What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(tagged with 'art')

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: art, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 3,531
26. Creative ways to think outside the box

0a548624d2e8ff1dba99679fac693e56

 

It’s easy to presume that your doodles, illustrations, paintings and creative thoughts should make their way straight to paper or canvas although just for a minute why not think outside the box.  Break the rules and do something creatively different that sets your doodles apart , not to abandon your sketchbook for to long but challenge yourself to something different. To help get you started heres just a few creative ways you can do that and truly think outside the box to show others just how creative you can be.

  • Remember that rather dull phone or tablet case you bought thats lacking a certain creative omph, well grab yourself some paint or a paint based marker and create your own custom case design.  Add your own style and choose your own theme to make a stylish creative case you’d want to show off and not hide.
  • Mugs are great because they often get filled with heart warming teas or beverages although a plain little old mug is some what sad and gloomy. However with some ceramic paint or markers you  could give it an unique handdrawn design of its own that is sure to make your tea breaks even better.
  • For fellow lovers of fabric the dream is no doubt to create your own and you can even without a huge fabric printer. With some acrylic paints and fabric medium you can paint your own designs onto calico, making reams of your own one of a kind design to embellish any type of project from home furnishings to wallart and more.
  • That little pair of converse you happen to have sitting in the hallway could use a splash of ink wouldn’t you say? Grab yourself some pens and markers ( ones that work well on canvas fabric and will not run) and create yourself a fashion piece that will set you apart from everyone else.

Image by artist  Jaco Haasbroek  you can find out more about their work here.

0 Comments on Creative ways to think outside the box as of 11/23/2014 4:48:00 PM
Add a Comment
27. Holy cow, James Jean

james jean seasons Holy cow, James Jean
After some well publicized difficulties, artist James Jean has been back making great art for a while now. And better than ever, as this already sold out print Seasons may indicate.

1 Comments on Holy cow, James Jean, last added: 11/21/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
28. Call for Submissions: Tiferet

Tiferet is currently accepting new submissions. You are invited to submit a short story, an essay or interview, poems, or an original piece of art. 

Click here to read the guidelines and use our online submission process. 

Deadline is December 31st!

Add a Comment
29. Call for Submissions: pacificReview: Vivarium

pacificREVIEW 2015: Vivarium

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
FICTION * NONFICTION * POETRY *
GRAPHIC NARRATIVE * PHOTOGRAPHY * ARTWORK


Submission Period: October 1st 2014 – February 28th 2015

A vivarium (Latin for "place of life") is an area for keeping and raising animals or plants for observation or research. Often, a portion of the ecosystem for a particular species is simulated on a smaller scale, a microcosm with controls for environmental conditions.

We, as human beings, create vivariums for both ourselves and other species. In these environments of our own design (zoos, shopping malls, universities, cathedrals, etc.), we breathe simulation, observe phenomena both natural and unnatural, speak in symbols, and cypher our dreams. We are inhabitants of our creations, thriving in the flux between the abstract and the absolute. The newest issue of the pacificREVIEW seeks dynamic work that speaks to this theme and interrogates the ever-blurring line between "real" and "unreal" settings.

Add a Comment
30. Call for Entries: second Society of Illustrators Comic and Cartoon Art Competition

SOI 2015CFE Call for Entries: second Society of Illustrators Comic and Cartoon Art Competition

Last year the Society of Illustrators inaugurated a comics art competition similar to the one for illustrators they’ve been running for many years. (Disclosure: I was a judge.)  The Comics and Cartoon Art Annual offered a printed guide to the best comics of the year in a succinct form. The competition is back in 2015, chaired by Steven Guarnaccia, with Co-Chair: R. Sikoryak. The above art is by Bendik Kaltenborn. I had a great time with my fellow judged and absorbing a great many new cartoonists and established one in a new guise. I’m sure this year will be an even better compeition. Entry guidelines are below. Last year’s winners are here. 


 
ABOUT THE COMIC AND CARTOON ART ANNUAL

The Society of Illustrators is proud to announce the second annual Comic and Cartoon Art Competition.
Open to artists worldwide, entries are considered by a jury of professionals, including renowned cartoonists, illustrators, publishers, and editors. The competition will result in an exhibition that will showcase the most outstanding works created in this genre throughout each year.

The original works will be exhibited in the MoCCA Gallery at the Society of Illustrators from June 16 through August 15th, 2015.

Opening Award Galas will be scheduled where Medals and Certificates will be presented to the artists whose works are judged best in each category.

All accepted entries will be reproduced in a full color catalog.

A selection of 40 works from each Exhibition will then tour colleges throughout the country in an educational traveling show, a tradition that we have had at the Society for over 30 years.

CATEGORIES

Long Form: A work that is longer than 40 pages. Includes graphic novels, comic books, etc. An anthology is eligible in this category if it is created by one person, and the individual stories form a cohesive whole. If stories should be judged independently, please submit an entry form per person.

Short Form: A work that is more than two pages but shorter than 40 pages. Includes stand-alone work, zines, comic books and work that has been published in anthologies. Work appearing in anthologies may be entered in this category if the individual story is shorter than 40 pages. If stories should be judged independently please submit an entry form per story.

Special Format: Work that is design-driven and created with special attention to production values, including limited edition, small press, hand-made and artist’s books.

Digital Media: Work that is native to a digital format. Includes web comics, online comic strips, and other digitally driven works. Up to 20 images accepted per entry.

Comic Strip: A short-form work published in newspapers, magazines, books, online, etc. featuring four or more panels. Must be one page or less.

Single Image: Work featuring a self-contained narrative image with or without caption. Includes gag cartoons, political cartoons, single-panel cartoons, etc.

——————————————————————————————————

HOW TO ENTER LONG FORM & SHORT FORM BOOK SUBMISSIONS

Eligibility: Any book that was created from January 2014 – January 2015. Both published or self-published are accepted. International entries are welcome. Each submission will receive consideration by every member of the jury for its category.

How to enter: Mail 6 copies of the publication to the Society of Illustrators: 128 East 63 Street, New York, NY, 10065. Attn: Comic and Cartoon Art Competition. Must include the official entry form with each copy.

DEADLINE: Monday, January 5, 2015.

Entry Fees For Book Submissions:
$30 per entry (includes all six copies) for non-members of the Society of Illustrators.
$20 per entry (includes all six copies) for members of the Society of Illustrators.
Include a check with the entry. Checks made out to Society of Illustrators.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD ENTRY FORM

0 Comments on Call for Entries: second Society of Illustrators Comic and Cartoon Art Competition as of 11/20/2014 7:12:00 PM
Add a Comment
31. Art Resource: Koosje Koene’s Draw Tip Tuesday

drawtiptuesday
(Added the shadow color before the cookie was dry, and the yellow bled. Whoops!)

Saturday night, as I’ve mentioned, is one of the best parts of my week. My boys go to bed early these days—7:30, ever since the time change. (Ahhh…) Rose and Beanie watched S.H.I.E.L.D. with Scott. And Rilla and I cozy up on my bed to listening to our current audiobook—right now we’re midway through Matilda, having had such a delightful time with The BFG—and our sketchbooks.

Sometimes we start off with a few short art videos on YouTube for warmups. Lately we’ve had some of our most fun bouts of clip-watching yet, because we have discovered Koosje Koene’s Draw Tip Tuesday. Koosje is a Dutch artist who teaches online art classes at Sketchbook Skool and via her own site. Her clips are clear, fun, and super helpful. Rilla and I are having the best time making our way through all of them. I’m learning a lot!

I’ll share only a few here. It was hard to choose which ones! You can click through to see the whole series. We have subscribed to Koosje’s Youtube channel so we won’t miss anything.

We had fun with this tangerine:

(direct link)

And this cookie quartet:

(direct link)

Of course we couldn’t resist the one about popsicles:

(direct link)

This tip for how to draw both edges of a banner at once was new to me and is very cool:


(direct link)

Enjoy!

Add a Comment
32. Call for Submissions: Thin Air Magazine

Thin Air Magazine is reading submissions from now until Dec 15 for our Spring 2015 issue and our Web Features.

Founded in 1994, Thin Air is a nonprofit operating at an altitude of 6,910 ft, on the mountain of Flagstaff, Arizona, a popular stop along Route 66. The magazine is managed and edited entirely by Northern Arizona University graduate students on a volunteer basis, with faculty support from Nicole Walker. 

Thin Air is published in print once a year and on the web on an ongoing basis. We seek work that represent the forefront of contemporary American prose and poetry, work that tear up our hearts, and work that matter. We care about sharp aesthetics, cultural relevance, artistic cohesion, and are especially excited about writings that bend rules and surprise readers while sneakily winking at tradition. 
 
We are supportive of emerging writers and diverse voices, and aim to represent a wide range of talent in every issue we publish. We encourage submissions from writers of non-dominant, traditionally underrepresented backgrounds.
 

Add a Comment
33. Call for Poetry and Art about Animals: The National Museum of Animals & Society

The National Museum of Animals & Society seeks submissions of poetry and visual art for an upcoming exhibition on animals in poetry. This first of a kind exhibit will focus on poems, and the visual presentation of poems, that represent animal subjects and animals’ subjectivities, and that explore human-animal relations and the human-animal bond. Poets and visual artists are encouraged to participate.

Submissions link.

The deadline for submissions is January 10, 2015.

Add a Comment
34. Call for Submissions: The Cumberland River Review

Deadline: April 30, 2015

The Cumberland River Review reads during the traditional academic year, September through April, and aims to maintain a regular response time of three months. We read and encourage simultaneous submissions and acquire First North American Serial Rights and the right to maintain an archive copy of accepted work online. (All other rights revert to our authors upon publication.) 


We nominate work for the Pushcart Prize, Best New Poets, Best of the Net, and other anthologies and prizes. As always, our hope is to feature work of moral consequence.

 To submit and for more information, please visit our website.

Add a Comment
35. Call for Submissions: Tiferet

Tiferet is currently accepting new writing submissions! 

We look for high-quality creative work that expresses spiritual experiences and/or promotes tolerance. Our mission is to help raise individual and global consciousness, and we publish writing from a variety of religious and spiritual traditions. 

We seek and publish the following types of work:  

Fiction: We interpret the word "spiritual" broadly. First, we seek well-written stories, pure and simple, that engage us in some small pocket of humanity.  

Nonfiction: We like to publish essays and interviews that shed light on personal experiences of grappling with the invisible...or different aspects of spiritual traditions.  

Poetry: We look for the highest quality poems that display mastery of content and craft. Technical proficiency is extremely important, along with clear expression of various aspects of the human spirit.  

Art and Photography: We seek original art and photography which in some way captures the spiritual or contemplative in a visual representation. 

For complete submission guidelines or to submit your work, please visit our website.

The deadline for all submissions is December 31st, 2014.  

Thank you for being a part of the global Tiferet community. We look forward to reading all submissions!

Add a Comment
36. Illustration Inspiration: Hervé Tullet

Hervé Tullet is known for his prodigious versatility, from directing ad campaigns to designing fabric for Hermès. But his real love is working with children, for whom he has published dozens of books, including Press Here.

Add a Comment
37. laying down an icy background...

©the enchanted easel 2014
on some arctic adorableness! :)

it's no secret how much i LOVE winter (yes, i know, i'm a freak...but hey, someone has to love that beautiful season...). so....

i thought i would do a quick set of penguins. cute penguins, of course. will be selling the ORIGINALS of these cuties once they are done.

ah, winter, my friend. can not wait for your return! :)

0 Comments on laying down an icy background... as of 11/11/2014 2:49:00 PM
Add a Comment
38. CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens

The Beat took pictures at CAB 2014! Some of them are Hipstamatic. Live with it. This was a good show, as usual. I came back with a bag full of books and immediately started reading them, one of the virtues of the home show. Although jam packed the show was surmountable, and I thought I would go once around the room and take photos of every one so I would have good file photos for when someone wins the Nobel Prize or marries Taylor Swift. This plan did not go as well as anticipated as you will see.

CAB 201402 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
The cotillion for young cartoonists was arranged by experience. It takes a few years to get to tyro.

CAB 201403 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
This book, The Jacket, by Kristen Hall and Dasha Tolstikova is lovely. Published by Enchanted Lion.
CAB 201404 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Enchanted Lion publisher Claudia Z. Bedrick on the right, I forgot the young fellow’s name alas.

CAB 201405 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
That’s Laura Lannes on the left, cartoonist of the mini comic The Basil Plant which got a rave review on the Comics Journal the other day which had about 200 times more words than the comics. but sometimes that’s how it works. She’s good! On the right is…another cartoonist from the Paper Rocket studio whose hand cleverly covered his name badge. I’m really awful with names, people.
CAB 201407 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Fantagraphics publisher Gary Groth spring into action as Paul Karasik looks on and Olivier Schwauren sketches away. This show was action packed!

CAB 201409 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Secret Acres creators. One of them is Theo Elsworth. Help me out here, people!
CAB 201410 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Sophie Yanow and Sam Alden are shocked to see all the action at the show. These guys have moved beyond Tyro class even!
CAB 201413 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
People looked at comics sometimes buying them.
CAB 201414 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
I was trying out this new Hipstamatic filter I just bought. A little too blue?
CAB 201417 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
The animated Leslie Stein.
CAB 201419 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
John Pham was at the show! I didn’t even know he was going to be there!
CAB 201421 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
The mad talented Lala Albert. Her new comic from Breakdown Press was a sellout.
CAB 201422 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Patrick Kyle, returned from his tour more or less intact.

CAB 201425 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Dean Haspiel and Z2 Publisher Josh Frankel.

CAB 201426 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Nick Bertozzi is chatting to SVA’s Keith Mayerson, I believe, That’s David Mazzucchelli in the hat but don’t worry you’ll get a better look at that later. Bertozzi has developed quite a varied shelf of books. I adore his latest one, Shackleton

CAB 2014271 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Gregory Benton of Hang Dai and Target.

CAB 201429 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Jillian Tamaki, Keren Katz and Mazzucchelli. David and I embarrassed Jillian by telling her how amazing her work in This One Summer is, and then David explained how tiny gestures can changes every drawing. A collection of Jillian’s funny and painful SuperMutant Magic Academy is coming in the Spring from D&Q.

CAB 201431 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
I know this isn’t a very good photo, but CAB is full of magical moments like Keren Katz yakking with Ben Katchor while James Romberger and Marguerite van Cook stand nearby.

CAB 201432 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
I grabbed a bite with tireless Torsten Adair at this little sandwich shop called re.Union which was around the corner from the church. Their sandwiches were JAMMIN’ but everyone turned backlit. Scott Eder of the Scott Eder Gallery was at the next table and we passed a pleasant half hour or so talking about shows and art.

CAB 201436 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Here’s the Breakdown Press gang, which is, I believe Simon Hacking and Tom Oldham. Breakdown is a small English publisher and they’ve put out works by Cossé, Conor Willumsen, Connor Stechschulte, Lala Albert, Joe Kessler and Seiichi Hayashi. They are kind of killing it. Seriously, loved every book I got from them. They also filled me in on some of the background of the UK’s fast growing indie scene. (Thought Bubble is already on!) I pointed out that once the English think something is cool, American hipsters have to go along, so all our hopes rest on these guys. They also told me a possibly apocryphal story about a cartoonist who had spent the night on a park bench and still managed to make a mini comic in the process.

CAB 201438 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Karl Stevens! He’s backed by Sam Henderson.

CAB 201441 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Action Austin English! Those Domino Books people totally use a hurry up offense.

CAB 201443 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Of course an actual wedding was going on at the church. What would a comics show be without a wedding nearby?

CAB 201444 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Adrian Tomine. A new issue of OPtic Nerve is on tap for 2015 he told me.

CAB 201447 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Annie Koyama and Gary Groth exemplify the love that is CAB.

CAB 201453 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Flash Forward to Day 2! There was some confusion over people thinking that there would be books for sale on Sunday, but there weren’t Only panels. Here’s Paul Karasik talking to Art Spiegelman and Roz Chast. This was a blockbuster panel by any definition, and I love Paul Karasik, but I kind of wish more had been devoted to the two talking about their parents. I don’t mean to gripe. Karasik put together a marvelous slideshow of both their work and of course both Chast and Spiegelman were witty and wonderful.

CAB 201457 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
Then Josh Bayer interviewed Raymond Pettibon, the famed punk artist. This was a priceless, you-had-to-be-there moment as Bayer would ask a question and Pettibon would go off on an amazing rant about something, every line quotable. (I put a few really goods ones on Twitter.) It was a pretty unstructured talk but Bayer knows Pettibon well and quickly rushed through a slideshow that included work by Harold Gray and Jack Kirby, both obvious influences. Petibon clearly has comics hopes and dreams (Caniff and Frank Robbins were also cited as influences.) but luckily came up at a time when someone of his talents could make a ton of money doing commercial art and selling paintings.

If I may shift into diary mode here for a moment (I wasn’t already?) I experienced one of those weird time circles. Back when I lived in LA I went to a blockbuster show at MOCA that included Robert Williams, Pettibon, and Manuel Ocampo among others. It was called Helter Skelter: LA Art in the 90s, and it was a pretty incredible show, I have to say. The work of Pettibon and Ocampo and Williams very clearly referenced comics imagery in a respectful way. This was long before comics were as accepted as they are now, but I saw clear flashes of it back then. A few months later I was at that cafe in Silverlake we all used to hang out at (Jeebus what was it called?) with Phil Yeh and Alfredo Alcala and Ocampo and his fellow Filipino art crowd, because it turned out Ocampo idolized Alcala and the other cartoonists. Anyway flash forward 24 years, and Bayer asked Pettibon if he liked the Filipino comics school, and he said “Yeah, Alcala and…” So, see, everyone knows every one!

I saw Robert Boyd at the show and he was taking notes at this presentation. I look forward to his notes on the event because he knows a lot more about art than I do.

CAB 201463 CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens
For a finale, Pettibon did a live drawing based on a Jack Kirby drawing of Spider-Man. It was awesome. CAB was awesome.

You can see the finished drawing here. WARNING: NOT SAFE FOR WORK! REPEAT NOT SAFE FOR WORK!

2 Comments on CAB 2014 in Pictures! With Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Raymond Pettibon and a cast of dozens, last added: 11/11/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
39. “Your taste is still killer”

I came across this Ira Glass quote (direct YouTube link for my iPad readers) and was struck by how accurately it describes my relationship to my drawing efforts.

“Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.”

Such a good point. It’s because you can recognize what good art (writing, music, etc) is that you know yours isn’t good…yet. And so the daily habit becomes almost an imperative, if you want to improve. My writing is best when I’m writing every day. If I keep up the sketchbook habit for eight or nine years, I just might be able to draw the way I want to. :)

sketchbooknov10

Not there yet.

Add a Comment
40.

Edward Hopper Paints His World By Robert Burleigh; Paintings by Wendell Minor Christy Ottaviano Books: Henry Holt and Company. 2014 ISBN: 780805087529 Grades 2-12 To write this review, I checked this book out of my local public library. Little Edward Hopper had many dreams.  But one dream was biggest of all—he was going to be a painter when he grew up. In Edward Hopper Paints His

0 Comments on as of 11/10/2014 7:16:00 AM
Add a Comment
41. 5 ways to take your sketchbook ideas and turn them into finished pieces

6331599fbf7d7474649b9181c18038c9

Last week we were spending a creative sunday discovering ways you can have fun filling the pages of your sketchbook.  No doubt by now those exact same pages are filled with the seeds of a great creative project , now all you have to do is take those initial sketchbook ideas and turn them into something creatively amazing and here’s ways following last week’s post you can do that.

1.  From a continuous fine liner doodle look at what you’ve created. Is there are character or motif on your page that you can trace on layout paper turning it into a developed illustration piece. Could you grow that initial idea; add extra aspects to it that weren’t there before and develop it into something new that might be a great addition to your portfolio.

2.  What was once a spontaneous splash on your page might now be an amazing initial illustration idea all dried up and ready for developing. You might have a series of quirky inky characters, imaginative creatures and more that you can now scan and turn into anything from a surface pattern to a series of illustrative prints.

3. Were you brave enough to rip a hole in your sketchbook page? If you were and grew a little illustration into a bigger one, growing a concept for a story or filling it with typography script, you could now scan and digitally colour your pieces turning them into a book or series of prints for an online shop.

4. If you dabbled in paper collage and created a sketched paper piece, you could take elements from your experimentation that worked and move them further in your project. So for example if a black fine line doodle contrasted better on graph paper collage, then use those elements that work along with your drawing theme of choice to develop further turning initial sketchbook ideas into a series of framed pieces maybe?

5. The last sketchbook filling idea was to find one thing where you were and sketch it in different ways, materials and perspectives on your pages to create a number of motifs. Once you’ve done this you could retrace your sketches onto tracing paper to tidy up the best designs you want to use. Then begin incorporating colour and combine shapes to make new pattern prints that could be for many different things from phone cases to notebook covers, fabric and more.

Image by artist Sarah Ahearn you can find out more about her work here.

0 Comments on 5 ways to take your sketchbook ideas and turn them into finished pieces as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
42. DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own

By David Nieves

Even though Los Angeles is the entertainment capital of the world, ten years ago, you’d be remiss to find comic conventions, toy shows, or most other forms of pop culture gatherings. The monthly mini show at the Shrine Expo was at times more a flea market than a convention and Frank and Son’s collectibles is always basically a swap meet. Today, there’s an overabundance of conventions and expos in L.A. for every facet of fandom. Seems like very weekend, fans of the popular arts have a place to gather somewhere in Southern California and that’s far from a bad thing.

This weekend in Pasadena CA; artists, toy makers, and vinyl sculptors of all kinds gathered at the convention center for DesignerCon or Dcon as it’s commonly known. If you’re an art connoisseur or a collector of unique toys this show is for you. Dcon smashes together collectible toys and designer goods with urban, underground and pop art. The show is over 70,000 square feet and features over 300 vendors, art & custom live demonstrations, and much more. Attendees can get prints by quirky artist Michelliezoid, the barbwire covered bat from Skybound Ent, or something from Prints On Wood by Tara McPherson and Greg “Craola” Simkins.

Dcon also host a limited number of informative and fan panels covering topics such as crowdfunding, character design, and building a style all your own.

However the real star of the show is the floor. Traversing the straightforward rows of aisles is simplicity. A person could walk the entire floor to get the lay of the land and easily find the booths they want to get back to. One of the most interesting parts of Dcon is that no two booths are even remotely alike. First you see the adorable art of Unicorn Crafts and then turn around to look at the zealously detailed horror dioramas of Jackorama. One of our favorite exhibits was the Lego recreations of some iconic comic book covers by ComicBricks. The Iron Man: Demon in a Bottle cover was exquisite right down to its tiny bottle of hooch.

The show has a very niche appeal. If you’re looking for comics, or figures from Mattel you won’t find them here. But if you enjoy innovatively designed toys like Giant Robot or gallery quality art by masters like Jeff Soto then this show is well worth the low low price of $7 for entrance.

Dcon continues Sunday from 10am-5pm at the Pasadena Convention Center. Find out more info at DesignerCon.com. Check out a few pics from the show below.

IMG 0379 100x150 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0375 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0374 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0373 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0371 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0370 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0369 100x150 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0367 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0366 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0365 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0362 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0358 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0356 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0355 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0354 100x150 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0352 100x150 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0351 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0350 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0348 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0347 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0346 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0345 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0344 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0342 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0339 100x150 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0338 100x150 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0335 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0334 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0333 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own IMG 0331 150x100 DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own

0 Comments on DesignerCon Tells a Toy Story All Its Own as of 11/9/2014 3:16:00 AM
Add a Comment
43. Sweet thoughts

DSC_1672Little bee, no swerving from your line when you deliver the goods back home.

A busy place with no door but when you enter you still use your buzzer.

Then back again from flower to flower, collecting the pollen that gives you power.

It’s home again, little bundles carried to feed the Queen


0 Comments on Sweet thoughts as of 11/8/2014 11:57:00 PM
Add a Comment
44. App of the Week: Brushstroke

Name: Brushstroke
Cost: 2.99
Platform: iOS 7 or later

code organa logoBrushstroke is a seemingly simple app that turns a photo into a painting. You might think to yourself, so what? But really, it’s a pretty powerful tool that gives teens, teachers, and librarians the chance to use a variety of effects on their photos and is a great way to start discussions on painting techniques, styles, how visual messages change as a result of visual choices, and even artists and art movements.

The way it works is that a user selects a photo from an iPad or iPhone camera roll or takes a photo from within the app. The next step is to crop the image if need be. After that, and I admit it took me a minute to figure out how to get from the crop screen to the painting screen – it’s the > on the top right (as you can see in the images below) – the image is rendered as a painting. In the photos below you’ll see the original version of the photo I painted on the left and the painted version on the right.

original photo of harry and lulu relaxing brushstroke painted photo of harry and lulu relaxing

Once a photo is turned by Brushstroke into a painting, a wide-array of painting styles are available to render the image in. Choices range from oil and watercolor styles to experimental and abstract styles. You can also add color filters; a canvas type such as primed, rough, canvas, stone, and so on; change exposure, brightness, and add a highlights; and add a signature to a painting. Brushstroke signature screenWhen adding a signature there are a few color choices available and as the signature is created it’s visible on the painting so it’s easy to tell which color will display the best.

After completing a painting it can be saved, shared via traditional social media channels, or even produced and shipped framed and ready to hang in a school, library, or teenager’s bedroom.

Teens who are interested in different styles of art can compare their favorite artist’s paintings to the styles they create with Brushstrokes. Teachers who are working with teens in art classes, history classes, and so on can use Brushstroke as a jumping off point in conversations about the ways in which different painting techniques can be used in order to send a particular message or create a particular emotion.

Turning a photo into a painting might seem like a simple idea. But in reality, to transform the photo into the style most appropriate for the image portrayed takes a lot of thought and trial and error. Critical thinking and problem-solving are a key part of the process.

Add a Comment
45. Jingle Bulbs


This time of year I am creating Hand Painted Ornaments for my JingleBulbs.com site.
I started painting them for clients that I would have during the year, and then it turned into a nice side business.  Eventually it would be nice to be able to turn the designs into cards and Christmas related products.

0 Comments on Jingle Bulbs as of 11/6/2014 10:15:00 AM
Add a Comment
46. thursday morning thumbnails....

©the enchanted easel 2014
some arctic adorableness is on the way....:)

happy thursday, friends! 

0 Comments on thursday morning thumbnails.... as of 11/6/2014 12:11:00 PM
Add a Comment
47. Illustrator Frank Morrison takes us behind the art of Little Melba and Her Big Trombone

SONY DSCReleased in September, Little Melba and her Big Tromboneis the story of Melba Liston, a little-known but trailblazing jazz musician who broke racial and gender barriers to become a famed trombonist and arranger. We asked illustrator Frank Morrison to take us behind the scenes for creating the art work used in Little Melba and her Big Trombone. 

Illustration Process

  1. After reading the manuscript for Little Melba and her Big Trombone, I immediately searched for references that could help me  bring the story to life. This included clothing from the time period and a trombone, which I have never painted before. I was fortunate enough to find a CD by Melba titled, “Melba Liston and her Bones” as well.  After gathering all of my materials my studio begins to sound like a jazz session as I begin reading.
  2. I make thumbnails sketches and jot down notes on the sides of the manuscript while the Be Bopping is blaring from the speakers. My sketches are loose like a trombone’s slide and they take about a minute each. thumbnails for cover resize
  3. When the thumbnails are completed I being drawing defined sketches from them and at the same time placing them in page order. Sometimes I may have two or three different ideas for a page as shown in the cover sketches.  1st cover sketch resizepage 10-11 sketch  resize
  4.  Once my sketches are approved, I transfer the final drawings to an illustration board. This, of course, is done after I’ve measuring the dimensions and taped off the edges, which includes a half-inch border.2nd cover sketch resize
  5. I spray a fixative on the drawing so it won’t smudge then coat it with a clear gesso. Next I tape the image to a wooden board. The board allows me to work sitting down at my art table or placing the painting on my easel. page 10 -11 gesso resize
  6. Finally I use a lot of jazz music, dancing and oil paints to finish the final art.

melbas cover  resize

PAGES 10-11 resize


Filed under: Art and Book Design, Book News, Cover Design, Dear Readers, Interviews with Authors and Illustrators, Lee & Low Likes, New Releases Tagged: African/African American Interest, art, diversity, Frank Morrison, illustration, illustrations, jazz music, Katheryn Russell-Brown, Little Melba, Little Melba and her Big Trombone, melba liston

2 Comments on Illustrator Frank Morrison takes us behind the art of Little Melba and Her Big Trombone, last added: 11/7/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
48. Justice

Justice is a matter of belief that fairness has won the day, that truth and honesty has prevailed …

But alas, Justice is only a perception that many times is corrupted by greed …JDMartRedRoadJustice11520142


0 Comments on Justice as of 11/7/2014 11:46:00 AM
Add a Comment
49. Mini Inspirations

It started here. I made five fairy busts for my book demonstrating the different ways to approach painting skin tones.


It then moved onto this without me realizing it, I began doodling them with this crazy spiral hair during Inktober.


At the end of October I listed the five busts from my book to be sold during my first Flash Sale at my Etsy shop. They went so fast! I didn't think something so small and so simple would be that popular.


Once the sale was all finished and I had so many envelopes to draw on, I decided to continue with these wee fairy busts as a way to "brand" the sale. I came up with a simple design and modified it for each envelope. Every envelope from a sale during that day has a fairy bust drawn on it. You can view all of them on my Facebook Page.

Now, with all of that said and done, here is where I have ended up.


I think I am border line obsessed with these wee ladies. They are quick, full of sweet personality, and I really can't wait to paint them. I envision them in tiny ornate frames hanging together or in the smallest of nooks and crannies around the house. Just like a fairy! They measure about 2x2 inches.

I love them so much I made myself into one!


0 Comments on Mini Inspirations as of 11/7/2014 6:17:00 PM
Add a Comment
50. Call for Flash Fiction and Art: Fine Linen Magazine

Fine Linen Magazine seeks tight, gripping flash fiction for publication in their winter issue.  

Fine Linen is a quarterly print journal that publishes fiction and art. We pay professional rates for accepted stories and art. Information and guidelines are available here.

Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts