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Results 26,701 - 26,725 of 156,566
26701. Music Monday - If I Didn't Know Better

More surprisingly addictive Nashville goodness -

0 Comments on Music Monday - If I Didn't Know Better as of 5/7/2013 3:43:00 AM
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26702. Distance Runners Getting Their Speed Work On: The multi-level approach to getting faster

Getting a runner to be faster is an interesting undertaking. It’s actually a concept that coaches and athletes have been trying to perfect for centuries. As science has improved, training has evolved, we’ve created training phases and workouts that push the runner and train their body.

Simplistically it’s easy to sum it up like this: if you want to run faster, run faster. This is true of course, doing speed work and improving your base speed, is going to enable a runner to run a faster pace as the distance gets longer. As in, if you improve your mile time you’ll be able to run a 5k and 10k faster. If you don’t do speed work you’ll never improve your speed.
runner cartoon
Though as I said, that’s overly simplistic, and if a runner is truly wanting to see how fast they can be they need to open their eyes and expand their training logs to include ALL of the factors that make a runner faster. You see, the body is an interconnected machine, you can’t just concentrate on straight running workouts.

I’ve been working on a series for Competitor.com tied to speed work and the other techniques that enable a runner to, well, run faster. There are drills, strength work, and a neuromuscular component to getting faster.

Check out the series so far:

What Distance Runners Can Learn From Sprinters

The Neuromuscular Component to Speed Work

Distance Runners Staying SHARP During an Injury

In reading each of them you’ll see that the first step to getting faster is working on your shorter-repeat speed. You shouldn’t avoid those 200′s even if you’re a 10k and above runner. But that’s ONE step in the process.

After that you’ve got to build the synapses and teach the nerves to fire faster; your brain is ‘telling’ your legs and foot to move faster. But if you don’t build the connections the ‘message’ won’t be able to travel faster from brain to foot.
running fortune cookie
A runner’s form is also related, and the articles touch on that. Running faster takes POWER and EXPLOSIVE propulsion from your muscles. Your muscles also need to be ‘waken-up’ and eased into the movements of running. That’s why a proper warm-up is so important for your had workouts and races. There will be more on that specifically in upcoming articles.

So if you’d like to run faster, even if you’re a marathoner, it’s important to realize that it’s a multi-pronged approach. It will take time too, but consistency is the law of distance running and THAT is what will, in the end, take you to the next level.

Consistently incorporate speed work, speed-endurance, and endurance work into your training.
Consistently be working on your core and strength routines.
Consistency with foot-firing and ladder drills that play off of the short speed sessions.
Practice, improve, and then have a coach or be a student of the sport if you’re training yourself.

Without going on a long tangent, a big mistake many new runners are making is getting swept up in marathon and mileage mania. They just want to do more, more, more. That’s fine, but if you want to get faster you need to TRAIN to run faster. That’s where quality of miles becomes more important than just quantity.

I hope you enjoy the series so far and keep on the lookout for the next ones. Running is an action that can be broken down to be incredibly simplistic: left, right, left. Running faster can also be thought of in simple fashion: run faster. BUT it’s a lot more complicated, and to be honest insanely interesting, than just that.

To run faster you’ve got to be training your body to do so on multiple levels.

1) What’s a concept about speed work that you have learned from this series so far?

2) Have you done any work geared toward training your neuromuscular system to get you faster? Or is this a new idea to you?

3) If you’re training to get faster, what are some of your ‘staple’ speed sessions?
best running shirts

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26703. Hunger Mountain’s 2013 Manuscript Critique Auction

Hunger Mountain’s Annual Manuscript Critique Auction is happening NOW on ebay. Don’t miss out. It ends on May 12th. I have listed below the agents involved in children’s books and YA novels. Here is the link to bid: http://stores.ebay.com/The-Hunger-Mountain-Store


penfoldYoung Adult/ Middle Grade Manuscript Critique with Literary Agent and former Simon & Schuster Editor Alexandra Penfold

ALEXANDRA PENFOLD has been working in publishing for nearly a decade. Formerly an Editor at Paula Wiseman Books/Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, she’s now an agent with Upstart Crow Literary and specializes in young picture books and middle grade and young adult fiction. She is the co-author of New York a la Cart: Recipes and Stories from the Big Apple’s Best Food Trucks. 


25-Page Middle Grade Fiction Critique with Agent Alyssa Henkin

ALYSSA EISNER HENKIN began her career in children’s publishing as an editorial assistant in 1999. Now, as a successful literary agent at Trident Media Group, Alyssa considers herself privileged to be able to work with such talented authors and illustrators who create the books readers cannot put down.

