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1. Jamie Marks Is Dead

  
Jamie Marks Is Dead is based on a book I love by a writer I love: One for Sorrow by Christopher Barzak. I realized recently that I think of it as the first novel of "our" generation/group of writers — Chris is a few months older than me, and originally introduced me to probably half the writers and editors I know. I read One for Sorrow in manuscript, exhorted Juliet Ulman to buy and edit it for Bantam, and celebrated its publication. Chris sent me a copy with the kindest inscription penned onto its title page that any writer has ever given me. I feel like a kind of distant (crazy) uncle to the book, and thus also deeply protective toward it. I didn't read most of the reviews when it was released for fear that I would seek out any negative reviewers and do terrible things to them that would get me arrested.  When I found out it was being made into a movie, I was both excited for Chris and for the higher profile the book would likely gain, and terrified that the movie would just be awful. I mumbled to myself for weeks about the change of title before coming to accept it.

The movie was officially released in some major US cities today, and the distributor is also doing a simultaneous release on video-on-demand (Amazon, iTunes, etc.), so those of us, at least in the US, who can't get to one of the cities it's playing in can still see it. I watched it this morning.

The movie is not awful — far from it — and though at first I had my crazy-uncle fists clenched, ready to pounce on anything that even touched a hair of my beloved nephew's head, it was soon clear that this was a movie made from not only a general understanding of the book, but a profound sympathy with it. They're very different creatures, but if you love One for Sorrow, I think you're likely to love Jamie Marks Is Dead, too.



It begins in a style I've come to think of as "digital somber", a style common to a lot of artsy low-budget movies these days: muted colors; the clarity of light peculiar to a certain kind of digital lensing; long takes and fluid camera movement; dreamy music. It's become a familiar enough style that I now find myself skeptical of it at first, because too often it screams out, "Serious Movie!" before it earns its mood. (But at its best it can be devastating. See, for instance, The Snowtown Murders.)  In this case, it's a good fit to the material, and director Carter Smith, cinematographer Darren Lew, and the various designers and decorators (Amy Williams, Steven Phan, Nora Mendis, Rachel Dainer-Best) do a superb job of uniting the elements into a whole that sustains a mood impressively. The production design and decoration in particular deserve notice, because the details are exquisite — though the movie makes absolutely no effort to drawn attention to it, the setting is not contemporary, but rather seems to be late '90s, early '00s (the time of the book). Further, though the novel is explicitly set in and around Youngstown, Ohio, the movie is more general in its setting: somewhere northeastish, somewhere working class, somewhere rusty and full of industrial and commercial ruins. (It was shot in New York state. Chris says it looks plenty like Ohio. It looks plenty like places I know in New Hampshire, too, the places the tourists don't go.)

Smith's background as a photographer serves him well, as he and Lew sustain a difficult look for the film without strain. Shot after shot is evocative but not ostentatious. One example (a screen capture doesn't do it justice, or I'd place a picture here): a high-angle long shot of a yellow ribbon of crime scene tape snaked across the wet ground of a grey riverbank on a moonlit night. The tape, though muddied, is the brightest object in the image, rivalled only by the white of driftwood and fragments of light rippling on the water. The image evokes mood and meaning, but most importantly it provides a perfect introduction for a ghost.

I wasn't sure if I was going to like Noah Silver as Jamie, because I had such a clear idea of Jamie in my own mind, an idea that has congealed over a decade of living with the novel, and the soggy-Harry-Potter styling of the character was very different from the lighter, whispier Jamie in my head. (Adam was always less defined for me, more an aural than physical image, since the novel is written from his first-person POV.) But Silver's performance won me over, especially in the second half of the film when he must be alluring, mysterious, innocent, and menacing all pretty much at the same time. In his first scenes, the lighting and make-up make him seem almost like a plastic mannequin, but as the scenes progress, he becomes more and more human — an odd and very effective choice for the representation of this ghost.

All of the performances are strong, and the film demonstrates quite well the adage that finding the right cast (and crew) is 90% of the success of a production. In pre-release photos from the film, I thought Cameron Monaghan as Adam looked a bit too much like a human Kewpie doll, but he gives an impressive performance. His physique is remarkably variable — he can play vulnerability and sensitivity as well as sharpness and hardness, with his face seemingly changing shape depending on the needs of the scene: at one moment, his face is soft and a bit round, at another, it's all cold angles. (Some of this is also the responsibility of the cinematographer and his lighting team.) Monaghan has excellent instincts, and Smith is smart enough to bring those instincts to fore by encouraging him to hold back: Monaghan's eyes tell entire stories.

Where Silver and Monaghan were not immediately in sync with how I'd imagined the characters, and thus had to (and did) win me over, Morgan Saylor was the Gracie in my mind's eye. I've rarely seen an actor so perfectly fit how I'd imagined a character when reading the original material. A big part of it is her voice, which is deeper and huskier than you might imagine if you just looked at her. It would be easy to make the character of Gracie into a cliché of the adolescent "bad girl", but the movie thankfully doesn't do that — as Saylor plays the role, Gracie is very much an individual, not a type. We don't actually learn a lot about her in the movie, but there is a richness to the performance that allows us to imagine so much that the film itself doesn't have time to convey.

Smith made some excellent choices with his screenplay and direction, particularly in how he focused the story. There's an epic quality to the second half of the novel that just couldn't be conveyed well in a 2-hour movie, never mind a 2-hour movie without a big budget. As any good artist does, Smith turns his limitations into opportunities. The close focus on Adam, Jamie, and Gracie (with some other folks wandering in and out of the story to create and complicate tension) allows the film to build a slow, careful emotional resonance. It's seductive, this movie, and it sticks its hooks in when you're not expecting it. Partly, this is because Smith decided to keep the dialogue to a minimum and to not explain everything. It's a movie of glances and glimpses, of possibilities more than answers. That will, I'm sure, bother plenty of viewers, viewers who want explanations for the logic of the ghost world (as if the supernatural must follow a logical system!), who will want some of the plot's mysteries solved more neatly, who will want some of the side stories tied up or justified — but this is a different sort of film, and its commitment to suggestiveness, its willingness to allow possibilities to linger, enhances the fundamental effect. Give yourself over to it, and this is a movie that will haunt you. The novel does this some, but as a novel it has the space to answer questions without closing off possibilities. Two-hour movies are more like short stories, and at its best moments this one reminded me of the effect of reading my favorite writer of ghost stories, Robert Aickman.

For all its many great moments, the most extraordinary is the very last. Since the movie goes in a different direction for some of its later parts than the novel does, I had no idea how or where it would end. (Figuring out the end was, I know, one of Chris's biggest challenges when writing the novel.) What could it possibly do? How could it find the resonance it needed to be satisfying?

I'll just say this: the moment the credits started rolling, I was in tears. Tears not only because of the profound effect of the absolutely perfect choice of ending, but also of relief that this beloved novel had been translated with such care and love to a very different medium.



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2. ‘Infinite Jest’ Adapted in Lego

Kevin Griffith, an English professor in Ohio has teamed up with his 11 year old son to create a Lego adaptation of David Foster Wallace’s novel Infinite Jest.

Brick Jest” recreates 100 scenes from the tome. The two have documented the project with photography with text captions.

The pair were inspired to create Brick Jest after reading Brendan Powell Smith‘s The Brick Bible, a series of books that teach Bible stories to kids with Lego. Check it out:  ”Wallace’s novel is probably the only contemporary text to offer a similar challenge to artists working in the medium of Lego.  The artist in this case was Griffith’s eleven-year-old son, Sebastian, who created all the scenes based on his father’s descriptions of the relevant pages.”

 

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3. Sony Pictures & Imagine Entertainment to Adapt Dan Brown’s ‘Inferno’

Sony Pictures and Imagine Entertainment are teaming up to adapt Inferno by Dan Brown. According to USA Todaythis novel was the bestselling book of 2013.

The movie studios will be skipping over the third installment of this popular fiction series, The Lost Symbol. Actor Tom Hanks will return to play Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon, filmmaker Ron Howard will serve as the director, and screenwriter David Koepp will pen the script.

Here’s more from Deadline: “In Inferno, Langdon awakens in an Italian hospital with amnesia. He teams up with Sienna Brooks, the doctor he hopes will help him recover his memories and prevent a madman from releasing a global plague connected to Dante’s Inferno.” Which actress would you cast to play Sienna Brooks?

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4. Cate Blanchett & Christian Bale Sign on To Jungle Book Adaptation

Cate Blanchett and Christian Bale are the latest actors to sign on to star in Warner Bros.’ live action film adaptation of Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book.

The two actors will star alongside Naomie Harris, Tom Hollander, Eddie Marsan and Peter Mullan in the Andy Serkis-directed film.

