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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: books, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 13,907
26. Love before logic: politics, persuasion, and the Puritans

Election Day is more than a year away, yet already the presidential campaigns have begun. Given previous contests, we should most likely expect a good deal of disingenuous diatribes and debates—some of it from the candidates, and even more of it from their supporters. In anticipation of the coming ugliness, it seems as good a time as any to learn something about civil disagreement and the possibilities of persuasion from an unlikely source: the Puritans.

The post Love before logic: politics, persuasion, and the Puritans appeared first on OUPblog.

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27. Why a technologically enhanced future will be less good than we think

Today there are high hopes for technological progress. Techno-optimists expect massive benefits for humankind from the invention of new technologies. Peter Diamandis is the founder of the X-prize foundation whose purpose is to arrange competitions for breakthrough inventions.

The post Why a technologically enhanced future will be less good than we think appeared first on OUPblog.

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28. Live Read-Aloud Revival Author Chat Next Sunday

Hey gang, I’ll be doing a live online chat with Sarah Mackenzie at Read-Aloud Revival next Sunday at 1pm Pacific. Read-Aloud Revival started as a terrific podcast (I was interviewed for an episode here) and has grown into a membership site with workshops, discussions, and a lot more.

Event details: Live Author Event: Melissa Wiley

Read-Aloud Revival Live Author Events are for your whole family. Come hang out with us live– your kids can type questions into the chat box, and our featured author will answer them live on screen! Throughout the hour-long live event, we give away prizes, get a sneak peek at what it’s like to be an author, and ask our best questions about the featured book.

During the live event, we’ll be giving away 5 copies of The Arrow Guide to The Prairie Thief from Brave Writer, and 3 copies of The Prairie Thief itself.

Participate in the chatbox to enter, and winners will be selected randomly throughout the event!

$5 gets you access to the Live Author Event plus everything else in membership for a whole month.

I can’t wait!

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29. Onwards and Upwards

My goodness the last two weeks have simply flown past. Books and ephemeral items are selling at such a rate I’m having trouble keeping up. Thank you to everyone for the numerous messages of support and love. Thank you for the orders, the cards and the sweet words.  I thought March House Books would be missed by a few people now I know it will be missed by many.  The doors will be closing for good on the 1st August, so if there is something you want don't delay.



I visited the flea market at the Bath and West showgroundtoday and came home with these. 


I promised Terry I would look and not buy but how could I resist these treasures? Some will go into my collection (how could I sell the Muffin the Mule Christmas card?) and others will be listed on eBay.  I might keep a couple of the Little Grey Rabbit books too. 


Last weekend we visited the annual St. John's Church Fete at Milborne Port


One of the most popular attractions was the 'human fruit machine' 


The book stall was doing a brisk trade
According to the local paper, over 200 people attended and between them raised more than £2,000 towards the upkeep of the church. Pretty impressive considering the fete was competing with Yeovilton air Day and Wimbledon. 

I'm toying with the idea of modifying/changing the name of my blog.  My cousin John came up with March of Time Books which I really like but what do you think?

I read a great quote on Facebook a couple of days ago... If a door closes, open it, that’s what doors are for!

Have a wonderful week  

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30. Let’s fly away: IAG and Aer Lingus

News has erupted of another potential merger and acquisition (M&A) in the Airline sector – the acquisition of Irish airline Aer Lingus by the International Airlines Group, IAG. IAG, the product of the merger in the early 2010s between ex-state-owned enterprises British Airways and Spain’s Iberia, has become one of the world’s global giants, ranked in the latest Forbes 2000 index of 2015 as the third largest airline in the world.

The post Let’s fly away: IAG and Aer Lingus appeared first on OUPblog.

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31. 10 things you may not know about Samuel Pepys

Samuel Pepys’s diary of the 1660s provides ample evidence that he enjoyed writing about himself. As a powerful naval administrator, he was also a great believer in the merits of official paperwork. The upshot is that he left behind many documents detailing the dangers and the pleasures of his life in London. Here are some facts about him that you may not know...

The post 10 things you may not know about Samuel Pepys appeared first on OUPblog.

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32. The belated autopsy of a forgotten Revolutionary War hero

John Paul Jones died in Paris on this day in 1792, lonely and forgotten by the country he helped bring into existence. Shortly before his death, he began to lose his appetite. Then his legs began to swell, and then his abdomen, making it difficult for him to button his waistcoat and to breath.

The post The belated autopsy of a forgotten Revolutionary War hero appeared first on OUPblog.

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33. Emerson and Islam

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-82), a quintessentially American writer and thinker, is also one of the most international. Greek, Roman, Chinese, Indian, Persian, French, British, and German philosophers and literary figures pervade his work. As we think about “Western values” and “the clash of civilizations” today, it may be useful to consider the significant role that Islam plays in Emerson’s thought.

The post Emerson and Islam appeared first on OUPblog.

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34. Darra Goldstein on the history of sugar

Sugar has had an important hand in many facets of history, not all of it fun and games (but certainly not all of it dreary, either). Did you know fudge played a huge part in American women's college education? or that slavery in sugar plantations was rampant? We asked Darra Goldstein a number of questions on sugar and its history, unearthing the good, the bad, and everything in between.

The post Darra Goldstein on the history of sugar appeared first on OUPblog.

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35. The “best” in kids’ book reviews

As I did last year, I’d like to share with you my choices for the “best” in book reviews for children, by children. All appeared online and were written (without byline) by children participating in New Jersey’s Collaborative Summer Reading Program, “Every Hero has a Story.”

(Reviews are unedited and do contain spelling and grammatical errors.)

Highest praise review:

STAR WARS THE CLONE WARS

Author – Adapted by Rob Valois

crazy awesome

Best back-handed compliment for an audiobook:

Sky jumpers

What a excellent book, even though this was on cd, I really enjoyed it alot.

Cutest review:

Revenge Of The Flower Girls

Author – Jennifer Ziegler

Lots of mischief. Hee hee hee…

Best alternative title in a review (tie!):

Lair & Spy

Author – Rebecca Stead

Mummus in the Morning

Author – Mary Pope Osborne

Reviewer most likely to have a future in writing book jacket copy:

Humphrey

Betty G. Birney

In the story Humphrey was a little smart hampster who lived in a pet store. One day, a teacher got a class pet it was Humphrey! Humphrey had a dream of being a sailor.
His friends in room 26 made boats. The adventure began…

 Best “Whaaaat?” review:

Captain America, The Winter Soldier: Falcon Takes Flight

Author – Adam Davis

A man meets another man and they both like to run.

Most random complaint review:

My Froggy Valentine

Author – Matt Novack

We wish there was a unicorn picture in the book. Cute story. Good ending.

Best review for a book that changes personal viewpoint:

The Isle of the Lost

Author – Melissa De La Cruz

I liked this book because I never knew villains had kids, too. Also because it was funny.


I hope you’ve enjoyed these reviews as much as I did. :)

The post The “best” in kids’ book reviews appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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36. Deluxe Edition of Illustrated “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone”

Bloomsbury has announced that it will be releasing a deluxe edition of the anticipated illustrated Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Bloomsbury laid plans for the illustrated books in 2012. Since the first press release announced that Jim Kay would be providing the artwork for an illustrated version of J.K. Rowling’s masterpieces, sneak previews and images have been slowly released.

New from Bloomsbury comes a press release, along with more pictures, of the a gilded, cloth-bound, deluxe edition of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. This deluxe edition will be published after the initial release of the illustrated books (October) on November 5.

Additional features of the deluxe edition include a pull out double-sized picture of Diagon Alley, exclusive to this edition, purple cloth cover and slipcase, gilt with gold along the edges of top grade paper, as well as the cover, head and tail bands, and two ribbon page markers. An image of the deluxe edition can be seen below.

Illustrated_Deluxe

 

Illustrated_Diagon-Alley

The deluxe edition will be exclusively sold at Bloomsbury from November 5, 2015 until March 2016. At that time, the book will be available through other retailers. Sold alongside the standard illustrated edition which will cost 30 pounds ($40 in the US, or $21 on Amazon), the deluxe edition will cost 150 pounds ($270 for US buyers). Bloomsbury is offering a 10% to bring the price down to 135 pounds.

The Press Release reads:

The deluxe illustrated edition of J.K. Rowling’s timeless classic will feature an exclusive pull-out double gatefold of Diagon Alley; intricate foiled line art by Jim Kay on a real cloth cover and slipcase; gilt edges on premium grade paper; head and tail bands and two ribbon markers. It is the ultimate must-have edition for any fan, collector or bibliophile. This edition will be sold exclusively from the Bloomsbury.com website until March 2016 when it will be made available to retail outlets.


This special edition is an utterly enchanting feast of a book and something to treasure for a lifetime. Brimming with rich detail and humour, Jim Kay’s dazzling depiction of the wizarding world and much loved characters will captivate fans and new readers alike. In oil, pastel, pencil, watercolour, pixels and a myriad of other techniques, Jim Kay has created over 115 astonishing illustrations.

The Harry Potter books will grow in size to accommodate all the new images. Published through Bloomsbury, one can hope that the deluxe edition of the illustrated Philosopher’s Stone will be available through Scholastic or Amazon come March 2016.

Thanks to MuggleNet and Hypable for bringing this news story to our attention.

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37. Children’s voices in family law conflicts

Children are commonly recognized as separate human beings with individual views and wishes worthy of consideration. Their ability to freely express these views and wishes constitutes the concept of child participation, defined by Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child as the right of children capable of forming their own views to be able to express themselves freely in all matters affecting their lives.

The post Children’s voices in family law conflicts appeared first on OUPblog.

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38. This land is your land

Seventy-five years ago folk singer Woody Guthrie penned the initial lyrics to “This Land Is Your Land,” considered by many to be the alternative national anthem. Sung in elementary schools, children’s summer camps, around campfires, at rallies, and during concert encores, “This Land Is Your Land” is the archetypal sing-along song, familiar to generations of Americans. But what most do not know is that Guthrie, the “Oklahoma Cowboy,” actually wrote the song in New York and that its production and dissemination were shaped by the city’s cultural institutions.

The post This land is your land appeared first on OUPblog.

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39. Reading on Screens

Things have been quiet in the print versus digital debate lately for which I am glad, what’s the saying about beating a dead horse? I do understand that there is still much we don’t know about our brains and how reading online and reading in print affects how we read, what we read and how well we read it and I am grateful that the debate is heading down that river and away from the techno-evangelist’s books are dead digital utopia. But because it has been awhile since there has been anything “out there” about it, someone had to write an update about where we stand just in case we forget. And like a moth to the flame I had to fly right for it.

Everythig Science Knows about Reading on Screens is pretty much a summary to-date. You won’t find anything new or revelatory in the article unless you are one of the few readers in the world who have somehow managed to be disconnected from it all (and if you are that sort of reader, you have my admiration!).

What is most striking about this article is how it proves a number of things about reading on screens that it discusses. Like skimming. The presentation of the article invites it with blurry moving things on the header and cutting up the text of the article. I almost didn’t finish reading the article because all of the moving blurs were giving me a headache! The article quotes Ziming Liu, a researcher at San Jose State University:

Liu noted in his study that sustained attention seems to decline when people read onscreen rather than on paper, and that people also spend less time on in-depth reading. ‘In digital, we can link in different media, images, sound, and other text, and people can get overwhelmed,” explains Andrew Dillon, a professor at the School of Information at the University of Texas, Austin, “These are disruptive activities that can carry a cost in terms of attention.’

Ironically, this falls immediately below one of the big, moving blurry blocks! Distracting, check! Overwhelming, check!

We’ve been trained by internet articles like this one. It isn’t necessarily that I want to skim or that I purposely interrupt my reading with distractions, it’s the way words have been presented on the internet since websites were invented that has made me read this way on a screen. So is it any surprise then when given an article or story to read on a screen even without all of the attendant internet bling that I might read it just as though all that bling were there?

The article concludes:

Despite the apparent benefits of paper, Mangen and other reading researchers caution the screen-reading vs. traditional reading question has nuances that scientists have yet to fully understand. Which method works better may depend on the individual (for example, there’s evidence that for some people with dyslexia, e-readers improve reading speed and comprehension). Ultimately, it may be that both print and screen have unique advantages, and we’ll need to be able to read equally well on both—which means keeping our distracted habits onscreen from bleeding into what we read on an e-book or paperback. And reading researchers have some advice for how to prevent this: forget your smartphone and computer, sit down, and read a book.

Common sense. But I have to stop myself decrying the painfully obvious conclusion because common sense isn’t always a strong point for a good many people I have found, especially those getting grants to study the things that avid readers already know and could have told them without any trouble. Should it ever happen that researchers ask us one of these days about print and digital reading, someone is going to have to pick me up off the floor because I will have fainted.


Filed under: Books, ebooks, Reading, Technology Tagged: print v digital

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40. The Bat-Poet

cover artI don’t often read children’s books, I don’t have children of my own nor do I spend time with people who have children. However, when Carl Phillips in The Art of Daring discusses a few poems by Randall Jarrell and mentioned he had written a children’s book called The Bat-Poet, well, I had to check it out. My marvelous public library had a copy and I requested it immediately. Oh happy day when it arrived and I discovered it had illustrations by Maurice Sendak!

First published in 1964, just a year before Jarrell died at the age of 51, this is a little book that will delight everyone no matter what age. It is the story of a little brown bat “the color of coffee with cream in it,” who spends his days sleeping upside down from the roof of a porch snuggled up with the other bats. One day the other bats move into the barn to sleep but the brown bat didn’t want to sleep elsewhere so he stays on the porch alone. And because he is alone without the warmth of his companions, he begins waking up during the day and noticing things.

Like the mockingbird. The mockingbird sings and sings and sings and can imitate other animals and sounds. The bat is enchanted. He tries to sing but quickly discovers that bats can’t, so decides instead to imitate the mockingbird’s words. And the bat composes a poem:

At dawn, the sun shines like a million moons
And all the shadows are as bright as moonlight.
The birds begin to sing with all their might.
The world awakens and forgets the night.

He is so pleased with himself he wants to share his poem and all he has learned about the

click to embiggen

click to embiggen

daytime with the other bats. But the other bats just can’t be bothered. The sun hurts their eyes. They are too tired. Bats aren’t supposed to be awake during the day.

Disappointed, the little brown bat decides he will share one of his poems with the mockingbird. The mockingbird is so full of himself he has a hard time being impressed, but he does not completely discourage the brown bat’s poetic endeavors. So our little bat goes in search of a new audience and discovers the chipmunk. The chipmunk is at first afraid of the bat but eventually agrees to allow the bat to compose a poem about him and then return in a few days to recite it. Are you surprised to hear the chipmunk is delighted and becomes the bat’s best listener and cheerleader?

I won’t tell you more, you have to get a copy of this book and discover the rest of the story for yourself. It’s a lovely, gentle story about poetry, creativity, and being different. But it does not have a slick moral at the end that slaps you in the face. It is a story written by a poet after all. Don’t worry, our little brown bat doesn’t die, nor is he an outcast or anything like that. Winter comes and he does what brown bats do in winter, hibernates in the barn with the rest of the bats. But it is not a giving in to convention and giving up poetry either, because as out little bat falls asleep he is thinking of the poem he composed about bats that he plans on telling them all when they aren’t so sleepy.


Filed under: Books, Children's Books, Reviews Tagged: Randall Jarrell

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41. The history of the word “bad”, Chapter 3

The authority of the OED is so great that, once it has spoken, few people are eager to contest or even modify its verdict. The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology adds perhaps (not probably!) to Murray’s etymology, cites both bæddel and bædling (it gives length to æ in both words) and adds that there have been other, more dubious conjectures.

The post The history of the word “bad”, Chapter 3 appeared first on OUPblog.

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42. Review: Go Set A Watchman by Harper Lee

The book everyone is talking about. The book no one thought they would ever see. Fifty Five years after To Kill A Mockingbird we have a sequel…. Firstly I think it is really important to remember the context of this book while reading it. This book was written before To Kill A Mockingbird. Before all […]

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43. Who was Jonas Salk?

Most revered for his work on the polio vaccine, Jonas Salk was praised by the mainstream media but still struggled to earn the respect and adoration of the medical community. Accused of abusing the spotlight and giving little credit to fellow researchers, he arguably become more of an outcast than a "knight in a white coat." Even so, Salk continued to make strides in the medical community, ultimately leaving behind a legacy larger than the criticism that had always threatened to overshadow his career.

The post Who was Jonas Salk? appeared first on OUPblog.

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44. The British Invasion, orientalism, and the summer of 1965

Fifty years ago, at the height of the British Invasion, The Yardbirds released "Heart Full of Soul" (28 May 1965) and The Kinks, "See My Friends" (30 July 1965). Both attempted to evoke something exotic, mysterious, and distinctly different from the flood of productions competing for consumer attention that summer. Drawing on Britain’s long fascination with “The Orient,” these recordings started sixties British pop down a path that proved both rewarding and problematic.

The post The British Invasion, orientalism, and the summer of 1965 appeared first on OUPblog.

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45. Greece’s uphill battle: a weekend roundup

With the world bracing for Greece's exit from the Eurozone, Donald Tusk, President of the European Council, miraculously announced that a deal with the debt-crippled country had been reached. After nearly 17 hours of negotiations at the Euro Summit, Eurozone leaders extended a $96 billion bailout to Greece in what has proved to be the third bailout since 2010. As rumors continue to circulate regarding Greece's next steps, Stathis Kalyvas, leading expert and author of Modern Greece: What Everyone Needs, joined the international conversation, responding to the announcement of the recent bailout via Twitter.

The post Greece’s uphill battle: a weekend roundup appeared first on OUPblog.

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46. “Are there black Mormons?”

In the months leading up to the 2012 presidential election between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, a few media outlets reinforced the public perception that Mormons (members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) were mostly white. Jimmy Kimmel asked on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, “Are there black Mormons? I find that hard to believe.”

The post “Are there black Mormons?” appeared first on OUPblog.

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47. Was the French revolution really a revolution?

The French celebrate their National Day each year on July 14 by remembering the storming of the Bastille, the hated symbol of the old regime. According to the standard narrative, the united people took the law in its own hands and gave birth to modern France in a heroic revolution. But in the view of Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), the famous German philosopher, there was no real revolution, understood as an unlawful and violent toppling of the old regime.

The post Was the French revolution really a revolution? appeared first on OUPblog.

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48. The Best of Luna Station Quarterly

The post The Best of Luna Station Quarterly appeared first on The Giant Pie.

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49. Article: “This Is Your Brain on Jane Austen”

The study also provides us with a fascinating picture—quite literally—of the ways in which the imaginative experience of reading takes place in our bodies as well as our minds. Close, sustained, and attentive reading, Phillips found, activates parts of the brain responsible for movement and touch, “as though,” writes NPR, “readers were physically placing themselves within the story as they analyzed it.”

Source: This Is Your Brain on Jane Austen: The Neuroscience of Reading Great Literature | Open Culture

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50. Can leadership be taught?

Leadership training has become a multi-billion dollar global industry. The reason for this growth is that organizations, faced with new technology, changing markets, fierce competition, and diverse employees, must adapt and innovate or go under. Because of this, organizations need leaders with vision and the ability to engage willing collaborators. However, according to interviews with business executives reported in the McKinsey Quarterly, leadership programs are not developing global leaders.

The post Can leadership be taught? appeared first on OUPblog.

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