What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(from the Illustrator category)

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Illustrator Category Blogs

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
<<May 2015>>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
     0102
03040506070809
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from the Illustrator category, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26,701 - 26,725 of 147,782
26701. Quote for the Day...

"Comparison is the thief of joy." - Theodore Roosevelt
I made it into my screen saver:



0 Comments on Quote for the Day... as of 9/13/2012 7:38:00 PM
Add a Comment
26702. DESIGNER - tali furman

tali furman is a print designer from tel aviv in israel. tali currently works as a freelance designer for several fashion companies but next month will moving to london, to study an Ma in printed textiles at the royal college of art. tali is available for collaborations so if you like her style check out more of her work online here.

1 Comments on DESIGNER - tali furman, last added: 9/15/2012
Display Comments Add a Comment
26703. Why Design

why design

At Herman Miller design is the language they use to ask questions and seek answers to the problems their customers face. The design process is a journey into the unknown—or as George Nelson once quipped, “I have never met a designer who was retained to keep things the same as they were.” Before we decide what we do and how we do it, we like to begin by asking the question “Why?” In Why Design, a new film series, Herman Miller explores the world through the eyes of their designers, and shares something of why we value their point of view.

Each Monday morning, from September 10th through October 29th, Herman Miller will launch a new designer profile at Why Design. The series includes:

9.10.12 - Yves Béhar - “Surfing Is Like Improvisational Jazz”
9.17.12 - Don Chadwick - “The Camera Becomes an Extension of Your Eyes”
9.24.12 - Ayse Birsel - “Your Life Is Your Most Important Project”
10.1.12 - Irving Harper - “Paper Is a Versatile Medium”
10.8.12 - Gianfranco Zaccai - “Great Food Should Be Like Great Design”
10.15.12 - Studio 7.5 - “Design by Its Nature Is Collaborative”
10.22.12 - Steve Frykholm - “It’s the Breaks That Allow My Mind to Refresh”
10.29.12 - Sam Hecht + Kim Colin - “We Need Contrast and Tension to Be Able to Create”

why design

—–

Also worth viewing:
Herman Miller: Design For You
Matte Stephens Studio Visit
Marius Roosendaal

Not signed up for the Grain Edit RSS Feed yet? Give it a try. Its free and yummy.

A Huge thanks to Squarespace for sponsoring this week’s RSS Feed!


©2012 Grain Edit - catch us on Facebook and twitter

Add a Comment
26704. I'm back




Hello there! I've been away for quite a while but I'm back now and slowly getting into the routine.

This is a picture of a corner in my studio. I got this cute little lamp at IKEA. I keep buying light fixtures for my tiny dark studio.. I can't have too many lamps! LOL

Anyway, I'll be back into posting regularly soon. I'll share bits of the things I've been working on.

Hope you all had a great summer like I did! :o)


2 Comments on I'm back, last added: 9/15/2012
Display Comments Add a Comment
26705. The Painted Maze


I have blisters on my hands, my fingers are glued together with paint, my back hurts, my clothes are covered in paint blobs.
I spent all day painting 150m or cardboard together with the help of my friend Matthew (he painted that whale).
So you better come to the Royal Festival Hall this weekend to see it all, RIGHT?


If you come around Sunday afternoon when it all ends you can pick a bit of the maze and keep it, I believe, maybe for a small donation, maybe for free, anyway, its a fine way to get a huge painting, if you like sealife.

0 Comments on The Painted Maze as of 9/13/2012 5:16:00 PM
Add a Comment
26706. Waiting for Daddy sketch...


0 Comments on Waiting for Daddy sketch... as of 9/13/2012 6:10:00 PM
Add a Comment
26707. NEW SEASON - marimekko

most of us reading here at print & pattern enjoy looking at the work of sanna annukka so i was pleased to see this year sanna had been working with marimekko again on various designs. i came across three ranges whilst googling - vanhakaupunki, kultakero, and raanu and thought they would make great eye candy for a friday post.

