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Results 26 - 50 of 3,510
26. Illustrator Frank Morrison takes us behind the art of Little Melba and Her Big Trombone

SONY DSCReleased in September, Little Melba and her Big Tromboneis the story of Melba Liston, a little-known but trailblazing jazz musician who broke racial and gender barriers to become a famed trombonist and arranger. We asked illustrator Frank Morrison to take us behind the scenes for creating the art work used in Little Melba and her Big Trombone. 

Illustration Process

  1. After reading the manuscript for Little Melba and her Big Trombone, I immediately searched for references that could help me  bring the story to life. This included clothing from the time period and a trombone, which I have never painted before. I was fortunate enough to find a CD by Melba titled, “Melba Liston and her Bones” as well.  After gathering all of my materials my studio begins to sound like a jazz session as I begin reading.
  2. I make thumbnails sketches and jot down notes on the sides of the manuscript while the Be Bopping is blaring from the speakers. My sketches are loose like a trombone’s slide and they take about a minute each. thumbnails for cover resize
  3. When the thumbnails are completed I being drawing defined sketches from them and at the same time placing them in page order. Sometimes I may have two or three different ideas for a page as shown in the cover sketches.  1st cover sketch resizepage 10-11 sketch  resize
  4.  Once my sketches are approved, I transfer the final drawings to an illustration board. This, of course, is done after I’ve measuring the dimensions and taped off the edges, which includes a half-inch border.2nd cover sketch resize
  5. I spray a fixative on the drawing so it won’t smudge then coat it with a clear gesso. Next I tape the image to a wooden board. The board allows me to work sitting down at my art table or placing the painting on my easel. page 10 -11 gesso resize
  6. Finally I use a lot of jazz music, dancing and oil paints to finish the final art.

melbas cover  resize

PAGES 10-11 resize


Filed under: Art and Book Design, Book News, Cover Design, Dear Readers, Interviews with Authors and Illustrators, Lee & Low Likes, New Releases Tagged: African/African American Interest, art, diversity, Frank Morrison, illustration, illustrations, jazz music, Katheryn Russell-Brown, Little Melba, Little Melba and her Big Trombone, melba liston

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27. thursday morning thumbnails....

©the enchanted easel 2014
some arctic adorableness is on the way....:)

happy thursday, friends! 

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28. Jingle Bulbs


This time of year I am creating Hand Painted Ornaments for my JingleBulbs.com site.
I started painting them for clients that I would have during the year, and then it turned into a nice side business.  Eventually it would be nice to be able to turn the designs into cards and Christmas related products.

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29. App of the Week: Brushstroke

Name: Brushstroke
Cost: 2.99
Platform: iOS 7 or later

code organa logoBrushstroke is a seemingly simple app that turns a photo into a painting. You might think to yourself, so what? But really, it’s a pretty powerful tool that gives teens, teachers, and librarians the chance to use a variety of effects on their photos and is a great way to start discussions on painting techniques, styles, how visual messages change as a result of visual choices, and even artists and art movements.

The way it works is that a user selects a photo from an iPad or iPhone camera roll or takes a photo from within the app. The next step is to crop the image if need be. After that, and I admit it took me a minute to figure out how to get from the crop screen to the painting screen – it’s the > on the top right (as you can see in the images below) – the image is rendered as a painting. In the photos below you’ll see the original version of the photo I painted on the left and the painted version on the right.

original photo of harry and lulu relaxing brushstroke painted photo of harry and lulu relaxing

Once a photo is turned by Brushstroke into a painting, a wide-array of painting styles are available to render the image in. Choices range from oil and watercolor styles to experimental and abstract styles. You can also add color filters; a canvas type such as primed, rough, canvas, stone, and so on; change exposure, brightness, and add a highlights; and add a signature to a painting. Brushstroke signature screenWhen adding a signature there are a few color choices available and as the signature is created it’s visible on the painting so it’s easy to tell which color will display the best.

After completing a painting it can be saved, shared via traditional social media channels, or even produced and shipped framed and ready to hang in a school, library, or teenager’s bedroom.

Teens who are interested in different styles of art can compare their favorite artist’s paintings to the styles they create with Brushstrokes. Teachers who are working with teens in art classes, history classes, and so on can use Brushstroke as a jumping off point in conversations about the ways in which different painting techniques can be used in order to send a particular message or create a particular emotion.

Turning a photo into a painting might seem like a simple idea. But in reality, to transform the photo into the style most appropriate for the image portrayed takes a lot of thought and trial and error. Critical thinking and problem-solving are a key part of the process.

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30. Things about Denys Cowan: Dewars, Static, Shaft

cowan dewars Things about Denys Cowan: Dewars, Static, Shaft

I totally stole this from artist/producer Denys Cowan’s FB page, but it’s an interesting little sidenote, Back in the 90s people still read magazines, and liquor companies would purchase full page advertisements in these magazines. Man, history is SO WEIRD, right? Anyway, Dewars scotch ran a series of profiles of debonair achievers attempting to convince you that if you drank their scotch you would also be a debonair achiever. Cowan, then well known for his Batman and Question comics and about to co-found Milestone Media, was a fitting choice but it did seem like a win for comics at the time. This predated the Rob Liefeld Levis commercial, but both are a reminder that cartoonists as media figures is far from a recent phenomenon.

Which reminds me that I forgot to mention that Static Shock is getting a live action series as part of Warner’s Blue Ribbon digital division, with Reginald Hudlin producing. Static was created for Milestone by the late Dwayne McDuffie, the late Robert Washington III and John Paul Leon, but Cowan produced the previous Static Shock animated series. He’s a sturdy character and it’s good to see him getting a reboot.

As long as we’re making this The Denys Cowan Post, here’s a cover to Shaft #2 that Bill Sienkiewicz finished over Cowan’s pencils.
10636132 740525975984161 5073308246211039385 n Things about Denys Cowan: Dewars, Static, Shaft

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31. 5 creative ways to fill your sketchbook

Liliema Brainstorm (3)

If you’re ready to start a new project or just feel like taking a lazy sunday to doodle but aren’t quite sure how to best start filling those blank sketchbook pages with amazing things, here’s 5 ways to fill your sketchbook and have fun doing it.

  1. Take a fine liner and draw in one continuous line filling all spaces on your page without actually taking the pen off the surface until you’re finished.
  2. Using ink make a spontaneous splash, drip, or dribble on your page then leave it to dry and afterwards using a material of choice (pen or pencil etc.) create something from that drip whether an animal, flower , imaginative creature and more.
  3. Rip a hole in a middle section of your page and begin drawing an illustration or doodle in the middle of the hole. The idea is to grow the little illustration into something bigger out of that hole, could be anything in any shape or form you wish from typography, pattern to an imaginative story like concept .
  4. Take a piece of paper collage ( this could be a newspaper clipping, diary piece, parcel paper, map or magazine clipping) and stick it to the sketchbook page, then create an illustration on its surface. If you’re a lover of fashion illustration you could for example cut out models and create your own imaginative designs the potentials endless because so is your imagination.
  5. Find one thing where you are now (whether you’re outside, at home ,bedroom or office) and sketch that one thing in different ways, materials and perspectives on that one page creating a pattern of that one thing you chose.

Once you’re done you can then develop these initial sketchbook ideas into something bigger like a series of book illustrations, patterns, fashion pieces, paintings and more. So grab those materials, open up those sketchbooks and get started  having fun working on those big ideas.

Image by artist Aurelie you can find out more about her work here.

1 Comments on 5 creative ways to fill your sketchbook, last added: 11/4/2014
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32. there's always room at the top...

there's always room at the top...for a hug!
©the enchanted easel 2014
for a hug!

~HAPPY 40TH BIRTHDAY TO THE ADORABLE AND ALWAYS FABULOUS, MISS KITTY WHITE....BEST KNOWN OF COURSE AS HELLO KITTY!!!~

hard to believe it's been 40 years since this sweet little character made her debut. i have been a sucker since day one. i love sanrio and their adorable characters...but she reigns supreme!

this painting features tiny chum, her cute little bear companion, as they embrace in what else? a hug, of course. one of hello kitty's favorite things...hugs. also, the 3 apples represent her weight (as she is said to weigh approximately 3 apples and be about 5 apples high and the 4 bows? well they represent 4 decades of sheer fabulousness!)

{this painting kind of reminds me of candy (must be the confection of colors i chose)....and that always makes me happy! :)}

PRINTS AND OTHER SWEET TREATS ARE AVAILABLE THROUGH THE SHOP LINKS FOUND HERE:

happy birthday hello kitty...you are FABULOUS! still!

there's always room at the top...for a hug!
©the enchanted easel 2014



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33. Tutorial - Background Color Around A Subject

Laying in a background color around a subject can be tricky, and it can be very frustrating, especially after taking the careful time to draw out all of your details. It can be approached loosely, or with a tight hand. I will demonstrate both.

Keep in mind, these are my methods, and by no means the ONLY way to go about it. Watercolor painting is a very personal in application. Trial and error are the best ways to learn the medium. The worst thing you can do for your painting is get furious and give up. Give yourself grace and have patience.

Okay, here we go.

Set Up



Place your water, paper towel, and paints on the side you write with, keeping your painting in the middle. Grouping your supplies will help you grab what you need more efficiently.


Choose your brushes. I usually have three different sizes on hand. They are #2, #5, and a #12 (or around that). These are not my BEST kept brushes, and are typically used for events such as this.


Prepare enough paint to fill the space you're going to cover. Choose a transparent color, like my Sap Green here. It will allow light go travel through down to the white of the paper and back. Trust me. I have also chosen a color that will work well with the other colors I'm going to lay down, such as blues, yellows, and reds.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Painting Around the Subject
The Tight Hand Approach



Choose the smallest of your brushes to start, but keep that medium size close by. You want it to be small enough to get into the tight spots, but large enough to hold a decent amount of paint/water mix. You can see I have placed it close to the face (most important to me) to ensure I'll be able to get in around the nose and lips with the point of the brush. 


Scary part, start laying in the color. Charge (meaning fill the brush) with your color making sure it's full. Lay down next to the subject, but NOT along your line. Give yourself wiggle room. Make a little 'puddle' of paint, but don't over extend it. The idea is to keep plenty of wet paint sitting there, hence the 'puddle'.


Now pull from the puddle to your line with the color. Slow down here...it should all be wet enough to give you at least a moment to do this. It will take practice to find your sweet speed spot. Remember, give yourself grace. 


To prevent unwanted lines, RIGHT after you do some of the face move to the other side of your puddle with a rinsed brush. Fade it out, this way, if it dries, you'll be able to paint and fade over it giving the illusion that you painted it all at once. ;) NOTICE I didn't do the entire face all the way down. 


Work in little puddles/spots and work your way down and around, using the same method over and over again.


Again, fading out with a rinsed brush and clean water, getting rid of any unwanted crisp edges.


With this method I can confidently move away from my subject and begin to venture out. You may need to switch to your medium sized brush to have enough paint and water.


I will begin to add droplets of clean water in to help give my background texture, depth, and this will give the eye something to look at other than what I may have missed. Naturally, in my opinion, this is the most beautiful characteristic of watercolor, they're called blooms.

You can continue the entire painting with this approach. 

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 

Painting Around the Subject
The Loose Approach


Grab your big brush and charge it up. Lay down a good size puddle, but small enough that you still have a puddle (remember, don't over extend your paint). Also, don't go to your lines, you need the space between.


Rinse out your brush and return to the edge of your puddle, pulling the paint towards and OVER your line art. You are fading out the color on top of your subject. 


Like with the tight approach, take your rinsed brush and fade out the back end of the puddle. Repeat.


• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 

Touching Up


In the tiniest of spots, take your smallest brush and pull the wet paint in. If it's dry charge your brush, but first dab it on your paper towel so that it won't over flow or bubble in the tight space you're painting. Try to match the intensity of the color.


If there are crisp edges you don't want...


...go back in with a rinsed brush and clean water, gently scrub and fade them out.


There are tiny little white spots left around the forehead and nose...see them?


Very lightly, and very gently, with your small brush, pull the paint left in the crisp edge onto the white. Go in, lightly do this, and get out. Too much scrubbing too aggressively will leave inconsistent marks you don't want.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 

Fading Color on top of Faded Color


Just to show I know what I'm talking about, once your first faded section is dry, go in to a new section and start again with a puddle.


Keep making puddles and scooting/painting them over the dry faded area. Once you've overlapped start to fade out your puddle with a rinsed brush. Again, might take some practice, so use light water droplets if you need to. ;)

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 

Finishing It Up



Good Luck!
And feel free to ask me any questions or if there is something you need a tutorial in I'd be happy to help out if I can. 

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34. ~HaPpY HaLlOwEeN~

"moonstruck"
©the enchanted easel 2014
love, sally...and her beloved kitty companion
xxx

{PRINTS AND SUCH FOUND HERE:

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35. Let's Go: Taiwan Trip with Artist Ming Franz


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Spring Garden; Splash Ink Watercolor
with Gouache on Mulberry Paper
<!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE <![endif]-->

Happy Halloween! I can't believe it's been 3 weeks since my last blog post. Put it down to an overly-busy day job; going out of town for a bit; too many birthday parties to attend (including my blog's 6th anniversary--6 years!); getting ready for NaNoWriMo 2014 (cannot believe I've signed up again); and of course the fantastic Handsprings SCBWI conference here in Albuquerque last weekend--an amazing, and very tiring, event. I'll try to post some of my impressions from the conference next week, but for now my big news is:

I'm going to Taiwan next year! Best of all, there's still some room left on the tour for more friends of the arts to join up. Here's a sampling of info from the trip brochure:


Art and Scenic Tour of Taiwan with Ming Franz
March 25th to April 7, 2015

<!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE <![endif]-->Ming Franz is an artist who is a native of Taiwan. This is her second tour leading artists to Taiwan. This tour will take you to visiting museums, art galleries, art studios and beautiful tropical Taiwan. 2 days flight, 12 days tour. 

Fees includes round trip air fare from San Francisco to Taipei, 12 days 4-5 star hotels, restaurants, tour bus and guide, all park and museum fees and tax, also basic medical insurance. Total is $3500 USD.  


Please go to her website to see the travel itinerary at www.mingfranzstudio.com, click on "Events" section. Feel free to contact her for questions at mingfranz555@gmail.com or 505-281-4956.


So what do you think?? Fun, or what?

I met Ming Franz last year when I took her Splash Ink Watercolor class through the UNM continuing education department. The class literally changed my entire approach to art-making, allowing me to be much more comfortable with who I am as an artist, rather than trying to constantly live up to my often unrealistic expectations. I know this is going to be a wonderful trip; I've never had the opportunity to visit any part of Asia, and I've never had the chance to seriously travel with other artists. I can't imagine what it must be like to be allowed to sketch unhindered and at leisure--usually my experiences have been people telling me to a) hurry up, and b) why can't you just take a photograph and draw at home? 

I really can't wait to start packing. In the meantime, we still have several months ahead, and I'm sure there's plenty to do till then, beginning, of course, with National Novel Writing Month tomorrow. Start flexing those plot muscles!


A Little Bird Told Me; Splash Ink Watercolor
 with Gouache on Mulberry Paper

Tip of the Day: Even if you can't make the trip, you can still be an "armchair traveler" by reading Ming's book, Splash Ink with Watercolor; Looking East, Painting West and visiting her website. Her artwork will inspire you on many levels. Personally I think they make amazing writing prompts. Just place your characters in one of her settings and let the magic begin!

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36. Why Halloween Doesn't Matter Anymore

Happy Halloween! 


It used to be my favorite holiday. Seriously, over Christmas. Who needs gifts when you can dress up into your wildest fantasy? That's what I used to think. 

The question I ask myself this morning, on Halloween, is:

The image on the left was painted in 1996. I was in 8th grade, obsessed with the movie "The Crow", listening to heavy metal,  and addicted to Gen 13 and Witchblade comic books. I believe it was around that time I dressed like the Catwoman from Batman Returns for Halloween. Whip and all. Yep, I thought I was quite the bad girl. I hid behind a made up character I named "Raven", who I drew all the time, made stories for, and just simmered there. Angry and lost.



She followed me all through high school and into my freshman year of college.

1997
1998
1999

In college she began to morph, just a little. And although I invented other stories to hide myself behind, she was always there. I tried so hard to hold on and not forget who I thought I was.

2003 - Heavily into Manga and still learning watercolor

2004 - Style used for my senior project in college.

When I left college the real soul searching started. I continued to practice witchcraft, but grew in my watercolor and figure drawing skills. I entered into some really difficult relationships, did my years of exploring the night life, and hit rock bottom.

Enter the church. Now wait, don't jump the gun yet. There was LIGHT. I lived in the shadows so long, it was refreshing and very unexpected. I was skeptical but continued to find faith in it. I always had faith I would find LOVE. Find TRUTH. Find WHO I WAS. Who I AM. 

I can't paint the darkness like what's above anymore. I try, and this is what happens:



This image (just below), after many years of searching, is the truth of who I am. I hide behind masks to protect my heart, but it's golden because I am a child of light, the daughter of He who is LIGHT. I wander through the night, not because I am lost, because I'm hunting evil and snuffing it out to make the night safe and beautiful. I have wings so that I can fly, because I am free. These are the truths I have learned through the years, and it is because of these truths I can not go back. I am glad that Raven is now a face who smiles, who comforts, who flies in to bring LIGHT. Not death, pain, or sadness. 


So Halloween you say? Sure, I'll dress up, I'll laugh and find the joy in it, but the holiday used to have such meaning to me - freedom to hide. I think today as we celebrate dressing up and scaring away ghosts and goblins, I see myself as a warrior who doesn't need to hide anymore behind costumes, it doesn't matter anymore. So, I'll happily eat some zombie finger pretzels and begin to look forward to Christmas, when family, love, light, and joy are all dancing about. 


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37. a birthday celebration....

painting tiny dots...
©the enchanted easel 2014
almost done!

CAN NOT WAIT TO SHARE THIS... TOMORROW!!! :)
...'cause every good cat costume needs a pretty red bow.
©the enchanted easel 2014

perhaps someone has tapped into my Mally Beauty stash...;)
©the enchanted easel 2014




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38. 24 Hours of Halloween: Francesco Francavilla’s 31 Days of Horror

B1P2ircCUAAG9hh.jpg large 24 Hours of Halloween: Francesco Francavillas 31 Days of Horror

If there’s one person who loves Halloween and scary monsters more than us it’s artist Francesco Francavilla who has been running his own 31 Days of Horror event on his twitter feed with daily art and process posts. You can more or less follow along at the hashtag #fffear but here’s a sample:

B0MJpcVCQAEORGF 24 Hours of Halloween: Francesco Francavillas 31 Days of Horror BzjX9sfCQAEOvLX 24 Hours of Halloween: Francesco Francavillas 31 Days of Horror B1AKPhYCAAIFo S 24 Hours of Halloween: Francesco Francavillas 31 Days of Horror B07BcMoCcAAfCNR 24 Hours of Halloween: Francesco Francavillas 31 Days of Horror 312 d

 

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39. 24 hours of Halloween: J.O. Applegate

JO Applegate is an illustrator who has appeared in The Classical, ESPN Playbook, SI Extra Mustard, Buzzfeed Sports and Dime Magazine among others and he passed along some art he did for a Halloween art show:

tumblr nd1qp9Dg3L1r950llo1 500 24 hours of Halloween: J.O. Applegate

Monster Meet Cute

 

tumblr nd1qsxnjbr1r950llo1 500 24 hours of Halloween: J.O. Applegate

Curse of the Lover’s Tree

 

BTW it’s not Halloween, but if you go to his site or Tumblr there’s some really neat stuff, much of it sports themed,. We especially liked the mock pulp paperback covers done for the Classical with a basketball draft theme.

 

tumblr msebobMZMr1rtj7mjo1 500 24 hours of Halloween: J.O. Applegate

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40. Call for Submissions: Tammy

Tammy is reading for its fifth print issue for only four more weeks. Aimed at the esteemed fringes and unguarded egresses of American letters, Tammy seeks writing in all genres and forms of visual art that lend themselves to the printed page.

Submit September 1 - December 1 for the spring 2015 issue and March 1 - May 1 for the fall issue

Online submissions manager 

Submissions in multiple genres and simultaneous submissions are encouraged. If your submission(s) is accepted elsewhere, please let us know via Submittable. 

For queries outside of these guidelines, please email:

thetjournalATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

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41. Call for Submissions: Duende

Duende welcomes submissions of prose, poetry, hybrid writing, and visual art. We are especially interested in collaborations between two or more writers, or between writers and visual artists. We accept submissions from writers working in English, or translating into English, from anywhere in the world.

Duende tastes good on the tongue and caresses the ear. Duende seeks authenticity & soulfulness, earthiness & expressiveness, a chill up the spine. It encompasses darkness and intensity; elicits sorrow and joy; wrests a response from the body.

If your poetry is rough-cut diamonds, slightly off-kilter; if your fiction will make us feel more human and less alone; if you enjoy exploration of new forms at the edges of the literary universe; if you can bring us elegant translations of literature from far corners of the globe; if your nonfiction is wild and honest; if your visual art is raw and earnest…show us. We want to see it.

Duende aspires to represent the true beauty and diversity of the U.S. literary ecosystem. A majority of the work we publish will be from writers and artists who are queer, of color, differently abled, immigrant, working class, youth, elder, and / or otherwise from communities underrepresented in U.S. literary magazines and journals. Please send us your work!

Submissions are open through November 15th.  


Visit our website for detailed guidelines.

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42. Marvel spotlights Superheroes as Cats

marvel cats4 625x943 Marvel spotlights Superheroes as Cats
Yesterday was National Cat Day and Marvel celebrated by showing casing these covers by Jenny Park, who specializing in painting famous pop culture characters as cats. How she isn’t a billionaire I don’t know.

Could this possibly be another variant month theme for Marvel? Makes sense doesn’t it.

National Cat DAy was celebrated pretty quietly here at Stately Beat Manor, except by Charlie who overdid it a little and yakked all over the litter mat. And THAT is truly why we celebrate National Cat Day.

marvel cats2 625x943 Marvel spotlights Superheroes as Cats

marvel cats3 Marvel spotlights Superheroes as Cats

marvel cats1 625x943 Marvel spotlights Superheroes as Cats

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43. Catch up post – Inktober Day 26, 27, 28 and PiBoIdMo!

Here is my catch up post! A 3 in 1 :) We are getting down to the wire now, only a few days left of Inktober. I will miss it, but I will have PiBoIdMo to keep me occupied. What is it? It is Picture Book Idea Month. Every day, for 30 days, participants come up with an idea for a picture book story. It is a wonderful, creative project that I have participated in every year since 2009. More details at Tara Lazar’s blog!

Inktober 26

Morning bird & bugs 

Micron brush pen black & graphite

Inktober 27

Witch hat 

Micron brush pen black & graphite

Inktober 28

This isn’t scary…

Micron brush pen, micron 05 black, graphite

 

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44. Catch up post – Inktober Day 24 and Day 25

 

 

Inktober 24

“Do you know which way?”

Micron brush pen black, graphite pencil, and Micron Pigma 05 pen black

Inktober 25

Buzz, buzz, buzz…

Micron brush pen black, graphite pencil, and Micron Pigma 05 pen black

Still playing catch up! Sorry for the delay in posting these. Only two more to go and I will be finally caught up. I am hoping to finish inking 27 tonight and posting in the morning. Happy Monday and thanks for visiting!

 

 

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45. Call for Submissions: Beecher's Magazine

Beecher’s Magazine Is Now Open for Submissions

Submission deadline: February 14, 2015

Beecher’s Magazine, an annual print journal produced by graduate students at the University of Kansas, seeks inimitable poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and B&W art for its fifth anniversary issue. For guidelines and to submit your work, visit our Submittable page.

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46. Call for Submissions: Lime Hawk

Lime Hawk Seeks Original Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Art for its Winter Issue!

Our Submittable Link.
We look forward to reading your work!

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47. Call for Submissions: Mud Season Review

MUD SEASON REVIEW is a community-led literary journal based in Vermont.

We invite strong, deeply human work in fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and art for upcoming issues, and seek to celebrate the writers and artists behind the work. 


For guidelines, visit our website.

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48. I'm on Society 6!!!

Hi Everyone

I am so excited to have a shop on Society 6.   Check it out and if you like my stuff please promote or follow me.  I plan on adding a few more illustrations soon.

Check it out http://society6.com/keridawnstudios

Also check out my facebook page http://facebook.com/keridawnstudios

0 Comments on I'm on Society 6!!! as of 10/28/2014 1:23:00 AM
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49. Society 6 store!!!!

Hello Everyone I just wanted to let you know I opened up a Society 6 shop. Check it out at http://society6.com/keridawnstudios

Very Excited!!! Check it out and please promote me or follow me if you like my stuff. Also check out my facebook page at http://facebook.com/keridawnstudios

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50. Escape from Netherworld—Borhai

More jacket art for Escape from Netherworld—it’s about a group of role-playing gamers who are somehow transformed into their characters and transported into an alternate realm: Netherworld. Yesterday I showed you Twiggy the dwarf. Here’s Borhai the warrior who starts out as a regular gaming guy named Dave.

My pal, the extraordinarily talented Gina Datres, is the book’s designer and she called me in to illustrate the jacket. After some discussion and rough sketches back & forth we hit on the idea of 3 individual images of the gamers going through their transformation. For the 2 guys, I drew the gamers in pencil but fully rendered their characters in paint. I work with watercolor (gouache), so I traced some of the drawing with a wax candle. Since watercolor won’t stick to wax, you can see the drawing of the gamer ‘through’ the painting of the character. Piper, the elf-girl, doesn’t change in size enough to make that idea work so I made her hair a magical element that swirls around her as it grows.

If you’d like to buy a copy of Escape from Netherworld just click here.

Author: David Kuklis
Designer: Gina Datres
Illustrator: John Manders
Editor: Nan Newell
Published and Printed by:
Word Association Publishers
Tarentum, PA 15084
ISBN: 978 1 59571 994 2
Available for purchase:
wordassociation.com   —   1 800 827 7903
barnesandnoble.com
amazon.com

As usual, here are the rough sketch, tight sketch, color study and final painting.

sketch sketch color study final art

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