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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: harry potter, Most Recent at Top [Help]
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1. Warner Bros. Grants Permission For Students to Adapt ‘The Tale of the Three Brothers’

The students from the New England School of Communications will create a short film adaptation of J.K. Rowling’s short story, “The Tale of the Three Brothers.”

This short story can be found in two Rowling books: Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows and The Tales of Beedle the Bard fairy tale collection. We’ve embedded the first trailer above–what do you think?

The filmmakers have been granted permission from Warner Bros. to create this project. The team will screen the full film on May 04, 2014 at Husson University’s Gracie Theatre. Follow this link to watch behind-the-scenes videos. (via The Harry Potter Alliance)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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2. Warner Bros. to Create Three Movies For the ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’ Film Franchise

rowlingWarner Bros. will create a total of three moves for the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them film franchise.

According to The New York Times, “the main character will be a ‘magizoologist’ named Newt Scamander. The stories, neither prequels or sequels, will start in New York about seven decades before the arrival of Mr. Potter and his pals.”

Earlier this year, author J.K. Rowling sat for a Wonderland magazine interview with actress Emma Watson, best known for playing Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter movies. Rowling revealed that when she first started thinking about Newt’s back story, she didn’t intend on writing the script. She ended up finishing her first rough draft in just twelve days. (via IGN)

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3. ‘History of Quidditch’ Part 2 Posted on Pottermore.com

527862_552519414782427_1463657314_nPottermore.com, the digital platform dedicated to Harry Potter, has posted the second part of J.K. Rowling’s “History of the Quidditch World Cup.”

The first part, released last week on March 14th, detailed the historical background of the Quidditch World Cup competition. According to the press release, the new material contains recaps of each tournament that was held from 1990 to 2010.

Rowling’s intention with part two is to “amuse and entertain sport-lovers and Harry Potter fans alike with its witty descriptions of a game that has many parallels in the real, ‘Muggle’ world.” Readers will learn “which small country managed to beat China in a furiously contested match lasting 3 days” and “which ‘Seeker’ had a short-lived stint as Burkina Faso’s Minister for Magic following his team’s win.” Have you ever played the Muggle version of Quidditch?

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4. J.K. Rowling Shares History of Quidditch on Pottermore.com

pottermore.comPottermore.com, the digital platform dedicated to Harry Potter, has posted J.K. Rowling’s first “History of the Quidditch World Cup.” The 2,400-word history gives color to the game played by witches and wizards in the book series.

The story is one  of the longest Rowling has written for the site, since it launched in 2012. The piece  will be available in two sections over the next week. The first part is up today, the second part will post next Friday. Here is an excerpt:

According to the Official Guide to the Quidditch World Cup – produced by the International Confederation of Wizards Quidditch Committee (ICWQC) and available through all reputable wizarding bookstores for what many feel is the ridiculously overpriced sum of thirty nine Galleons – the tournament has been held every four years since 1473. As with so much else about the wizarding world’s most important sporting competition, many query the accuracy of this statement.

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5. Fusenews: Nailed It!

TardisGingerbread Fusenews: Nailed It!Don’t you hate it when you’ve saved oodles of links for a Fusenews only to find your computer apparently ate them without informing you?  Fun times.  So if I promised some of you that I’d post something and then I didn’t, remind me of the fact.  Clearly me brain is running on fumes.

  • Stop.  Before you go any farther I will show you something that will make you laugh.  It is this post by my sister on making a particularly unique gingerbread creation.  If nothing else the photos at the end will make you snort in a distinctly unladylike manner.
  • Please remind me the next time I wish to garner outrage to simply tap Philip Pullman.  The man has sway.  Big time sway.
  • This is fun:

The SCBWI is proud to announce the winner and honor recipients of the 2013 Jane Yolen Mid-List Author Award.  Congratulations to winner Eve Feldman, author of such works asBilly and Milly Short and Silly (Putnam) and Dog Crazy (Tambourine).  Eve has been a children’s book author and SCBWI member for over twenty years.  To learn more about Eve visit www.evebfeldman.com.

Two Honor Grants were also awarded to authors Verla Kay and Deborah Lynn Jacobs.  Verla Kay is the author of Civil War Drummer Boy (Putnam) and Hornbooks and Inkwells(Putnam) among others.  Learn more at www.verlakay.com.  Deborah Lynn Jacobs is the author of the young adult novels Choices (Roaring Brook Press) and Powers (Square Fish).  Learn more at www.deborahlynnjacobs.com.

