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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: art, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 3,453
26. #Inktober Day 8

Inktober 8

“Of course, I will go with you to meet Oz!”

 

Micron Pigma Brush Pen Black and Graphite Ink

Inktober 2014 #scarecrow #oz #inktober

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27. Finishing the WIP and Visiting Open Space

From my sketchbook: 
"Open Space Farm Land." Watercolor Pencil.

Last week I finished the year-long revisions to my WIP, The Abyssal Plain. As in: finished, complete, all done. I can't believe this journey is finally over, at least the writing part of it. Soon I plan to begin my marketing, and after that I'm sure there will be more editorial changes to be made at some future date prior to publication. But for now, the book is written and ready to go. Which means I am now officially free to explore some new directions for awhile. So how apropos that I would recently visit a place called Open Space

Open Space is 30,000 undeveloped acres of land situated throughout Albuquerque with the intention that these acres stay wild and free and forever open to the public. Set somewhat in the center of it all is the Open Space Visitor's Center where I met up with the Colored Pencil Society for an afternoon of plein air drawing and painting. 

At first I was a bit nervous--plein air painting has never really been my thing, a topic I wrote about in my post Adventures in Travel Journaling. However, this time I remembered to bring a hat, sandwiches, water, and a sweater, and I was fine. More than fine--I sketched without getting a single bug bite, dirt smudge, or having to run to my car for refuge! 

It was good to be outdoors after all these weeks and months cooped up with my Alphasmart and more red pens than you can count. And it was also good to think about "open space" in more metaphorical and personal terms. For instance, what parts of my creative life can I keep open for new ideas, new methods, new subjects and mediums? Where do I want to stay open in my artwork, and why? And when do I have to follow the rules without neglecting my own individuality? 

These are good questions, and ones that I found myself thinking about while I was sketching the sun on the trees and watching the clouds float by. I also found myself thinking about what I want to do with the rest of this year. Some plans include:
  1. Writing a children's picture book set in Barcelona. 
  2. Designing and painting  illustrations for the book, even if it's just for my own fun. (Note for the curious: Sending a picture book manuscript with illustrations to a publisher is never recommended. Still, that doesn't mean I can't have some input at the end of the day, and the drawing does help me with the writing process.)
  3. Preparing and completing a piece of artwork for the upcoming Colored Pencil Society 2015 show here in Albuquerque--my first ever!
  4. Attending the October SCBWI conference, also here in Albuquerque. (I've signed up for all the picture book workshops.)
  5. Reading. Lots of reading.
  6. And of course, drafting my query and synopsis for The Abyssal Plain so I can begin submitting it to agents and editors early next year.
Looking at my list I almost feel like I'm embarking on a 3-month vacation. So what's on your Open Space list? Drop a line and let me know!

Tip of the Day: Collage can be an excellent way to cultivate and explore your own vision of creative open space. To give yourself plenty of room, try working with a format larger than your usual journal-sized page, for instance, a full-size piece of poster board or construction paper. Don't be in a rush to fill the paper, but do think of what will fill your spirit. Take your time to see what evolves, and what inspires you the most. Keep in mind that this isn't so much about being a "to-do" list as it is about finding what will keep you inspired and happy over the coming months. Enjoy!

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28. Inktober Day 7

Inktober 7

 

Poor Mort, stood up again!

Micron Brush Pen Black & Graphite pencil

 

 

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29. time for a little *plug*....


never used these guys before, but surely will be using them again!!!

thanks so much to easy canvas prints for doing such a FANTASTIC job on some canvas prints of my painting entitled, Moonstruck (PRINTS FOUND THROUGH THE SHOP LINKS HERE-www.theenchantedeasel.com). the colors looks amazing and the quality of the canvas is superb!

will definitely be using them again in the future. highly recommend.

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30. Inktober 6

Inktober 6

 

Inky was such a scaredy cat!

Micron Brush Pen Black & Graphite pencil

#inktober #inktober2014

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31. Inktober 5 #inktober #inktober2014

Inktober 5

It is raining leaves! – Micron Pigma Brush Pen Black & Graphite pencil

 

Autumn leaves are falling to the ground here in Western Massachusetts. The fall colors are becoming more and more vibrant. As I walked on campus yesterday, I noticed the leaves coming down, just like rain. Beautiful!

I purchased a black Micron brand Pigma Brush pen. I really loved the feel of it. It is my first time using a brush pen for inking. I love the loose line it allows yet still with the control of a pen. I will be using it again!

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32. Call for Submissions: The Jet Fuel Review

The Jet Fuel Review is now accepting submissions for our 8th issue. We are an online journal welcoming submissions of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and art. No previously published works are accepted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted. 

The Deadline for submissions is October 15, 2014. 

Fiction: 3,000 words or less
Nonfiction: 3,000 worlds or less
Poetry: 3-5 poems
Art: up to 5 pieces
 


More information concerning the submission process can be found at our website.


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33. Inktober 4

Inktober 4

 

Inktober 4 – Mr. Bones Dancing

Anyone  who knows me well, knows that I LOVE bones! This one was fun to draw. Since it is that time of year, maybe I will find more inspiration to draw Mr. Bones!

Pigma Micron Pen Black Ink 05 and graphite pencil

 

 

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34. Inktober 3

 

Inktober 3

Pigma Micron Pen 05 and graphite pencil

One of the best things about living in New England is the beautiful autumns here. The leaves are just starting to fall to the ground and the colors are so vibrant. It is just beautiful. Here is my third entry for Inktober. I am all caught up now. Hooray!

 

Note: Sorry if I spammed anyone on twitter while I was tweaking my feed burner. Hopefully it is all straightened out.

 

Thanks for stopping by and have a great weekend!

 

 

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35. Madeline & Genevieve sharing some quiet time in the rain. I...



Madeline & Genevieve sharing some quiet time in the rain. I love Madeline, and always have- here’s my tribute to her.



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36. 31 Days of Halloween: Under the Apple Tree by Sarah Winifred Searle

utat 31 Days of Halloween: Under the Apple Tree by Sarah Winifred Searle

Want to read a 96 graphic novel about a young woman and a time travelling ghost for FREE? You can read about the making of the book at the  Under the Apple Tree webpage and download it here.  Cartoonist Sarah Winifred Searle created it as part of a Children’s Writer-in-Residence at the Boston Public Library. here’s the logline:

When sixteen year old Rosie and her mother leave the Boston suburbs and move to a little tourist town in Maine, she is understandably upset. Unfortunately for her, rural life turns out to be more exciting than expected. A bit too exciting, actually.

Rosie must deal with a fate forced upon her by events nearly a century past: she needs to solve the mystery behind the Civil War era soldier who haunts her new home. “Discover the truth,” he pleads, “so I may rest.” Plagued by strange dreams, she digs into the past and discovers secrets about the town. Her mission hits obstacles, however, as she struggles to make friends, find independence, and make it to graduation.

A little mystery, a little magic, a little New England…yep, Halloween is on its way.

 

1 Comments on 31 Days of Halloween: Under the Apple Tree by Sarah Winifred Searle, last added: 10/2/2014
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37. 31 Days of Halloween: Menton3 and 44Flood

monocyte cover1b 31 Days of Halloween: Menton3 and 44Flood

Fall is in the air, bringing a crisp step and the crunch of leaves under foot, and the inevitable—perhaps inescapable—presence of Pumpkin Spice everything all around us! Yes, it’s time for 31 Days of Halloween, The Beat’s annual tribute to our MOST FAVORITEST TIME OF YEAR. And let’s get things going with probably the most obvious link possible…but I have ever written about painter/cartoonist/musician Menton3 on The Beat before so here goes!

Based in Chicago, Menton3—aka Menton J Matthews III—is a painter of atmospheric and disturbing images. While you can find a lot of his work at his website, he’s probably best known these days as a partner in 44Flood, a publishing company that has teamed with IDW to put out art books and comics. Along with fellow artists Kasra Ghanbari, Ben Templesmith and Nick Idell, 44Flood has put out Tome, an artbook which was mostly Kickstarted, Templesmith’s The Squidder, the comic Monocyte, which you see on this page, and Libretto, an anthology of eerieness centering on vampirism. A new volume of Tome is on its way or already here (I couldn’t find a lot of solid news about the bunch.)

Collectively they also do a thing called Monster Mondays, available on the 44Flood webstore, but I’m warning once you start poking around there you’re gonna want to buy something from Menton, Templesmith, Jonathan Wayshack or any number of talented spooky colleagues.

Yep, Halloween is on its way.

Rebis Blur pic 31 Days of Halloween: Menton3 and 44Flood page6 31 Days of Halloween: Menton3 and 44Flood

1 Comments on 31 Days of Halloween: Menton3 and 44Flood, last added: 10/3/2014
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38. Joe Quesada’s Star Wars #1 cover variant revealed

star wars 1 joe quesada cover 1024x791 Joe Quesadas Star Wars #1 cover variant revealed StarWars.com
has unveiled Joe Quesada’s variant cover to Star Wars
#1. The first Marvel issue of the 21st century will debut in
January with story by Jason Aaron, and art by John Cassaday and
Laura Martin. Marrtin colored Quesada’s cover. Marvel’s CCO
wrote:

I was asked to give a quote
about this cover and to tell fans about the first time I saw Star
Wars or how it completely changed my life, but it’s a story I’m
sure isn’t all that interesting when compared to the countless
others that have been told, much more eloquently, by so many before
me,” said Quesada. “While each of us has had our unique moments of
discovery and love affair with the property there’s nothing that I
think I could say or add that hasn’t been said before and
truthfully it really isn’t all that important because It’s that
love for Star Wars that binds all of us who share those unique
moments like the Force itself. That’s why when I was offered the
opportunity to do this cover I was both thrilled beyond belief and
as nervous as I was when I did my very first professional work over
twenty years ago. To have the opportunity to illustrate the classic
cast members in one piece has been by far one of the highlights of
my career as an artist. I can only hope that it turned out okay and
that maybe, just maybe, I get the chance to do it again
someday.

I like it, but no
Jaxxon?

2 Comments on Joe Quesada’s Star Wars #1 cover variant revealed, last added: 10/1/2014
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39. What Shape Is That Story?

This article is a post I wrote for the fabulous Writers Rumpus blog today, September 30th. While recently reading John Green’s Looking for Alaska, I was surprised by the shape of the story. I’ll get to that in a minute, but it reminded me of other authors who played with the structure of their narratives. […]

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40. All’s Well That Ends Well

CalendarBB

 

Do you ever have those days when nothing goes right?  When everything you try does not work? That was my day today, accompanied by a doozer of a headache.  Photoshop just quit on me. I could not open CS5 or CS6.  Finally at the end of the day the Adobe Twitter Support came through!  Hooray! It works!!

While I was waiting for support to write me back I was able to begin writing my stories for Burt ad Briley, my new characters.  Their conversations made me smile.  All’s well that ends well.  I will post another picture soon.

 

 


Filed under: My Characters

4 Comments on All’s Well That Ends Well, last added: 9/30/2014
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41. Call for Submissions: Barking Sycamores

A journal for neurodivergent literature and its craft-- 
 
Barking Sycamores is a literary journal publishing poetry, short fiction (1000 words or less), and art by neurodivergent (autistic, ADHD, bipolar, dyslexic, etc.) writers and artists. 
 
We seek poetry, short fiction, and art for Issue 4, Winter/Spring 2015. Theme: “The Doors of Perception”. Pieces about doors, perception, and vision are welcome as well as ekphrastic work based on the works of William Blake, Aldous Huxley, or the American rock band The Doors. However, in the end, artists may submit poetry, short fiction, and visual art that interpret the theme as broadly or as narrowly as desired. We also seek essays on neurodivergence and how it impacts the creation of literary works. Artwork submitted may be considered for use as cover art. 
 
The philosophy of our journal is unique, so we ask that interested writers consult our submission guidelines before sending any work to us.  
 
Submission period: October 1 – November 30, 2014.

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42. Call for Nonfiction: Passing Through Publications

We are seeking nonfiction submissions about "the road less traveled," however interpreted, for an inaugural issue which will go live in late 2014.

Your piece should be anything related to travel, travelers, wanderlust…a homage to a city or a town… a piece featuring a home, whether attached to the ground or carried on your back… places out of the way and unexpected, the road less traveled but perhaps more loved, and definitely more intriguing.

Submissions should range between 250-1000 words, with a preference for 500 words. Art and photo submissions also welcome. 

Please embed and attach your submissions to emails directly sent to Jessica, the Editor:

jericahahnAThotmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

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43. Call for Submissions: Lunch Ticket

Lunch Ticket is accepting submissions for its Summer/Fall 2014 issue from the following genres: Fiction, Flash Fiction, and Poetry, Writing for Young People, Visual Art, Translation / Multi-lingual texts & Creative Nonfiction. 

Translated submissions: include original work with your translation, and a document showing that you have permission to publish the original work. Original, bilingual work may be submitted under the translation category; please indicate this in your cover letter. The responsibility for clearing rights, permissions for translated works, & the payment of any related fees, lies with the translator. 

For any of the genre guidelines and submission manager (Please follow submission guidelines CAREFULLY), visit our website.

Deadline: October 31, 2014

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44. Call for Submissions: Glassworks

Glassworks, the literary magazine of Rowan University’s Master of Arts in Writing graduate program, invites writers to submit work to be considered for publication.

Glassworks publishes nonfiction, fiction, poetry, hybrid pieces, craft essays, new media, and art both digitally and in print. We are currently reading until December 15, 2014.


More information about the magazine, sample issues, and our submission manager can be found at our website.


Submissions link.

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45. Call for Submissions: Psychopomp Magazine


Psychopomp Magazine, a journal devoted to genre-bending and experimental prose, is now open for free submissions.
 
Please read an issue or two to get a sense of what we're looking for. Surprise us. Ferry us away from the familiar. We like fiction and art. Please visit our website for more information.



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46. Its Fall!


I've been tempted to do this a time or two; at a Wayne Thiebaud exhibit, with a Holbein at the Frick, some stuff at the Met. Didn't try it though.

Its FALL, finally. Now if it would just rain . . .


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47. Show Your Work

Show Your Work!: 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered Austin Kleon

A great follow-up to Steal Like an Artist, which details how to be discovered.

Basically, find your people (easy to do with the interwebs) share a lot (easy to do with the interwebs) don’t be spammy (being spammy is easy to do with the interwebs) and learn to take criticism and stick it out for the long term.

My favorite part was when he says “No Guilty Pleasures” because he means it in the way that you shouldn’t be guilty about your pleasures--if you like it, embrace it.

I also like his emphasis on teaching and sharing skills and inspirations and opening up work processes as well as work products. I love that aspect of online maker culture right now. (I think Pinterest is great for sharing and discovering other people’s inspirations and work.)

Overall, it’s very practical, hands-on advice on how let other people know you’re out there, making things.

It retains the same vibe and design aesthetic of Steal Like an Artist and the two work really well together.

Book Provided by... my local library

Links to Amazon are an affiliate link. You can help support Biblio File by purchasing any item (not just the one linked to!) through these links. Read my full disclosure statement.

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48. The Running Grinder and the Recovery Champ

Within every runner live the Yin Yang twins…the grinder and the ice-cream loving, sloth who lives to watch cartoons. We’ll call the latter the ‘recovery champ’.
runner and lazy girl art
While I jest, because it’s not just ice cream they love but pizza, donuts, burritos, french toast [insert runger fantasies here], there is truth to it.

In order to run hard you’ve got to allow your body to recover just as ‘hard.’ It often takes runners awhile to learn this, often the hard way. Typically everyone goes through the stage where they race every run, a run doesn’t count unless you’ve maxed out, right?! ;) While this usually leads to improvement in the short term, eventually going hard every day will lead down the road of an injured, over-trained, mess.

Without adequate recovery you’ll be too tired to actually run fast. Easy days are important, as are other ways to speed up your recovery. In order to NAIL the days that count, your hard workouts and races, you’ve got to ensure your muscles are able to rebuild and repair themselves between hard sessions.

So there IS an excuse to laze around in your sweats and hit up a Netflix marathon. ;) Recovery is more than just an easy day too, for most mortal runners of the world running isn’t your job so lifestyle choices and how you spend the non-running hours of your day will play a big role in your ability to recover.

Even for the elite runners, they are continually looking for ways to improve their recovery…because chances are there is ALWAYS room for improvement somewhere.

Take a look at your own habits and look for areas you know you could be better at. I’ve made a handy little checklist to give you some ideas of where to start:

* Make sure your easy days COUNT: rely on effort, don’t wear a watch if you have to, you should be able to hold a conversation between breathes on these runs.
* Proper Workout Scheduling: every runner needs to learn their body and how many hard workouts they can handle in a week. As we age we need to learn how to adjust, that may mean turning your ‘week’ into a 10 day cycle.
* Cross Training: I did a whole post HERE about how to maximize training if you know your body can’t handle too many running miles. Cross training on your easy days or as a ‘second run’ can help keep you healthy and allow for an ‘easier’ workout for recovery purposes.
* 30 Minute Refuel: eat a combo of protein and carbs IMMEDIATELY after your runs…especially your hard workouts. Miss this window and recovery rates drop upwards of 60%.
* Nutrition: eating to perform means opting for quality foods, timing them around when you run, and ensuring you get enough nutrients. This means protein, carbs, healthy fats, and overall enough calories to fuel your training demands. Eating to perform also means LIVING, if you’re training hard enough and want a freaking donut, you’ve earned it. Balance comes into play, so I’ll use the analogy of a silo. Fill your body with all the quality nutrients first, then any extra ‘energy demands’ needed to fill the rest of the silo should be up to you. A world without french toast is a dark one.
* Self massage: whole post on that HERE, flush out that lactic acid, keep your body knot-free.
* Hydrate: this is incredibly important regardless of the season, obviously hotter weather requires you to hydrate more and with electrolytes but even in a snow storm you’re losing moisture. Drinking after massage is also important to flush out all that ‘junk’ worked out of your muscles.
* Stretching: tied into self-massage, stay loose, limber, and avoid injuries.
* Time on Your Feet: it’s draining on your legs and energy-zapping, if your job requires you to do lots of ‘work’ know that you may need to adjust your training or learn how it affects you.
* Time on your butt: yea it’s important to rest, BUT office jobs can lead to problems too…too much sitting leads to weak glutes, tight hamstrings, and reduced blood flow. Not good for recovery, so be sure to move around and at least walk around a bit between Netflix marathons.
* Sleep: while I may leave this one for last, this is HUGE!! Sleep is when the body REALLY restores and repairs itself. Skimping on sleep will hamper your recovery, professional runners guard their sleep time and usually take naps too. Make sleep a priority. For those with sleeping problems and insomnia (ugh, join the party!) look for ways to improve the situation or figures out what can sometimes help. Restless nights add up to tired legs and eyebags. ;)

I think that’s a solid list of ways to improve your recovery habits. Start cracking! To let that grinder perform at it’s best, that recovery-er needs to be doing it’s job right too! ;)

—–
New ART is listed and available for prints on my page there…restructured to make things a little easier. As always, anything not shown, email me a request and I’ll get you a print.
—-
1) What are some ways you make recovery a priority?

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49. Artist's Date--With Friends!

Writer's Group friend Elaine Soto choosing something
wonderful from Blue Bead Designs.

I'm a true believer in Julia Cameron's concept of the artist's date, something I've been lucky enough to take advantage of in the last few weeks. But sometimes I like to tweak it up and break the rule of "go somewhere by yourself." Which is exactly what I did with my writer's group last weekend when we went on the Tanoan Studio Tour here in Albuquerque. 

Tanoan is an exquisite gated community of custom homes built around a golf course and country club. Walking through the immaculately landscaped neighborhoods as we made our way from studio to studio was almost as much fun as seeing the artwork! 

Altogether we visited nine home studios:
    1. Margaret Ferrer makes necklaces and earrings with an ethnic flair. Her company is Blue Bead Designs LLC, and she can be reached at (505) 301-2661.
    2. Sandy Miller-Lastra and Diana Swanson work in fused glass. Their imaginative designs range from kitchen cupboard pulls to delicate jewelry pendants. Contact Diana at creationsx2@juno.com or (760) 601-4417.
    3. Carolyn Poole is an artist working in oils as well as other mediums. She paints portraits, landscapes, still life, and . . . pets! Her business postcard features a bull terrier who I swear could double as Swatch of Project Runway. Carolyn's contact info is (505) 828-3909 or crpoole@comcast.net.
    4. Brenda Bowman makes contemporary jewelry with semi-precious gemstones and glass beads. One item she had for sale that really stood out for me were her beaded wineglasses. She had wire wrapped the stems in a variety of colorful beads and patterns, an excellent way to know whose glass is whose at parties. Brenda can be contacted at www.brendasjewels.com
    5. Debi Housley, Heather Housley, Marie Torres Cimarusti. Debi and Heather made beaded and felted crosses and hair ornaments, and Marie has a series of children's picture books. More info about her books can be seen on Marie's Amazon Page.
    6. Jessica Bonzon is a quilter. Besides traditional bed quilts, she also has home items such as place-mats, wall hangings and pot holders for sale. She can be reached at Pieces and Patches, (505) 828-1066.
    7. Karen, Kirsten, and Jenn Swanson had modern paintings, drawings, and decorated bags for sale. The tiny drawstring bags are perfect for storing jewelry purchases!
    8. Rachel Nelson, the organizer of the tour, was selling wreaths, notecards, and paintings based on her photographs of the Tanoan community. She also very kindly gave visitors drilled pine cones ready to be made into bird feeders. Just smother the cones in peanut butter, roll in birdseed and hang in the garden--how cute is that?
    9. Gloria Dial Hightower is a local author writing mystery and adventure novels. Her titles include The Cotton Rope Strangler, In Total Darkness, The Shadow Mountain Murders, and her latest, Simon of Cyrene. The first three, a trilogy, are set in a Country Club community--a lot like where we took our tour, LOL! Books can be ordered from tomglo@comcast.net, or by phone, (505) 345-7192.
    All of the studios generously provided us with snacks, water, and juice (much needed and appreciated by the time we arrived at each stop. The Albuquerque sun becomes pretty hot after an hour or two.). Heat aside, though, it was a glorious day, indeed, and I was so grateful for the opportunity to share it with my writing friends. Thank you everyone for the fun and hospitality! Looking forward to our next adventure.


    Yay! Earrings!

    Fused glass from Sandy Miller-Lastra and Diana Swanson
    All that color was just luscious.

    Blue and orange--always my favorite pair of 
    complementary colors.

    Fall is in the air with Pieces and Patches.

    Tip of the Day: Taking the time to see what other artists, writers, and craftspeople are creating in their individual fields is just as important as setting aside time for your own work. Whether you take your artist's date on your own, or make it an event to share with friends, just make sure you go. Now is a particularly good time for exploring as there are so many shows and exhibits planned with the holidays in mind. (P.S. Shows make great places to find those holiday gifts, too!)

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    50. moonstruck

    "moosntruck"
    ©the enchanted easel 2014
    so happy to finally share this painting...considering it's been done for a couple of weeks already. was trying to wait closer to october, but i couldn't wait any longer! 

    based on my FAVORITE tim burton character ever (from the nightmare before christmas), the sweetly shy seamstress filled with fall leaves, sally...and her faithful black kitty companion. together they are clearly "moonstruck". :)

    PRINTS (AND OTHER TREATS) AVAILABLE THROUGH THE SHOP LINKS FOUND HERE:

    happy EARLY halloween and happy fall (thank God-bye bye summer, you won't be missed!)!!!

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