The Hollywood Reporter has the scoop: “Bale will voice Bagheera, a fearsome panther, both of whom save Mowgli from the killer tiger Shere Khan (Cumberbatch) and teach him the law of the jungle. Blanchett will voice Kaa, a sinister python who is also a friend to Mowgli, while Hollander will play Tabaqui, the jackal who is an underling of Shere Khan.”

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5. Cote de Pablo & Rachel Brosnahan to Star in ‘The Dovekeepers’ Miniseries

Two ladies have joined the cast for The Dovekeepers adaptation. Deadline reports that Cote de Pablo will portray Shirah and Rachel Brosnahan will portray Yael.

The filmmaking team still has to cast two actors to play the lead protagonists Revka and Aziza. The story takes place in ancient Israel.

Scribner, an imprint at Simon & Schuster, released Alice Hoffman’s novel back in October 2011. CBS plans to air this four-hour TV miniseries in 2015.

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6. ‘Vampire Academy’ Production Team Launches Indiegogo Campaign

The Vampire Academy movie production team have launched a crowdfunding venture on Indiegogo.

They hope to raise $1.5 million to adapt the second installment of Richelle Mead’s young adult series, Frostbite. The campaign will run until September 05, 2014. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s an excerpt from the message that screenwriter Piers Ashworth posted on the Indiegogo page:

“We have to get this movie made. We have to meet Adrian and understand the new dimension he brings to the story. We have to experience the changes Rose undergoes as she battles the ultimate foe at the same time as coming to terms with her relationships (including the one with her mother). We have to see the battle of wills in the basement – and the surprise of Mia’s use of water magic to incapacitate Isaiah. We have to see the Strigoi for what they really are. Please help make that happen.”

(more…)

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7. Christopher Walken to Play King Louie in ‘The Jungle Book’ Adaptation

Christopher Walken has signed on to star in the new Jungle Book movie re-make.

The Oscar-winning actor will play the orangutan King Louie in Disney’s live action adaptation. TheaterMania reports that the movie will be released in October 2015.

As we previously reportedIron Man director Jon Favreau will helm this project. The cast also includes Idris ElbaLupita Nyong’o, and Scarlett Johansson. Who would you cast as Rudyard Kipling’s orphan “man cub” character, Mowgli?

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8. Universal Pictures & Imagine Entertainment Nab Film Rights to ‘The Vampire Chronicles’

Universal Pictures and Imagine Entertainment have joined together to acquire the film rights to The Vampire Chronicles.

More than 20 million copies of these novels have been sold worldwide. Thus far, Anne Rice has written ten installments in her popular series. Knopf will publish book 11, Prince Lestat, on October 28, 2014.

Here’s more from Variety: “An earlier version of the story, Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles, starred Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise in 1994 and was a strong performer for Warner Bros. with $220 million in worldwide box office. Rice’s Queen of the Damned, also part of The Vampire Chronicles, starred Aaliyah and Stuart Townsend in 2002 and grossed $45 million worldwide for Warners.” Which actor would you cast as Lestat?

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9. Pemberley Digital & PBS Digital Studios to Create Web Series Based on ‘Frankenstein’

Pemberley Digital has partnered with PBS Digital Studios to adapt Mary Shelley’s beloved horror novel, Frankenstein, into a web series called “Frankenstein M.D.”

According to the PBS Digital Studios press release, the story follows ”Victoria Frankenstein is a Ph.D./MD student focused on a career as a research scientist. With her colleague Iggy DeLacey (based on the iconic character ‘Igor‘) and mentor, Dr. Waldman, the ambitious, daring genius is flipping the script and creating a new (self-titled) YouTube science show, explaining complex biological and medical concepts to a general audience. As Frankenstein pursues her boldest line of research yet, she makes a shocking series of discoveries that could potentially endanger not only her career, but her life and the lives of her friends.”

The cast includes Anne Lore playing VictoriaSteve Zaragoza playing IggyBrendan Bradley playing EliSarah Fletcher playing Rory, and Kevin Rock playing Dr. Waldman. The team plans to shoot twenty four episodes that will run between five to eight minutes long. The first three installments will be available for public viewing on the PBS Digital Studios YouTube channel starting August 19th. The finale will air on Halloween later this year.

(more…)

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10. What is the role of governments in climate change adaptation?