 


25-Page Middle Grade, Picture Book, or Young Adult Manuscript Critique with Author and Literary Agent Ammi-Joan Paquette

AMMI-JOAN PAQUETTE is associate agent with the Erin Murphy Literary Agency, where she represents all forms of children’s and young adult projects. She’s especially passionate about connecting with and launching the careers of debut authors and is most excited by a strong lyrical voice, tight plotting with surprising twists and turns, and stories told with heart and resonance. She is the author of a picture book, The Tiptoe Guide to Tracking Fairies, and a middle grade novel, Nowhere Girl.


Full-length Middle Grade Fiction Manuscript Up to 250 Pages with Literary Agent Elena Mechlin

ELENA MECHLIN  began as a literary agent at Pippin Properties, Inc. in June of 2009. She notes that she “is thrilled to be pursuing her love of children’s literature and the industry from her seat at Pippin and especially enjoys the treasure hunt that is sorting through the daily query emails.” Pippin Properties, Inc., an agency devoted primarily to picture books, middle-grade, and young adult novels, has represented such literary luminaries as Katherine Applegate, Kate DiCamillo, Kathi Appelt and illustrator Harry Bliss.


100-Page Young Adult or Middle Grade Critique with Literary Agent Emily Van Beek

EmilyEMILY VAN BEEK is a literary agent at Folio Literary Management. She spent six years as agent and rights director at Pippin Properties, Inc, where she represented such titles as Kathi Appelt’s Newbery Honor-winning The Underneath , Jandy Nelson’s The Sky is Everywhere, and Jenny Han’s New York Times bestselling Summer series. Since joining Folio in May of 2010, Emily has represented established writers of YA and Middle Grade fiction, debut voices in children’s lit, and a select group of illustrators, including the Caldecott Medal winning creators of A Sick Day for Amos McGee, Philip C. Stead and Erin E. Stead.


Full-length Picture Book Critique with Agent and Agency Founder Holly McGhee

HOLLY MCGHEE founded Pippin Properties, Inc., an agency devoted to the management and representation of the finest authors and artists at work today. Her fascination with making books began in 1991, and now her agency is devoted primarily to picture books, middle-grade, and young adult novels, and has represented such literary luminaries as Katherine Applegate, Kate DiCamillo, Kathi Appelt and illustrator Harry Bliss.


50-Page YA or Middle Grade Manuscript Critique with Literary Agent Tricia Lawrence

TRICIA LAWRENCE worked for 17 years as a developmental and production-based editor (from kids book to college textbooks, but mostly college textbooks) before she joined the Erin Murphy Literary Agency team in March 2011. As associate agent, Tricia represents picture books/chapter books, and middle grade and young adult fiction and nonfiction. She also writes a blog about social media for authors and the publishing industry at large.


Hunger Mountain is both a print and online journal of the arts. They publish fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, visual art, young adult and children’s writing, writing for stage and screen, interviews, reviews, and craft essays.

Good Luck! and Happy Bidding.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Agent, Competition, News, opportunity Tagged: Ammi-Joan Pacquette, ebay, Emily Van Beek, Holly McGhee, Hunger Mountain, Manuscript Critique Auction

2 Comments on Hunger Mountain’s 2013 Manuscript Critique Auction, last added: 5/7/2013
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26704. Ferret Ballet

ferret ballet

The post Ferret Ballet appeared first on Scribble Chicken.

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26705. Why We Don't Learn As Fast As Musicians

11 Comments on Why We Don't Learn As Fast As Musicians, last added: 5/10/2013
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26706. Italy Part 3: Florence

This was drawn after a very rainy morning. I need to design that urban sketcher sit-upon. Only cooler than the ones we made in girl scouts though.

Here is a vine video sketching on location: https://vine.co/v/bdbu6ubdLwn

I was sitting on the steps of the Duomo for this one. There were throngs of people around and lots of students eating gelato.

It was very cold. I sketched until my hand was numb.

Vine video: https://vine.co/v/bdnxVt3H6q2



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26707. Straitjackets and Outlines

Lately, I’ve been dealing with my love/hate relationship with plot and outlines. I recently saw the quote below on Nancy Sondel’s Facebook page. It came with the accompanied tag from Nancy: “An outline is meant to be a road map (including detours)… NOT a straitjacket!”

Always start an outline

All of my writer spidy senses went into high alert when I read this. Immediately, I felt the need to defend my personal feeling that an outline is like a straitjacket. My mind whirred with reasons: an outline is going to stifle the story! It’s not going to give my characters room to breathe! I’m going to force my characters to do all the things my outline says they must do!

Obviously, outlines are a trigger for me.

I should clarify, when I say outline, I’m thinking about something very detailed. I’ve written 10 to 17  page outlines in the past, cataloging what happens when, where, how, and why. If you say the word outline to me, this is what I think of. Often, when you put that much work into an outline it can feel like the story is set in stone, unmovable, and pre-written. I’ve had to throw away entire projects that came as a result of this type of outlining, and it stole away my sense of discovery during the writing process. Many projects I’ve outlined, I’ve never finished. Hopefully this gives a little insight into why I have such a dramatic reaction to outlines.

But deep down I do think it’s important to have some sense of where your headed – some vague elusive sense, yes.

Let’s return to the quote above, I want to identify exactly why I reacted so negatively to it. The heart of the issue lies in the implication of the following two lines:

1)  “Always start a novel with an outline.”

Outlines and a sense of direction are important, but must you always start with one? First drafts (in my opinion) should be about exploration and discovery. Who are your characters? What do they want? What’s the premise and how could it play out? If you have an outline before you have a clear sense of who your characters are – will they even become real people? Or are they doomed to be cogs in your plot machine?

BlindfoldedAre we so afraid of not knowing where we are headed? Outlines give us set destinations, but is there no room to explore with our characters? Is there no room to let our characters come a life and dictate the direction of their own stories?  (Be sure to read author Tristan Riehl’s great post about authors not being honest to their character’s stories).

Do we lack the faith that our stories will reveal themselves to us if we give them the space to do so? Do we not trust the writing process?

Of course, at some point we will want to look at the big picture and deal with the overall structure and plot. Of course, we will do this! But should we always start the process that way?

I think my big question here is: When is the right time to outline? Not that you should never outline, or that it can’t be a useful tool. But why do we choose to outline at all? At what point in the process should we do it? And what help does it provide? Is always starting with an outline an action done in service of the story or in service of the author?

Which leads me to…

2)  “…you will be able to make changes without wasting too much time.”

I have a sneaky suspicion that sometimes an outline exist so we don’t waste time. It exists for the author, so we can be efficient. I get it, time is valuable! There are sacrifices that must be made in order to make time in our lives to write. An outline can be a great tool to keep us on track and moving forward with our stories.

However, just because something is efficient, doesn’t mean it’s effective. It may serve us (the author) and give us a sense of accomplishment. But is it always serving our characters?

What gets lost in the process? What do we rush past and not see?

joshua_bell_violinistYou may have heard the story of renowned violinist Joshua Bell, who did an incognito performance in a subway station in 2007. Bell played for 43 minutes during the morning rush hour and was passed by over 1000 people. Only a handful of people (including a child) stopped to hear him play. The rush to get to work, save time and not be late, was a stronger force than the desire to slow down and listen. Very few allowed themselves the space to experience something beautiful and unexpected.

Are we doing the same thing with our own stories in our mad rush to save time, finish our drafts, and get published? I’ll admit it. I’ve done it. And I had a nice pretty outline to guide my way. I know outlines have kept me from noticing the glorious events on the sidelines, things that would have made my book stronger, more alive, and vibrant. Has a dependency on an outline caused you to have similar blind spots?

Am I saying you shouldn’t outline. No, not at all. I’m saying you should ask yourself what you need from your outline. What’s the right time to use it? And is it a crutch that’s causing you look rush past the true heart of your novel?


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26708. Jean from Racine

 
File under: things-you-draw-while-on-the-telephone.

2 Comments on Jean from Racine, last added: 5/8/2013
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26709. still life


still life

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26710. Philographics: The Book and Postcard Box

philographics

Several years ago we featured the Philographics poster series by UK based Genis Carreras.  We just received word that the popular series will soon be available as a book as well as a postcard set. Currently Genis is raising funds to being print production. You can support this effort here.


Genis Carreras

Genis Carreras

——————–

Also worth viewing…
Lotta Nieminen
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Irving Harper:Works in Paper

Not signed up for the Grain Edit RSS Feed yet? Give it a try. Its free and yummy.

Featured Book: Irving Harper: Works in Paper.

A Huge thanks to Squarespace for sponsoring this week’s RSS Feed!






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26711. Ferret Ballet

ferret ballet

The post Ferret Ballet appeared first on Scribble Kids.

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26712. It's Publishing Day!


