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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Movies, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 2,875
1. The Marvel Studios “Creative Committee” is reportedly dissolved

While the films under the Marvel Studios banner have proven to be enormously popular with moviegoers (even in what’s presumed to be an “off” year for the studio, Avengers: Age of Ultron and Ant-Man are both currently in the Top 10 grossing films of 2015), there’s no doubt that there are certain creative difficulties behind the […]

1 Comments on The Marvel Studios “Creative Committee” is reportedly dissolved, last added: 9/3/2015
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2. THE SCORCH TRIALS Movie Prize Pack Giveaway \\ $25 GC, Movie Tie-in Book & More

So we are SUPER huge fans of THE MAZE RUNNER series. We love the books and the first movie, and we can't WAIT for THE SCORCH TRIALS movie to come out! To celebrate the release (Sept 18), we are fortunate to have an amazing giveaway for one of you! Check it all out below!! Visit all the MAZE RUNNER: THE SCORCH TRIALS websites - #ScorchTrials Visit the Official Website Like ‘Maze

0 Comments on THE SCORCH TRIALS Movie Prize Pack Giveaway \\ $25 GC, Movie Tie-in Book & More as of 8/30/2015 12:21:00 AM
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3. See Tom Felton in New “Risen” Trailer!

A new trailer for the movie, Risen, starring Tom Felton (Draco Malfoy) has been released. Tom Felton retweeted the news from MovieFone, with a picture of Tom Felton’s character, Lucius, grappling over a sword with Cliff Cutris’s character, Yeshua.

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Matthew Lewis (Neville Longbottom) was quick to tweet about the new Risen trailer, saying that he was “Psyched for this, pal!” The two are currently tweeting back and forth about their weekend plans–throwing in Harry Potter references, of course, because the rivalry between Gryffindor and Slytherin is still very real.

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J.K. Rowling has just joined the conversation–expressing the same pleasure at seeing our Harry Potter boys banter between their respective houses.

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Risen is a biblical story of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. The story is told from the views of non-believers, attempting to find the body of Christ after it has risen, leading the worlds largest and most important man-hunt. IMDB shares Sony Pictures description of the movie:

“Follows the epic Biblical story of the Resurrection, as told through the eyes of a non-believer. Clavius, a powerful Roman Military Tribune, and his aide Lucius, are tasked with solving the mystery of what happened to Jesus in the weeks following the crucifixion, in order to disprove the rumors of a risen Messiah and prevent an uprising in Jerusalem.”

 

 

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4. Borderlands movie on the way from Lionsgate and Take-Two

Another videogame is heading to the screen–this time, Borderlands, a FPS game is set in a comics-inspired SF universe. Avi Arad and Ari Arad, who certainly have a lot os experience with comics-inspired films, are making it with Lionsgate. The game was developed by Gearbox Software and published by 2K, a division of Take-Two Interactive […]

0 Comments on Borderlands movie on the way from Lionsgate and Take-Two as of 1/1/1900
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5. Marvel has entered into talks with Mads Mikkelsen to join Doctor Strange

I seem to recall a few years back that Marvel Studios was really hot on getting Mads Mikkelsen on-board with one of their productions, to the point where he was cast as Malekith in Thor: The Dark World, but had to drop out due to scheduling conflicts with the then-debuting Hannibal. Given what Christopher Eccleston […]

4 Comments on Marvel has entered into talks with Mads Mikkelsen to join Doctor Strange, last added: 8/27/2015
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6. Check Out Who’ll Be Fighting Whom in “Captain America: Civil War”

Some big news came out of Marvel Studios today as they unveiled some concept art from next year’s Captain America: Civil War.  The art confirms the members of each side in the film’s hero on hero war and gives us some new information about the movie’s major players. Of note is Agent 13 Sharon Carter, who made her […]

6 Comments on Check Out Who’ll Be Fighting Whom in “Captain America: Civil War”, last added: 8/28/2015
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7. J.K. Rowling addresses Race in “Fantastic Beasts”

The controversy over the whiteness of the Harry Potter series, especially in the upcoming Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them films. Hypable recently posted an opinionated editorial on Fantastic Beast diversity–giving their reasoning for why the new movies series did not have to be all white. They addressed the historical accuracy of the films and why the subject of diversity matters within the Harry Potter franchise and the movie industry as a whole. The article can be read in full here.

Hypable isn’t the first news source to release a viral post about this topic. YouTuber Dylan Marron released a video completion of all lines spoken by actors of diverse nationalities. Of the thousands of minutes within the series, this video totals about six minutes for non-white actors.

It is true that the entire cast, that we know of, in Fantastic Beasts so far, is white. As we can see from IMDB’s listings.

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Even the new addition to the cast announced last week, Jane Perry (World War Z, The Three Musketeers), does not add any diversity to the cast.

J.K. Rowling addressed this issues, as it’s ever-growing presence on the internet came to her attention. She reminded us that the question at hand is an important one, but to remember that we do not have a lot of information on the Fantastic Beast films, and we are not to make judgements until the films are released and we have viewed them.

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“I sincerely hope you aren’t being sent rude tweets! You raised an important point, I just can’t address fully without giving away rather a lot.”

J.K. Rowling has been a producer for many of the Harry Potter films, and is the screenwriter for Fantastic Beasts. We have no doubt that her input and opinions are valuable and highly influential within the film industry. As Jo is known for her compassionate manner, and standing up for civil/human rights, we have no doubt that she will continue to implement the same moral principals, which she abides by personally, within her franchise.

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8. Rupert Grint featured in New “Moonwalkers” Trailer

Rupert Grint’s new movie, Moonwalkers, is set to release in Japan on November 14. (The film made it’s USA debut at the South by Southwest Film Festival, and was shown at the Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival in South Korea.) Just in time for Rupert Grint’s birthday, Japan released a new trailer of the film.

The trailer is mostly in English, with Japanese voice over and subtitles. It can be viewed below. The movie is rated R, and the trailer is not suitable for young audiences.

 

Thank you to The Ice Cream Man for the heads up!

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9. Troubled Warners exec finds comfort in watching Batman v Superman over and over again

Last week The Hollywood Reporter ran a succinct piece about Warner Bros. and its current box office woes. Behind a string of flops and under performers like Hot Pursuit, Vacation, Magic Mike XXL (it’s a classic folks), and The Man from U.N.C.L.E., WB is finishing #3 for the summer for the second year in a […]

8 Comments on Troubled Warners exec finds comfort in watching Batman v Superman over and over again, last added: 8/25/2015
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10. Review: American Ultra asks “What if Jason Bourne was a stoner?”

Sometimes films take on heavy concepts: life, death, space, time travel. Other times, they take a simpler approach. Sure, it’s hard to argue that American Ultra is doing anything profound or meaningful, but it’s also hard not to have fun with a movie where the primary question seems to be: What if Jason Bourne was a neurotic pothead? […]

1 Comments on Review: American Ultra asks “What if Jason Bourne was a stoner?”, last added: 8/23/2015
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11. Michael Shannon reveals an odd detail about Batman v Superman

I might get a little spoiler-y here, perhaps, so steer clear if you want to see Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice with fresh eyes. If you saw the trailer for the film that was released at SDCC, you’ll notice one detail that caught some by surprise was the inclusion of Michael Shannon‘s Zod being […]

0 Comments on Michael Shannon reveals an odd detail about Batman v Superman as of 8/20/2015 1:52:00 AM
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12. The Perils of Biopics: Life in Squares and Testament of Youth


The universe has conspired to turn my research work this summer into mass culture — while I've been toiling away on a fellowship that has me investigating Virginia Woolf's reading in the 1930s and the literary culture of the decade, the mini-series Life in Squares, about the Bloomsbury group and Woolf's family, played on the BBC and the film Testament of Youth, based on Vera Brittain's 1933 memoir of her experiences during World War One, played in cinemas.

I've now seen both and have mixed feelings about them, though I enjoyed watching each. Life in Squares offers some good acting and excellent production design, though it never really adds up to much; Testament of Youth is powerful and well constructed, even as it falls into some clichés of the WWI movie genre, and it's well worth seeing for its lead performance. 