By Kai A. Konrad and Marcel Thum


Adaptation to climate change is currently high on the agenda of EU bureaucrats exploring the regulatory scope of the topic. Climate change may potentially bring about changes in the frequency of extreme weather events such as heat waves, flooding or thunder storms, which in turn may require adaptation to changes in our living conditions. Adaptation to these conditions cannot stop climate change, but it can reduce the cost of climate change. Building dikes protects the landscape from an increase in sea level. New vaccines protect the population from diseases that may spread due to the change in the climate. Leading politicians, the media and prominent interest groups call for more efforts in adaptation.

But who should be in charge? Do governments have to play a leading role in adaptation? Will firms and households make the right choices? Or do governments have to intervene to correct insufficient or false adaptation choices? If intervention is necessary, will the policy have to be decided on a local level or on a national or even supranational (EU) level? In a recent article we review the main arguments for government intervention in climate change adaptation. Overall, we find that the role of the state in adaptation policy is limited.

In many cases, adaptation decisions can be left to private individuals or firms. This is true if private sector decision-makers both bear the cost and enjoy the benefits of their own decisions. Superior insulation of buildings is a good example. It shields the occupants of a building from extreme temperatures during cold winters and hot summers. The occupants – and only the occupants – benefit from the improved insulation. They also bear the costs of the new insulation. If the benefit exceeds the cost, they will invest in the superior insulation. If it does not pay off, they will refrain from the adaptation measure (and they should do so from an efficiency point of view). There is no need for government intervention in the form of building regulation or rehabilitation programmes.

In some other cases, adaptation affects an entire community as in the case of dikes. A single household will hardly be able – nor have the incentive – to build a dike of the appropriate size. But the local municipality can and should be able to so. All inhabitants of the municipality can share the costs and appropriate the benefit from flood protection. The decision on the dike could be made on the state level if not at the municipal level. The local population will probably have a long-standing experience and superior knowledge about the flood events and its potential damages. The subsidiarity principle, which is a major principle of policy task assignment in the European Union, suggests that the decisions should be made on the most decentralized level for which there are no major externalities between the decision-makers. In the case of the dike, the appropriate level for the adaptation measure would be the municipality. Again there is no need for intervention from upper-level governments.

floods

So what role is left for the upper echelons of government in climate change adaptation? Firstly, the government has to help in improving our knowledge. Information about climate change and information about technical adaptation measures are typical public goods: the cost of generating the information has to be incurred once, whereas the information can be used at no additional cost. Without government intervention, too little information would be generated. Therefore, financing basic research in this area is one of the fundamental tasks for a central government.

Secondly, the government has to provide the regulatory framework for insurance markets. The economic consequences of natural disasters can be cushioned through insurance markets. However, the incentives to buy insurance are insufficient for several reasons. For instance, whenever a major disaster threatens the economic existence of a larger group of citizens, the government is under social pressure and will typically provide help to all those in need. By anticipating government support in case of a disaster, there is little or no incentive to buy insurance in the market. Why should they pay the premium for private insurance, or invest in self-insurance or self-protection measures if they enjoy a similar amount of free protection from the government? If the government wants to avoid being pressured for disaster relief, it has to make disaster insurance mandatory. And to induce citizens to the appropriate amount of self-protection, insurance premiums have to be differentiated according to local disaster risks.

Thirdly, fostering growth helps coping with the consequences of climate change and facilitates adaptation. Poor societies and population groups with low levels of education have the highest exposure to climate change, whereas richer societies have the means to cope with the implications of climate change. Hence, economic growth – properly measured – and education should not be dismissed easily as they act as powerful self-insurance devices against the uncertain future challenges of climate change.

Kai A. Konrad is Director at the Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance. Marcel Thum is Professor of Economics at TU Dresden and Director of ifo Dresden. They are the authors of the paper ‘The Role of Economic Policy in Climate Change Adaptation’ published in CESifo Economic Studies.

CESifo Economic Studies publishes provocative, high-quality papers in economics, with a particular focus on policy issues. Papers by leading academics are written for a wide and global audience, including those in government, business, and academia. The journal combines theory and empirical research in a style accessible to economists across all specialisations.

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Image credit: Flooding, July 2007, by Mat Fascoine. CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

The post What is the role of governments in climate change adaptation? appeared first on OUPblog.

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11. ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ Movie Trailer Revealed

Focus Features has released the trailer for the film adaptation of E.L. James’s bestseller Fifty Shades of Grey film. The stars of the erotica film Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson were on TODAY this morning to premiere the trailer. We’ve embedded the trailer above for you to check out.

The film is slated to come out on Valentine’s Day 2015 and it features a new recording of Beyoncé’s hit track Crazy In Love.

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12. The Weinstein Company Reveals Trailer For ‘The Imitation Game’

The Weinstein Company has unveiled an official trailer for The Imitation GameThis film adaptation is based on Andrew Hodges’ biography Alan Turing: The Enigma.

The video embedded above offers glimpses of star actor Benedict Cumberbatch as the famous logician and computer scientist. Novelist Graham Moore penned the script.

According to Deadline, the story “centers on Turing and his team’s race against time to break the Enigma code at Britain’s top-secret Bletchley Park facility.” This movie will hit theaters on November 21, 2014.

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13. Teaser Trailer Out For ‘Mockingjay’ Part 1

Lionsgate has unleashed a teaser for Mockingjay Part 1. The video embedded above offers glimpses of former head gamemaker Plutarch Heavensbee, District 13 leader Alma Coin, and the reluctant rebel Katniss Everdeen.

Prior to the unveiling of this trailer, the movie studio released two “Panem Address” videos with victors Peeta Mallark and Johanna Mason standing beside the evil President Snow. This film adaptation will hit theaters on November 21, 2014. (via Vanity Fair)

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14. Teaser Trailer Unveiled For Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Season 2

A teaser trailer for Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. season 2 was unveiled this weekend at a Comic-Con International panel.

The video embedded above features Patton Oswalt doing double duty as Agent Billy Koenig and Agent Sam Koenig while overseeing a “security orientation.”

Entertainmeny Weekly reports the upcoming season will introduce several new characters including Barbara Morse a.k.a. Mockingbird, Isabelle Hartley, Lance Hunter, and Daniel Whitehall a.k.a. Kraken.

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15. Teaser Trailer Unveiled For ‘The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies’

New Line Cinema has unveiled a teaser trailer for The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies. The video embedded above offers glimpses of Bilbo Baggins, Gandalf the Wizard, and the Dwarves.

Thus far, the trailer has drawn more than 127,000 “likes” on Facebook. A theatrical release date has been set for December 17, 2014. (via Slate)

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16. IDW Publishing to Release An ‘Edward Scissorhands’ Comic Book Series

IDW Publishing will release a comic adaptation of the 1990 hit movie, Edward Scissorhands.

Author Kate Leth has been brought on as the writer. Illustrator Drew Rausch has been hired to create the interior art. Artist Gabriel Rodriguez designed the cover for the first issue.

The story of this series takes place twenty years after the ending of Burton’s beloved film. According to the press release, “Kim’s granddaughter, Meg, grows up with Edward Scissorhands only being a legend, a bedtime story. But when weird things start to happen in her sleepy little town, it reawakens her curiously and she decides to search out for the mysterious Edward Scissorhands.”

 

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17. Warner Bros. Snatches Up Movie Rights to ‘The Goldfinch’

Warner Brothers has snatched up the movie rights to The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt. Brett Ratner, Brad Simpson, and Nina Jacobson have signed on as producers.

Tartt’s lengthy fiction title won her the Pulitzer Prize earlier this year. She devoted 11 years to working on this book.

Here’s more from The Huffington Post: The Goldfinch, Tartt’s third novel, has sold at least 1.5 million copies, despite clocking in at an intimidating 784 pages — a length that may pose a challenge for the film adaptation. The novel, a coming-of-age story about a boy whose grief over his mother’s senseless death is assuaged by his dangerous and illegal love for a priceless painting, drew comparisons to Charles Dickens upon its publication and has continued to command critical attention and popular sales.

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18. ‘Sesame Street,’ 200 New Yorkers, & More Will Appear in ‘The Winter’s Tale’ Play

The Public Theater, an institution in New York City, will put on an original musical adaptation of William Shakespeare’s play, The Winter’s Tale, from September 5th to 7th.

Several cameo performances are planned for this production from Sesame Street, New York Theater Ballet, DanceBrazil, Rosie’s Theater Kids, Shinbone Alley Stilt Band, Staten Island Lions, and AATMA Performing Arts. More than 200 New Yorkers will appear on the stage too.

Free tickets will be distributed on a daily basis at Central Park’s Delacorte Theater. The idea for this crowdsourced project, an initiative through Public Works, was conceived by director Lear de Bessonet. Composer Todd Almond wrote the lyrics and music. Chase Brock oversaw the choreography.

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19. Elle Fanning to Star in ‘All the Bright Places’ Adaptation

Actress Elle Fanning will star in the film adaptation of Jennifer Niven’s debut YA novel All the Bright Places.

Producers Paula Mazur and Mitchell Kaplan acquired the screen rights to the Alfred A. Knopf novel, which is due out in January 2015.  The novel is the story of “a girl who learns to live from a boy who intends to die.”

“We are thrilled to have Elle Fanning star in this profound tale of two teens who find themselves in the heart-stopping throes of love, life and death,” stated Mazur. “Remarkably, Jennifer Niven had pictured Elle when she was writing Violet’s character. She is such a perfect fit, and we look forward to watching her bring Violet to life on-screen.”

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20. Allison Williams to Play Title Role in NBC’s ‘Peter Pan’ Musical

Girls actress Allison Williams (pictured, via) has landed the titular role in the Peter Pan musical.

According to TheaterMania, this musical adaptation opened on Broadway back in 1954. Since then, several female actors have stepped into the shoes of the “boy who wouldn’t grow up” including Sandy Duncan and Cathy Rigby.

NBC plans to air the live telecast on December 04, 2014. As we reported earlier, Oscar winner Christopher Walken will play the villainous pirate, Captain Hook. Who would you cast as Wendy Darling?

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21. Lorde to Curate the Soundtrack For ‘Mockingjay’ Part 1

Lionsgate has hired Grammy Award winner Lorde to curate the soundtrack for Mockingjay Part 1. An announcement on Facebook has drawn more than 30,000 “likes.”

Lorde has been tasked with selecting the artists who will be featured on the album. The New Zealand pop singer will also record the first single.

Lorde had this statement in the press release: “The cast and story are an inspiration for all musicians participating and, as someone with cinematic leanings, being privy to a different creative process has been a unique experience. I think the soundtrack is definitely going to surprise people.”

(more…)

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22. Bill Murray to Play Baloo in ‘Jungle Book’ Adaptation

Bill Murray has signed on to do the voice of the bear Baloo in Disney’s upcoming remake of the The Jungle Book.

The adaptation of Rudyard Kipling’s classic children’s book will include a mix of live action and animation. Actor Andy Serkis is directing the Warner Bros. film.

Rolling Stone has more details about the film: “Murray is taking up the post in an already-impressive cast that includes Christopher Walken as the orangutan King Louie, Scarlett Johansson as the snake Kaa, Ben Kingsley as the panther Bagheera, Lupita Nyong’o as the wolf Raksha and Idris Elba as the tiger Shere Khan.”

 

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23. YouTuber Creates ‘Harry Potter’ & ‘Scott Pilgrim’ Mash-Up Trailer

What happens when you cross Harry Potter with Scott Pilgrim vs. The World?

The comedian behind “The Unusual Suspect” YouTube channel tried to answer this question with his “Harry Potter vs. The World” mash-up trailer. The video embedded above features scenes from all eight Harry Potter films.

Thus far, the video has drawn more than 607,000 views. Two days ago, The Unusual Suspect announced on his Facebook page that filmmaker Edgar Wright (the Scott Pilgrim movie director) complimented this project. What do you think? (via io9)

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24. ‘Frozen’ Screenwriter Jennifer Lee to Pen Script For ‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Movie

Jennifer Lee, the co-director and screenwriter of Disney’s hit film Frozen, has signed on to pen the script for a film adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time.

Longtime Hollywood veteran Jim Whitaker will serve as a producer. At the moment, no director has been hired to oversee this project.

Here’s more from Variety: “Published in 1962, Wrinkle in Time was one of Lee’s favorite novels as a child, and she impressed Disney executives with her take on the project, which emphasizes a strong female-driven narrative and creatively approaches the science fiction and world-building elements of the book.” Who would you cast as Meg Murry? (via Time)

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25. The CW Unveils New Trailer For ‘The Flash’ TV Show

The CW has unveiled a new trailer for The Flash TV adaptation. The video embedded above offers glimpses of actor Barry Allen portraying the speedy superhero.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, this trailer features many details that fans of the comic book series would appreciate. Can you uncover them?

Check out this YouTube playlist to learn more about the television show. A premiere date has been set for October 07, 2014.

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