7 Comments on NEW SEASON - marimekko, last added: 9/17/2012
Display Comments Add a Comment
26708. Errol Le Cain



Le Cain’s Mr. Mistoffelees


0 Comments on Errol Le Cain as of 9/13/2012 5:28:00 PM
Add a Comment
26709. Crazy about and crazy without my space

How much emphasis should be put on a productive working space? Personally speaking, the productivity and enthusiasm for the next 8-16 hours is greatly affected by my environment the moment I step into my studio. I can chug along, pushing through the day amongst disorganised chaos or be totally fired up, energised and extremely focused in an environment that is suitably balanced. My environment

1 Comments on Crazy about and crazy without my space, last added: 9/14/2012
Display Comments Add a Comment
26710. Are You Writing Propaganda?

I was recently reading a book and halfway through it I realized I was reading propaganda! By propaganda, I mean that the author clearly had an idea that he/she wanted to promote with the book and was using the fictional device as a vehicle for that idea. I was simultaneously intrigued and appalled. I was impressed by the author’s ability to pull me into the story and make me feel. But I was appalled by how easily I was manipulated, particularly when I realized the manipulation.

This got me thinking about our authorial agenda as we write.

It’s not uncommon to start a book with a particular idea or point of view in mind. For example you might want to write about teen pregnancy, or school shootings, or true love, or any number of topics that you personally might have an opinion about. And here’s where it gets tricky… we should write about topics that we care about and are interested in. But, the question is: should we force our opinions onto our characters, their lives, and situations? If we do that, are we no longer telling honest stories? Are we instead creating propaganda where our characters become vehicles for our opinions?

I need to take a moment to define propaganda, particularly because it has a strong negative connotation. When we say the word propaganda, it’s easy to think about something “evil,” like war propaganda. We think of lies and rumors and things created with malicious intent. In fact, the dictionary definition reinforces this idea:

Propaganda:  information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to help or harm a person, group, movement, institution, nation, etc. The deliberate spreading of such information, rumors, etc.

But notice the key words I point out below, particularly in relation to our own intent as writers for children:

Propaganda:  information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to help or harm a person, group,movement, institution, nation, etc. The deliberate spreading of such information, rumors, etc.

When we focus on just the positive words related to Propaganda we see where propaganda comes from. Ultimately, one probably doesn’t think they’re spreading propaganda, they believe they’re sharing an idea that they think will help others. As adults writing for children, I think we may have a lot of ideas (and agendas) about how to help and influence children, including values and beliefs that we think will make them grow into healthy and happy human beings. It seems like a noble thing to do. Not to mention that literature as a “teaching tool” has a long history in children’s lit. But do we have the kids in mind when we do this, or are we working in service of ourselves and our own beliefs?

I speak from experience when I ask this. Not too long ago I was writing a YA novel about virginity. I wanted my character to not have sex and to realize that abstinence was an okay choice and she was a good person for choosing it. I clearly had an agenda! But you know what…I couldn’t do this book justice. I wrote draft after draft and it never worked. This is because what I wanted my character to do was not what she wanted to do. The issues of my book were much deeper, more complex and fascinating, than I was allowing them to be. I was trying to force my ideals into the book and it became didactic and soul-less in the process.

In a recent lecture at school, one of the faculty members said:

“It’s not our job [as writers] to take sides. If we do we are writing propaganda. It’s our job to advocate for both sides.”

I’ve come to agree with this statement, because the amazing thing is – my story came alive – when I let go of what I wanted to say and let my characters be honest to themselves and direct themselves through the difficult questions and issues that the novel wanted to explore. The story became infinitely more complex, deep, and honest without my meddling little hands on it.

Personally, I search for truth in my writing. That’s my bottom line. Truth. And I don’t think I can find the truth of my story with my agenda in the way. There’s a great quote that goes something to the effect of: “True wisdom is knowing that you know nothing.” And I take this nugget with me when I sit down to write. I may have my opinions, but I don’t know what my character needs. She does and she will tell me. All I can do is advocate for her, and advocate for her antagonists as well, so that she is truly challenged in her beliefs.  And it turns out, that in this writing process, sometime my beliefs get challenged too. But isn’t that what we really want to do with our writing? Don’t we want our readers to think for themselves and decide what they want to agree or disagree with, believe or not believe? Mustn’t we show both sides in order to have them do this?