It's publishing day at Amazon Children's Publishing for Baby Wants Mama, which was written by Nancy Loewen and illustrated by me!

At the end of the day, everyone in the family wants something....but what do they ALL want? Dinner!

© 2013 Deborah Melmon

Baby wants Mama.
Cat wants Fish.
Daddy wants supper.
Pup wants Dish.

The sparse text was a dream to illustrate as it gave me so much room to have fun and play with lots of fun details. I envisioned each page with big, colorful images. 


Here is the sketch for one of the spreads. I inked the line and painted each image on watercolor paper. I then scanned in the images, cleaned them up and added details like stripes on the sweaters and dots on the baby's clothing. I was also able to adjust skin color so that all the images looked consistent.



Baby Wants Mama is available on Amazon with a "look inside" so you can see more images.

This is the second book I have illustrated for Amazon Children's Publishing. Give Up, Gecko!, written by Margaret Read MacDonald, was released earlier this year. 

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26713. HIgh Five Magazine

Here is an illustration I did for this month's High Five Magazine.






1 Comments on HIgh Five Magazine, last added: 5/7/2013
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26714. /Sponsor/ Squarespace

A Huge thanks to squarespace for sponsoring this week’s RSS Feed!

Squarespace provides everything you need to create an exceptional website for you or your business, all within a single platform. Start with beautifully designed templates, an easy-to-use interface, and a free domain name – all backed up with award-winning 24/7 customer support.

Add your own content, customize the style, and you’ll have a website that looks great on any device.

Try Squarespace for free at squarespace.com.

Interested in sponsoring the Grain Edit Feed? Visit our sponsorship page for more info.

Featured Book: Irving Harper: Works in Paper.

A Huge thanks to Squarespace for sponsoring this week’s RSS Feed!






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26715. Genie!


                          
Here's part of a drawing I did, the genie part! This is for a card game I'm contributing to. In fact I've been crazy busy this last few weeks because I'm doing so many projects I've been neglecting my usual blogging. As of right now I'm illustrating a children's book about schooner racing, doing the above mentioned card game as well as a new comic book pitch, None of which I can share much about yet. But more very soon. 

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26716.


Hear this my friends, You are beautifully and wonderfully made! Have a great week!!

11 Comments on , last added: 5/20/2013
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26717.


A few weeks ago, I was commissioned to create a handmade picture book for actress Kerry Washington, star of ABC's “Scandal”. It was an exciting project and it allowed me to work alongside some beautifully talented women: my sisters Coy LaVerne Brantley Curry and Moo Karen McLendon Gunter, along with my sister-friend, Editor Karen Procter. This beautiful project was for the community organization, Cool Culture (www.coolculture.org), which addresses the absence of low-income families in the audiences of New York's wonderful arts, cultural, and scientific institutions. Bevy Smith, (Host of Dinner With Bevy- www.dinnerwithbevy), graciously presented the book to Kerry Washington. To God Be All the Glory for the opportunities that HE presents. Our God IS AWESOME!!!

11 Comments on , last added: 6/1/2013
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26718. Straitjackets and Outlines

Lately, I’ve been dealing with my love/hate relationship with plot and outlines. I recently saw the quote below on a friend’s Facebook page. It came with the accompanied tag: “An outline is meant to be a road map (including detours)… NOT a straitjacket!”

Always start an outline

All of my writer spidy senses went into high alert when I read this. Immediately, I felt the need to defend my personal feeling that an outline is like a straitjacket. My mind whirred with reasons: an outline is going to stifle the story! It’s not going to give my characters room to breathe! I’m going to force my characters to do all the things my outline says they must do!

Obviously, outlines are a trigger for me.

I should clarify, when I say outline, I’m thinking about something very detailed. I’ve written 10 to 17  page outlines in the past, cataloging what happens when, where, how, and why. If you say the word outline to me, this is what I think of. Often, when you put that much work into an outline it can feel like the story is set in stone, unmovable, and pre-written. I’ve had to throw away entire projects that came as a result of this type of outlining, and it stole away my sense of discovery during the writing process. Many projects I’ve outlined, I’ve never finished. Hopefully this gives a little insight into why I have such a dramatic reaction to outlines.

But deep down I do think it’s important to have some sense of where your headed – some vague elusive sense, yes.

Let’s return to the quote above, I want to identify exactly why I reacted so negatively to it. The heart of the issue lies in the implication of the following two lines:

1)  “Always start a novel with an outline.”

Outlines and a sense of direction are important, but must you always start with one? First drafts (in my opinion) should be about exploration and discovery. Who are your characters? What do they want? What’s the premise and how could it play out? If you have an outline before you have a clear sense of who your characters are – will they even become real people? Or are they doomed to be cogs in your plot machine?

BlindfoldedAre we so afraid of not knowing where we are headed? Outlines give us set destinations, but is there no room to explore with our characters? Is there no room to let our characters come a life and dictate the direction of their own stories?  (Be sure to read author Tristan Riehl’s great post about authors not being honest to their character’s stories).

Do we lack the faith that our stories will reveal themselves to us if we give them the space to do so? Do we not trust the writing process?

Of course, at some point we will want to look at the big picture and deal with the overall structure and plot. Of course, we will do this! But should we always start the process that way?

I think my big question here is: When is the right time to outline? Not that you should never outline, or that it can’t be a useful tool. But why do we choose to outline at all? At what point in the process should we do it? And what help does it provide? Is always starting with an outline an action done in service of the story or in service of the author?

Which leads me to…

2)  “…you will be able to make changes without wasting too much time.”

I have a sneaky suspicion that sometimes an outline exist so we don’t waste time. It exists for the author, so we can be efficient. I get it, time is valuable! There are sacrifices that must be made in order to make time in our lives to write. An outline can be a great tool to keep us on track and moving forward with our stories.

However, just because something is efficient, doesn’t mean it’s effective. It may serve us (the author) and give us a sense of accomplishment. But is it always serving our characters?

What gets lost in the process? What do we rush past and not see?

joshua_bell_violinistYou may have heard the story of renowned violinist Joshua Bell, who did an incognito performance in a subway station in 2007. Bell played for 43 minutes during the morning rush hour and was passed by over 1000 people. Only a handful of people (including a child) stopped to hear him play. The rush to get to work, save time and not be late, was a stronger force than the desire to slow down and listen. Very few allowed themselves the space to experience something beautiful and unexpected.

Are we doing the same thing with our own stories in our mad rush to save time, finish our drafts, and get published? I’ll admit it. I’ve done it. And I had a nice pretty outline to guide my way. I know outlines have kept me from noticing the glorious events on the sidelines, things that would have made my book stronger, more alive, and vibrant. Has a dependency on an outline caused you to have similar blind spots?

Am I saying you shouldn’t outline. No, not at all. I’m saying you should ask yourself what you need from your outline. What’s the right time to use it? And is it a crutch that’s causing you look rush past the true heart of your novel?


10 Comments on Straitjackets and Outlines, last added: 5/8/2013
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26719. HIgh Five Magazine

Here is an illustration I did for this month's High Five Magazine.






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26720. show you the way to go

Right then, so as promised in my last post, here is the second part of the third stage of the Little Acorns project. Are you keeping up?!

Meet Archibald Twig again. The drawing at the top of this page is an original and I'm putting that on sale on Ebay (starting at a penny, as always), but that's not all. What you get is the original, the original handwritten provenance and one of the cut-out-and-make limited edition cards.

 You can find the Archibald Twig package HERE.
And, if you pocket doesn't stretch to an original, there are still a few of the printed cards available HERE.

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26721. Thank you Pawel!

Thank you Pawel Wasowicz for the beautiful banner for May! I love how the background and foreground seem to dance together, and they come together in a great composition. Excellent!

5 Comments on Thank you Pawel!, last added: 5/22/2013
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26722.


Hear this my friends, You are beautifully and wonderfully made! Have a great week!!

0 Comments on as of 1/1/1900
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26723.


A few weeks ago, I was commissioned to create a handmade picture book for actress Kerry Washington, star of ABC's “Scandal”. It was an exciting project and it allowed me to work alongside some beautifully talented women: my sisters Coy LaVerne Brantley Curry and Moo Karen McLendon Gunter, along with my sister-friend, Editor Karen Procter. This beautiful project was for the community organization, Cool Culture (www.coolculture.org), which addresses the absence of low-income families in the audiences of New York's wonderful arts, cultural, and scientific institutions. Bevy Smith, (Host of Dinner With Bevy- www.dinnerwithbevy), graciously presented the book to Kerry Washington. To God Be All the Glory for the opportunities that HE presents. Our God IS AWESOME!!!

0 Comments on as of 1/1/1900
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26724. MaltaComicCon 2013

Year five of my all-time favourite event

Hi Folks,


It’s now time to announce, officially, the dates for this year’s forthcoming MaltaComicCon. Is it really five years since I first met you all? Anyhow, I’ll turn you over the guys themselves for a moment…

”Do you remember how much fun you had at the Malta Comic Con 2012? How good it felt to meet all the awesome guests and creators that exhibited at our show? The rush you felt seeing your favourite creators sign and sketch? Do you remember how amazing it was to spend 2 days with so many wicked folk, discussing and doing the things you like most? Of course you do! How can you forget when we all had such a blast at the show? All those lovely people in costumes, all the buzz in the video game rooms, the thrill of tabletop and role playing games with the wicked folk at W.A.R.S, all those informative and entertaining talks, discussion panels and workshops! And what about all the free movies? The portfolio reviews, those impressive exhibitions and most of all, the fun filled atmosphere experienced during the whole 2 days of the convention!

You would all love to experience all these feelings again wouldn’t you? And why shouldn’t you? Yep the Malta Comic Con is coming again and it’s going to be super!

And if you haven’t experienced the Malta Comic Con yet, this is your wake up call!

Wicked Comics are proud to announce that this year the Malta Comic Con (Good Vibes) will be happening on Saturday 30th November and Sunday 1st December at St. James Cavalier Valletta. So keep the dates free for 2 more days of fun for everyone! Fans can look forward to another killer roster of foreign creators who are not only gifted but are also really nice folks, more local creators and locally created comics, cosplay events and competitions, gaming events and competitions, free movies and animations showing during the whole duration of the convention, impressive exhibitions and a healthy number of talks, workshops and discussion panels. There will be something for everyone!

As customary Wicked Comics have designed a number of packages for fans wishing to travel to the Malta Comic Con from abroad, which include heavily discounted accommodation rates and local transport from hotel to convention. Similarly Wicked Comics have a number of packages tailored for foreign creators who whish to exhibit at the Malta Comic Con including heavily discounted tables.

Anyone wishing to know more about these packages, and local creators/retailers wishing to exhibit at the Malta Comic Con 2013 are kindly requested to email us for more details on:

info@maltacomic-con.com  

For more details kindly visit:

http://www.maltacomic-con.com  


Testimonial from legendary comic creator and Malta Comic Con 2012 guest Herb Trimpe:

“I have to reiterate and say what a great time we had in Malta, and all because of your show. Selling points: great people--great location (the fort)--great environment (your country, five+ stars, fantastically beautiful)--hospitality tops--weather--the Med--oh, yeah, and… the food! If I left anything out, you can add it, as we're sure it's the best of whatever. I honestly can't think of anything you could do better!” (H.Trimpe, 2013)”

Well there we go, take it from me when I say the deals they do for folks are brilliant. One of my students came along last year and he enjoyed himself so much he is joining me back out there once more later this year.

The event is spectacular and what’s not to love?

They have the event in a medieval fortress, there’s the sunshine, there are comics and other merchandise, sunshine, lots of international and local guests, sunshine, lots of sights to see, sunshine, lots of wonderful cuisine and the people themselves are brilliant, warm and accommodating and great fun to be with to boot. Oh, yeah, and there’s the sunshine too…

As I‘ve said many times before; now I look on the organisers as my friends and really look forward to seeing them every year around the same time. It really is that kind of event.

In fact I’ll be out there in a few weeks time as I produce two of my now famous comic workshops. One is for the Wicked Comics Educational Program, which is a Basic Course in Creating Comics for the Premju tal-President Fund. This I will be running on Saturday 1st June for a number of students already on a ten-session long course on creating comcs. Wonderful that these guys don’t just produce the conventions they produce educational activities like this. I am running three sessions, whilst the Wicked Comics folks will have already run the rest.

The other is a workshop I am going to run on Sunday 2nd June. I have wanted to do so for quite some time as a way of saying thanks to everyone for their treatment of me whilst I am out there. This one is for the local artists and the organisers themselves and anyone else that wishes to go along there – all fans of comics.

For more information on this workshop drop the guys a line at:

info@maltacomic-con.com


I’ll be posting a promotional poster on here soon with more details too.

I’m really excited and cannot wait to be amongst my buddies again.

Of course there’ll be photos and a Blog for the time spent there too.

See you soon guys.

Just before I sign off, I’d just like to thank everyone that has been in touch in regards the Orphan Works Bill, this last few days. Your support is fantastic, but we need to keep promoting and keep sharing the links to the petition with everyone we know as well as writing to the MPs themselves.

Next up, some new artwork from Worlds End – Volume 2 – A Hard Reign’s Gonna Fall.

Until next time, have fun!

Tim Perkins…
May 7th 2013

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