, Barry Lyga, and Michael Buckley, plus renowned middle-grade authors including Newbery winner Rebecca Stead and Louis Sachar. There’s Alice Hoffman’s Nightbird, her first novel for this age range. We also get a first look at YA debut authors Margo Rabb, Maria Dahvana Headley, plus Paige McKenzie’s The Haunting of Sunshine Girl (adapted from the web series of the same name and already in development as a film from the Weinstein Company) and Sabaa Tahir’s debut An Ember In the Ashes (already sold to Paramount Pictures in a major deal).

Fourteen of the adult titles featured in last year’s Buzz Books 2014 were named to one or more major \"Best Books of 2014\" lists, and 18 became bestsellers. Of the 28 books published to date and previewed in the 2014 Fall/Winter edition, 19 have made \"best of the month/year\" lists and nine are New York Times bestsellers.

Add a Comment
4. Classroom Connections: UNDER A PAINTED SKY by Stacey Lee

age range: 12 and up
setting: Missouri en route to California, 1849
Stacey Lee’s website

High drama, tension, romantic longings, and touches of humor will entice historical fiction fans, and will be a perfect tie-in to social studies curriculum.
— School Library Journal

Please tell us about your book.

Missouri, 1849: Samantha dreams of moving back to New York to be a professional musician—not an easy thing if you’re a girl, and harder still if you’re Chinese. But a tragic accident dashes any hopes of fulfilling her dream, and instead, leaves her fearing for her life. With the help of a runaway slave named Annamae, Samantha flees town for the unknown frontier. But life on the Oregon Trail is unsafe for two girls, so they disguise themselves as Sammy and Andy, two boys headed for the California gold rush.

Sammy and Andy forge a powerful bond as they each search for a link to their past, and struggle to avoid any unwanted attention. But when they cross paths with a band of cowboys, the light-hearted troupe turn out to be unexpected allies. With the law closing in on them and new setbacks coming each day, the girls quickly learn that there are not many places to hide on the open trail.

An unforgettable story of friendship and sacrifice—perfect for fans of Code Name Verity.

What inspired you to write this story?

I’d always wondered what life in America was like when my ancestors arrived to California in the late 19th century. When I researched the history of Chinese in America, I learned that the bulk of the Chinese came during the western expansion and California Gold Rush. I don’t speak Chinese myself, so I knew my heroine needed to have a full command of the English language. The story grew from there.

Could you share with readers how you conducted your research or share a few interesting tidbits you learned while researching?

I’m not a historian, so for me, every book begins with a trip to the library. There are plenty of online resources as well, but I seem to learn better when reading a hard copy. Also, I find the Children’s section of the library to be invaluable for subjects I know nothing about. Children’s books and videos break down the material into easy to understand chunks, not to mention, they’re much more entertaining than the adult stuff.

What are some special challenges associated with writing historical fiction?

One challenge is understanding the geography of the area as it existed during a particular period in time. Cities can change a lot over a few years, and while I certainly believe in taking liberties, I like to know when I’m doing it. I’m starting quite a collection of antique maps and reproductions!

What topics does your book touch upon that would make it a perfect fit for the classroom?

The Oregon Trail and western expansion, slavery, Chinese American history, and the California Gold Rush, and last but not least, cowboys.

 

The post Classroom Connections: UNDER A PAINTED SKY by Stacey Lee appeared first on Caroline Starr Rose.

0 Comments on Classroom Connections: UNDER A PAINTED SKY by Stacey Lee as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
5. J.K. Rowling’s Handwritten Harry Potter Notes

When J.K. Rowling was working on the fifth Harry Potter book, she mapped it out on a piece of lined paper.

The handwritten sheet which informed Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, includes chapter titles, plot points and timelines among other details that helped her with the writing.

Additional columns map out subplots including the titles: \"Prophecy, \"Cho/Ginny,\" \"D.A.,\" \"Dumbledore’s Army,” \"O of P,\" \"Snape/Harry,\" and \"Hagrid and Grawp.\" (Via Open Culture). We’ve got the whole sheet for you to explore after the jump.

JK-Rowlings-Phoenix-Plot-Outline

Add a Comment
6. Michael Bond On Maintaining His Momentum as a Writer

PaddingtonMichael Bond has enjoyed a writing career that has spanned more than five decades.

Bond has published hundreds of children’s books and continues to write to this day. How does he maintain his authorial momentum? He makes it a practice to avoid working on one character’s story for too long.

Here’s more from Bond’s interview with The New York Times: “When I have finished a Paddington, I think, that’s it, I’m out of ideas. When I get to the end of a Monsieur Pamplemousse, I think that’s it, but maybe I’ll go back to another Paddington. I’m a great believer in the subconscious. Graham Greene wrote about going to bed in the evening and waking up to discover you’ve solved the writing problem that had been worrying you. Alternating between characters is a way for me of staying fresh. My wife found a website that lists everything people have written. I’ve done over 200 books apparently; there are quite a lot I’ve totally forgotten I’ve written.”

Add a Comment
7. Joan Didion’s Favorite Books

In her writing, author Joan Didion talks about how Robert Lowell and W.H. Auden have influenced her writing.

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway, Victory by Joseph Conrad and Guerrillas by V.S. Naipaul are also on her list, along with Wonderland by Joyce Carol Oates, Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë and The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford.

Brainpickings recently scored a handwritten list of the author’s favorite books from documentary filmmakers Susanne Rostock and Griffin Dunne, Didion’s nephew, who are working on a documentary about her life. Follow this link to check it out.

Add a Comment
8. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Has Written a New Short Story

Chimamanda Ngozi AdichieNigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has written a new short story entitled “Olikoye.” It has been posted in its entirety on medium.com.

This piece appears in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “The Art of Saving a Life.” According to the project’s website, this is a “collection of stories about how vaccines continue to change the course of history. It offers an opportunity to hear, see and feel the tremendous impact of immunization, and to energize us in the global effort to protect every child from life-threatening disease.”

For Adichie (pictured, via), her goal in writing this piece is to humanize “the importance of healthcare.” Follow this link to listen to her 2009 TED talk on “the danger of a single story.” What do you think? (via Entertainment Weekly)

Add a Comment
9. Neil Gaiman & Chris Riddell Team Up Again

artist's creedWriter Neil Gaiman and artist Chris Riddell have once again teamed up on a project. In the past, the two worked on an illustrated book edition of The Sleeper and The Spindle short story; Bloomsbury U.K. published it last year.

According to The Guardian, the two collaborators came together again to express their feelings on the “the Paris terror attacks” with an “artist’s creed.” Altogether, Riddell created four images for this “credo”; both Gaiman and Riddell have shared the finished pieces on their Facebook pages.

Here’s an excerpt from Gaiman’s writing: “I believe that in the battle between guns and ideas, ideas will eventually win. Because the ideas are invisible and they linger and sometimes, they are even true.” What do you think?

Add a Comment
10. Lev AC Rosen Inks Deal With Regan Arts

Depth BookLev AC Rosen has landed a deal for his second adult novel, Depth.

Regan Arts has scheduled a publication date for April 2015. According to the press release, the story “is set in a post-apocalyptic flooded New York City where a private investigator’s routine surveillance case leads to a treasure everyone wants to find and someone is willing to kill for.”

Joy Tutela, a literary agent from the David Black Agency, negotiated the terms of this deal on Rosen’s behalf. Ron Hogan, an editor at Regan Arts and a former senior editor at GalleyCat, will edit the manuscript.

Add a Comment
11. Patterson’s New Book Explodes

James Patterson plans to blow up his next book, literally (meaning literally). The planet’s bestselling author since 2001, according to Vanity Fair, is offering his fans the chance to join him and watch his next release, Private Vegas, self-destruct at an undisclosed location 24 hours after the purchaser opens it.

For a cool $294,038, the winner receives \"the most thrilling reading experience of all time\"; a first-class flight to said undisclosed location, luxury hotel accommodations for two nights, a pair of 14-karat gold binoculars (the better to see with), dinner with the author, and the exploding copy of Private Vegas. \"While the details of how the book will explode are being kept secret, the process will involve a bomb squad and a location that could come straight out of a Patterson story,\" reports Lori Holcomb-Holland in the New York Times.

Another 1,000 fans will be able to read the book for free — for 24 hours. On the site selfdestructingbook.com, codes will be released in groups. Users can download free digital copies that will delete themselves a day after reading begins.

The ninth in Patterson’s \"Private\" series, Private Vegas is due out next Monday, January 26. Codes for the free \"exploding\" digital copies will begin to be released at noon on Wednesday.

Add a Comment
12. Ethan Young to Create a Graphic Novel on the 1937 Nanjing Massacre

NanjingComics creator Ethan Young will write and draw a graphic novel entitled Nanjing: The Burning City. The story for this book is set during the tragic Rape of Nanjing event that took place during World War II.

Young devoted many hours of research to this project. Dark Horse Comics has scheduled a publication date for August 2015.

Here’s more from the press release: “Exploring the horrors of the Nanjing Massacre of 1937, Nanjing: The Burning City focuses on two abandoned Chinese soldiers trapped in the city as they desperately attempt to escape. Outnumbered by the invading Imperial Japanese Army, they’ll encounter the horrors and terrifying effects of war—but they’ll soon learn that no enemy can destroy the spirit of resistance and bravery.”

Add a Comment
13. Try, Try Again

So this week I sent out six new agent queries. I'll do more next week; it takes a lot of time to explore agents and pick those who you think will connect with your writing. I feel good about it, even though statistically speaking I likely won't end up with any of them as my agent. I am pretty sure I'm not the only one who gets frustrated by this merry-go-round of submissions and rejections. Why do we keep doing it?

I'll tell you why I keep doing it. I am not interested in self publishing. I have nothing against it, per se. It gains more and more credibility every year as a viable path. But I want to write. I don't want to negotiate contracts, pay for my books to be printed, market all by myself. I just want to write my books. So I keep doing it. (I will say that most of the self-pubbed books I've read have not been of the same caliber as traditionally pubbed books. This isn't to say it's not possible, but traditional publishers have teams of people who work on your book. It's bound to improve the quality of the thing. I should also add that I edit for self-publishing authors, and I think those who hire an editor end up with a much better book.)

I have several friends who were almost at the end of their proverbial ropes when they finally signed with an agent and sold one or more books to traditional publishers. Their stories lift my spirits when I want to give up.

Here are a few of things I've learned over my many long years of writing, submitting, being rejected, and trying again.

1. If the same work keeps getting rejected, maybe it's time to set it aside and work on something new. I know for a fact that each book I write is better than the last. And every time, I think this one is it, until it's not. Each one teaches me something I didn't understand before. So don't put all your eggs in that one basket.

2. I am confident that I am a good writer. Maybe even a great writer. I know this because I go to a lot of workshops, conferences, retreats, and critique groups with professionals, and they tell me this. Also because I've been practicing for a very long time. Also because I read by the ton, and I know what's out there. Also, because I have no ego left, so I can assess my own writing in a fairly unbiased way.

3. It's a good thing that some of the agents and editors I've submitted to have rejected me. As mentioned, I been in this rodeo quite a long time, and I've seen the big stall that can happen to a writer with an agent who isn't right for them. Inevitably, that partnership ends, and one has to start all over. As I have gotten to know some of the agents I once thought would be perfect for me, I cry happy tears that they didn't sign me.

4. Agents are just people. Very fallible people. Very nice people. Professional people. But there is nothing to be afraid of. I have given up the role of sweet little author who needs the help of an agent (if that ever was me), and I have started being completely myself when I query and submit. I tell people straight out what I want, what I'm willing to do, and what my vision for a particular book is. I am too old to tiptoe around, hoping my good behavior will get me in the door. You know that saying about well behaved women rarely making history? That.

5. Even when nothing happens, something is happening. I spent the last year hoping to nail down a particular agent. She asked for fulls of two manuscripts, read them, sent back copious editorial notes. I spent two months revising one manuscript per her notes, resubmitted at her request, and waited. For six months. Nothing. All my writing friends said to move on, which I am doing. But that was a good experience, because it gave me more confidence, revision notes to work with, and some good revisions came out of it.

6. Never, ever sit around and wait for that reply. Be working on new things and revising old things and researching and everything else. It gives me so much energy to be working on the next, new, shiny manuscript that I can forget there is ever one making the rounds out there. It keeps me from obsessing or worrying. It keeps me moving forward and writing better books.

I wish us all the best luck this year in achieving our writing and publishing dreams.




0 Comments on Try, Try Again as of 1/15/2015 8:09:00 PM
Add a Comment
14. Tell Us a Story: Authors Reframing Their Tales

TheStarlingProject

In the legend, Scheherazade told her king 1,000 stories; today, she would have 1,001 ways to tell them. James Atlas, writing in the New York Times, listens as we move from books to e-books to \"no-books,\" and he is happy to celebrate the long tradition of \"non-text-based\" literature (read oral literature or podcast) making a comeback. Other authors arrive in print, and come bearing gifts beyond the book itself.

 

Atlas cites thriller writer Jeffery Deaver, whose new audio drama for Audible, “The Starling Project,” is narrated by Alfred Molina and features 29 actors in more than 80 speaking roles, created with \"state-of-the-art sound and music design.\" It’s a dramatic audiobook, and there is no plan for a follow-on text-based book, print or e-book.

 

Chicago-based writer Shannon Cason shares his memories on a podcast called \"Homemade Stories.\" Called a \"storyteller’s storyteller\" by public radio’s Glynn Washington, Cason includes sound effects in his storytelling…barking dogs, a bouncing basketball…to bring us to his neighborhood and into his tale.

 

Utilizing print, and transforming the experience of her work by adding an art project/performance art/marketing piece, Miranda July is selling 50 items on her website that were created to be handled as if they fell directly out of the pages of her debut novel, The First Bad Man. There’s bubble-gum-flavored popcorn, a broken vase, a pink hairbrush, a secret in an envelope. In the New York Times, Alexandra Alter said, \"By allowing fans and readers to own items that previously existed only in her imagination and on the page, Ms. July is attempting to blur the line between fiction and reality, a boundary that she’s constantly puncturing through her performance art and writing.\"

 

Miranda July told the Times:

 

\"Often, these marketing-type projects are just a millimeter away from my actual work. I like people feeling like they could almost be that person in the story, crossing this line that’s not supposed to be permeable.\"

Add a Comment
15. Exploring the Careers of Famous Authors: INFOGRAPHIC

author careers blinkboxWhich authors do you admire most? The team at blinkbox books has created an infographic that examines the careers of several famous authors including J.K. Rowling, Stephenie Meyer, Meg Cabot, Stephen King, and Haruki Murakami. For each author that is listed on this image, their “breakthrough” novel is highlighted.

Both Douglas Adams and J.R.R. Tolkien hit it big with their debut novels, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and The Hobbit: There and Back AgainF. Scott Fitzgerald became well-known at age 30 for his third book, The Great Gatsby, while Leo Tolstoy achieved great success at age 42 with his sixth title, War & Peace. We’ve embedded the full infographic below for you to explore further—what do you think?

blinkbox books author careers infographic

Add a Comment
16. Ray Bradbury’s House to Be Torn Down

bradbury

Ray Bradbury’s former house has sold, but it sounds like the buyer is not a fan. The house, which fetched $1.76 million, is currently being torn down.

Bradbury lived in the charming three bedroom, single family home at 10265 Cheviot Drive in Los Angeles for more than 50 years.

John King Tarpinian visited the house and documented the teardown. “As I was taking pictures locals were walking their dogs. They’d stop to observe and we’d converse. One lady had no idea who had owned the house; she was new to the neighborhood,” he writes on the sci-fi site File 770.com.  “She walked away in tears. Another long time neighbor knew it was Ray’s home and we mutually agreed things like this are just wrong but money wins out. Another young couple had no idea who Ray was…the saddest encounter of all.”

(Via The Los Angeles Times).

Add a Comment
17. Kate Beaton Inks Deal With Drawn + Quarterly

step aside, popsComics creators Kate Beaton has signed a deal with Drawn + Quarterly.

A release date for Step Aside, Pops: A Hark! A Vagrant Collection has been scheduled for September 2015. Editor Tom Devlin negotiated the deal with Seth Fishman, a literary agent at the Gernert Company, and acquired North American English rights.

Devlin had this statement in the press release: “Kate’s wit is sharper than ever in Step Aside, Pops. She’s found the perfect way to explore her love of history, while effortlessly deflating the pompous, self-righteous figures of authority we were taught to respect in school. Her restlessness has made her drawings even funnier.”

Add a Comment
18. Amazon Signs Woody Allen

woodyallenAmazon Studios has signed author/film director Woody Allen up to write and direct a television series.

This will be the director’s first foray into TV and is part of Amazon’s recent push into the creation of original TV content, a move that puts the company in direct competition with Netflix.

Untitled Woody Allen Project, has the green light for a full series of half-hour episodes. Amazon has yet to disclose who will star in the show. The episodes will be available specifically to Prime Instant Video customers in the US, UK and Germany.

Add a Comment
19. Cover Unveiled For Elizabeth Gilbert’s New Book On Creativity

Big Magic Cover

Author Elizabeth Gilbert has been writing a new book entitled Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear. Riverhead Books has scheduled the release date for September 22, 2015.

Gilbert revealed on Facebook that she was inspired to work on this project by the conversations she has had with her fans through social media. The cover was revealed on the Etsy blog and we’ve embedded the full image above—what do you think? Click here to watch a video about the cover creation process.

Here’s more from Gilbert’s Facebook post: “It’s basically a manifesto. It contains everything that I believe about creativity. Some of you have watched my TED talks over the years about this subject, and all of that will be in the book…and more…How do I define a creative life? Any life that is guided more strongly by curiosity than by fear. How do you get around your fear, in order to live a more creative life? Well, that’s what the book is all about!”

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Add a Comment
20. Simon & Schuster Debuts Online Courses Taught by Authors

simonsaysSimon & Schuster has introduced an online destination designed for readers to connect with authors through video courses.

The latest SimonSays.com classes are centered around mind-body-spirit, health and fitness, as well as wealth and personal finance topics.

The current courses courses include: A Short Guide to a Long Life with David B. Agus, MD; Finding Your Purpose and Living It with Zhena Muzyka; and Outrageous Openness: Letting the Divine Take the Lead with life coach Tosha Silver. Courses range from $25-85 and include a variety of interactive exercises online including: workbooks, online journaling tools and access to a live Q&A with the author, depending on the course.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Add a Comment
21. Cover Unveiled For Elizabeth Gilbert’s New Book On Creativity

Big Magic Cover

Author Elizabeth Gilbert has been writing a new book entitled Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear. Riverhead Books has scheduled the release date for September 22, 2015.

Gilbert revealed on Facebook that she was inspired to work on this project by the conversations she has had with her fans through social media. The cover was revealed on the Etsy blog and we’ve embedded the full image above—what do you think? Click here to watch a video about the cover creation process.

Here’s more from Gilbert’s Facebook post: “It’s basically a manifesto. It contains everything that I believe about creativity. Some of you have watched my TED talks over the years about this subject, and all of that will be in the book…and more…How do I define a creative life? Any life that is guided more strongly by curiosity than by fear. How do you get around your fear, in order to live a more creative life? Well, that’s what the book is all about!”

Add a Comment
22. Simon & Schuster Debuts Online Courses Taught by Authors

simonsaysSimon & Schuster has introduced an online destination designed for readers to connect with authors through video courses.

The latest SimonSays.com classes are centered around mind-body-spirit, health and fitness, as well as wealth and personal finance topics.

The current courses courses include: A Short Guide to a Long Life with David B. Agus, MD; Finding Your Purpose and Living It with Zhena Muzyka; and Outrageous Openness: Letting the Divine Take the Lead with life coach Tosha Silver. Courses range from $25-85 and include a variety of interactive exercises online including: workbooks, online journaling tools and access to a live Q&A with the author, depending on the course.

Add a Comment
23. Neil Gaiman Shares His Thoughts On How to Become a Writer

Neil Gaiman TruthHow does one become a writer? American Gods novelist Neil Gaiman offered some practical advice to answer this question on his Tumblr. For Gaiman, it’s all about making sure to see a project through from start to finish.

Here’s more from Gaiman’s post: “Write the ideas down. If they are going to be stories, try and tell the stories you would like to read. Finish the things you start to write.”

Do you agree with Gaiman’s thoughts? If not, Gaiman describes an alternative process that involves scaling a mountain, catching a crow, collecting a golden berry, enduring a week of silence, and reciting Dr. Seuss’ Fox in Socks in its entirety with a golden berry under your tongue. Which method would you prefer?

Add a Comment
24. Robert Stone Has Died

Robert StoneAuthor Robert Stone has died. He was 77-years-old.

Throughout his published career, Stone penned eight novels, two story collections, and one memoir. Besides writing, he also served as a Navy man and as a correspondent during the Vietnam War.

Here’s more from The New York Times: “In muscular, observant prose, he wrote largely in the realistic mode, though he was not averse to hallucinatory or surreal passages at climactic moments with his characters in extremis. His books resonate with philosophical concerns, the thin divides between life and death, good and evil, God and godlessness, reflecting Mr. Stone’s own grappling with spiritual matters, dating from his childhood, when he grew up partly in a Roman Catholic orphanage. He rebelled, but never outgrew his hunger for some kind of ethereal nourishment.”

Add a Comment
25. Gone Girl Blu-Ray Package to Feature Amazing Amy Print Book

Gone Girl - Amazing AmyAn Amazing Amy spin-off story will be printed. MTV.com reports that this 36-page children’s book, entitled Tattle Tale, will be included in the package for the Gone Girl movie blu-ray.

In both the original novel and the movie, Amy Elliott-Dunne’s psychologist parents co-write the Amazing Amy series with a titular character who is modeled after their own daughter. Artist Kirk Van Wormer created the illustrations for Tattle Tale.

Author and screenwriter Gillian Flynn recently revealed that she is open to creating a sequel for the Gone Girl film adaptation. In an interview with the The New York Daily News, Flynn explained that a follow-up project could examine “what those crazy Dunnes are up to a few years down the road and if they got on — not well I don’t think.”

For Flynn, her one stipulation for such an endeavor would be to have David Fincher return as the director, Ben Affleck to continue playing Nick Dunne, and Rosamund Pike to come back as Amy Elliott-Dunne. Do you have any predictions on how the Dunnes’ story will evolve in the future?

Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts