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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Animals, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 1,906
1. Neighborhood Sharks

Neighborhood Sharks: Hunting with the Great Whites of California's Farallon Islands  by Katherine Roy David Macaulay Studio (Roaring Brook Press), 2014 Grades 2-5 The reviewer borrowed a copy of the book from her school library.  The shark section gets a lot of traffic in my elementary school library. Many young readers are fascinated by the creatures, so I was excited when I heard about

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2. Animals Everywhere!

Animals Everywhere!
Author & Illustrator: Simon Abbott
Publisher: Ticktock Books
Genre: Children / Animals
ISBN: 978-1-78325-077-6
Pages: 24
Price: $8.99

Author’s website
Downloadable fun activities – coming soon!
Buy it at Amazon

There are many kinds of habitats, and each supports certain animal populations. Animals Everywhere! is an illustrated guide which provides some interesting information about them.

Habitats such as the rain forest, mountains, desert, and ocean are each presented in a two-page spread. In these pages, various animals that live in the habitat are illustrated in cartoon style, along with fun facts about them.

Kids will be fascinated to learn about the goliath bird-eating spider, which is as big as a pizza, or the male narwhal, which is also called the “unicorn of the sea” because it has a long, spiral tusk. These and other fascinating creatures fill the pages of this fun and colorful book.

Reviewer: Alice Berger


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3. starred review

Happy Monday all! I'm going to  start the week with a couple of black and white Illustrations from my upcoming (first!) chapter book Audrey (Cow)


We're celebrating a starred review in Publishers weekly, hurray!

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4. EYES ON THE WILD SERIES BY SUZI ESZTERHAS

Cheetah ISBN: 9781847803016 Elephant ISBN:9781847805188 Gorilla ISBN: 9781847802996 Tiger ISBN: 9781847805171 Written and photographed by Suzi Eszterhas Frances Lincoln Children's Books. 2014 Preschool to Grade 2 I received these titles from the publisher. After a long night of hunting in the forests of India, a mother tigress carefully returns to her den. She crawls into this secret place

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5. Mail Art: Birds on Envelopes

This is one of the projects I've been working on recently, for an art college class. Yes, birds and mail art. Wonderful. Loads of cutting, slicing, collaging, and then drawing and painting, was done. I ended up with a couple of options to work on, and liked them both but ended up picking this one below for the final review.

 

Huginn-and-Muninn-Envelope-Art-1-by-FLoating-Lemons

I went through a bit of exploration and research and managed to develop quite a fascination with ravens, sifting through poems such as Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Raven', folklore, fairy-tales, fables--almost picked Aesop's The Crow and the Pitcher--so it isn't too surprising that I went with this pair in the end ... In Norse mythology, Huginn (from Old Norse "thought") and Muninn (Old Norse "memory" or "mind") are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world of Midgard, and bring information and news back to the god Odin. Flying messengers. Perfect.

I've depicted them as a white and black raven, and addressed the envelope to them. Their names are written in ancient Nordic runes just above their respective beaks. Yes, there's a message inside as well, written on rice paper 'parchment'. Private, of course. Let's hope that the envelope will eventually be returned to sender (me!) with a postal mark to show that it's been in the system. Here's a glimpse of the bit of mess I made while researching and working on the project ...

 

Huginn-and-Muninn-Envelope-Art-2-by-FLoating-Lemons

 

Here's the back of the envelope with a depiction of the Nordic mythical Tree of Life, Yggdrasil ...

 

Huginn-and-Muninn-Envelope-Art-3-by-FLoating-Lemons

 

The ravens and the tree were paper cuttings (my sketch book suffered somewhat) that I painted (watercolour for the birds and some marker pen on the tree) and collaged onto the envelope. On the front I'd also glued crosswords (to symbolize thought, naturally) onto the original white envelope, and then placed a thin sheet of rice paper over the whole thing so that it looked like parchment, slightly aged. I quite like the result, what do you think?

The other attempt at mail art was slightly a different one: I made an envelope from black paper and then cut straight into it, collaging and shading only the white bird on the front. Then I placed white paper inside the envelope so that it showed through the snipped out leaves, flowers and insects.

 

Bird-Mail-Envelope-Art-1-by-Floating-Lemons

Bird-Mail-Envelope-Art-2-by-Floating-Lemons

Simple, but I think it's quite cute. The back is a more abstract representation of a (meaner) raven and its wings, can you see it?

 

Bird-Mail-Envelope-Art-3-by-Floating-Lemons

 

I did like this black and white bit of mail art, but once I'd begun on the research for the winged messengers of Odin, I fell in love with them and that was pretty much that. I think I made the right choice picking them as my final piece, what do you think? There are infinite possibilities for both options though, and I may end up using them somehow on cards and other goodies, so keep an eye out for them up at the Floating Lemons shops in the near future ...

Meanwhile, I wish you a fantastic week. Cheers.

 

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6. Super Sniffers by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent

Super Sniffers: Dog Detectives on the Job By Dorothy Hinshaw Patent Bloomsbury. 2014 ISBN: 9780802736185 Grades 3-6 To review this book, I borrowed a copy from my local public library. I couldn't resist reviewing another book about dogs who use their incredible sense of smell to help get the job done. Take any dog, any dog, for a walk along a sidewalk or in a park, and you won’t be

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7. Nine types of meat you may have never tried

Sometimes what is considered edible is subject to a given culture or region of the world; what someone from Nicaragua would consider “local grub” could be entirely different than what someone in Paris would eat. How many different types of meat have you experienced? Are there some types of meat you would never eat? Below are nine different types of meat, listed in The Oxford Companion to Food, that you may not have considered trying:

Camel: Still eaten in some regions, a camel’s hump is generally considered the best part of the body to eat. Its milk, a staple for desert nomads, contains more fat and slightly more protein than cow’s milk.

Beaver: A beaver’s tail and liver are considered delicacies in some countries. The tail is fatty tissue and was greatly relished by early trappers and explorers. Its liver is large and almost as tender and sweet as a chicken’s or a goose’s.

Agouti: Also spelled aguti; a rodent species that may have been described by Charles Darwin as “the very best meat I ever tasted” (though he may have been actually describing a guinea pig since he believed agouti and cavy were interchangeable names).

Armadillo: Its flesh is rich and porky, and tastes more like possum than any other game. A common method of cooking is to bake the armadillo in its own shell after removing its glands.

Hedgehog
Hedgehog. Photo by Kalle Gustafsson. CC BY 2.0 via Flickr

Capybara: The capybara was an approved food by the Pope for traditional “meatless” days, probably since it was considered semiaquatic. Its flesh, unless prepared carefully to trim off fat, tastes fishy.

Hedgehog: A traditional gypsy cooking method is to encase the hedgehog in clay and roast it, after which breaking off the baked clay would take the spines with it.

Alligator: Its meat is white and flaky, likened to chicken or, sometimes, flounder. Alligators were feared to become extinct from consumption, until they started becoming farmed.

Iguana: Iguanas were an important food to the Maya people when the Spaniards took over Central America. Its eggs were also favored, being the size of a table tennis ball, and consisted entirely of yolk.

Puma: Charles Darwin believed he was eating some kind of veal when presented with puma meat. He described it as, “very white, and remarkably like veal in taste”. One puma can provide a lot of meat, since each can weigh up to 100 kg (225 lb).

Has this list changed the way you view these animals? Would you try alligator meat but turn your nose up if presented with a hedgehog platter?

Headline Image: Street Food at Wangfujing Street. Photo by Jirka Matousek. CC BY 2.0 via Flickr

The post Nine types of meat you may have never tried appeared first on OUPblog.

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8. A Peek into the Sketchbook: Mail Art & Birds

I can't believe that it's been less than two months since I moved to the UK ... so much has been squeezed into that small amount of time that I'm still in a bit of a daze. But the good news is, of course, that I'm finally back on the internet.

Have tons of catching up to do but it will have to fit into the cracks between my college artwork. And I haven't been completely idle creatively either, despite 'real life' competing for my attention lately. Here's a glimpse into what I've been doing - tons of research and a few sketches for an upcoming class project. First though, here's the art-space I've set up for myself in our new, temporary home:

 

Sketchbook-1-by-Floating-Lemons

 

And a glimpse into the pages of a new sketchbook:

 

 

Sketchbook-2-by-Floating-Lemons
Sketchbook-3-by-Floating-Lemons
Sketchbook-4-by-Floating-Lemons
Sketchbook-5-by-Floating-Lemons

Sketchbook-6-by-Floating-Lemons

 

Different mediums, styles, cutting, collaging - lots of lovely experimentation going on. Birds (I'm developing a particular fascination with ravens and crows) and mail art. I've also been pinning for inspiration so if you'd like to have a look, check out my Pinterest Boards, Art: Mail Art, Art: Crows & Ravens, and Art: Birds. Have fun.

Wishing you a week full of flights of fancy. Cheers.

 

 

 

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9. Orange Triangle Fox, by Sarah Jones | Book Review

Orange Triangle Fox is a sturdy and colorful board book that incorporates three learning opportunities into one! Each spread features a different animal, shape, and color with a darling illustration and clear and easy to read words.

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10. Who Was Here? Discovering Wild Animal Tracks

Who Was Here?: Discovering Wild Animal Tracks  by Mia Posada Millbrook Press, 2014 9781647718714 Grades K-3 The reviewer received a copy of the book from the publisher. Young readers will enjoy learning about animals tracks in this engaging science picture books. The writing style alternates between descriptive poems and expository paragraphs as readers try to guess the animals based on the

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11. Harriet Can Carry It Launch Party!

In celebration of  our BRAND NEW Star Bright title, Harriet Can Carry It, Star Bright Books welcomes anyone in the area to attend a launch party held by author Kirk Jay Mueller at the Old Town Newhall Library in Santa Clarita, California. The event, which will also include a signing by the author, will take place in the library's Community Room on Saturday November 1, 2014, from 2-4 PM. Full event details are available at the Events & Visits tab of the author's website, kirkjaymueller.com.

Here at Star Bright Books, we are incredibly excited for the impending publication of this book. Through every read-through and discussion of this story, our delight in experiencing the journey of Harriet, her little Joey, and the quirky characters that she meets has never weakened, owing in large part to the fantastic and imaginative storytelling of Kirk Jay Mueller. While this is Mr. Mueller's first children's book, he has told many stories throughout his life and career; as a teacher of 4th-6th grade students for thirty years, he made sure to set aside time every day to introduce his students to engaging stories, the writing process, as well as a song or two (Mueller is also a singer-songwriter). He now especially enjoys going into schools and classrooms, guitar in hand, to share his songs and stories with children.

For more information on the author, his work, and his future events and visits, please visit his website. For more information on Harriet Can Carry It, our other new and exciting fall titles, as well as the rest of our catalog, please visit our website, starbrightbooks.org.


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12. #663 – Can I Come Too? by Brian Patten & Nicola Bayley

Can I Come Too jacketx                  PEACHTREE PUBLISHERS BOOK BLOG TOUR
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Can I Come Too?

Written by Brian Patten
Illustrated by Nicola Bayley
Peachtree Publishers            10/01/2014
978-1-56145-796-0
Age 4 to 8            32 pages
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“One day, a tiny mouse goes in search of the biggest creature in the world. Along the way, she meets a menagerie of animals. Each towers over mouse, but which is the biggest of all? One by one, mouse’s new friends join her quest. After a long day of searching, they finally discover a creature as big as an island and bigger than a million mice! Join mouse on her journey as she assures young readers that they don’t have to be big to have a grand adventure.”

Opening

“A very small mouse decided she wanted to have a very big adventure.”

The Story

A little brown mouse decides to find the biggest creature in the world. She thinks this will make for a grand adventure. By the lake, Little Mouse finds Frog, who is bigger than she is. Little mouse asks the brown frog,

“Are you the biggest creature in the world?”

Frog said no, but he thinks Little Mouse is brave for trying to find the biggest creature in the world. He wants to come along. Together, Little Mouse and Frog continue searching for the biggest creature in the world. They come upon several creatures, including a bird, a cat, an otter, a badger, a dog, a goat, a tiger, and a polar bear. Little Mouse asks each the same question she had asked Frog, but none of these magnificent creatures is the biggest in the world.

Polar Bear believes the biggest creature in the world lives in the ocean. One-by-one, each of the creatures Little Mouse and Frog came upon—all of whom joined the adventure—follow the others along the river to where it empties into the ocean. There, swimming in the salty ocean water, is a creature as big as an island . . . and the biggest in the world.

Review

Can I Come Too? brings together ten animals of varying shapes, sizes, and sensibilities on a journey to find the biggest creature in the world. Little Mouse was, of course, the smallest, yet lead the group by the lake, along the river, through a small valley, a city zoo, and up a small mountainside before ending at the ocean. The animals are cordial despite differences in size and natural instincts. A few are humorous, adding a new layer to the story.

Can I Come Too interior-page-009

The cat is inclined to enjoy both the mouse and the bird, but chooses instead to join in the adventure, its curiosity getting the best of it. The tiger—with “paws as big as frying pans”—even promises not to eat anyone if only he could join the adventure. Like with Cat, Tiger is unanimously welcomed into the growing group. The Little Mouse looks to be no larger than one of Tiger’s front claws. In this spread, five other animals show their claws, all of which are larger than Little Mouse. The Kingfisher bird comfortably rests upon Tiger’s tail as if it sits here daily.

I love that none of these animals had to be afraid of another. The journey is more important to them than following a natural inclination to make a snack out of a smaller animal. One of the funniest parts, to me, is when the group comes upon the dog. Little Mouse asks the dog,

“Are you the biggest creature in the world?”
[Before Dog can answer} The cat said, “He’s the scruffiest creature, but certainly not the biggest.”

I could hear the sarcasm in the cat’s voice as it scrutinizes the dog. Then there is the animal that Little Mouse never approaches, yet decides the adventure is worth joining, so it follows the group out of the zoo. I think kids will enjoy meeting these creatures and deciding for themselves if the group has met the world’s biggest creature. They will also enjoy identifying each animal and comparing each to the next, always larger, animal to join the group.

Can I Come Too interior-page-008

The colored pencil on cartridge paper* illustrations realistically portray each animal and its surroundings. The brightest object is the Kingfisher bird with its bright blue feathers—with white dots on its head—and an orange belly. Rather than a more traditional green frog, the artist created a brown frog, but kids will easily recognize each creature. The most beautiful spread is, appropriately, the spread showcasing the biggest creature in the world. The magnificent yellow-orange sky on the right shines down upon the ocean and the name of the creature, making them stand out. All the animals in the adventure stand silhouetted on the bank, marveling at the creature they have found.

Young children and parents will both enjoy Can I Come Too? In addition to the gorgeous illustrations and the variety of animals, the mouse’s adventure sends a strong message that one does not need to be big, or bold, or brave to enjoy a magnificent adventure and gain new friends along the way. I like that the tiger and the cat choose the journey and its surprises against eating the smaller animals (as is their nature), showing kids that it is possible for anyone to become friends when they have the correct mindset. Can I Come Too is the perfect first adventure for young readers.

*cartridge art paper is a very heavy drawing paper (90 gsm to 128gsm), and sometimes toned, and used mainly in Britain and Australia.

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CAN I COME TOO? Text copyright © 2013 by Brian Patten. Illustrations copyright © 2013 by Nicola Bayley. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Peachtree Publishers, Atlanta, GA.

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Purchase Can I Come Too? at AmazonB&NBook DepositoryPeachtree Publishersyour favorite book store.

Learn more about Can I Come Too? HERE

Meet the author, Brian Patten, at his website:   www.brianpatten.co.uk

Meet the illustrator, Nicola Bayley, at her pinterest:   http://www.pinterest.com/bustersays/art-of-nicola-bayley/

Find wonderful picture books at the Peachtree Publishers website:   http://peachtree-online.com/

Can I Come Too? was first published in 2013 in Great Britain by Andersen Press.

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Also by Brian Patten

The Most Impossible Parents

The Most Impossible Parents

Thawing Frozen Frogs

Thawing Frozen Frogs

The Monsters' Guide to Choosing a Pet

The Monsters’ Guide to Choosing a Pet

The Big Snuggle-Up

The Big Snuggle-Up

 

 

 

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Also by Nicola Bayley

The Big Snuggle-Up

The Big Snuggle-Up

PARROT CAT

PARROT CAT

POLAR BEAR CAT

POLAR BEAR CAT

The Curious Cat

The Curious Cat

 

 

 

 

 

 

can i come too

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Copyright © 2014 by Sue Morris/Kid Lit Reviews

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PEACHTREE PUBLISHERS BOOK BLOG TOUR

Can I Come Too?

Monday 10/6

Green Bean Teen Queen

Tuesday 10/7

Geo Librarian

Kid Lit Reviews

Wednesday 10/8

Chat with Vera

Thursday 10/9

Blue Owl

The Fourth Musketeer

Friday 10/10

Sally’s Bookshelf


Filed under: 5stars, Children's Books, Favorites, Library Donated Books, Picture Book Tagged: adventures, Andersen Press, animals, Brian Patten, children's book reviews, friendships, Nicola Bayley, Peachtree Publishers, picture books

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13. Mother’s Love Can Conquer Any Fear! by Subhash Kommuru | Dedicated Review

In Mother’s Love Can Conquer Any Fear!, author Subhash Kommuru and illustrator Sujata Kommuru have combined animals, storytelling, and expressive illustrations to successfully share the core values of family, community, and courage with young readers.

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14. A Sketchy Catch Up Post

If you're not following me on Instagram, you might have missed a few things.

First of all, I've decided to participate in Inktober, a daily challenge for the month of October. I've got some crazy deadlines, so I'm not sure I'll manage it each day, but I'll try.
Day 1: Meet Zelda P. Bird modeling her best cape and hat.

I really love all things Halloween, so my sketching has been centered around that.
Nibbles has a wicked sense of humor which Stubby does not appreciate.



Dance like there's no one watching.



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15. Silver Moonbeam Award Winner

swamp_Baird

2014 Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards Results are in and Picture Book – 4-8 Year Old – SILVER Award goes to: The Swamp Where Gator Hides, by Marianne Berkes; illustrated by Roberta Baird (Dawn Publications)

This book was a joy to work on. I now know more about gators that I ever dreamed I would.

Beautiful creatures really!

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16. Shark Baby

Shark Baby
Author: Ann Downer
Illustrator: Shennen Bersani
Publisher: Sylvan Dell
Genre: Children / Animals
ISBN: 978-1-60718-6342
Pages: 32
Price: $9.95

Author’s website
Buy it at Amazon

Shark baby is snug in his egg case, tied to a strand of kelp, wondering what’s outside. But when a storm hits, the rough ocean waves break the case loose, tearing it slightly. Shark baby can now see where he is and who he is encountering as he drifts about. But now he has a new question – what kind of shark is he?

Shark Baby introduces children to the life cycle of a shark and shows them a variety of shark species. A discussion guide with questions is also provided for classroom use. This book would be a great resource for science lessons.

Reviewer: Alice Berger


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17. sneeze

Welcome fall! I'm enjoying the cooler weather, but it's making me sneeze. 20 times in a row yesterday - my record

Have a nice weekend!

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18. Lifetime: The Amazing Numbers in Animals’ Lives, by Lola Schaefer | Book Review

This whimsical and educational book combines a love for both animals and numbers, which makes it a great way to get animal lovers excited about math while giving them the opportunity to learn more about the individual animals as well.

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19. playing around

 I'm having fun playing with watercolor and collage on the side. Here's my favorite so far:


 I like the combination of loose watercolor, playful pencils and precise papercutting, so I think I'm going to keep working on this idea some more.
By the way, this is the last day to vote on the GTS round two designs (see earlier post). If you haven't voted yet, check out the gallery here.


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20. New work

windwillow1_robertaBaird

“Glorious, stirring sight! The poetry of motion! The real way to travel! The only way to travel! Here today–in next week tomorrow! Villages skipped, towns and cities jumped–always somebody else’s horizon! O bliss! O poop-poop! O my! O my!”
– Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

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21. Sing like nothing else matters !

When you are feeling all alone, if you just sing out loud you may be surprised how many others will join in with you …JDMn6Birds62920141


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22. Sniffer Dogs by Nancy F. Castaldo

Sniffer Dogs: how dogs (and their noses) save the world By Nancy F. Castaldo Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 2014 ISBN: 9780544088931 Grades 3 thru 12 To write this review, I borrowed this book from my local public library. In Sniffer Dogs, readers learn how canines use their incredible sense of smell to help find us, keep us safe, and rescue us from danger. They even help protect the

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23. Painting from Taxidermy

At the SKB Foundation Workshop in Dubois, Wyoming, most of the painting practice involves landscape painting outdoors, or wildlife painting from photographs indoors. 

I thought it would also be a helpful exercise for everyone to paint real, three dimensional animals from observation, but living models weren't available on short notice.

So we arranged to borrow a fine specimen of coyote, a pronghorn antelope, and a wolf from local taxidermy artist Lynn Stewart, who very generously brought them over to the art center.

This was my view of a running white wolf. I liked the pose, but I imagined it backlit against the bold fall colors of the quaking aspens, with sagebrush in the foreground, as I remembered the setting from a horseback ride in the morning.


Here's the two hour gouache demo I did  with that idea in mind.

It would have been even better to do a location study separately outdoors and combine it with the taxidermy study, properly lit -- or to take the taxidermy outside into a natural setting. The idea is to put away the camera and see if there's a way to do a wildlife study as much as possible from life and imagination.

On the other side of the room, John Seerey-Lester did this magnificent acrylic study of the same wolf. He chose to set it within a snowy winter backdrop. 

That's John and his wife Suzie (pink hat) in the right foreground of the photo below. They are featured in the current issue of International Artist magazine, not only for their wildlife art, but also for their landscapes and nostalgia scenes.

It was a marvelous experience for all of us to paint together with a combine imagination and observation.
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Links:
John and Suzie Seerey-Lester's website
Stewart Taxidermy, Dubois, Wyoming
SKB Foundation Workshop

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24. Giraffes Can’t Dance: Number Rumba, by Giles Andreae | Book Review

Based upon the picture book, Giraffes Can’t Dance, this sturdy and colorful board book is a fun way for little ones to learn how to count to ten.

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25. in the mail...

Today's mail brought the current issue of Ladybug magazine, with two of my illustrations. It looks nice and was a lot of fun to do. I'm also happy to be in such good company, the other art looks great!
Here's a peek:




who doesn't want to dress up like their pet ? Do you know what you'll be for Halloween this year?

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