The two productions got me thinking about what we want from biographical movies and tv shows, how we evaluate them, and how they're almost always destined to fail. (Of course, "what we want" is a rhetorical flourish, a bit of fiction that would more accurately be expressed as "what I think, on reflection, that I want, at least now, and what I imagine, which is to say guess, what somebody other than myself might want". For the sake of brevity, I shall continue occasionally to use the phrase "what we want".)



Testament of Youth is easier to discuss in this context, partly because it's a single feature film based (mostly) on one text and not a three-part mini-series depicting the lives of people about whom there are shelves and shelves of books. Though the filmmakers clearly read some of the biographies of Vera Brittain, as well as her diaries, and occasionally incorporate (or at least allude to) some of this material, the structure of the film of Testament of Youth is pretty much the structure of the book, even though the screenplay takes some massive liberties. (I expect the 1979 mini-series was able to be more faithful, since it had more time, but I haven't gotten around to watching it on YouTube, which is pretty much the only place it seems still to be available, never having been released on DVD.)

For any 2-hour movie of Brittain's memoir, massive liberties are unavoidable, and overall I think the filmmakers found good choices for ways to streamline an unwieldy text — 650 pages or so, with countless characters who constantly bounce from one locale to another.

I should admit here that I don't much like Brittain's book. Some of the war parts are compelling, and it's certainly important as a historical document, but it seems to me at least twice as long as it needs to be, and Brittain simplified the main characters to such an extent that I find it hard to care about any of them. For instance, when Roland, the great love of her life, dies, it's all supposed to be terribly sad and devastating and I just thought, "Finally! No more of that insipid pining and those godawful letters back and forth and that hideous poetry!" (Which is not to say that I wanted more of the slog of the first 100+ pages of the book with all the details of Oxford University's entrance exams.) Someone could create an abridgement of Testament of Youth, maybe reducing the book to 150 or 200 pages, and it would be vastly more interesting and compelling, because there really is some excellent material buried amidst it all. Concision was not among Brittain's writerly skills.

I am not the right reader for Testament of Youth, however. None of us are, really. The book became a bestseller for a number of reasons, but one of them was that readers could fill in its thin parts with their own memories, experiences, and griefs. What the film of Testament of Youth achieves is to evoke some semblance of the emotion that was, I expect, present in the book for its first readers, most of whom would have had memories of the war years, and many of whom would have suffered similar losses as those described by Brittain — losses both of loved ones and of a certain, more innocent, worldview.

The deaths in the film were, for me at least, far more powerful than the deaths in the book. One reason is the change in medium: the move from the words on a page to actors embodying roles. Deaths in books can be hugely powerful, of course (see A Little Life for a recent example), but Brittain's ability as a writer was not up to the task, at least in a way that would transfer beyond the experiences of people for whom the First World War was still an event that had defined important portions of their lives. The characters in the film are less idealized than in the book, more human. The screenplay by Juliette Towhidi creates situations, moments, and dialogue that allow the characters to live a bit more than they do in Brittain's narrative, where the characters are more asserted by the writer than dramatized. The acting by the men is generally good, and Taron Egerton is especially effective as Brittain's brother Edward. (Kit Harrington struggles a bit in the role of Roland, but it's a nearly impossible role, since its primary requirement is for the actor to make poetic mooning somehow alluring.) But I think the real reason this film of Testament of Youth ultimately succeeds at evoking some emotion and making us care about what we watch is that Alicia Vikander is a truly extraordinary actor. Her portrayal of Brittain manages to convey the important overall arc of the character: from naive, idealistic girl to war-hardened woman shattered not only by the events of the war but also by the deaths of all the men she most loved.

Life in Squares might have been saved by its performances as well, given the talent of the actors in the show, but they never get a chance to do much. Writer Amanda Coe tries hard to give focus to the story she wants to tell, but she was unfortunately undone by the limitations of time — three episodes of not quite an hour in length is simply too little for what Coe and the other filmmakers attempt, and the result is mostly thin and unaffecting. Coe does some great things with the material, but there's just not much for the actors to work with, because the scenes move forward so quickly that there's no chance to build up anything. It's a real waste, unfortunately, because the lead actors in the first two episodes, James Norton (as Duncan Grant) and Phoebe Fox (as Vanessa Bell), capture some of the energy, attraction, and personality of young Bloomsbury in ways I've never seen before. The mise-en-scene is important, too, and marvelously rendered, giving a sense of the physical world through careful attention to the detail of sets, props, and, especially, costumes. But it's a mise-en-scene in service to ... well, not much.

For anyone who doesn't know the intricacies of the personal relationships among the "Bloomsberries", Life in Squares must be terribly confusing, especially given the choice to have two sets of actors play the main characters: a younger group and an older one, with the older group seen in quick flashbacks in the first two episodes, then dominant in the third, which is set in the 1930s. (The BBC has a helpful guide to the characters on their website.) With so many people coming and going through the show, and only a handful of characters given more than a few lines, it's difficult even for a knowledgeable viewer to know who is who.

The best decision the show makes is to focus primarily on Vanessa Bell, a fascinating person who has too often been invisible in the pop culture shadow of her sister, Virginia Woolf, but who was really much more at the core of the Bloomsbury group than either Virginia or Leonard Woolf. Her life also exemplified the ideals and aspirations of the group — she was an artist, had an open marriage to Clive Bell (with whom she had two children), and had a child with Duncan Grant, who preferred sex with men but for whom Vanessa was about as close as a person can get to what might be thought of as a soul mate. Their lives included mistakes, prejudices, jealousies, and great grief, but nonetheless seem to me to have been quite beautiful.

The problem Life in Squares fails to solve is the problem of showing entire lives over a long period of time. This was a problem Virginia Woolf knew well, and tackled again and again in her novels. But the problem of narrative time in a movie is very different from the problem of narrative time in a novel, because cinema's relationship to time is different from that of prose narratives, as lots of filmmakers and film theorists have known (Deleuze's second Cinema book is subtitled "The Time-Image"). This is one of the big perils of biopics, since they seek to show the progression of a life, and yet cinema is usually at its best when taking a more focused, less expansive view. Some wonderful films have covered entire lives — Citizen Kane comes to mind, as does 32 Short Films About Glenn Gould — but most history-minded movies that take on such a large expanse end up feeling thin, especially if they try to tell the story in a fairly conventional way, as Life in Squares does. (For comparison: The Imitation Game can thrive in its utterly conventional, audience-pleasing form because its narrative is relentlessly straightforward and the history is simplified to fit the linear movement of the plot and the characters' desires. Life in Squares doesn't simplify the historical figures or events nearly so much, but it also doesn't find a form that fits what it seeks to depict.)

Actually, the problem for Life in Squares is that it can't decide quite what approach it wants to take — will it be fragmentary and impressionistic, or will it try to string events together in a more linear structure? Linear becomes impossible because there's just so much material, and thus the show has to skip over all sorts of things, but it still retains an urge for linearity that sinks it. (How much better it would have been to, for instance, show us just three days in the lives of the characters. Or to take a page from Four Weddings and a Funeral and base it on the weddings of Vanessa, Virginia, and Angelica and the days of the deaths of of Thoby Stephen, Lytton Strachey, Julian Bell, and Virginia. Or base it on particular art works. Or ... well, there are any number of possibilities.) Coe structures the story around the love lives of the characters, but there's too much else that she wants to throw in, and it all ends up a muddle that, sadly, too often domesticates people who, in reality, very much did not want to be domesticated.


What's worse, Life in Squares ultimately fails to show anything much of what's important about Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and the people around them — their contributions to culture. We see paintings around, we see the artists working now and then, and there are a few brief moments when we hear talk of books (Woolf's first novel, The Voyage Out, is, if I remember correctly, the only one we actually see, though there's some brief mention of The Years being a bestseller in the third episode). If not for the significant contributions to art, literature, and politics (hello there John Maynard Keynes, who gets maybe three lines in the whole show), these would not be especially noteworthy people, nor would there be much historical record of them. But more importantly, it's impossible to think of these people without their contributions to art, literature, and politics, because they lived for art, literature, and politics. (Well, Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant were less politically inclined than many of the others, but that's relative — the first biography of Leonard Woolf, for instance, was a political study.) Life in Squares does an admirable job of showing the truly radical sexual politics of the group, but it subordinates everything else to the personal relationships, which of course makes for easier drama, even if that drama is, as here, unfulfilling. But what it looks like and feels like and sounds like to devote your life to the things the Bloomsbury Group devoted their life to ... that isn't really here in a meaningful way.

(Is there a movie about a writer that gives a real sense of the writing life? Nothing comes immediately to mind. For artists, yes — Mr. Turner, Vincent & Theo — but the making of art is itself visual action. Carrington, which could almost be Life in Squares Episode 2.5, was better because it focused very closely on its two protagonists and allowed Lytton Strachey to talk to Carrington about books and Carrington to work on, and discuss, her art. It's still pretty flat as a movie, but it's earnest and Jonathan Pryce and Emma Thompson are quite good in their roles.)

Which brings me back to the original question: What do we want from biopics? Why was I excited to see a new film of Testament of Youth and a mini-series about the Bloomsbury Group? Why, even now, given all I've said especially about Life in Squares, am I glad these exist?

Partly, there's a sense of validation. It's a powerful feeling when mass culture recognizes the perhaps strange or esoteric thing you yourself obsess over. I watched the first episode of Life in Squares with a friend who only knows Virginia Woolf's name because he's seen her books around my house. He was bored by the show, but seemed amused by my ability to expound on the various relationships and histories of the characters flitting across the screen (and indistinguishable to him) — and in that moment, suddenly all of the work I've done this summer (not to mention the past twenty years of sometimes casually, sometimes obsessively reading in and around Woolf and her circle) felt somehow less ... hermetic. This, I could say, is something the wider world cares about, too, at least a little, at least superficially, at least...

It's possible that Life in Squares was a more fulfilling experience for me than for most viewers who know less about the characters and era. Not only could I figure out who was who, but I could also fill in the blanks that the show didn't have time or ability to dramatize. In that way, the show was, for me, pointillistic: my mind's eye filled in the space between the dots and extrapolated form from the individual moments of color.

Knowledge of the book of Testament of Youth is not necessarily helpful for the movie, because the film takes so many (mostly necessary) liberties that it's likely the knowledgeable viewer will become distracted by thinking about where the book and movie diverge. Both Testament and Life in Squares suffer from common problems of biopics, particularly name-dropping and random, obligatory cameos. Characters in Life in Squares constantly have to say each other's names because there are so many of them and they're all so quickly dealt with. Large historical moments must of course be alluded to in dialogue. And then important people must at least show up — there's a pointless moment with Vita Sackville-West in Life in Squares, for instance, and the presence of Winifred Holtby in Testament of Youth is only explicable because Holtby was so important in Brittain's life; but she gets so little time in the movie that she feels like she's been airdropped in at the last moment, and the portentousness of her announcing herself is never really dealt with. This brings me back, as ever, to the wonder that is Mr. Turner — director/writer Mike Leigh in that film and in his other historical movie, Topsy Turvy, avoids this sort of thing, because he knows that a movie is not a history book, and that what matters is not so much who people are as what they do and how they behave with each other.

What do we want to be accurate in our biopics ... and why? Does it matter if three minor characters are melded into one? Does it matter if chronologies are rearranged or simplified? Does it matter if people are put into places where they never were? "Well, it depends..." you say. Depends on what, though? I want to say that it depends on the ultimate goal, the effect, the meaning.

For me, the only changes that feel like betrayals are ones that distort the personality of characters I care about. Both Testament of Youth and Life in Squares do pretty well on that count, which is why, for all my grumbling, I was overall able to enjoy them and feel not great animosity toward them. I wish that the makers of each had been more imaginative, certainly — Life in Squares needed more imagination in order to come alive and feel vital, while Testament falls into too many clichés of the WWI story (plenty of which are directly from Brittain's text, which is why circumventing them requires significant imagination) and adds a couple of credibility-straining coincidences (particularly with Edward in France). If the Vera Brittain of the movie is a bit less naive and jingoistic at first than the real Vera Brittain was as a girl and the textual Vera Brittain is in the book, there is still a strong sense of her development in the film and, especially, in Vikander's performance, which begins with idealistic energy and ends with something far more profound.

In the end, I suppose what I want from biopics is a sense of the ordinary moments of extraordinary lives and the emotional realities of worlds gone by. This is something that drama in general can give us, and that cinema can give us especially well, with the camera-eye's ability to zoom and focus and linger and look. I got a sense of all that now and then in Life in Squares, especially when it calmed down and didn't try to squeeze so much in — I got a sense (imaginary, of course, but real in the way only the imaginary can be) of why everybody who ever met him seems to have fallen in love with Duncan Grant, and why Vanessa Bell was such a bedrock of the group, and what, in some way, it maybe felt like to wander those rooms and landscapes when they were not museums but just the places these people lived.

Testament of Youth offers a bit more, and also shows some other virtues of the historical or biographical film — it enlivened the material for me, and I returned to the book with a certain new appreciation, a new ability to find my way into it, to care about it and to imagine how its first readers cared about it.

The cinema fell upon its prey with immense rapacity, and to this moment largely subsists upon the body of its unfortunate victim. But the results are disastrous to both. The alliance is unnatural. Eye and brain are torn asunder ruthlessly as they try vainly to work in couples. The eye says: 'Here is Anna Karenina.' A voluptuous lady in black velvet wearing pearls comes before us. But the brain says: 'That is no more Anna Karenina than it is Queen Victoria.' For the brain knows Anna almost entirely by the inside of her mind -- her charm, her passion, her despair. All the emphasis is laid by the cinema upon her teeth, her pearls, and her velvet. Then 'Anna falls in love with Vronsky' -- that is to say, the lady in black velvet falls into the arms of a gentleman in uniform, and they kiss with enormous succulence, great deliberation, and infinite gesticulation on a sofa in an extremely well-appointed library, while a gardener incidentally mows the lawn. So we lurch and lumber through the most famous novels of the world. So we spell them out in words of one syllable written, too, in the scrawl of an illiterate schoolboy. A kiss is love. A broken cup is jealousy. A grin is happiness. Death is a hearse. None of these things has the least connection with the novel that Tolstoy wrote, and it is only when we give up trying to connect the pictures with the book that we guess from some accidental scene -- like the gardener mowing the lawn -- what the cinema might do if is were left to its own devices. 
—Virginia Woolf, "The Cinema", 1926

Vanessa Bell by Duncan Grant

0 Comments on The Perils of Biopics: Life in Squares and Testament of Youth as of 8/16/2015 4:10:00 PM
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13. D23 showcases big reveals for both Marvel and Star Wars

I’m not at D23 this weekend, and I’ll reserve any of the “on the scene” impressions for Beat contributors Alex Jones and Victor Van Scoit, who are both there in person. But that doesn’t mean I won’t report on the biggest announcements that are worthy of attention and discussion, and when it comes to Disney […]

1 Comments on D23 showcases big reveals for both Marvel and Star Wars, last added: 8/16/2015
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14. Review: The End of the Tour captures the relationship between creators and their creations

The End of the Tour is probably the closest thing I’ve ever seen to a Matryoshka Russian dolls analogy put to paper. It isn’t “meta”, nor does it contain literal stories within stories, but it’s a work that is only birthed out of the ones that came before it. The outer shell is of course […]

3 Comments on Review: The End of the Tour captures the relationship between creators and their creations, last added: 8/15/2015
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15. We now have our first look at Black Panther on the set of Captain America: Civil War

On the set of Captain America: Civil War (aka Avengers 2.5 basically), which is now filming in Germany, an intrepid photographer got the first live-action shot of the Black Panther costume that the public has seen thus far. The below photo is clearly a stuntman, but it at least gives you an idea of what […]

2 Comments on We now have our first look at Black Panther on the set of Captain America: Civil War, last added: 8/13/2015
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16. Tom Hardy is developing 100 Bullets for New Line

It was just a few months back that Tom Hardy had hinted that he was working on a DC Comics adaptation, with all kinds of guesses flying around as to what he could have been referring to. Planetary? The Invisibles? Hitman? Per THR, we now have an answer, as they report that Hardy is set […]

2 Comments on Tom Hardy is developing 100 Bullets for New Line, last added: 8/12/2015
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17. Trank Sank: Fantastic Four blame flies after poor box office showing

About the one element not being blamed for the Fantastic Four’s meagre $26.2M opening is superhero box office fatigue. The film opened at #2, and was the worst “opening frame” for a superhero film since Green Lantern. And the finger of the blame game is being posted squarely at director Josh Trank, with the Wrap […]

10 Comments on Trank Sank: Fantastic Four blame flies after poor box office showing, last added: 8/11/2015
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18. Josh Trank implies that you can blame the studio for Fantastic Four

Fantastic Four opens today (technically last night), and the reception that’s greeted the film has been venomous. I didn’t like it either, but I don’t think it’s “9% on Rotten Tomatoes bad”. After seeing the film a week ago, the question that immediately sprung to my mind was: how much of this film represented director Josh […]

8 Comments on Josh Trank implies that you can blame the studio for Fantastic Four, last added: 8/10/2015
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19. With Channing Tatum Going AWOL, Is the Gambit Movie Dead?

Tonight, TheWrap reported that Channing Tatum might be leaving 20th Century Fox’s Gambit production.  Tatum, who was slated to star as everyone’s favorite mutant with a gimmick, is apparently still in talks with the studio, but “something is up” and time is running out, as the movie is scheduled to be release on October 7th, 2016. […]

1 Comments on With Channing Tatum Going AWOL, Is the Gambit Movie Dead?, last added: 7/30/2015
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20. Wonder Woman and Justice League now have filming start dates

Per the big cover story in the latest issue of Empire Magazine, we now know just when Wonder Woman and Justice League, the two 2017 entries that will follow Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Suicide Squad will begin filming. According to the magazine, Wonder Woman director Patty Jenkins is currently in London prepping […]

6 Comments on Wonder Woman and Justice League now have filming start dates, last added: 8/3/2015
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21. Review: Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation works best when the adrenaline kicks in

While my familiarity with the television series is admittedly meager, the consistently Tom Cruise-led Mission: Impossible film entries have played like minor American efforts at aping the formula that made James Bond a success. Generally, they lack the iconic imagery of 007’s finest efforts, while never really being able to hit the same critical appeal […]

0 Comments on Review: Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation works best when the adrenaline kicks in as of 7/31/2015 10:17:00 AM
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22. Our latest crisis is over, Channing Tatum will be Gambit after all

Just like Alexander posited a few days ago, it turns out that Channing Tatum was indeed undergoing a bit of public negotiating regarding his upcoming role in the X-Men spin-off, Gambit. Today, THR reports that the Magic Mike star has signed on the dotted line to play the kinetic card-wielding Cajun mutant. According to their […]

1 Comments on Our latest crisis is over, Channing Tatum will be Gambit after all, last added: 8/3/2015
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23. Warner Bros. Reveals the Result of the London Casting Call for ‘Fantastic Beasts’

On July 18th, RadioTimes reported that an estimated 14,000 girls aged between eight and 12 stayed in line for hours to audition for the role of Modesty. One of our own Leaky editors was there to report on the event. Now Warner Bros. has revealed to BBC Newsround the results of the Open Casting for Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them which took place on July 18th.

The name of the 10-year-old actress who has been cast to play a character named Modesty is Faith Wood-Balgrove. WB has described Modesty as “a haunted young girl with an inner strength and stillness. She has an ability to see deep into people and understand them.”

Faith Wood-Balgrove is set to join the star-studded cast of Fantastic Beasts later this month. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is set to release in November 2016.

Filming is to begin later this month. Please join us here at Leaky & warmly welcome Faith to the expanding Harry Potter family!

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24. The Deadpool trailer brings R-rated superhero action to the cinemaplex

A version of this trailer debuted at SDCC, but now you too can get a glimpse at what just a few thousand got to see in person a few weeks ago (unless you watched a bootleg cam recording). Debuting on tonight’s “Conan”, here’s the red-band, very R-rated, Deadpool trailer:

1 Comments on The Deadpool trailer brings R-rated superhero action to the cinemaplex, last added: 8/7/2015
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25. Review: Fantastic Four, a case of botched vision colliding with studio demands

In the current mold of superhero film-making, it’s difficult to escape the prevailing wisdom of how studios formulate their respective franchises. There’s the Marvel method, which embraces the colorful comic tones and inherent silliness of the medium, but at its worst can lead to tedium. The efforts of other studios (Fox, WB, Sony) in recent […]

10 Comments on Review: Fantastic Four, a case of botched vision colliding with studio demands, last added: 8/8/2015
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