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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Slice of Life, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 462
1. Write. Share. Give.

It's Tuesday! Happy Slicing

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2. Moving? New library job? Some helpful hints

moving-truck-300pxWhether you’re a new librarian moving to take your first job, or an experienced librarian moving to greener pastures, here are some suggestions that might help.

I’m not saying I followed them all, but I should have! :)

Before you move:

  • Make sure you leave your previous job in good stead.  Give adequate notice, file paperwork, clean your desk, get your checkups in before your insurance runs out, return all your library books. :)
  • If you can, give yourself some time open roadbetween jobs – especially if you’re moving out-of-state.  Acquiring a new, license, registration, cell service, cable, electricity, etc., can be daunting if you’re working full-time.

At your new location:

  • Be a team player. It’s easy to think of yourself as the “outsider,” but work is more fun when you work together.  Be interested, be helpful, be approachable.
  • Know what’s going on. It’s your  home now. Who’s your mayor, your congressman, your baseball team? Subscribe to the local news in print, feed, or online.
  • Join your union – or at least hear them out.  They’re the folks working to earn better wages and benefits for you and they’re a good source of job-related information that you might not receive elsewhere.
  • Figure out who doesn’t mind answering questions, who doesn’t like to be pestered, who likes to joke around.  Work with that.
  • When you get that mountain of papers about insurance options – read it! And don’t miss the deadlines.
  • If you’re offered the chance to sign up for deferred compensation of some kind, do it right away before you ever have a chance to  miss the money.  Later, you’ll be glad you did.

A few don’ts:

  • Don’t get discouraged. If your new library is like every other library – there’s too much to do and not enough people to do it.  Relax; do the best you can do.
  • If you’re in a position of authority, don’t make  drastic changes right away.  First, find out what works and what doesn’t, and why things are done the way they are.  Be respectful.library icon
  • Don’t eat the boiled peanuts.  I hear they’re terrible! 😉

 

 

Image credit: Openclipart.org

The post Moving? New library job? Some helpful hints appeared first on ALSC Blog.

0 Comments on Moving? New library job? Some helpful hints as of 4/21/2016 12:54:00 AM
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3. Write. Share. Give

What's happening in your world today? Share your slice!

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4. Write. Share. Give.

It's Tuesday! Come share your slice and try visiting a "new to you" slicer today.

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5. SOL Tuesday! Write. Share. Give.

Welcome back to the year-long Tuesday SOL challenge!

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6. Fingerprints and Forensics with First-graders

Did you know with a few simple, inexpensive materials and some creativity you can create your own forensics lab for early elementary kiddos? You can! I lead a STEAM focused program at my library for first, second and third graders entitled Imagination Lab. The idea is that for four weeks in the fall, and again in the winter, we meet up after school to explore a variety of concepts that fit under the broad umbrella of STEAM. We experiment, sometimes I demonstrate, and we always create something to take home. In the past few weeks we have explored the science behind sound, polymers, and color, but my favorite topic may just have been forensics!

Inspired by the awesome Mad Scientists Club CSI program, I crafted my own 45-minute program for first through third grade patrons. I think this is a great program that can be easily modified for older children and held without breaking the budget purchasing special science equipment. The most fancy items you’ll need are magnifying glasses.

First, start off discussing what the word “forensics” means and what sorts of evidence might be helpful at a crime scene. Since my program was for early elementary school students, and I mostly have first graders in my group, we kept our discussion of crime scenes to stolen cookies, missing stuffed animals and library robberies.

Once you think everyone has a good basic understanding of the topic, you’ll want to get into the really fun part which is hands-on experimenting! Be sure to share some cool facts about fingerprints and using fingerprints to solve crimes before you start. You can find more neat facts in the great book Crazy for Science with Carmelo the Science Fellow by Carmelo Piazza . I have used this title for many program ideas, including our fingerprinting experiments. Check it out if you have it in your collection! Each chapter introduces a different branch of science and all the experiments are linked to science curriculum requirements for grades K through 3.

Below you can see some of the details from the program so you can easily replicate this at your library!

Fingerprinting Detective Supplies. image from Nicole Martin.

Fingerprinting detective supplies. Image from author.

Examine Your Fingerprints

Materials:

  • Pencils
  • Clear tape ( I used book tape)
  • White paper (copier paper works fine)
  • Fingerprint pattern cards (You can find many images of typical fingerprint patterns online. I printed out the images on cardstock and distributed a card to each child.)
  • Mini-magnifying glasses
  1. Color a small square (about 4 inches) onto the white paper with a pencil.
  2. Press the top part of your index finger onto the pencil square, rolling it back and forth several times. You should have a very dirty finger!
  3. Press the clear tape firmly onto the dirty finger.
  4. Slowly pull the tape off the index finger and press it onto a clean sheet of white paper. The fingerprint should now be visible on the paper!
  5. Look at the details of the fingerprint with a magnifying glass. Try to identify what pattern each individual fingerprint is using the fingerprint pattern cards.
  6. Try this process with other fingers and compare patterns with your index finger as well as neighbor’s fingerprints.

Lifting Fingerprints 

Fingerpritns! Image by Nicole Martin.

Fingerprints! Image from author.

Materials:

  • Small paintbrush
  • Corn starch (I measured a couple tablespoons into small plastic cups for each table to share.)
  • Clear tape ( I used book tape)
  • Dark black paper (construction paper or cardstock)
  • Paper plate (ideally coated paper plates, not just the regular white kind) 
  1. Rub the fingerprint part of your index finger down the side of your nose or in your hair/ scalp to get your finger dirty. (Gross, I know. But it works.)
  2. Press your oily finger against the center of the plate.
  3. Dip the paintbrush into the corn starch. You don’t need a lot! So be sure to shake off the extra powder before removing from the cornstarch.
  4. Use the brush to lightly “paint” the powder over the center of the plate where the fingerprint should be. The powder should stick to the oily fingerprint. Be sure to not press too hard or you will smear the fingerprint! This might take a couple tries to get right.
  5. “Lift” the fingerprint from the plate by placing a piece of tape firmly against the fingerprint. Then slowly and carefully peel the tape up.
  6. Place the sticky side down on the black paper.
  7. You should see the fingerprint on the paper!
  8. Take it farther and see if you can lift fingerprints off of nearby counter tops or door handles!
Mystery powder identification. Photo from Nicole Martin.

Mystery powder identification. Photo from author.

After our fingerprinting, we identified a “mystery powder” (aka powdered sugar) by observing chemical reactions. The kids loved it! I used instructions from Quirkles.com that you can find and follow yourself here. If you have time you can also create some fingerprint artwork using washable ink pads and markers, but my little detectives had so much fun we ran out of time! The kids were so excited to be able to take their fingerprints and fingerprint pattern cards home to share what they learned.

There are so many more fun ideas for forensic experiments and extension activities out there- this is just the tip of the iceberg. I’d like to do this program again but set up a mock crime scene involving a stuffed pigeon, caution tape, and stolen cookies. Happy investigating fellow librarians!

The post Fingerprints and Forensics with First-graders appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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7. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 31 OF 31

Huge Congratulations! Today is the final day of the March classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge.

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8. Family Fort Nights FTW

IMG_0881Kids are ridiculously excited about books. Families cram into your library. The level excitement is high. You have everything ready to go, supplies gathered, and then you just sit back and orchestrate. Thanks to Jbrary, Amy, Laura, Marge, Jane, and Katie, the program is pre-planned. If you browse those links, you’ll find a list of supplies you need as well as exactly how to do this program. I’m talking about Family Fort Night folks, the best thing since lined paper.

I’ve been around libraries for a while. I’ve done a lot of programs. This had to have been the easiest, most rewarding program I’ve done in ages. I’m not going to rehash how to do it– follow the links above and you’ll find out all you need to know. What I want to crow about is how easy it was, and how much fun it is. Librarians love to share- and those links up there prove it (really, have you NOT read those posts yet?) When I heard about Family Fort Night, I got incredibly excited. Not only did it look like fun, it seemed a pretty simple idea. And it is. Links, people. Go. Now.

Ok, now that you are back — here’s the good stuff that happened. Moms askedIMG_0883 when we were going to do this again. I heard from one family that there were forts all over their house the next day. Kids were as excited to read in their forts as they were to build the forts. Turning out the lights to play flashlight hide & seek? Priceless. Dads and Grandfathers and Moms and neighbours and friends and siblings were all there. It was a community of fun. I could go on and on about the warm fuzzy feelings this program generates. But I will just end with this– put your pyjamas on and try it. Open your library after hours and build forts. Get some cheap flashlights and watch the magic happen. Go forth and fort, my friends.

The post Family Fort Nights FTW appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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9. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 30 OF 31

It's the penultimate day in this month's Classroom Slice of Life Story Writing Challenge. Join us!

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10. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 29 OF 31

Wow! It's Day 29 Classroom Slicers!

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11. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 28 OF 31

Welcome to Day 28 of the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge.

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12. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 27 OF 31

Welcome to Day 27 of the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge.

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13. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 26 OF 31

Welcome to Day 26 of the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge.

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14. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 23 OF 31

Welcome to Day  23 of the 4th Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge! If your students are writing for the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you will post… Continue reading

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15. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 22 OF 31

Welcome to Day  22 of the 4th Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge! If your students are writing for the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you will post… Continue reading

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16. Making Your Schedule Work for You in the New Year

We’re all in the same boat it seems—looming piles of professional reading that you’ll get to “someday,” schedules to create for staff and for upcoming programs—that sometimes it feels like there is too much to get done and not enough of you to go around!

Over the past decade in Children’s Services, especially when I’ve been managing a branch or a citywide program, I have definitely felt this way. So I would like to share two quick tips that I’ve found to be really helpful when I’ve felt like I’m on a treadmill going too fast that I can’t get off.

  1. The To Do List vs. Scheduling Appointments (spoiler alert—I’m pro scheduling appointments)
    We all have a to-do list, right? And there is always that one thing (or more than one thing) that somehow seems to always be on the list week after week. As much as I love procrastination, and sometimes the anxiety it gives me gets me over the hump of getting started, this is not a great way to live day to day. While I still have a small to-do list that consists of small, easily completed tasks or reminders, I’ve started scheduling appointments for the things I noticed I was putting off over and over. Professional reading?  There is an appointment on my calendar for 30 minutes of professional reading twice a week. This blog post?  I scheduled an appointment to write it. By creating an appointment instead of just having it on an open-ended to-do list, I’ve carved out a time I’m committed to it. Give it a try on something you are putting off, and let me know in the comments how it worked for you.
  1. Using Your Energy to Your Advantage (i.e., set yourself up to win)
    What does your energy level look like during the day? What time of day are you most productive? What times of day is it easier or harder for you to focus?  For myself, I find that I’m most able to tackle tasks that require mental focus and creativity early in the day. If I need to write a blog post, if I need to create a program outline, etc., I create an appointment for myself between 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. By the end of the day—by say 3:00 p.m.-ish—I find that it’s harder for me to focus; something that would take me 20 minutes at 9:00 a.m. takes well over an hour in the afternoon. So I try to arrange my day with focused tasks that require creativity early in the day. That book-shifting project?  That’s definitely going to happen after 3:00 p.m., AND then there is the likelihood of kids and teens who want to help me. (Plus that is something I can easily go back to after being interrupted for homework help or finding just the right science project book). What about in your library?  When are your busy hours?  Early storytimes?  Afterschool hours?  When have you noticed that there is a block of uninterrupted time?  When are you more likely to be busy answering questions and finding books?  Try tracking the ebb and flow of your time for one week and see if you can identify patterns.

Those are two of the things I’ve learned over the years to help me not only be more productive, but that also help keep me sane when things get really busy. If you are interested in more tips from your ALSC colleagues, check out the upcoming webinars from the members of ALSC’s Managing Children’s Services Committee, with topics like Communication, Scheduling, Managing Financials, and Supervising: www.ala.org/alsc/edcareeers/profdevelopment/alscweb/webinars.

Rachel Fryd

Image courtesy of the author.

Rachel Fryd is the Young Adult Materials Selector at the Free Library of Philadelphia. In the past she has managed citywide programs and partnerships as the Youth Services Coordinator and managed a neighborhood library in West Philadelphia. She is currently a member of ALSC’s Managing Children’s Services Committee as well as YALSA’s Best Fiction for Young Adults Committee. She loves cheese, farmers markets, and pastries but hates broccoli.

The post Making Your Schedule Work for You in the New Year appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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17. So long…farewell…

wiki commons search - author Stephan Brunet Macphreak

wiki commons search – author Stephan Brunet Macphreak

…Auf Wiedersehen…adieu!

It seems amazing to think that I have been blogging over here at the ALSC blog for 8 years now. But like all good things, it’s time for my regularly scheduled blogging here to come to an end.  It has been a wonderful experience that has led to great connections among other librarians and educators, as well as an opportunity to reflect on my own practice.

I just wanted to take a moment to thank all of the folks who work on the back end as well as my fellow bloggers.  The ALSC blog is a fantastic resource that has truly grown over the years.  I know that I look forward to checking it everyday, and even more often during conference time.

I’d also  like to encourage readers to take the opportunity to become  regular posters.  Reflections of everyday practice, sharing out of program successes and challenges, talking up favorite books/apps/authors/sites, and writing about the joys and frustrations of our work is helpful not only to readers, but to our own work as well.

Thanks for the opportunity!

The post So long…farewell… appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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18. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 15 OF 31

Welcome to Day  15 of the 4th Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge! If your students are writing for the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you will post… Continue reading

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19. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 16 OF 31

Welcome to Day  16 of the 4th Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge! If your students are writing for the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you will post… Continue reading

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20. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 17 OF 31

Welcome to Day  17 of the 4th Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge! If your students are writing for the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you will post… Continue reading

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21. You know you’re a children’s librarian when …

You know you’re a children’s librarian when …

20160219_084957…you clean out your office desk for the final time and your personal possessions consist of a teddy bear, a tambourine, frog and duck finger puppets, a ukulele,  a storytime bell, and similar treasures.  :)

What’s your most curious programming possession?

 

(Next month: thoughts on moving to a new library!)

Photo credit: L20160317_185608 Taylor

The post You know you’re a children’s librarian when … appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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22. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 18 OF 31

Welcome to Day  18 of the 4th Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge! If your students are writing for the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you will post… Continue reading

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23. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 19 OF 31

Welcome to Day  19 of the 4th Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge! If your students are writing for the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you will post… Continue reading

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24. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 20 OF 31

Welcome to Day  20 of the 4th Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge! If your students are writing for the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you will post… Continue reading

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25. CLASSROOM SOLSC FOR STUDENTS: DAY 21 OF 31

Welcome to Day  21 of the 4th Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge! If your students are writing for the Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge, this is where you will post… Continue reading

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