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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Book Lists, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 392
1. Themed Cybils Reading Lists!

If you haven't been over to the Cybils blog in a while, you're missing out--there's been regularly posted content, including book reviews, featured bloggers, and interviews with this year's award winners. AND, there is a new, fun recurring feature:... Read the rest of this post

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2. Beloved Books to Inspire 12-Year-Olds | Shared by Author K.E. Ormsbee

"These stories kept me up way past my bedtime and still hold places of honor on my bookshelf."

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3. Celebrate National Poetry Month!

It’s April! At First Book that means it’s not just springtime, it’s the month that we celebrate all things rhythm, verse and rhyme: National Poetry Month. Here are five of our favorite collections to make poetry fun for kids of varying ages.

button_upButton Up! Wrinkled Rhymes Written by Alice Schertle, illustrated by Petra Mathers

This hilarious book features poems written from the points of view of different articles of clothing. From “Emily’s Undies” to “Bob’s Bicycle Helmet,” each is certain both to get laughs and to help kids think creatively about voice and perspective. Perfect for Kindergarten – 3rd grade.

 

firefly_julyFirefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems Edited by Paul B. Janeczko, illustrated by Melissa Sweet

Stunning illustrations fill the pages of this beautiful collection. Hand-picked poems of just a few lines each take readers through the changing moods and weather of the four seasons, making this a perfect book for year-round reading. Ideal for Kindergarten – 4th grade.

 

emmas_poemEmma’s Poem: The Voice of the Statue of Liberty Written by Linda Glaser, illustrated by Claire A. Nivola

“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…” When poet Emma Lazarus penned these words in 1883, she was speaking out for the immigrants arriving on America’s shores and shaping the world’s view of the Statue of Liberty. This simple but powerful biography brings her story to life and invites  conversations about U.S. history, women’s history, immigration, and human rights. Recommended for 2nd – 5th grade.

 

wild_book_engleThe Wild Book Written by Margarita Engle

Filled with luscious language and rich imagery, this moving novel in verse by Cuban-American poet Margarita Engle tells the story of a girl who is struggling with dyslexia but determined to defy the predictions of those who say she’ll never read. The book offers sensitive insights into life with a disability while showing readers an especially chaotic time in Cuban history, circa 1912. Best for 5th – 8th grade.

 

youdontevenknow_flakeYou Don’t Even Know Me: Stories and Poems About Boys Written by Sharon Flake

Honest, heartfelt and thought-provoking – three words we’d use to describe the poems and short stories in this collection, each told from a black teen’s point of view. Their voices tell tales of gangs, guns, pregnancy, STDs and abuse; but there’s also love, community and positivity on these pages.  In short, it’s a truthful look at life’s realities, told with rhythm, insight and genuine care. This would be terrific for use as reader’s theater or as inspiration for teens to record their own stories in writing. For use with mature middle school and high school students.

The post Celebrate National Poetry Month! appeared first on First Book Blog.

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4. Best Selling Kids Series | April 2015

This month's best selling kids series from The Children's Book Review's affiliate store is the wonderfully educational series The Adventures of Riley.

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5. Best Selling Young Adult Books | April 2015

With so many strong novels on this list, everything remains the same on our hand-picked list from the Best Selling Young Adult list—including The Children's Book Review's number one best selling young adult book is The Children's Homer: The Adventures of Odysseus and the Tale of Troy, a classic must-read for all Greek mythology fans.

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6. Best Selling Middle Grade Books | April 2015

This month, Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Book 1, by Jeff Kinney, is The Children's Book Review's best selling middle grade book.

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7. Best Selling Picture Books | April 2015

This month our best selling picture book from our affiliate store is the gorgeously illustrated Sleep Like a Tiger, written by Mary Lougue and pictures by Pamela Zagarenski.

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8. Best New Kids Stories | April 2015

We have selected three picture books, a middle grade novel and two young adult books to highlight for this month's new release kids books. Enjoy perusing our picks for kids and teen books that we feel represent some of the best new kids stories ... Read the rest of this post

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9. Guess How Much I Love You Celebrates 20 Years

This year, Sam McBratney’s timeless, endearing story of Big and Little Nutbrown Hare, Guess How Much I Love You, turns 20!

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10. Best Non-Fiction Picture Books of 2014

The best non-fiction picture books of 2014, as picked by the editors and contributors of The Children’s Book Review.

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11. Five Family Favorites with Todd Tarpley, Author of My Grandma’s a Ninja!

My sweet little boys somehow grew into teenagers, so we have to take a trip back in time to talk about the five books that are special to my family ... Read the rest of this post

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12. 4 Gorgeous Color Books Perfect for Little Hands

Simple, bold illustrations with fun formats that beg to be touched by little hands.

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13. 5 Art Activity Books for Kids that are Meditative, Innovative, and Inspiring

Art activity books can serve as a wonderful meditative tool to help reduce stress, refocus and recharge the brain, and spark inspiration.

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14. Best Selling Kids Series | March 2015

Holy books, Batman! The Batman Classic series is this month's best selling kids series from The Children's Book Review's affiliate store.

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15. Best Selling Young Adult Books | March 2015

With so many strong novels on this list, everything remains the same on our hand-picked list from the Best Selling Young Adult list—including The Children's Book Review's number one best selling young adult book is The Children's Homer: The Adventures of Odysseus and the Tale of Troy, a classic must-read for all Greek mythology fans.

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16. Best Selling Middle Grade Books | March 2015

This month, A Boy and a Bear in a Boat, by Dave Shelton, is still The Children's Book Review's best selling middle grade book. And we're very happy to add the very popular Kid President’s Guide to Being Awesome and The Terrible Two to our selection from the nationwide best selling middle grade books, as they appear on The New York Times.

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17. Best Selling Picture Books | March 2015

This month our best selling picture book from our affiliate store continues to be the lively board book Peek-a-Zoo!, by Nina Laden.

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18. Best New Kids Stories | March 2014

Wow! This is a great month for picture books—amazing picture book authors and sensational illustrators star in this month's new release kids books. Plus, The Penderwicks in Spring is here!

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19. Best Selling Young Adult Books | February 2015

With so many strong novels on this list, all but one young adult novel, John Green's Paper Towns, remains the same on our hand-picked list from the Best Selling Young Adult list.

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20. Best Selling Kids Series | February 2015

Jeff Kinney's Diary of a Wimpy Kid series is this month's best selling kids series from The Children's Book Review's affiliate store.

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21. Seven Middle Grade Books for African American History Month

February is African American History Month. Sharing these books with young readers comes with the responsibility to discuss ... progress towards equality.

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22. 10 Non-Fiction Books About Presidents: Facts, Guides, and Trivia, Oh My!

These books, guides, and cards offer interesting trivia and facts, engaging formats, and lively illustrations; a perfect combination to pique interest for hours of casual reading, followed by days of reciting trivia, and hopefully, years of knowledge about these important people in American history.

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23. The Newbie’s Guide to Hosting a Día Program

Learn more about  Día at dia.ala.org

Learn more about Día at dia.ala.org

Thinking of hosting a Día program at your library? While the ALA Building STEAM with Día grants deadline has passed, it’s never too late to set up your own program. Have questions about where to start, who to contact, and what kinds of things you should do? Well, look no further—we will answer your questions right here!

First thing you must do, is log onto http://dia.ala.org, read a bit about Día and what others have done in the past, then register your program. This registry creates a searchable database of Día programs of all sizes from across the county that highlight Diversity In Action. Not only is the database a resource for you to find ideas, and printables that may work for your community, but it’s also a great place for your library patrons to find programs they might be interested in attending.

Then you need to take a deep breath. For those who have not held a Día program before, it does not need to overwhelm you. This is Children’s Day/Book Day, a celebration of the importance of literacy for children of all backgrounds. So, do what you do best…invite the community to join you in celebrating literacy.

Who should you contact? Everyone! Start with the list on the dia.ala.org website under the Learn More – Partners and Supporters page. This list links you to great national organizations who have indicated interest in celebrating Día. From there, look to your communities. Other agencies who serve children are a natural fit, but restaurants, and ethnic grocery stores can also be great partners and add a completely different element.

What should you do? Host a Book Fest, each room of your library is a celebration of a book, culture, or language. If you have enough partners involved, have them each be responsible for a room. Then families can move through the library, experiencing and discovering a variety of new things. Hold a Books Alive Parade, encourage children to dress up as their favorite book character and march around the library. Hold a few sessions that offer tips and tricks to create a love a reading in every home. Start a book club, using books that are offered in both English and another language. Encourage the sharing of cultural and personal experiences. Offer a variety of extension activities that coordinate with a book, showing children that literacy is more than just reading a book, but also all the things you can do with what you’ve read and learned.

Best tip: invite organizations and agencies to join you, and let them create their own activities to share with your patrons.

Pictures courtesy of the Kendallville Public Library bethmunk2 bethmunk3 bethmunk4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Post written by Beth Munk, Kendallville Public Library, Kendallville, IN

Pictures courtesy of the Kendallville Public Library

The post The Newbie’s Guide to Hosting a Día Program appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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24. Best Kids Board Books of 2014

The best board books of 2014, as picked by the editors and contributors of The Children’s Book Review.

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25. Our Five Favorite Books This February

This month on Five First Book Favorites you’ll find books that help kids understand civil rights and fair wages, explore different cultures… or even explore the moon!

For PreK – 1st (Ages 2-6)

yakyuTake Me Out To The Yakyu By Aaron Meshon

The narrator of this delightful book is a boy who loves baseball – in two different countries! He goes to games in the U.S. with his American grandfather (pop pop) and games in Japan with his Japanese grandfather (ji ji). Bold, colorful illustrations show, side-by-side, the trip to each stadium. It’s a wonderful invitation for kids to compare and contrast two different experiences and also reflect on the countries and cultures of their own families.

For Grades 1-3 (Ages 5-8)

Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers’ brave_girlStrike of 1909 written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Melissa Sweet

Clara Lemlich immigrated to New York with nothing aside from her family, clothes, and a few words of English. When her parents were unable to find work, she took a job as a garment factory worker – earning a few dollars a month for countless hours bent over a sewing machine. With a blend of vivid watercolors and stitched fabrics, this book tells the story of how Clara led her coworkers on strike to protest their horrendous working conditions. Bosses of the factories paid for Clara to be beaten and arrested repeatedly, but nothing could stop this gritty, five-foot tall woman from securing a better life for millions.

For Grades 2-5 (Ages 6-10)

moonshotMoonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 by Brian Floca

The moment Apollo 11’s Eagle touched down on the Moon, it became a defining moment for a nation that had lived up to a President’s lofty goal. With stunning illustrations,  this poetic story allows you to join Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin as they prepare for liftoff, follows them at every stage of the mission, and doesn’t let go until they are safely back home. Brian Floca has created a work of art worthy of inspiring young readers to dream beyond what is easy, and strive for what is hard.

For Grades 5+ (Ages 10 and up)

port_chicago_50

The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin

Loading 500-pound bombs into a Navy warship is, to say the least, a dangerous job. On July 17th, 1944, the fears of the untrained men who held this job became reality when an explosion claimed the lives of 320 men, the majority of whom were black. During this time, the Navy, like every other part of the United States Military, was segregated,frequently leaving black men to be treated as second class citizens serving menial roles. This masterfully crafted nonfiction book follows the fifty men who refused to go back to this life-threatening and degrading work, and the court case that followed.

 

For Grades 6+ (Age 11 and up)

okay_for_nowOkay for Now by Gary D. Schmidt

There are few characters you will ever root for more than Doug Swieteck. On the surface, he is a good for nothing, skinny thug with a reading disability. Just ask his teachers and they’ll tell you. However in the depths of Doug Swieteck, where this book takes place, you find a boy who is trapped – one brother a bully, one a vacant shell of his pre-war self, and an abusive alcoholic for a father who has left a horrific mark on his youngest son. The secrets Doug is holding back from the reader are gut-wrenching, but with the help of a few strangers-turned-friends and a newfound passion for art, this fourteen-year-old will inspire every person lucky enough to pick up his story.

The post Our Five Favorite Books This February appeared first on First Book Blog.

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