  • Gift giving to a young ‘un when you yourself are without young ‘uns?  Well, this post A Message to Those Without Children is dead on.  She doesn’t mention alternatives but I can: What about books instead?  Board books!  Give it a whirl, prospective gift givers.

HPclothes 173x300 Fusenews: Nailed It!

  • The most amusing part of this Harry Potter Swimsuit Line to my mind isn’t the content so much as it is the models they got to wear the outfits.  Most of them don’t seem to have any clue what they’re wearing.  However, #2 in the Snape dress model appears to have been cast solely for the part and #3 has the decency to look slightly embarrassed to be there at all.  Thanks to Liz Burns for the link.
  • Speaking of HP, we all knew that the covers of the Harry Potter books were being re-illustrated here in the States.  But how many of us knew that the Brits were planning on releasing full-color illustrated books with art by Jim Kay?  Does the name Jim Kay ring a bell for you, by the way?  You might be thinking of the art he did for A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness.  That was a far cry from that cutesy Harry picture included in the article.  Suddenly I can’t wait to see what the man can do with Dementors.  Thanks to Ben Collinsworth for the link.

 

  • Daily Image:

Doggone it.  Yet again I delayed posting my Fusenews a day and failed to mention Jarrett Krosoczka’s Joe and Shirl Scholarship Auction in time.  Sorry Jarrett!  Fortunately, the man is no stranger to auctions of every stripe.  This past Sunday there was a big fundraiser for First Book Manhattan at Symphony Space.  The actors involved were HUGE and Jarrett was the lucky guy who got to host (he even played Glowworm to Paul Giamatti’s Centipede).

As part of the fun, Jarrett created this cool art. The Dahl estate then signed off on it to be auctioned off to continue to benefit First Book.  Like what you see?  Then buy here!

 CharlieChocolate Fusenews: Nailed It!

JamesGiant Fusenews: Nailed It!

Witches Fusenews: Nailed It!

Bidding ends on Friday at 5 p.m.

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6. Films Now, Books First

What are your favorite book-to-film adaptations? Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, The Book Thief? Anxious for the movie version of Divergent? Can't wait to see the next installment of The Hobbit? Leave a comment at Allie's latest Teens Wanna Know article!
 

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7. The Book Review Club - Magic Marks the Spot

The Very Nearly Honorable
League of Pirates
Book 1: Magic Marks the Spot
by Caroline Carlson
Middle Grade

To say I have been waiting for this book's release like a dog waiting for a mouthwatering steak is, well, an understatement. Caroline and I were fellow classmates at Vermont College. Go Extraordinary League of Cheese Sandwiches!

I had the awesome pleasure of getting to hear an excerpt of Magic Marks the Spot during our last residency. To say the deck was stacked in favor of my liking this book is to state the obvious. But don't let my bias sway you (much :-) My girls were there too, and they were literally lining up to buy the not-yet-sold ms before the reading was over.

This is one of those books you dream about coming along. The one you'd dearly love to write and happily disappear in when you found someone else has.

Basic plot: Hilary wants to be a pirate. Her father, the admiral, is for obvious reasons grandly opposed. Her mother, a member of high society, is swooningly opposed. Hilary's magical gargoyle, and sidekick, is swashbuckingly not. The two escape boarding school to try out their piratical-ness on the high seas and find adventure galore.

Got your google browser open to download a copy?

Carlson keeps the reader magically entertained while at the same choosing Pirates of the Caribbean humor over blood and gore, which, for young readers, is such a godsend. There is no persisting nightmares in which dementors chase said child, or take up residence in her closet (which happened many many nights to my youngest after we read one of the Harry Potter books). Instead, there is laughter and merriment and general tomfoolery all around. 

From a writer's perspective, admittedly, the lack of gore and ever present possibility of sudden death  gentles the emotional ride for readers. At the same time, a young reader isn't emotionally put through the ringer either.

If for no other reason than authorly curiosity, read the story and ask yourself, what does this mean to have a plot that doesn't hinge on pain of death, but rather, uses humor to skirt the darkness that could overwhelm? It's definitely had me thinking for a long long while.

While I sit in my ivory tower and mull, check out Barry Summy's website for an autumnal gourd o' reading plenty!

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8. Fusenews: That’s what I get for ignoring copyright

Happy Columbus Day to you!  I’ve not particularly insightful encapsulations of the day to offer you, though if you’d like to read some preview posts I’ve done on the day (completely with book recommendations) feel free to go here.

  • I will start today with this rather interesting post about a recent brouhaha that arose when a Macalester College student created a spoken word piece called “To JK Rowling, From Cho Chang”.  The internet being what it is you could certainly predict the nasty flaming war that would occur in the wake of her talk, particularly when the video went viral.  What makes the whole incident singular, to my mind, is the student’s response.  She sat down and calmly discussed the top five point folks made about her piece.  She admitted mistakes, reinforced certain points, and basically acted like a civilized grown-up.  The internet is shockingly devoid of civilized grown-ups these days, so in some small part of my brain I wish that high schools around the country could show kids this piece and teach them about internet etiquette in the 21st century.  Own up and also stand up for your beliefs.  It’s a hard lesson and this woman did it with class.  Bravo.
  • Now even before I read Travis Jonker’s fun post, I was aware that the Fuse channel had created something called Fuse News.  I can’t blame them.  It’s a catchy phrase.  Travis’s post is notable, by the way, because it manages to incorporate the phrase “Way to ruin my joke, Weird Al” completely within context.  And just so long as they don’t sue me for the term, we should be fine.  A Google search of the term “Fusenews” yields only them anyway.
  • Flowcharts.  We’re crazy about them.  After my little Noodle flowchart got such nice press I heard from a lot of librarians the cry, “Why can’t we do that?”  Turns out, you can.  I was alerted not so long ago to this cool Which YA Novel Is Right for You?  Feel free to fill in the blanks and come up with your very own personalized flowchart.  Fun for patrons and librarians alike.
  • I’m sure you already saw it at PW Children’s Bookshelf, but how clever were they to interview Elisha Cooper about his contemporary picture book Train alongside Brian Floca and his nonfiction picture book Locomotive.  Someone asked me the other day if Floca might be in the running for a Newbery.  It hadn’t occurred to me before but now . . . oh boy, I hope so.
  • Got the following note the other day and it’s a fun idea for small pubs.  A bit too small for its own press release, I’ll just post it here.

Beginning on Thursday, 10/10/13, at 10AM EST an original apple will be revealed every day until 11/10/13.  Readers, librarians, booksellers, and educators who follow Blue Apple Books on Facebook or Twitter are invited to guess the name of the artist who created the apple.  Whoever is first to guess correctly on either social network will receive a Blue Apple book illustrated by that artist.

Facebook page:
Twitter page:
  • Looks like we’re trendsetters.  First over at NYPL I help make the 100 Great Children’s Books list of the last 100 years. Note, we do not call it the “Best”.  However, Booktrust, a UK reading charity, had no such qualms about the word, coming up with their own 100 Best Books for Children.  Then I hear about the Grolier Club and their December 2014 exhibit on One Hundred Famous Children’s Books (which, to be fair, they’ve been working on since 2010). And then here in the States I couldn’t help but notice the eyebrow-raising title 100 best books for kids: NYPL vs P&C.  Come again?  Far less inflammatory than the title suggests, the post does a nice job of crediting both lists and what they do.  Of course, they do say at one point “Parent & Child‘s list was carefully curated by editors who know well many beloved children’s books from reading them to their own kids (and growing up on them!). The New York Public Library’s list was informed by top books of the past 100 years.”  Um.  Well, yes.  But we ALSO have kids that we’ve read these to.  Nothing got on the NYPL that isn’t actually being read to kids and that they’re actively asking for.  But then the piece notes the books we included that they didn’t, and that’s a pretty gutsy move.  Well played, P&C.
  • So Comic Con has ended here in NYC.  For those of you went and attended on the professional development day, you might have seen my co-worker Amie Wright.  She was presenting on “Comics & the Common Core: The Case to Include Comics in the Curriculum”.  And though it isn’t the same as seeing her live and in person, you can dip through her PowerPoint and see the titles and tips she’s included.
  • Daily Image:

With the backlog of images at my disposal I shouldn’t fall down on the job and cave to this.  But what can I say?  My will is weak.

BrideCat 500x312 Fusenews: Thats what I get for ignoring copyright

Yes. It’s from a site called Brides Throwing Cats where bridal bouquets have been Photoshopped out and cats have been Photoshopped in.  You’re welcome.

printfriendly Fusenews: Thats what I get for ignoring copyrightemail Fusenews: Thats what I get for ignoring copyrighttwitter Fusenews: Thats what I get for ignoring copyrightfacebook Fusenews: Thats what I get for ignoring copyrightgoogle plus Fusenews: Thats what I get for ignoring copyrighttumblr Fusenews: Thats what I get for ignoring copyrightshare save 171 16 Fusenews: Thats what I get for ignoring copyright

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9. The Five Series I Most Look Forward to Reading with My Daughter

FiveSeriesI wrote a couple of weeks ago about my three-year-old daughter's newly expressed interest in being read chapter books, in addition to her regular diet of picture books and early readers. I asked people on the post and on Facebook to share titles that they had read with their children while were still pre-readers. I collected a number of titles, and was especially pleased to be reminded of a post that Melissa Wiley wrote a couple of years on this very topic (Chapter book suggestions for a four-year-old). Out of these suggestions, and my own opinions, I've come up with a list of the top five series I most look forward to reading with my daughter. They are (in approximate age order):

1. The Clementine Books by Sara Pennypacker (ill. Marla Frazee). I absolutely adore Clementine. I think she is a wonderful character, and that the books are spot on in terms of both realism and humor. Frazee's illustrations perfectly capture Clementine for me, too. And there are enough illustrations that I think Baby Bookworm will be ready for the first book soon. In fact I just ordered a new copy, because I apparently gave mine away (back in the days before I knew that I'd have a daughter to read it to, I suspect). And as a bonus, the books are set in Boston, where my family's pro sports loyalties will forever lie. 

2. The Pippi Longstocking Books by Astrid Lindgren. My daughter has a 3-year-old's love of the ridiculous. I think that she'll be as charmed by the irrepressible Pippi as I was. And perhaps she'll be inspired by the way that Pippi solves her own problems. Pippi gives new meaning to the term "strong girl." My second grade class did Pippi as a class play, with my friend Holly as Pippi (her real braids manipulated out to the sides with a coat hanger or something). I was Annika, and I'll never forget it. 

I also splurged on the DVD boxed set of the four Pippi movies from the 1970s. This was more for me than for Baby Bookworm, in truth (though she adores movies), because I have fond memories of my dad taking my siblings and I (or probably just my next-youngest brother and I) to see them in the theater. Pippi in the South Seas was my favorite of the movies, and I look forward to seeing it again (after we read the book). 

3. The Little House Books by Laura Ingalls Wilder (ill. Garth Williams). This was the first series that I remember reading on my own, devouring book after book. Little House in the Big Woods will forever be the first middle grade title that Baby Bookworm expressed a serious interest in reading (admittedly inspired by Little House in the Big Woods paper dolls). So it is naturally on our Top 5 list. But as we've progressed in attempting to read the first book, it's become clear that she's more interested in hearing the stories associated with some of the pictures than in actually listening to the whole book right now. No worries. The books will wait. 

4. The Penderwicks Books by Jeanne Birdsall. I adore The Penderwicks. To me these books are modern classics, with the characterization and emotional resonance of the Elizabeth Enright books (childhood favorites of mine), but with a more up-to-date feel. Clearly 4-year-old Batty will be Baby Bookworm's favorite character, if we read the books any time within the next few years, but I imagine that one day she will identify with Jane or Skye or eventually Rosalind. These are books I'd like to read with her while she's in elementary school, when she's old enough to discuss Rosalind's crush, and Jeffrey's loneliness. But young enough to feel the endless potential of summer in the first book. 

5. The Harry Potter Books by J.K. Rowling (ill. Mary GrandPre). OK, this one is a bit of a cliche. But really, who doesn't look forward to reading the Harry Potter books with their child? I did, in fact, read Baby Bookworm the first book when she was an infant, but I look forward to her being old enough to appreciate the story. I don't want to start too soon, because the later books are pretty dark, and I know that once we start we're likely to want to keep going. But I do look forward to spending time with my daughter in Harry Potter's world. In fact, I think this one will be a family affair, because I can't imagine my husband not wanting to participate, too. 

There are lots of other books that I hope to read with my Baby Bookworm when the time is right. I hope that she will be as captivated by the work of Elizabeth Enright and Zilpha Keatley Snyder as I was, and am. I imagine that she'll love The Borrowers. I hope that she doesn't find A Little Princess or The Secret Garden dated. I hope that we are able to read book after book after book together. I think that there are some books that she'll enjoy more if she discovers them on her own (though I can't say which ones off the top of my head). But the above five are the series that I am most looking forward to sharing with her. Perhaps in a future post I'll look at some standalone titles (Matilda, perhaps?).

What books do you look forward to reading aloud with your children? What books did you enjoy when they were younger? If you've already been through it, don't you kind of envy me, having all of these books still ahead of us? An unintentional upside to having a child late in life. Thanks for reading!

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook. This site is an Amazon affiliate. 

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10. More Harry Potter-ish films on the way from J.K. Rowling and WB

201309121038.jpg
Don’t call it a prequel. WB and J.K. Rowling have agreed to make more films set in the Harry Potter universe. The first film will be written by Rowling herself and based on Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, a slim volume of lore taken from the Potterverse (invented word). The film will star Newt Scamander, a cryptozoology-obsessed wizard who eventually became headmaster of Hogwarts.

The films will be set 70 years before the start of the Potter books, and the movie opens in New York, according to Rowling. “Although it will be set in the worldwide community of witches and wizards where I was so happy for seventeen years, ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’ is neither a prequel nor a sequel to the Harry Potter series, but an extension of the wizarding world,” said Rowling. “The laws and customs of the hidden magical society will be familiar to anyone who has read the Harry Potter books or seen the films.”

Rowling’s notes on the science, magic and backstory of her invented world are voluminous, so these movies can go on forever, much to WB’s relief. Who needs superheroes when you’ve got the Potterverse?

The new tale will be spun out into a video game, consumer products, and digital initiatives. No comic books, though—to be fair, Rowling does not allow any ‘extended universe’ type stuff for her world. She writes it all.

These new movies sounds fine to me. More cute beasts, adorably named foodstuffs, and cranky old wizards. In other words, instead of letting Peter Jackson do the fanfic prequel extension, Rowling is doing it herself. We’ve already bought a ticket.

12 Comments on More Harry Potter-ish films on the way from J.K. Rowling and WB, last added: 9/13/2013
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11. How To Promote your Book While Using Pseudonym

I just finished reading an article related to the recent revelations about the author of  The Cuckoo’s Calling, and was amused by Jody Picout’s comment:  “She wouldn’t have been able to go out and promote the book.”   But, taking a cue from Lemony Snicket and Daniel Handler, maybe she could.

Scene: the event section of a book store.  There is a happy buzz as an enthusiastic crowd of mystery readers wait  for the author, a debut writer, to arrive.  Their conversations are about the writer’s intriguing background, how much they enjoyed the book, and what might be next for him.  The book store owner comes to the front and the crowd stops their discussion to look expectantly at him.

“I am delighted you are all here tonight. I have bad news and good news.  The bad news is that Mr. Gailbraith is unable to attend tonight (groans and cries of dismay from the crowd).  The good news is his representative Ms. R. is here in his stead. “

There is stunned silence from the crowd as an attractive blonde woman makes her way to the front. “I am so sorry that Mr. Gailbraith couldn’t be here. His current work as an independent contractor in civilian security means that his safety and that of his clients could be compromised if he was seen here. However, I am very close to him and can answer any questions you might have about him.  You sir, in the first row.”

“What are Mr. Gailbraith’s favorite books?”

“Well, he likes a great variety — mysteries (of course), thrillers, classics, and even children’s books.  A book he recently read and enjoyed was  “The Vanishing Point” by Val McDermid.”

“Where does Mr. Gailbraith get his ideas?”

They pop into his head on long train journeys.”

Has he read Harry Potter?

“I believe his children have. He was overseas when the final book came out though so I don’t know if how he felt about the ending.”

The bookstore owner comes back.  ”Thank you for those questions. Ms. R will now sign books on behalf of Mr. Gailbraith.  She will ONLY sign The Cuckoo’s Calling — one per person.”


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12. How To Promote your Book While Using a Pseudonym

I just finished reading an article related to the recent revelations about the author of  The Cuckoo’s Calling, and was amused by Jody Picout’s comment:  “She wouldn’t have been able to go out and promote the book.”   But, taking a cue from Lemony Snicket and Daniel Handler, maybe she could.

Scene: the event section of a book store.  There is a happy buzz as an enthusiastic crowd of mystery readers wait  for the author, a debut writer, to arrive.  Their conversations are about the writer’s intriguing background, how much they enjoyed the book, and what might be next for him.  The book store owner comes to the front and the crowd stops their discussion to look expectantly at him.

“I am delighted you are all here tonight. I have bad news and good news.  The bad news is that Mr. Gailbraith is unable to attend tonight (groans and cries of dismay from the crowd).  The good news is his representative Ms. R. is here in his stead. “

There is stunned silence from the crowd as an attractive blonde woman makes her way to the front. “I am so sorry that Mr. Gailbraith couldn’t be here. His current work as an independent contractor in civilian security means that his safety and that of his clients could be compromised if he was seen here. However, I am very close to him and can answer any questions you might have about him.  You sir, in the first row.”

“What are Mr. Gailbraith’s favorite books?”

“Well, he likes a great variety — mysteries (of course), thrillers, classics, and even children’s books.  A book he recently read and enjoyed was  “The Vanishing Point” by Val McDermid.”

“Where does Mr. Gailbraith get his ideas?”

They pop into his head on long train journeys.”

Has he read Harry Potter?

“I believe his children have. He was overseas when the final book came out though so I don’t know if how he felt about the ending.”

The bookstore owner comes back.  ”Thank you for those questions. Ms. R will now sign books on behalf of Mr. Gailbraith.  She will ONLY sign The Cuckoo’s Calling — one per person.”


1 Comments on How To Promote your Book While Using a Pseudonym, last added: 7/19/2013
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13. New Harry Potter Covers!


In wizard news from last week, Scholastic released a new Harry Potter cover to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's/Philosopher's Stone. The designer is Kazu Kibuishi, and the covers will appear on the trade paperback version of the books. Hollywood.com had an interview with Kibuishi, who is the author of the Amulet YA graphic novel series.

What do you think of the new vision? Do you have a preference between the new and old?

25 Comments on New Harry Potter Covers!, last added: 2/27/2013
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14. Scholastic Unveils New Cover for Harry Potter & the Sorcerer’s Stone


Scholastic has unveiled the first of seven new covers for a set of U.S. trade paperback editions of J.K. Rowling‘s Harry Potter series. The new editions will come out in September.

Amulet graphic novel artist Kazu Kibuishi created the covers. What do you think? Kibuishi explained his process in the release:

When I was asked to submit samples, I initially hesitated because I didn’t want to see them reinterpreted!  However, I felt that if I were to handle the project, I could bring something to it that many other designers and illustrators probably couldn’t, and that was that I was also a writer of my own series of middle grade fiction. As an author myself, I tried to answer the question, ‘If I were the author of the books – and they were like my own children – how would I want them to be seen years from now?’

continued…

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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15. Harry Potter Characters Critique the Super Bowl

While the entire country tuned into the Super Bowl last night, a number of Harry Potter characters followed the action on Twitter.

We’ve embedded a complete collection of these Harry Potter-themed posts below. If you thought that the evil Lord Voldemort caused the power outage at the New Orleans football game or rooted for the Voldemort Raisins, you should read these tweets.

Harry Potter tweets still rule the Internet. Last February, the Professor Snape Twitter feed (a parody account dedicated to the famous Harry Potter character) published the most popular tweet of the Academy Awards.

continued…

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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16. You Know You’re a Harry Potter Fan When

HarrypotterthumbWriting Prompt: You know you're a Harry Potter fan when. . .

We know who we are. Some people might call us obsessed. Some people might call us crazy. But when it comes to Harry Potter, there's nothing wrong with that!! How do you recognize other Potterheads? What are the signs of a TRUE Harry Potter fan?

Here are just a few symptoms of Harry Potter obsession. . .

  • You know what house you’re in and you have a scarf with your house colors on it. (You’ve taken the sorting hat quizzes a million different times!)
  • You’ve tried every flavor of Bertie Bott’s Every Flavor Beans. Even earwax and vomit.
  • You were a wizard for Halloween. 5 years in a row.
  • When you check the mail, you look around for owls, desperately hoping for your Hogwarts letter.
  • You started a Dumbledore's Army club at your school to fight real-world problems.
  • You stand up and shout at the movie screen, “That’s not what happened in the book!”
  • You've lost track of how many times you have read each book, but you know it's more than 10.
  • You are seriously thinking about naming your future son Albus Severus.
  • You have a birthday party for Harry every year on July 31.
  • You screamed very loudly when you heard that J.K. Rowling might write another children's book.

Now it’s YOUR turn to complete this sentence in the Comments. You know you’re a Harry Potter fan when . . .

—Ratha, Stacks Writer

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17. Which Door Would You Choose?


You find yourself in front of seven identical doors. A voice from above tells you, "These seven doors lead to seven different places: Narnia, Neverland, Wonderland, Hogwarts, Camelot, Middle Earth, and Westeros." Which door do you go through? Why that door? What happens?
 

I would go through the door to Wonderland without hesitation. I have always loved Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and count it as one of my top ten books of all time. The character of Alice and I have a lot in common, beginning with our curiosity and continuing with our adoration of cats, a thirst for knowledge, and sheer determination. I would love to wander through Wonderland and interact with different characters from the books, especially the White Rabbit, the Gryphon, and the Cheshire Cat. I'd rescue the hedgehogs from the croquet games and delight in the chess game. Plus, I really love the hallway of doors in Wonderland. 

Read more at my blog, Bildungsroman. 

Which door would YOU choose?


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18. The Art of Breaking Breaking Dawn

From The Hobbit to Harry Potter, Hollywood loves dividing popular novels into two separate films.

With the second adaptation of Stephenie Meyer‘s Breaking Dawn coming to theaters this weekend, we caught up with screenwriter Melissa Rosenberg to find out what it was like to break the novel into two pieces.

She explained in an email interview: “There was a very natural place at which to break the two books.  The second movie needed a little filling out, but the book itself offered many possibilities for that.  Because the book is all told from Bella’s point of view, things sometimes happen off the page and are related by Bella after the fact — for instance, when Jacob tells her father she’s a werewolf.  In the book, Bella finds out about this conversation after it happened, but in adapting the movie, I got to write the conversation itself.”

continued…

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19. Thoughts on Newbery: Focus on the Book…

…not the creator.  Having been on one of the Newberry committees I can say with complete certainty that this is what happens.  Committee members are looking intently at the books through the lens of the official criteria. They absolutely DO NOT consider the authors, illustrators, editors, or anything else of that nature.  They are looking full-on at the work and nothing else.

However, those of us outside the committee room are aware of those creators and it can be hard to not think about the love and thought and care they put into their books when considering them in terms of awards.  But I believe it is important to understand that this cannot be considered, not just for Newbery but other awards like the National Book Award too, I would guess.

This came to mind as I read Ian Parker’s New Yorker profile of J. K. Rowling, “Mugglemarch,” some of the responses to it (say this one), and now the first reviews of The Casual Vacancy.  While it is pretty impossible for any competent reviewer (and here we could get into the whole debate about reviewing but I won’t) to consider this title without considering Rowling and Harry Potter, those on a committee that works as does the Newbery would absolutely have to do just that.


2 Comments on Thoughts on Newbery: Focus on the Book…, last added: 9/29/2012
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20. J.K. Rowling May Write a ‘Director’s Cut’ Version of Two Harry Potter Books

While promoting A Causal Vacancy, J.K. Rowling revealed a few juicy Harry Potter tidbits.

Deadline reported that Rowling may write another story set in the Harry Potter wizarding world that does not star The Boy Who Lived. She is also pondering a “director’s cut” version of two installments from the Harry Potter series, writing them them with more “finesse.”

Would you read the director’s cut of Harry Potter?

continued…

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21. J.K. Rowling Breaks Goodreads Record

The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling set a Goodreads record for the all-time biggest “started reading” day. Currently, more than 40,000 people have marked the book “to-read.”

The book unseated Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins as the book with the strongest “started reading” day. Insurgent by Veronica Roth holds third place. As of this writing, The Casual Vacancy has 38 percent five-star ratings on Goodreads.

Goodreads CEO Otis Chandler had this statement: “The Casual Vacancy is one of those stand-out books where people not only pre-order it, they start reading it as soon as they get their hands on it. On Goodreads, it beat the record for our previous all-time ‘started reading’ day which was set by Mockingjay.”

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22. J.K. Rowling Sells 375,000 Copies of The Casual Vacancy in 6 Days

In just six days, J.K. Rowling has sold 375,000 copies in all formats of her new novel for adults.

Little, Brown and Company publisher Michael Pietsch explained in a statement: “The Casual Vacancy has exceeded our expectations in its first six days in stores, selling 375,000 copies in all formats.  We believe it is on track to become the year’s bestselling novel in hardcover.”

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23. J.K. Rowling Harry Potter Webcast

Jkr_130J.K. Rowling Webcast: Beyond the Page

Thursday, October 11, 2012. It's noon at the STACKS office. STACKS Staffer Karen is proudly wearing her Hufflepuff pin, and we have cupcakes — because this is a party! Harry Potter author, J.K. Rowling will be speaking live from Scotland, and I am hoping, hoping, hoping that she will talk about what book she is writing next.

The webcast starts with a slideshow history of her beautiful city Edinburgh, Scotland. Did you know that Gilderoy Lockhart was named after a church in Edinburgh? There is also a St. Mungo’s Church in Edinburgh. Hmmmm. . . . That sounds familiar too.

Rowling says she always knew in her heart of hearts she would be a writer. She wrote her first story called “Rabbit” when she was 6 years old, which is impressive because she not only started it, but she finished it. She says, “Beginning a story is easy, but actually finishing it is more difficult.” She should know. It took her 17 years to finish the Harry Potter series!

She talks about some of her favorite moments while writing the Harry Potter books:

  • Luna Lovegood’s first appearance
  • The graveyard scene in Goblet of Fire
  • Peeves’ jingles
  • Harry’s first visit to Ollivander’s shop (which she wrote while sitting under a tree in a park)

Rowling also talks about Pottermore, the online world she created for the Harry Potter books. Rowling herself is actually a participant in Pottermore! She won’t reveal her username, so she could be anybody on the site! You might have even sent her a message! She was sorted into Gryffindor House. Of course, she wrote the Sorting Hat questions, so she could have put herself into any house she wanted, but she said she answered the questions honestly so she really is a Gryffindor.

The most controversial question came from a student who asked how Rowling responds to kids’ disappointment when they get sorted into Hufflepuff. (STACKS Staffer Karen puts her hands on her hips and gets very indignant at this question.) Well, it turns out that Hufflepuff is J.K. Rowling’s favorite house! Hufflepuff has produced the fewest number of dark wizards and they showed their loyalty during the Battle of Hogwarts in the number of students willing to stay and fight Voldemort. Rowling’s oldest daughter Jessica even said, “I think we should all want to be Hufflepuffs.” That made Karen really happy.

Next the interviewer did a bunch of rapid-fire questions.

  • Favorite color: Pink
  • Favorite food: Sushi
  • Least favorite food: Tripe
  • Favorite sound: The sea and “my husband’s snoring”
  • Least favorite sound: “My husband’s snoring when I’m trying to sleep”
  • Favorite sport: Quidditch
  • Favorite things to do: Take the kids somewhere fun, draw, listen to music, cook, bake
  • Quality You Most Admire: Bravery
  • Fill in the blank: If I wasn’t a writer, I would be _depressed__.

Now we come to my 2nd favorite part of the interview when Rowling says that her next book will “likely be for children.” !! This is only my 2nd favorite part because she isn’t 100% sure yet and she doesn’t say anything about it being Harry Potter-related. Still, there is a chance that we may someday have another children’s book by the amazing J. K. Rowling! That is enough to get me excited.

My favorite part of the whole interview came at the end when Rowling talks about what she hopes kids take away from the Harry Potter books and why she loves books. She says, “What I take away from my favorite books is the knowledge that there is always somewhere you can go that you love and where you’re safe. . . . Wherever I am, if I’ve got that book with me, I’ve got a place I can go and be happy. If that place is Hogwarts for anyone, then I couldn’t be more honored or more humbled.”

I’m in awe. Hope you enjoyed my recap of the J.K. Rowling webcast. You can watch the entire video webcast for yourself, but give yourself a lot of time because it's 50 minutes long. Totally worth it though! Leave a Comment with your thoughts.

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24. J.K. Rowling’s Next Book Probably a Book for Children

Author J.K. Rowling revealed that her next book would likely be for young readers, chatting with fans in a webcast hosted by Scholastic.

During the virtual event, which drew more than a million Harry Potter fans, Rowling discussed her next writing project. She said, “The next thing I publish is likely to be a book for children. The reason, I’m not committing myself wholeheartedly, is because after fifteen years of being a writer for Harry Potter, where you would say something and someone would cease on it and say, ‘You are definitely doing that now.’ And you kind of thought you weren’t allowed to change your mind. And it got a little intense, so I try not to commit myself with my plan. So I’m not 100 percent sure about doing it, but I think it will be a book slightly more for children.” continued…

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25. It's All About Character


Yes, yes, I know, plot is important too. But think about it, why are the popular books popular? Because the readers identify with the hero. Is the hero a vampire, hobbit, or alien? Could be. But that doesn't mean we can't identify. 

No matter what world your story is set in, no matter what situation your character is in, it is the thoughts, feelings, and interactions with others that make the story worth investing time in. Take HP for example. Yes it would be awesome to discover we have wizard powers and can go to Hogwarts, but it's the relationships between Harry and the others that keep us reading. It's wanting to see this likable kid who's had a bad time of it come out on top. 

Can we the readers identify with Harry? Of course! Are we wizards? Did we grow up in a broom cupboard under the stairs? Probably not, but we've sure been the odd man out at times. We know what it's like to be the underdog or feel inadequate or awkward, right? 

When you write, you have to draw on those experiences and emotions you've experienced. Even if say, you're MC happens to be a leprechaun and is facing his worst fear - a wild unicorn, take that time you were five and the giant doberman next door got loose and ran right for you. Then just... extrapolate! That's why we're writers after all. ;D

What identifiable traits does your current MC have? Which MC have you fallen in love with and was it because you were ale to live vicariously and identify? 

14 Comments on It's All About Character, last added: 10/26/2012
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