Here’s some good gut-check questions to see where you stand with your story (and be honest with yourself):

Is there something you want your character to learn in this book? Or is there something you want your reader to learn from this book?

Are you willing to let your book develop and your characters to learn a different truth than you may have set out for when you started writing? If not, why not?

Do you allow your character(s) to make choices or take actions even if they will move the story in a direction other than the one you want it to go in? If not, what are you afraid will happen if they go in a new direction?

Have you ever found yourself forcing your character’s reactions to story events? If so, why does it feel like you’re forcing them?

Have you looked deeply into the other “side” of your story? What’s the point of view that’s the opposite of your protagonist’s? Have you only skimmed the surface or have you given it a chance to try to convince your protagonist that there’s a different way to live her life?

Have you simply let things fall into the camps of good vs. evil?

Do the answers to these questions mean you are writing propaganda? Not necessarily. I mention them only to point out how we – as authors – might be directing our stories more than we should, how we might have blind spots we weren’t aware of, and to explore how there is depth and complexity in some of the opportunities we may not be considering.

One of my current philosophies on writing is that if I want my character to read like a real honest living human being, then I must treat her like one. I must allow her to make her own decisions. I must not judge her if she makes choices that I am opposed to (even morally). I cannot force my character to do anything, and if I do, she’s no longer a human but a pawn of my story. I must do my best to respect, understand, and empathize with my character in order for her to come alive and trust me with her secrets. And I think we should do this for all our characters, even the villains and antagonists.

Truth is not an easy thing to find. But if we put our own agendas and preconceived notions aside and truly follow our characters on their journeys, I think we might have a better chance at finding it together.


0 Comments on Are You Writing Propaganda? as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
26711. Latest sketch for FoxyFriday

In honor of the recent Allen Ginsberg frenzy-renewal, the blog at my literary agent's site is posting various illustrative interpretations. I went with the rather straightforward approach. All that marvelous hair was quite fun to draw!

Add a Comment
26712. Sneak Peek: Aesop's Ark ch 3

A WIP from Ch 3. I've turned in Chapter 3 of Aesop's Ark and it will be out on Oct 3rd! Until then here's a sneak peek at the early work in progress! (and a look at my mechanical pencil ;) J.

1 Comments on Sneak Peek: Aesop's Ark ch 3, last added: 9/13/2012
Display Comments Add a Comment
26713. The Kid Who Talked to Forks

Robot Sidetable ©2012 Sparky FirepantsWhen I was a kid, I talked to forks.

Not out loud, because that would be weird.

No, I talked to forks with my mind. Actually, I talked to most of our family's cutlery using only the power of mind waves.

When I loaded the dishwasher as my evening chore, I had this deep sense that the forks, knives and spoons somehow possessed feelings. And feelings can be hurt. For example, if you remove all the forks from the cutlery bin and one is left behind, how would that feel? Here you are, a lonely fork with several soup spoons and a paring knife staring at you like the kid who got picked last for dodgeball. Ouch.

Noticing this, I would immediately attempt to correct the error by putting all the spoons away and leaving only one behind, possibly to foster a sense of dishwasher camaraderie. It was a never-ending battle to keep the emotions of our silverware balanced. No wonder I never did my homework, I was too amped up about the psychological state of our kitchen.

It should come as no surprise that I still do this. Actually, I leave the dishwashing chore to my kids, but I've never lost the sense that somehow all the things around me are alive, albeit on a very quiet level. Maybe anthropomorphism runs in my family. After all, my great uncle Ted helped build some of the rides at Disneyland. I totally get it.

My latest fork whispering activity has been giving a (literal) face to the objects around me. Like this sidetable I use to store envelopes and paper.

He's been talking to me for a while now. I can only hope I'm dressing him up like he wanted. No doubt we'll have a mind-chat when I'm done.

0 Comments on The Kid Who Talked to Forks as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
26714. Are You Writing Propaganda?

I was recently reading a book and halfway through it I realized I was reading propaganda! By propaganda, I mean that the author clearly had an idea that he/she wanted to promote with the book and was using the fictional device as a vehicle for that idea. I was simultaneously intrigued and appalled. I was impressed by the author’s ability to pull me into the story and make me feel. But I was appalled by how easily I was manipulated, particularly when I realized the manipulation.

This got me thinking about our authorial agenda as we write.

It’s not uncommon to start a book with a particular idea or point of view in mind. For example you might want to write about teen pregnancy, or school shootings, or true love, or any number of topics that you personally might have an opinion about. And here’s where it gets tricky… we should write about topics that we care about and are interested in. But, the question is: should we force our opinions onto our characters, their lives, and situations? If we do that, are we no longer telling honest stories? Are we instead creating propaganda where our characters become vehicles for our opinions?

I need to take a moment to define propaganda, particularly because it has a strong negative connotation. When we say the word propaganda, it’s easy to think about something “evil,” like war propaganda. We think of lies and rumors and things created with malicious intent. In fact, the dictionary definition reinforces this idea:

Propaganda:  information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to help or harm a person, group, movement, institution, nation, etc. The deliberate spreading of such information, rumors, etc.

But notice the key words I point out below, particularly in relation to our own intent as writers for children:

Propaganda:  information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to help or harm a person, group,movement, institution, nation, etc. The deliberate spreading of such information, rumors, etc.

When we focus on just the positive words related to Propaganda we see where propaganda comes from. Ultimately, one probably doesn’t think they’re spreading propaganda, they believe they’re sharing an idea that they think will help others. As adults writing for children, I think we may have a lot of ideas (and agendas) about how to help and influence children, including values and beliefs that we think will make them grow into healthy and happy human beings. It seems like a noble thing to do. Not to mention that literature as a “teaching tool” has a long history in children’s lit. But do we have the kids in mind when we do this, or are we working in service of ourselves and our own beliefs?

I speak from experience when I ask this. Not too long ago I was writing a YA novel about virginity. I wanted my character to not have sex and to realize that abstinence was an okay choice and she was a good person for choosing it. I clearly had an agenda! But you know what…I couldn’t do this book justice. I wrote draft after draft and it never worked. This is because what I wanted my character to do was not what she wanted to do. The issues of my book were much deeper, more complex and fascinating, than I was allowing them to be. I was trying to force my ideals into the book and it became didactic and soul-less in the process.

In a recent lecture at school, one of the faculty members said:

“It’s not our job [as writers] to take sides. If we do we are writing propaganda. It’s our job to advocate for both sides.”

I’ve come to agree with this statement, because the amazing thing is – my story came alive – when I let go of what I wanted to say and let my characters be honest to themselves and direct themselves through the difficult questions and issues that the novel wanted to explore. The story became infinitely more complex, deep, and honest without my meddling little hands on it.

Personally, I search for truth in my writing. That’s my bottom line. Truth. And I don’t think I can find the truth of my story with my agenda in the way. There’s a great quote that goes something to the effect of: “True wisdom is knowing that you know nothing.” And I take this nugget with me when I sit down to write. I may have my opinions, but I don’t know what my character needs. She does and she will tell me. All I can do is advocate for her, and advocate for her antagonists as well, so that she is truly challenged in her beliefs.  And it turns out, that in this writing process, sometime my beliefs get challenged too. But isn’t that what we really want to do with our writing? Don’t we want our readers to think for themselves and decide what they want to agree or disagree with, believe or not believe? Mustn’t we show both sides in order to have them do this?

Here’s some good gut-check questions to see where you stand with your story (and be honest with yourself):

Is there something you want your character to learn in this book? Or is there something you want your reader to learn from this book?

Are you willing to let your book develop and your characters to learn a different truth than you may have set out for when you started writing? If not, why not?

Do you allow your character(s) to make choices or take actions even if they will move the story in a direction other than the one you want it to go in? If not, what are you afraid will happen if they go in a new direction?

Have you ever found yourself forcing your character’s reactions to story events? If so, why does it feel like you’re forcing them?

Have you looked deeply into the other “side” of your story? What’s the point of view that’s the opposite of your protagonist’s? Have you only skimmed the surface or have you given it a chance to try to convince your protagonist that there’s a different way to live her life?

Have you simply let things fall into the camps of good vs. evil?

Do the answers to these questions mean you are writing propaganda? Not necessarily. I mention them only to point out how we – as authors – might be directing our stories more than we should, how we might have blind spots we weren’t aware of, and to explore how there is depth and complexity in some of the opportunities we may not be considering.

One of my current philosophies on writing is that if I want my character to read like a real honest living human being, then I must treat her like one. I must allow her to make her own decisions. I must not judge her if she makes choices that I am opposed to (even morally). I cannot force my character to do anything, and if I do, she’s no longer a human but a pawn of my story. I must do my best to respect, understand, and empathize with my character in order for her to come alive and trust me with her secrets. And I think we should do this for all our characters, even the villains and antagonists.

Truth is not an easy thing to find. But if we put our own agendas and preconceived notions aside and truly follow our characters on their journeys, I think we might have a better chance at finding it together.


0 Comments on Are You Writing Propaganda? as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
26715. IF: Imagination (or "What I think about when I have nothing in particular to think about".)


 The sun has got his bum out, hip hip hip hooray, the sun has got his bum out & he's coming round to play.

1 Comments on IF: Imagination (or "What I think about when I have nothing in particular to think about".), last added: 9/13/2012
Display Comments Add a Comment
26716. My latest children's picture book: THE SPY GAME


The Spy Game
Eddie would love to have a puppy to play with.  A puppy would pull on a rope. Catch a ball and lick your face. But his Uncle brings Eddie an older dog named about a famous spy.
What can you do with an old dog? It probably couldn't learn new tricks, and the only thing this dog did was stare.  It's what they find to do together that makes them the best of friends!

0 Comments on My latest children's picture book: THE SPY GAME as of 9/13/2012 3:10:00 PM
Add a Comment
26717. Character


0 Comments on Character as of 9/13/2012 11:36:00 PM
Add a Comment
26718. indigo season


a message from the Orianne society this morning prompted this little sketch.
I've long had a soft spot for indigo snakes...

0 Comments on indigo season as of 9/13/2012 12:24:00 PM
Add a Comment
26719. polluted water


0 Comments on polluted water as of 9/14/2012 2:16:00 AM
Add a Comment
26720. Hanging Basket

Maddy Kettle panel....

0 Comments on Hanging Basket as of 9/13/2012 4:04:00 PM
Add a Comment
26721. CALENDAR - khristian A howell

designer khristian A howell has just released her 2013 calendars. available in two size options they are available both in her online shop and etsy shop. the 17x22 calendar is printed on canvas and has been designed so you can easily discard the calendar portion and be left with a lovely canvas print.

0 Comments on CALENDAR - khristian A howell as of 9/14/2012 3:34:00 AM
Add a Comment
26722. Wise Words for this Week

Beauty says,

“Support should always lighten your load, not add to it.”

from the FAIRY TOOLS CLASS starts September 21


0 Comments on Wise Words for this Week as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
26723. A preview of what is to come for the Holidays

There's even more but I won't ruin the surprise ;)

1 Comments on A preview of what is to come for the Holidays, last added: 9/14/2012
Display Comments Add a Comment
26724. 17 Jan 1980

I experienced a "madelaine moment" when I found this ancient yellowed cutting from the glory days of Radio Times (when it was the largest circulation magazine in the UK). It features my illustration of bizarre objects for a typically genteel BBC quiz show. The pleasure of drawing this came flooding back. Note that they were showing one of my favourite films from childhood.
Click to enlarge.

0 Comments on 17 Jan 1980 as of 9/13/2012 10:04:00 PM
Add a Comment
26725. Leaving for Russia

Saturday I fly to Moscow.  Now, that's a sentence I haven't written before.  I am visiting Moscow and two other cities to speak on behalf of the US State Department about creativity.  I will have an interpreter wherever I go.  ALWAYS fun to sing a song and have each line translated.  I'm not sure what to expect.  I'm looking forward to the adventure!

I will try to post from my trip.  I wasn't able to access my account when I spoke in China.  We shall see how open Russia is.  I still can't believe I'm going!

More soon.


0 Comments on Leaving for Russia as of 9/13/2012 1:50:00 PM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts