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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: novellas, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 24 of 24
1. Writing Competition: Autumn House


The 2014 Autumn House Poetry, Fiction, and Nonfiction Contests ​

Postmark deadline: June 30. The winner in each genre will receive book publication, a $1,000 advance against royalties, and a $1,500 travel/publicity grant to promote his or her book.

For our 2014 poetry contest, the preliminary judge is Michael Simms, and the final judge is Alicia Ostriker.
 
For fiction, the preliminary judge is Heather Cazad, and the final judge is Sharon Dilworth. 
For nonfiction, the preliminary judges are Michael Simms and Heather Cazad, and the final judge is Dinty W. Moore.

Congratulations to our 2013 winners:
Poetry: Danusha Laméris, The Moons of August
Fiction: Tom Noyes, Come by Here
Nonfiction: Adam Patric Miller, A Greater Monster
See our complete contest guidelines at our website.

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2. Call for Submissions: Ploughshares

Mark your calendar! Ploughshares submissions will reopen this Sunday, June 1! We'll be accepting submissions for Ploughshares literary magazine and for our Ploughshares Solos series of long stories and essays. Starting Sunday, you can submit all those poems, essays, and stories that you've been working on and saving up since January. For guidelines and to submit, visit our website.

Remember, if you have a subscription to Ploughshares, you can submit online free of charge. Visit our website to subscribe.

Sincerely,
The Ploughshares Staff

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3. Book Competition: Waxing Press, the Tide Lock Prize

Waxing Press announces its inaugural contest for works of fiction, the Tide Lock Prize. We are seeking new work in the form of a novel, novella or collection of short stories. A single prizewinner will be selected and awarded with publication in both print and digital editions. There is a modest $5 entry fee.

Submissions are due February 1st, 2014.

For more information and guidelines, please visit our website or our submissions page. We are also on Facebook and on Twitter.

About the press:
Based out of Cincinnati, OH, Waxing Press is an independent small book publisher. We prize, above all else, literary excellence and work that pushes the bounds of what fiction does, what fiction can do and what fiction should do. Writing that is deeply intellectual. Work with big ideas, and navigates risk and experimentation with a masterful hand.

All other inquiries can be directed to us at:

info[AT]waxingpress(DOT)com (Change [AT] to @ and (DOT) to .)

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4. Call for Submissions: The Conium Review

You may submit up to five poems, three flash fiction pieces, two short stories, or one novella. We define flash fiction as below 1,000 words and novellas as over 15,000 words. There is no line limit for poetry. Do not send additional work until you get our response to the original submission.

Upload your fiction submission as a single file.

In the "Biography Statement" field, please include a brief third-person bio. If your work is accepted for publication, your bio appears inside the published issue of The Conium Review along with your story.

Submissions must be unpublished, original work. Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but you must withdraw your submission immediately if it is accepted elsewhere.

To submit and for more information, visit our website

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5. Fiction Competition: Waxing Press


Waxing Press announces its inaugural contest for works of fiction, the Tide Lock Prize. We are seeking new work in the form of a novel, novella or collection of short stories. A single prizewinner will be selected and awarded with publication in both print and digital editions. There is a modest $5 entry fee.

Submissions are due February 1st, 2014.

For more information and guidelines, please visit us at our website or our submissions page.

We are also on Facebook and on Twitter.

About the press:
Based out of Cincinnati, OH, Waxing Press is an independent small book publisher. We prize, above all else, literary excellence and work that pushes the bounds of what fiction does, what fiction can do and what fiction should do. Writing that is deeply intellectual. Work with big ideas, and navigates risk and experimentation with a masterful hand.

All other inquiries can be directed to us at:
 
info[AT]waxingpress(DOT)com (Change [AT] to @ and (DOT) to .)

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6. Book Competition: New Rivers Press MVP Competition


New Rivers Press MVP Competition
Deadline: November 1, 2013
Entry Fee: $25
Website

E-mail address: 
 
davisaATmnstateDOTedu (Change AT to @ and DOT to .)
 
 
Two prizes of $1,000 each are given annually for book-length manuscripts of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction by emerging writers. The winning works are published by New Rivers Press and distributed nationally through Consortium. 
 
Submit a poetry manuscript of 50 to 80 pages; a collection of short stories, novellas, or personal essays of 100 to 200 pages; or a novel or memoir of up to 400 pages with a $25 entry fee between September 15 and November 1. Visit the website for complete guidelines. Submissions accepted either as hard copies or via Submittable.

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7. Writing Novellas by Sally MacKenzie

An Invitation to Sin
Publisher: Kensington Zebra

Pub date: February 2011

Agent: Jessica Faust




(Click to Buy)

My second novella, “The Naked Prince,” releases today. I’m excited to be in an anthology headlined by New York Times bestseller and romance icon Jo Beverley. I’m hoping her fans—and those of the other authors, Vanessa Kelly and Kaitlin O’Riley—will enjoy my story, too, and be motivated to seek out my backlist—and to snap up my next book, The Naked King, when it comes out in June. And I’m happy to have another release out in the world, especially since I write only one book a year.

Wait a minute! Only one book a year, you say? Isn’t that sacrilege in romance land? If I can’t write two—or three—books a year, of course I should be knocking out a novella. Writing a shorter story—my novellas are 25,000 to 30,000 words, about a quarter the length of my novels—should be a snap, right?

Not exactly, at least not for me. Some writers are bristling with ideas and can write wonderful stories quickly and consistently. Sadly, I am not one of them. I agonize over every word, often to a fault. And short definitely doesn’t mean easy, IMHO. I find it quite a challenge to create three-dimensional characters, a coherent plot, humor, and a believable happily-ever-after ending in a style my core readers expect in only 100 rather than 400 manuscript pages.

How do I write a novella? My first step is choosing a suitable plot and main characters. The plot can’t be very convoluted, and the characters can’t have an elaborate backstory—or at least a backstory I feel compelled to explore in depth. Actually, I discover my novella heroes and heroines in my novels. I didn’t know Lord and Lady Kenderly’s story when they appeared in the The Naked King, but I knew they were going to be the stars of “The Naked Prince.” (This was a bit tricky, as I wrote the King first and then had to go back on copyedits and revise the novel to make it consistent with the “Prince.” Time is often a little out of sync in publishing.)

Once I have my characters and plot, I try a variety of things, probably concepts familiar to you, to tell a complete story in a relatively small amount of space. I’ve limited the setting—“The Naked Prince” happens on one country estate. I’ve limited the story’s duration—the "Prince" takes place over a couple of days. I still have a fair number of secondary characters, but I don’t spend as much time with them as I would in a novel, and I limit point of view to only the hero’s and the heroine’s. If I have any subplots, they are minor. As I say, my novellas and novels are all loosely connected; this is fun for me—and I hope fun for my readers as well—but I have to constantly guard against getting carried away with that, especially in a novella. There just isn’t room for extraneous stuff.

But no matter how long or short the tale, I want to leave my readers sighing and smiling and wishing the story wasn’t over when they reach the last page. I want to make them happy—and, of course, I want them eagerly coming back for more!


USA Today bestselling author Sally MacKenzie writes funny, hot Regency-set historicals for Kensington’s Zebra line, and her books have been translated into Czech, Japanese, No

10 Comments on Writing Novellas by Sally MacKenzie, last added: 2/2/2011
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8. I'm Delirious (I must be)


I've felt a little delirious since yesterday evening because (drum roll please)...

Shane Ryan Staley of Delirium Books has accepted my novella 'Barbed Wire Hearts' for the Delirium Novella Series. It will be appearing in November 2011.

Someone pinch me.

24 Comments on I'm Delirious (I must be), last added: 5/19/2011
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9. Penguin to Re-Launch Dutton Guilt-Edged Mysteries as a Digital Imprint

Penguin Group (USA) has relaunched Dutton Guilt-Edged Mysteries as a digital imprint. Dutton editor-in-chief Ben Sevier will oversee the imprint.

Dutton Guilt-Edged Mysteries will publish original crime short stories and novellas as Penguin eSpecials. Every year, the imprint will publish “at least one writer” from Book Country‘s online fiction workshop community.

Two projects in the works include Murder in Mumbai, a debut novella by NPR news editor Krishnadev Calamur and an original Dismas Hardy story by prolific crime novelist John LescroartFollow this link for more details on submission guidelines.

Here’s more from the press release: “From 1947 to 1956, Dutton Guilt-Edged Mysteries was a pulp noir publisher that specialized in hardboiled detective fiction, including the work of noir icon Mickey Spillane, whose first seven Mike Hammer novels were published under the Guilt-Edged logo. The new program will be dedicated to publishing original crime short stories and novellas as Penguin eSpecials. The imprint will launch in Summer 2012 to coincide with the 65th anniversary of the Guilt-Edged publication of Spillane’s first Mike Hammer novel, I, the Jury.”

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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10. Call for Submissions: Hobart 14

HOBART 14 (nonfiction, novellas, short-shorts, comics)

For our next print issue of Hobart we're considering publishing a much longer piece or two than we ever have before; and shorter pieces, too; and we'd love to see some more nonfiction. And comics!

Specifically, for shorter pieces, we like series or portfolios or collections or whatever you want to call them, of 3-7 pieces, that somehow work together. And with nonfiction, we tend to like essays that are personal in nature but their primary focus is on some exterior thing (past favorites have been "about" Magic: The Gathering, Leisure Suit Larry, luck, and boxing). We're already a little overwhelmed with submissions, but keep overwhelming us (until the end of the month)!

For more details, check out our online submission manager.
deadline: March 31, 2012

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11. Drue Heinz Literature Prize for Published Authors

For more than twenty-five years the Drue Heinz Literature Prize has recognized and supported writers of short fiction and made their work available to readers around the world. The contest, which includes a $15,000 prize and publication, is open to writers who have published a book-length collection of fiction or at least three short stories or novellas in commercial magazines or literary journals.

The Drue Heinz Literature Prize Call for Submissions 2012

The Drue Heinz Literature Prize recognizes and supports writers of short fiction and makes their work available to readers around the world. The award is open to writers who have published a book-length collection of fiction or at least three short stories or novellas in commercial magazines or literary journals.

Manuscripts are judged anonymously by nationally known writers; past judges have included Robert Penn Warren, Joyce Carol Oates, Raymond Carver, Margaret Atwood, Russell Banks, Rick Moody and Joan Didion. The prize carries a cash award of $15,000 and publication by the University of Pittsburgh Press under its standard contract.

The winner will be announced by the University Press in January. No information about the winner will be released before the official announcement. The volume of manuscripts prevents the Press from offering critiques or entering into communication or correspondence about manuscripts. Please do not call or e-mail the Press.

Past Winners of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize

Eligibility

1. The award is open to writers who have published a novel, a book-length collection of fiction or a minimum of three short stories or novellas in commercial magazines or literary journals of national distribution. On-line publication does not count toward this requirement.
2. The award is open to writers in English, whether or not they are citizens of the United States.
3. University of Pittsburgh employees, former employees, current students, and those who have been students within the last three years are not eligible for the award.
4. Translations are not eligible if the translation was not done by the author.
5. Eligible submissions include a manuscript of short stories; one or more novellas (a novella may comprise a maximum of 130 double-spaced typed pages); or a combination of one or more novellas and short stories. Novellas are only accepted as part of a larger collection. Manuscripts may be no fewer than 150 and no more than 300 typed pages.
6. Stories or novellas previously published in book form as part of an anthology are eligible.

Format for Submissions

1. Manuscripts must be typed double-spaced on quality white paper, unbound, and pages must be numbered consecutively. Clean, legible photocopies on high quality white paper are acceptable.
2. Each submission must include a list of the writer’s published short fiction work, with full citations.
3. Manuscripts will be judged anonymously. Each manuscript should have two cover pages: one listing the title of the manuscript and the author’s name, address, e-mail addre

1 Comments on Drue Heinz Literature Prize for Published Authors, last added: 5/14/2012
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12. Fiction Book Competition: The 2012 Drue Heinz Literature Prize

The Drue Heinz Literature Prize Call for Submissions 2012

The Drue Heinz Literature Prize recognizes and supports writers of short fiction and makes their work available to readers around the world. The award is open to writers who have published a book-length collection of fiction or at least three short stories or novellas in commercial magazines or literary journals.
Manuscripts are judged anonymously by nationally known writers; past judges have included Robert Penn Warren, Joyce Carol Oates, Raymond Carver, Margaret Atwood, Russell Banks, Rick Moody and Joan Didion. The prize carries a cash award of $15,000 and publication by the University of Pittsburgh Press under its standard contract.

The winner will be announced by the University Press in January. No information about the winner will be released before the official announcement. The volume of manuscripts prevents the Press from offering critiques or entering into communication or correspondence about manuscripts. Please do not call or e-mail the Press.

Past Winners of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize

Eligibility

1. The award is open to writers who have published a novel, a book-length collection of fiction or a minimum of three short stories or novellas in commercial magazines or literary journals of national distribution. On-line publication does not count toward this requirement.
2. The award is open to writers in English, whether or not they are citizens of the United States.
3. University of Pittsburgh employees, former employees, current students, and those who have been students within the last three years are not eligible for the award.
4. Translations are not eligible if the translation was not done by the author.
5. Eligible submissions include a manuscript of short stories; one or more novellas (a novella may comprise a maximum of 130 double-spaced typed pages); or a combination of one or more novellas and short stories. Novellas are only accepted as part of a larger collection. Manuscripts may be no fewer than 150 and no more than 300 typed pages.
6. Stories or novellas previously published in book form as part of an anthology are eligible.
Format for Submissions

1. Manuscripts must be typed double-spaced on quality white paper, unbound, and pages must be numbered consecutively. Clean, legible photocopies on high quality white paper are acceptable.
2. Each submission must include a list of the writer's published short fiction work, with full citations.
3. Manuscripts will be judged anonymously. Each manuscript should have two cover pages: one listing the title of the manuscript and the author's name, address, e-mail address (if available), and telephone number; and a second listing only the manuscript title. The author's name, other identifying information, and publication information must not appear after the first cover page.
4. Manuscripts will not be returned.

Multiple Submissions

1. Manuscripts may also be under consideration by other publishers, but if a manuscript is accepted for publication elsewhere, please notify the Press.
2. Authors may submit more than one manuscript to the competition as long as one manuscript or a portion thereof does not duplicate material submitted in another manuscript.
Dates for Submission

Manuscripts must be received during May and June 2012. That is, they must be postmarked on or after May 1 and on or before June 30.
Send submissions to:
Drue Heinz Literature Prize
University of Pittsburgh Press
3400 Forbes Avenue
Eureka Building, Fifth Floor
Pittsburgh, PA 15260

If you have any questions about these guidelines, please e-mail:

 press(at)pitt.edu

13. Fiction Competition: Tuscany Press Prize

Tuscany Press Prize

The Prize Criteria are:

  1. Original unpublished work of Fiction
  2. Great Story
  3. Well Written
  4. Captures the imagination of the reader
  5. A story infused with the presence of God and faith
    —  subtly, symbolically or deliberately
Submission Deadline: September 30, 2012
 
 
 
 
 

Short StoryNovellaNovel
- Fiction- Fiction- Fiction
- Unpublished work- Unpublished work- Unpublished work
- 1,000 to 10,000 words- 12,500 to 25,000 words- More than 37,500 words



PrizesPrizesPrizes
1st Place – $5001st Place – $750One Prize – $1,000
2nd Place – $1502nd Place – $250
3rd Place – $ 753rd Place – $150
Honorable Mention 1st – $50
All novels will be considered for publication by Tuscany Press.
Honorable Mention 2nd – $50
Published by Tuscany PressPublished by Tuscany PressPublished by Tuscany Press
Anthology: Paperback and eBookIndividually: Paperback and eBookPaperback and eBook
Standard Royalty Contract – non-exclusive rightsStandard Royalty ContractStandard Royalty Contract
Reading Fee: $10Reading Fee: $10Reading Fee: $10

An e-mail notification of the prize winners will be sent to all the participants at the end of October/November.

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14. New e-Imprint

101-Websites-225x300
IT IS TIME TO NOMINATE WRITING AND ILLUSTRATING www.kathy.temean.wordpress.com for the WRITER’S DIGEST’S 101 BEST WEBSITES FOR WRITERS!

If you have enjoyed the articles and information you received everyday this year, please help by dominating my blog.  Submit an email to writersdigest@fwmedia.com to nominate my blog www.kathytemean.wordpress.com 

I would greatly appreciate  your help. 

Thanks!

Happy Chanukah!

amalia Chanukah2

This Chanukah illustration was sent in by Amalia Hoffman. She was featured on Illustrator Saturday on September 18th, 2010.

Have you noticed that since so many people have bought e readers that publishers are looking for ways to grab more sales? 

It seems publishers are getting their authors to write novellas and short stories to help inspire people who have not read the author’s books to read a smaller story, at a low price, that ties into the novel.  So authors, doing all those character studies can help down the road.  You may be able to write a novella or a short story about a secondary character, which could pique a reader’s interest, let them see for a small amount of money how you write, and glean a flavor of your novel.  It is an excellent strategy and one that wasn’t there before e readers were introduced.  It also works to keep the reader who was been pulled into your novel series, ready and waiting to buy the next book.  Now an author can put out a novella that can be sold to your readers, while you are working on the next book in the series. Perfect!  It will help readers keep connected with the story and, help them remember the characters, while they are reading another novel series that is on their reading list.

I have found this to be a problem, especially if the author doesn’t think of the second book as a stand alone read. If it has been a year and a half between books, most people will have read 20 or 30 other books waiting for your next book to come out and by that time readers can get secondary characters confused. No one wants to go back and read the first one again before opening the new release, so this will help.  I have read a few novel series where the author did manage to tell a great story without having to read the first book.  One that comes to mind is Libba Bray’s Gemma Doyle Trilogy. I picked up the second book, because of the cover and I didn’t realize it was a series. Without having read the first, I was still able to enjoy that book and want to buy the first and third when finished.

Maryann Yin reported the following over a Galleycat the other week.

HarperCollins has created HarperTeen Impulse, an eBook imprint dedicated to publishing short stories and novellas for the young-adult genre.

The imprint will release one to four eBooks on the first Tuesday of every month, a day the publisher has dubbed “Impulse Tuesday.” The prices will range between $0.99 to $2.99. Follow this link to see the upcoming titles.

Here’s more from the release: “The first titles go on sale December 4, 2012, and they include Breathless by Sophie Jordan, a companion novella to her Firelight series; Stupid Perfect World, a future-set novella by bestselling author Scott WesterfeldCruisin’ by Sarah Mlynowski, a short story in which teens take a plunge on the high seas and discover that everything is not as it seems; and Radiant by Cynthia Hand, a novella set in the world of her bestselling Unearthly series…Forthcoming titles include The Prince: A Selection Novella by Kiera Cass, a companion to the New York Times bestseller The Selection; Tags, a one-act play by National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Walter Dean Myers; and One Day More, a prequel novella to bestselling author Aprilynne Pike’s forthcoming novel, Life After Theft.”

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: authors and illustrators, New Imprint, News, opportunity, Publishing Industry Tagged: 101 Best Websites for Writers, ebooks, Harper Teen Impulse, HarperCollins, Marcela Staudenmaier, Novellas

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15. Sidney Chambers and The Shadow of Death (2012)

Sidney Chambers and the Shadow of Death. James Runcie. 2012. Bloomsbury. 400 pages. (Grantchester Mysteries Series #1)

Canon Sidney Chambers stars in six cozy-mystery novellas set in Britain around 1953-1954. There are six mysteries to be solved; some mysteries include a dead body, others do not: in some it's a case of jewelry theft or kidnapping. Though there are six separate mysteries to be solved, there are a handful of characters whose lives we follow from story to story. Readers get to know the people closest to Chambers, and we also get to see into his personal life. There are two women that intrigue him: the first the widow woman introduced in the first story; the second is a glamorous, sparkly woman introduced in the second story. Amanda, the second woman, gives Sidney a Labrador--a dog he names Dickens.

For readers who enjoy cozy mysteries, cozy historical novels with plenty of detail and well-drawn characters, Sidney Chambers and The Shadow of Death is well worth considering. I didn't love all six stories. But I can easily say that I LOVED about three or four of them. The stories are all different from one another. It was easy to love Sidney Chambers.

My favorite stories were "The Shadow of Death," "A Question of Trust," and "A Matter of Time."

"The Shadow of Death"
Canon Sidney Chambers had never intended to become a detective. Indeed, it came about quite by chance, after a funeral, when a handsome woman of indeterminate age voiced her suspicion that the recent death of a Cambridge solicitor was not suicide, as had been widely reported, but murder. (1)
"A Question of Trust"
It was the afternoon of Thursday 31 December 1953, and a light snow that refused to settle drifted across the towns and fields of Hertfordshire. Sidney was tired, but contented, after the exertions of Christmas and was on the train to London. He had seen the festival season through with a careful balance of geniality and theology and he was looking forward to a few days off with his family and friends. (82)
"First, Do No Harm"
One of the clerical undertakings that Sidney least enjoyed was the abstinence of Lent. The rejection of alcohol between Ash Wednesday and Easter Sunday had always been a tradition among the clergy of Cambridge but Sidney noticed that it neither improved their spirituality nor their patience. In fact, it made some of them positively murderous. (148)
"A Matter of Time"
It was the seventh of May 1954 and Sidney had, at last, perfected the art of boiling an egg. (218)

"The Lost Holbein"
Locket Hall, with its grand E-shaped exterior of Ham Hill stone and mullioned windows, had been built at the beginning of the sixteenth century and was one of the finest stately homes in the vicinity of Cambridge. (282)
"Honorable Men"
Sidney was talking to himself again. 'Vanity, vanity, all is vanity, saith the Preacher,' he muttered as he walked towards the Arts Theatre for the first rehearsal of a modern-dress production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. (331)
The second novel in the series, Sidney Chambers and The Perils of The Night, will be released in May 2013.

Read Sidney Chambers and The Shadow of Death
  • If you love mysteries
  • If you love cozy mysteries
  • If you love historical fiction set in Britain (1950s)
  • If you enjoy character-driven novels
  • If you like novellas
© 2013 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

3 Comments on Sidney Chambers and The Shadow of Death (2012), last added: 1/5/2013
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16. Writing Competition: William Faulkner William Wisdom Creative Writing Competition

William Faulkner – William Wisdom Creative Writing Competition

Deadline: Mon, 4/01/2013

Categories
Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry

Entry Fees
Between $10 and $200 depending on category and manuscript length. (Note: Highest fee applies to books in excess of 225,000 words. Smaller fees apply to shorter works.)

Prizes
Between $750 and $7,500 depending on category.

Description
Accepting entries in eight categories: novel, novella, book-length narrative nonfiction, novel-in-progress, short story, essay, poetry and short story by a high school student. Only unpublished work accepted. No self-published or web-published material. See website for category details.

Contact Information:
Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society
624 Pirate's Alley
New Orleans, LA 70116

faulkhouseATaolDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to .)
Website

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17. Short Story Collection Competition: Georgetown Review

Short Story Collection Contest

Ends on 9/30/2013

1. Entry fee: $25.
2. Prize: $1500 and publication of the manuscript.
3. Deadline: September 30, 2013.
4. If sending a hard copy, please make check or money order for the entry fee payable to Georgetown College, and mail the manuscript to:

Georgetown Review Press,
Short Story Collection Contest,
400 East College St., Box 227,
Georgetown, KY 40324

5. If submitting electronically, our online submissions manager is available here.
6. Submissions can include any of the following:
a) An unpublished manuscript of short stories.
b) One or more novellas (a novella may comprise a maximum of 120 double-spaced pages).
c) A combination of one or more novellas and short stories.
d) Novellas are only accepted as part of a larger collection.
7. Manuscripts must be between 150 and 300 typed pages. Manuscript pages must be numbered.
8. Please include a cover letter that includes the manuscript’s title and the author’s mailing address, email address, and telephone number.
9. Manuscripts may be under consideration elsewhere, but if a manuscript is accepted for publication, please notify Georgetown Review Press.
10. Writers may submit more than one manuscript at a time as long as one manuscript or a portion of it does not duplicate material submitted in another manuscript. The $25 entry fee must be paid for each manuscript submitted.
11. Prior publication of your manuscript as a whole in any format makes it ineligible. However, it is fine if individual stories have been published electronically or in magazines or chapbooks.

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18. Call for Fiction: Tide Lock Prize

Waxing Press announces its inaugural contest for works of fiction, the Tide Lock Prize. We are seeking new work in the form of a novel, novella or collection of short stories. A single prizewinner will be selected and awarded with publication in both print and digital editions. There is a modest $5 entry fee.

Submissions are due February 1st, 2014.

For more information and guidelines, please visit our website or our submissions page.

We are also on Facebook and on Twitter.

About the press:
Based out of Cincinnati, OH, Waxing Press is an independent small book publisher. We prize, above all else, literary excellence and work that pushes the bounds of what fiction does, what fiction can do and what fiction should do. Writing that is deeply intellectual. Work with big ideas, and navigates risk and experimentation with a masterful hand.

All other inquiries can be directed to us at:
 
info[AT]waxingpress(DOT)com (Change [AT] to @ and [DOT] to .)

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19. Ten Thousand Words

PS Publishing are celebrating their 10th anniversary by selling Anniversary Gift Boxes of their books at a reduced price. As an early Christmas present (or rather a late one as I won't receive them until after the holidays) I ordered a collection of Ten Novellas that would have originally cost £100. I can't wait to see what books I receive.

Remember my blog post of December 1st when I was high from completing NaNoWriMo and I had such big, big plans? They're already floundering. I predicted the second draft of 'Theatre' would be at 20,150 words by now. It currently stands at 10,156 - but they are 10,156 brilliant and superbly plotted words of course. ::wink::

8 Comments on Ten Thousand Words, last added: 12/22/2008
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20. Lips Touch Three Times (YA)


Taylor, Laini. 2009. Lips Touch Three Times. With illustrations by Jim Di Bartolo. Scholastic. 272 pages.

Will I close my eyes?
Will I hold my breath?
Will I wanna cry?
Will our souls connect?
I've been thinking about it when I go to bed
at night I wonder - wonder.

--Mandy Moore, "First Kiss"

Lips Touch Three Times is a collection of three novellas by the oh-so-amazing Laini Taylor. Goblin Fruit. Spicy Little Curses Such As These. Hatchling. Each story revolves around a kiss. Sometimes for good; sometimes for bad.

Are you familiar with Christina Rossetti's Goblin Market? Goblin Fruit uses that story quite cleverly as a basis. If you're already a fan of Goblin Market, I don't know how you could resist this little story. If you're unfamiliar with the original, give this one a try. Trust me. And maybe just maybe you'll want to go back and read Rossetti at some point.

First paragraph of Goblin Fruit:

There is a certain kind of girl the goblins crave. You could walk across a high school campus and point them out: not her, not her, her. The pert, lovely ones with butterfly tattoos in secret places, sitting on their boyfriends' laps? No, not them. The girl watching the lovely ones sitting on their boyfriends' laps? Yes.
Them.
The goblins want girls who dream so hard about being pretty their yearning leaves a palpable trail, a scent goblins can follow like sharks on a soft bloom of blood. The girls with hungry eyes who pray each night to wake up as someone else. Urgent, unkissed, wishful girls.
Like Kizzy. (13)
Kizzy, no questions asked, has a weird family. She grew up listening to her grandmother tell stories about goblins. And her grandmother believed them. Does Kizzy? Everything she knows will be put to the test when Kizzy attracts the attention of the new boy, the oh-so-dreamy new boy at school.

Spicy Little Curses Such As These is the second novella in the collection. And it *may* just be my favorite of the three.

First paragraph of Spicy Little Curses Such As These:

Kissing can ruin lives. Lips touch, sometimes teeth clash. New hunger is born with a throb and caution falls away. A cursed girl with lips still moist from her first kiss might feel suddenly wild, like a little monsoon. She might forget her curse just long enough to get careless and let it come true. She might kill everyone she loves.
She might, and she might not.
A particular demon in India rather hoped that she would.
This is the story of the curse and the kiss, the demon and the girl. It's a love story with dancing and death in it, and singing and souls and shadows reeled out on kite strings. It begins underneath India, on the cusp of the last century when the British were still riding elephants with maharajas and skirmishing on the arid frontiers of the empire.
The story begins in Hell. (69)
This story was a 'wow' one for me. So I don't want to tell too much. I'll just say it's really good and leave it at that. After all, if you're not curious by reading that little intro above, then there's nothing that I can say to persuade you to pick it up! And I don't know about you, but she had me at hello with that name!

The last story is Hatchling. And it is my least favorite of the three. I'm not saying it's a bad story. It may be quite a good story. I don't know. This is one of those where it could be the fact that I was too drowsy to really enjoy it. Or to even understand and appreciate it. Or it could just be that I loved the others so much that this one was a bit of a let down. So it might work for you. (I hope it does!)

Here's how it starts off:

Six days before Esme's fourteenth birthday, her left eye turned from brown to blue. It happened in the night. (145)

It does start off promising, doesn't it?

To set the mood, create the right atmosphere for each novella, each is introduced by a series of illustrations by Jim Di Bartolo. And each novella ends with a closing illustration. (For example, Goblin Fruit has around thirteen pages of illustrations in all.)

This is my first Laini Taylor, but it won't be my last. She has a way with words, a way with fantasy. While not all of the novellas were equally compelling (for me at least), all of them had some oh-so-magical moments. I don't know how to convey just how good she is at creating the right atmosphere for these stories.



Other reviews: Teenreads.com, Reading Rocks, WLS Teens, Em's Bookshelf, Shelf Elf, Charlotte's Library.

© Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

3 Comments on Lips Touch Three Times (YA), last added: 10/11/2009
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21. Let It Snow (YA)


Let It Snow: Three Holiday Romances. John Green. Maureen Johnson. Lauren Myracle. Penguin. 352 pages.

Three little novellas await you in this holiday collection: The Jubilee Express by Maureen Johnson, A Cheertastic Christmas Miracle by John Green, and The Patron Saint of Pigs by Lauren Myracle.

These are three somewhat interconnected romances told by some of today's most popular YA authors. So expectations going into this are probably high. And not without reason. It's John Green and Maureen Johnson.

Words can't even begin to describe how wrong Jubilee's Christmas plans are going. She's supposed to be attending her boyfriend's holiday party. (It also happens to be their one year anniversary.) But when she hears the news that her parents--both of her parents--have been arrested and are at that very moment in jail, well, things go downhill from that point. For some reason, Jubilee can't be left home alone for Christmas. So she's sent off--via train--to visit her grandparents on very short notice. But when the big storm stalls the train, Jubilee has to make a few tough decisions...that might just change the direction of her love life.

That's the first story in this collection, and it introduces many of the story lines and characters. There is plenty of humor with the romance. Life is full of awkward moments, and no one does awkward better than these three. Of course, there's plenty of charm as well.

Do yourself a favor, and don't rush the reading experience. I don't know what I was thinking. I just think I probably would have liked this one a bit more if I was less tired.

© Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

2 Comments on Let It Snow (YA), last added: 12/6/2009
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22. The Moon Is Down


The Moon is Down by John Steinbeck. 1942/1995. Penguin. 144 pages.

By ten-forty-five it was all over. The town was occupied, the defenders defeated, and the war finished.

A novella by John Steinbeck published in the spring of 1942. Set in an unnamed country, an unnamed town even, it features a conquering but-again-nameless army. Of course, it's easy to read between the lines, to see the setting as Northern Europe, and the conquering enemy as the Nazis. And the message of this one is fairly simple. Resist. Resist. Resist. Ordinary people can in very small ways make a difference.

The reader meets a handful of characters on both sides. We get a portrait of those town folks who have been conquered but are determined to fight for their freedom. We get a portrait of the soldiers, the invaders. These soldiers are not as heartless and cruel as evil as you might expect. The picture Steinbeck paints is more human, more complex than that. They are men. Ordinary men who have been given orders, who have been assigned a job to do. For the duration of the war, they have to turn off their emotions, or else go crazy trying to stay on top of them all. The mental crises these soldiers face as the war continues....well, it's disturbing. We see the effect of war on everybody concerned.

How do I feel about this Steinbeck? I liked it. It reminded me of why I love Steinbeck. Of why I love the experience of reading Steinbeck. I love his descriptions, for example.


The paintings on the wall were largely preoccupied with the amazing heroism of large dogs faced with imperiled children. Nor water nor fire nor earthquake could do in a child so long as a big dog was available. (4)


Doctor Winter was a man so simple that only a profound man would know him as profound. (4)


Joseph habitually scowled at furniture, expecting it to be impertinent, mischievous, or dusty. In a world where Mayor Orden was the leader of men, Joseph was the leader of furniture, silver, and dishes. Joseph was elderly and lean and serious, and his life was so complicated that only a profound man would know him to be simple. (4-5)


This is a small book--a novella--about what it means to be a hero; what it is like to fight a war...whether you're a soldier or not.

© Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

2 Comments on The Moon Is Down, last added: 1/16/2010
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23. Bespelling Jane Austen

Bespelling Jane Austen. By Mary Balogh, Susan Krinard, Colleen Gleason, Janet Mullany. 2010. Harlequin. 377 pages.

From Almost Persuaded by Mary Balogh: Miss Jane Everett, middle daughter of Sir Horace Everett of Goodrich Hall in Hampshire, did not call as often as she ought at the vicarage in the village nearby. She called everywhere else--on tenants and laborers and others, on those who sick or elderly or in need of any sort. She took her duties very seriously.

From Northanger Castle by Colleen Gleason: Miss Caroline Merrill smoothed her ruffled-hem skirt as she settled into the chair against the wall. She quickly tucked her feet under the seat to keep them from being stepped upon or tripped over, and confirmed that the heavy, bulky reticule still dangled from her wrist. One never knew when one might need one of the accoutrements from within.

From Blood and Prejudice by Susan Krinard: It is a truth universally acknowledged that every decent straight guy who isn't dead broke, is in want of a good woman. As my dear Grandpa Bennet used to say...Bull.

From Little To Hex Her by Janet Mullany: "She turned me into a frog." I bit back the comment that he seemed to have recovered. "I can't tell you how sorry I am, Elton. I know it's no excuse, but it is almost full moon, and Harriet tends to be..." I paused and added a description of my assistant that seemed lame as soon as it was out of my mouth. "Difficult."

Bespelled By Austen is a collection of paranormal novellas "inspired by" four Jane Austen novels. Northanger Castle and Almost Persuaded are historical retellings of Persuasion and Northanger Abbey. (Names and situations have been altered.) Blood and Prejudice and Little To Hex her are modern day adaptations of Pride and Prejudice and Emma. Names have not changed though many aspects of the novel have been updated to reflect a contemporary setting. Each novella is by a different romance novelist. As you can imagine with reading any collection of novellas I have favorites and not so favorites. (My favorites may not be your favorites.)

My thoughts on "Almost Persuaded": I was not almost persuaded to believe in reincarnation. Unfortunately, that seemed to take precedence over the romantic aspects of this retelling of Persuasion. Much of the dialogue between our hero, Captain Mitford, and heroine, Jane Everett, seeming to be about past lives, soul mates, and such. You might not think it would be so intrusive to the text, but I found it to be so. When they weren't talking about the many times they got their love wrong in their past lives, they were doing things that seemed out of place with the historical time period. (Like shedding some clothes to go swimming together, and then getting intimate.) I did NOT like this one at all. Persuasion is my favorite Austen, and to see it "adapted" in this way irritated me.

My thoughts on "Northanger Castle": To be honest, I don't have many thoughts on this one. Unfortunately, I had a headache while reading this one, and I didn't feel a connection with this one. But. I think it was probably my fault. I think I would have been struggling to "enjoy" whatever I was reading at that time.

My thoughts on "Blood and Prejudice": This one was interesting. I thought I wouldn't like the modern-day adaptations. But I found both Blood and Prejudice and Little To Hex Her the best in the collection. Elizabeth, our heroine, finds out a secret about Mr. Darcy--and Mr. Wickham--they're vampires! But she's still doesn't have all her facts straight. Can Elizabeth discover the truth in time to find love for herself and her older sister, Jane? I liked this o

2 Comments on Bespelling Jane Austen, last added: 12/1/2010
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24. A Darcy Christmas

A Darcy Christmas: A Holiday Tribute to Jane Austen. By Amanda Grange, Carolyn Eberhart, and Sharon Lathan. Sourcebooks. 304 pages.

From Mr. Darcy's Christmas Carol by Carolyn Eberhart: Old Mr. Darcy was dead to begin with. There is no doubt whatsoever about that. The clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner had all signed the register of his burial. His son signed it. And Fitzwilliam Darcy's name was as good as his father's before him. Old Mr. Darcy was as dead as a doornail.

From Christmas Present by Amanda Grange: It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a married man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of an heir, and Mr. Darcy of Pemberley was just such a man. Moreover, he was soon to have that want satisfied, for his wife, Elizabeth, was expecting their first child.

From A Darcy Christmas by Sharon Lathan: He set the painting onto the sofa, assuring it was well supported before stepping away. He gazed at the canvas, a smile spreading as he looked upon his family. His family. The family created by him and his wife, just as he had dreamt for so many lonely years. They stood on the portico of Pemberley flanked by their precious children on the steps. All of them were smiling at the artist. A sentimental man by nature, he silently examined the newest portrait of his family and lost himself in happy memories.

For the most part, I liked this one. I did. I really enjoyed two of these novellas! And while I wasn't impressed with "A Darcy Christmas" I would still recommend this collection.

"Mr. Darcy's Christmas Carol" was surprisingly fun. I had my doubts--as you might have your doubts about weaving these two stories together--but I thought it worked. It does a slight variation on the original. What if Jane and Charles Bingley got their happily ever after--after Lydia was "rescued" by Mr. Darcy's intervention--but Mr. Darcy's pride was still in the way of his declaring his love (the second time). This is what that first Christmas might have been like. If he'd been visited by the spirits of Christmas past, present, future.

"Christmas Present" was a great novella by Amanda Grange. I've enjoyed many of her Austen adaptations in the past. This one did not disappoint. She got the characters just right. It felt authentic like what a Darcy Christmas might have *really* been like. Elizabeth and Darcy are expecting their first child, and Charles and Jane just had their first child. So the families are coming together--the extended families--to celebrate. I really enjoyed this one!

"A Darcy Christmas" is a collection of holiday short stories following the Darcy family through twenty or so years of marriage. (I believe we see their twenty-third Christmas as a couple? Although I might have lost track of the last few stories.) Since we only catch glimpses of the family--on Christmas Eve/Christmas--it's hard to precisely follow these stories. We do know that (almost) every Christmas sees Elizabeth either with a new baby or pregnant. (Perhaps these stories do connect to Lathan's previous novels about Elizabeth and Darcy. If that is the case, then the stories might make more sense when it comes to keeping up with their family, friends, etc. Especially in the case of her children's love interests.)

© Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews