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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Writing Competitions, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 298
1. Short Story Competition: InkTears

INKTEARS SHORT STORY COMPETITION 2014

Now open for entries.
Deadline: 30 November 2014
Type: Short story (UK + International)

Prizes:
Winner: £1,000
Runner-up: £100
4 x Highly Commended £25


All prizewinners will have their story published to the InkTears Readers and their Bio published on the InkTears website. Full results will be announced by 30 March 2015.

Fee: £6.00.

Length:1000-3500 words, any theme and open to age 18+.

NB: stories may have been previously published or unpublished – see website Rules 2 and 3 on our website for full details and how to enter.

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2. Middle Grade Novel Fellowship: Eldin Memorial Fellowship

Eldin Memorial Fellowship

Christine Elizabeth Eldin (1966-2012) was an aspiring middle grade author. Her passion for learning, and for sharing her knowledge with young people, inspired her to earn a master's degree in education and dedicate her life to writing young adult literature. She co-founded "Book Roast," an online book promotion site that spotlighted the recent releases of dozens of authors. She also maintained a popular blog and actively supported her community of fellow writers. She was a loving mother, sister, and daughter, and a dear friend to many.

Chris left this world too soon when her life took a tragic turn. Her gentle soul, creative spirit, and generous heart will forever be remembered by the many people whose lives she touched and inspired. *

The Christine Eldin Memorial Fellowship ("Eldin Fellowship") has two purposes:
1. Honor the memory of Chris Eldin.
2. Provide recognition and financial assistance to an unpublished middle grade fiction writer whose work-in-progress reveals potential for a successful writing career.

The Lascaux Review will host an annual contest to choose a "best" middle grade novel work-in-progress, along with a short list of finalists, among entries submitted. The contest will be conducted initially in 2014 (for award of the 2015 fellowship) and scheduled annually thereafter. A middle grade novel is understood to mean a work of fiction, typically a chapter book, for readers between the ages of eight and twelve.

Any unpublished middle grade manuscript, in whole or part, for which no publication contract exists at the time of submission, is eligible. Only English language submissions will be considered.

Contestants cannot be previously published in middle grade book-length fiction. Other types of previous publications are allowed. Previously self-published works are allowed. Contestants may be of any nationality and reside anywhere.

Judging takes place in two stages. In the first stage contestants submit the first 5000 words of their manuscripts, along with a synopsis. The synopsis may be of any length not exceeding 2000 words, and it should describe the entire story, including how it ends. Contestants submit digital files (doc, docx, pdf, rtf, etc.) via Submittable. The entry fee is $10. Readers selected by the Eldin Fellowship committee will choose the finalists.

In the second stage, a judge selected by the Eldin Fellowship committee selects a winner.

The first year's fellowship is $1000 and a trophy. The first year's judge is Louise Hawes.

Deadline for submissions is 31 December.
For more information contact:

lascauxreviewATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

To submit to the contest, click on the following link.

To contribute to a fundraiser presently underway, visit Indiegogo.

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3. Writing Competition: Center for Women Writers International Literary Awards


The Center for Women Writers is excited about the opportunity to discover and encourage writers through our International Literary Awards. Our 2014 winners were Brandel France de Bravo (Penelope Niven Creative Nonfiction Award), Joseph Bathanti (Rita Dove Poetry Award), and Bushra Rehman (Reynolds Price Short Fiction Award).  
 
For the 2015 contest, the Reynolds Price Short Fiction Award for a short story up to 5,000 words will be judged by award-winning author Kris Saknussemm, the Penelope Niven Creative Nonfiction Award for a work of creative nonfiction (including personal essay and memoir) up to 5,000 words will be judged by our 2014 winner, Brandel France de Bravo, and the Rita Dove Poetry Award for a poem of any style (3 poems per entry) will be judged by National Poetry Series winner, Lee Ann Roripaugh.  
 
The awards are open to any person who writes in English, excluding current Salem employees and students. The Postmark deadline for mailed submissions is 15 November 2014; and the postmarked deadline for our online submissions (via Submittable) will be 31 December 2014. The winner in each genre will receive $1,000, and an Honorable Mention in each category will receive $150
 
The contest entry fee is $15. Announcements will be made on our website on 1 May 2015.
If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact me by email:
 
cwwATsalemDOTedu Change AT to @ and DOT to . ) 
 
You can also visit our website.

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4. Poetry Competition: Gemini Magazine

Gemini Magazine is now accepting entries for its fifth annual Poetry Open competition.

Details at our website.

The grand prize is $1,000. Second place wins $100 and four honorable mentions will each receive $25. All six finalists will be published online in the March 2015 issue of Gemini.


The entry fee is $5 for each batch of three poems. 


Email and postmark deadline: January 2, 2015.

We are open to any type of poetry, any subject matter, any length. Scroll down the Poetry Open page to see the broad range of work from previous winners and finalists.

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5. 2015 Summer Poetry Residency: Poetry Center, University of Arizona

2015 Summer Residency Contest

Judge: Eduardo C. Corral

Since 1994, the Poetry Center’s Residency Program has offered writers an opportunity to develop their work. Beginning in Summer 2014, the Poetry Center will award one residency each summer for one poet to spend two weeks in Tucson, Arizona developing his/her work. The residency includes a $500 stipend and a two week stay in a studio apartment located within steps of the Center’s renowned library of contemporary poetry. The residency is offered between June 1 and August 31.


Deadline: December 15, 2015

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6. Writing Competition for Anthology: Stories of Resilience

Family Shelter Service Writing Contest: "Stories of Resilience"

Wheaton, IL -- Family Shelter Service recently published a new book entitled Hope Grows Here, a compilation of stories and artwork by survivors of domestic abuse, available online through Amazon and CreateSpace.

In recognition of October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the greater community is invited to add their voices to this exploration through the "Stories of Resilience" contest. Submissions are being sought that reflect the broad impact of abuse — through stories, personal essays or poems. Submissions will be considered for Volume II of Hope Grows Here.

Bestselling author Adriana Trigiani, whose best-known books include The Shoemaker's Wife and Big Stone Gap, will judge the contest submissions.

The "Stories of Resilience" contest will offer a first prize of $500 and two second prizes of $100. Entries will be accepted through October 20th, 2014 and winners will be announced at an event on November 6th, 2014. For submissions and contest details, please visit our website.

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7. Flash Fiction Competition: The Golden Key

The Golden Key is delighted to announce our first-ever flash fiction contest, judged by Karin Tidbeck. The winner will receive $200 and publication in our 6th issue (Spring/Summer 2015). As each of our issues are themed to be inspired by an “object” that might come out of the little iron chest, the subject of the winning story will also determine the theme for Issue 6.

The deadline is September 15, and the limit is 500 words. The fee for entry is $5 for one piece, or $7 for two. Entry fee donations go directly into the fund we are raising to pay writers. The winner will be announced November 1!

Judge: Karin Tidbeck is the author of the collection Jagganath, recipient of the 2013 Crawford Memorial Award. She is a graduate of the Clarion Writer’s Workshop, and her work has been published in both Swedish and English, in journals such as Unstuck, Weird Tales, Tor.com, and Lightspeed.
Prize: $200 and publication in Issue 6
Deadline: September 15, 2014


Contest Details.

Web 

Twitter 
Facebook

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8. Who in their Right Mind Would Be a Writer?

a-m-boyle Struggling WriterA writer buddy of mine phones up and tells me to meet him on the first tee in 45 minutes.

Say no more.

I love hanging out with writers. I love their lack of common sense, their desperation, their vulnerability, their implausibility. Their impossibility!

Who in their right mind would be a writer?

I especially love watching movies about struggling writers.

Joe in Sunset Boulevard, and Roy in You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger, and Henry in Factotum, and Charlie in Adaptation, and The Ghost Writer, and of course Miles (Paul Giamatti) in the film Sideways.

Miles (introvert, pessimistic, depressed) spends most of the story waiting to hear from his literary agent. The news won’t be good. Writers don’t show up in stories as symbols of success. They are setups for failure.

Someone should make a movie of my life.

Forget the first 40 years, they were altogether too glamorous. No, my life more truly started when my 13-year-old son called a meeting to say, “I’m in Grade Seven, Dad, and I’ve attended fifteen different schools.”

I said, “Wash your mouth out with soap,” but it turns out he wasn’t exaggerating.

“Pops, I want you to settle down,” he said.

So I quit shooting films, traded camera for keyboard, and decided that henceforth I was a writer. It was great. I soon became so broke that my son’s mother sent support payments from Hawaii.

Once, I forced my son to accompany me to the Welfare Office. They gave me so much money it was humiliating—rent, medical and dental care, bus passes, food vouchers, extra cash. I had to cut them off.

Though I soon acquired a stable of clients, every November it seemed I was scrambling to pay the rent. I sucked up my pride and hit the streets to sell door to door. Water filters, home insulation, sports videos, memberships, you name it, even vacuum cleaners.

I spent eight hours performing a demo for an Italian household. The extended family showed up to watch and applaud as my machine hoovered that mansion top to bottom. I thought they were going to adopt me. Alas, no sale.

I remember one cold, dark and stormy night somewhere out in Vacuumland huddling in a phone booth, demo machine in one hand and phone in the other as I listened to my agent promise me my script was all but sold. Alas, optioned three times, it’s yours, cheap.

One day the Revenue Department came snooping around to deny me my business expenses. It didn’t take her long to realize she couldn’t squeeze blood from a stone. Lost for words, she said, “Well, Mr. Reece…keep writing.”

Thank you, Ms. Klenck. And I did exactly that.

type-inI entered writing competitions—the 3-Day Novel Competition, Short Story Challenges, Screenplay Competitions, and Pitch-a-Plot workshops. But it is with special fondness that I remember the “24-Hour One-Act Play Competition”—all of us wannabe playwrights sequestered into one room.

Twelve hours into my scenario about a kid who is abducted off a golf course (well, they tell you to write what you know), I thought it would be wise to review what I’d written. I pushed back from my typewriter (that’s right, a typewriter!) and unenscrolled the paper from the rollers.

Typing on dot-matrix computer paperI was typing onto dot-matrix computer paper, you know, a continuous feed. I separated the sheets along the perforations and made a nice little stack which then fell to the floor. Thirty-five UN-NUMBERED sheets all helter-skelter.

I couldn’t organize the pages, couldn’t find the continuity, couldn’t put Humpty back together again. If I didn’t bolt from the room I was going to cry. It was 4:00 a.m.

Walking the streets, I was Miles and Roy and Henry and every fictional writer who ever agreed to let their creator thwart them to the point of despair and even self-loathing. Why weren’t the cameras rolling?

At a convenience store I suffocated my existential crisis with anchovy & garlic pizza. That I was a writer caused the proprietor to reflect on his own life, roads not taken, etc. Lamenting his lack of courage to lead an art-committed life, he said something along the lines of:

If you bring forth what is within you, what you bring forth will save you. If you do not bring forth what is within you, what you do not bring forth will destroy you.”

I knew there was a reason, besides my son’s ultimatum, why I was a writer.

At the same time I realized why I love movies about writers. As symbols of failure, writers depict Everyman at the brink of surrender. The struggling writer shows us what deep down we fear most—that the meaning of a life is to leave our old selves behind.

To be a writer is to have the courage to become unselved.

Spirits bolstered, I returned to the drama den—and damned if my abduction story didn’t win First Prize.

My words since then have earned me a million bucks, which, admittedly, spread over twenty years is a modest living. But I’m proud to count myself as someone struggling to bring forth what’s in him.

Who in their right mind would be a writer? I think that being a writer indicates nothing but right-mindedness.

But getting back to my son—I’d ring him for a golf game except the kid is doing so well that he’s off playing Pebble Beach. Last year it was The Old Course in St. Andrews. Next month Augusta National, it wouldn’t surprise me.

I might have to tell him to settle down.

PJ & son back then

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9. Flash Fiction Competition: Wilda Hearne Flash Fiction Contest

Wilda Hearne Flash Fiction Contest
Deadline: Entries must be postmarked by October 1, annually.
 
Fee: $15 check/money order/cash, made payable to Southeast Missouri State University Press, must accompany each entry. Fee includes a copy of Big Muddy in which the winning story appears.

 
Award: $500 and publication in an issue of Big Muddy: A Journal of the Mississippi River Valley.

Manuscripts submitted to the contest will be read and judged anonymously.

Submission Guidelines:
 

Submissions must not be previously published.
 

Submit a maximum of 500 words, double-spaced, with the following information on a separate cover page:
Contest title
Manuscript title
Author name
Address
Telephone number
Email (if available)
This information must not appear anywhere else on the manuscript.
 

Send a SASE for notification of results. Manuscripts will not be returned.
 

Failure to follow these guidelines may disqualify entry.

Mail entries with $15 reading fee to: 


Southeast Missouri State University Press
Wilda Hearne Flash Fiction Contest
One University Plaza, MS 2650
Cape Girardeau, MO 63701

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10. Poetry Competition: The Paumanok Poetry Award

The Paumanok Poetry Award Guidelines

The Visiting Writers Program at Farmingdale State College is pleased to announce the annual competition for The Paumanok Poetry Award.

One First Prize $1500 and expenses for a reading in our 2015 - 2016 series

Two Second Prizes $750 and expenses for a reading in our series

Interested writers should send

a cover letter
a one-paragraph bio
3-5 of their best poems (no more than 10 pages, total)
the required $25 entry fee to:

Margery L. Brown
English Department, Knapp Hall
Farmingdale State College
2350 Broadhollow Road
Farmingdale, New York 11735

Poems may be published or unpublished, and there are no restrictions on style, subject matter, or length of poems submitted: quality is the single criterion. Please note that the writer's name, address, and phone number should be clearly indicated on the cover page. Multiple entries will not be accepted. Entries from previous winners will not be considered.

Make checks payable to: Farmingdale State College, VWP.

Poems will not be returned, but writers who want to know the results of the competition by US mail should enclose a business-size SASE for results (notification by late December). Results are also published on this website.

Deadline: Postmark no later than September 15, 2014.

Please direct any questions or requests for clarification via email to Margery Brown.

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11. Essay Competition: Sacrifice Anthology Contest

Sacrifice Anthology Contest

Sacrifice Anthology Writing Contest – No Entry Fee
Email your submissions by midnight September 30, 2014 EST. to:


contestATsacrificeanthologyDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

Submissions accepted from June 15 – September 30, 2014
Winners will be announced by October 30, 2014.


Prizes:
1st Place: $50 and two copies of the anthology and will be included in the published anthology.
2nd Place: $30 and two copies of the anthology and will be included in the published anthology.
3rd Place: $20 and two copies of the anthology and will be included in the published anthology.

All other submissions accepted for publication in the anthology will receive one copy of the anthology. 


Theme: We seek submissions for inclusion in the upcoming inspirational essay anthology – Sacrifice – What Would You Give? Submit a personal essay about someone who sacrificed for you or for someone else, in whatever style you feel best expresses the story. Tell us what was done and how it impacted you or the person who received the benefit of the sacrifice.

Word Count: 1,000 – 2,000 word double spaced pages. Times New Roman 12pt.
If selected, your name and story will be in the book.

Open to legal residents of the United States age 18 or older at time of entry. Void where prohibited by law. (Entries will not be returned.) The three winners of the contest will be selected in a blind reading process. Simultaneous submissions are accepted.

The anthology essays will be collected by inspirational book and children’s book writer Eric Allen Jacobson and edited by published fiction and YA author Kelly Ann Jacobson. Original photographs by Eric Allen Jacobson

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12. Once upon a time... the end

In my past life, as a teacher, one of my most disliked tasks was marking. Not because I didn’t like reading my pupils’ work (though I often didn’t), but because having to assess a piece of writing against a set of increasingly arbitrary assessment objectives sometimes made me think it was all about jumping through hoops rather than the actual rules of good writing.

When I sat down a few weeks ago to judge a short story competition, I delighted in the fact that this time I was setting my own objectives, and they were pretty simple. Does this story work? Does it draw me in and keep me hooked? Do I feel confident in this writer’s hands?

I’ve won quite a few short story competitions, and it was flattering to be asked to judge this one. It was a fairly small, but very professionally-run competition, organised by a magazine. The magazine is Northern-Ireland-based, as am I, but attracted entries from all over the UK. The stories had been pre-shortlisted and were judged anonymously. Not knowing anything about a writer really makes you focus on what’s important in the story.


I’ve often read judges’ reports on competitions which say that the winner announced itself in the first few sentences, and I know agents and publishers often say that they can tell almost at once if a book is going to impress. This wasn’t my experience. Instead, though I found it easy to choose the winning story, several stories promised a great deal in the first paragraph, only to disappoint as the story went on. Some writers had put so much emphasis on that all-important hooking of the reader that they forgot to reel her in, and she was left dangling.

Several of the stories contained fantastic writing – really imaginative use of language. Heart-stopping moments. Intense character identification. Yet none of these stories was placed. Why? Because great use of language isn’t enough – a story has a job to do, and if it doesn’t do that, if it doesn’t take a character from A to B, it doesn’t matter how delightful its metaphors are. 


I write young adult fiction, and it’s normally a 70,000 word novel as opposed to a 2,000 word story. Yet I found the experience of assessing these stories really helped me to look dispassionately at my own work. Young adults, like short story judges, are hard to please. They aren’t fooled by metaphor-fur-coat and no story-knickers. They won’t keep going if a story doesn’t live up to early promise.


I enjoyed assessing these stories, and I’m looking forward to meeting the winners at the ceremony in November. But even more, I enjoyed being reminded of the nuts and bolts of good story-telling, and I hope my own readers stand to benefit from that.

0 Comments on Once upon a time... the end as of 9/13/2014 2:50:00 AM
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13. Call for Submissions and Chapbook Competition: Mohave River Review

Our fall 2014 issue features our very first chapbook contest! Our illustrious chapbook finalist judges panel includes Susan Tepper, Matthew Burnside, Allie Marini Batts, and Michael Dwayne Smith. You can read the judges' bios (and our previous issues) on our fall masthead.

MRR will publish four small chaps (20-25 pages each) within the fall issue of MRR; categories are poetry, flash fiction, hybrid, and flash non-fiction. Our issues are typically 220+ pages, so the plan is to publish four winning chaps within the issue, along with 100+ pages of general submissions, art, and interviews. Fun!

All entries will be read by MRR staff, and final determination of contest winning submissions will be made by our panel of judges: Allie Marini Batts, Matthew Burnside, Susan Tepper, and Michael Dwayne Smith. The chapbook guidelines and contest entry fee for each genre are on the Submissions page. 


Entry Fee: $5.00 per category

Contest entries close 10/1.

Here's the info about the general submissions:

In February, June, and October we publish poetry, fiction, non-fiction, hybrid works, chap/book reviews, plus articles or interviews relevant to arts and letters in the southwestern USofA. Please reference below the specific parameters for each category (max length, etcetera). And remember: if you wish to submit quality creative work that doesn't fit guidelines, we're always open to conversation about innovative goodness; please do contact us at:


mojaveriverpressATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

We're genuinely eclectic, open to all styles and topics, but are especially interested in poets, writers, and works related to southwest/desert culture(s). Read issues of Mojave River Review and dig for yourself. They're online and free. Works deemed by MRR as hateful and/or mean-spirited (misogynistic, racist, etc.) will be rejected without further consideration.

Simultaneous submissions are fine. Previously published work is not.

Here's the submissions website.

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14. Poetry Competition: Everett Southwest Literary Award


Poetry Contest: $5,000 Everett Southwest Literary Award
 
The fifth bi-annual Everett Southwest Literary Award open October 5th, 2014 and accepts unpublished poetry manuscripts of 75+ pages through December 5th, 2014. American Book Award winner Allison Hedge Coke to judge. Poets living in or writing about Oklahoma, New Mexico, or Texas are eligible. The winner will be announced in spring 2015.
 
Please send your manuscript, with your name appearing only on a separate title page, along with a $15.00 submission fee and SASE for notification of contest results to:

The Everett Southwest Literary Prize
c/o English Department
University of Central Oklahoma
100 N. University Drive
Edmond, OK 73034 

See our website for information about the award and for full contest details.

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15. Flash Fiction Competition: Gemini Magazine

The deadline for Gemini Magazine’s Sixth Annual Flash Fiction Contest is September 2, 2014. The grand prize is $1,000. Second place wins $100 and four honorable mentions each win $25. All six finalists will be published online in the October 2014 issue of Gemini. 

Maximum length: 1,000 words. Any style, subject or genre. 

Writers' names are removed from entries before reading, so each entry gets an equal chance. Both new and established writers have won our fiction contests. 

Entry fee: $4 ($3 for each additional entry). Full details at our website.

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16. Essay Competition: The C.G. Jung Society of St. Louis

The C.G. Jung Society of St. Louis is sponsoring an essay contest on the intersection of ecology and Jungian psychology, in preparation for our conference, which is coming up in 2015. This is the 3rd such contest we've sponsored, and each time, the winners are invited to a writer's evening at our conference where they read their work. We also publish a compilation of the winners, and space permitting, honorable mentions. There are monetary prizes as well.
 
Entry fee: $10.00
 
First Place Award: $1000
 
Deadline: October 1, 2014 
 
Please visit our website for more information.

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17. Translation Competition: Lunch Ticket's Gabo Prize for Literature in Translation or Multi-Lingual Texts


Lunch Ticket is now accepting submissions for our new Gabo Prize for Literature in Translation or Multi-Lingual Texts. Literary translation is crucial to writers of all cultures. Gabriel García Márquez completes what Edith Grossman details as a "Translation Loop" in her book, Why Translation Matters. Without a translator, Cervantes' Don Quixote would never have been read by William Faulkner, whose work, in turn, was translated into Spanish and influenced the work of Gabriel García Márquez, whose work has been translated into over a hundred languages, influencing authors from America to Japan. Translation makes for the possibility of untold numbers of these "loops of influence”—without which, we might never read the work of writers we could literally not imagine a world without (nor would most of us want to). For that reason, we have named this prize to honor "Gabo"Gabriel García Márquez.

Please indicate whether your translation falls under poetry or prose, and refer to standard Lunch Ticket guidelines for work submitted in our preferred format. 
 
Please include the original work along with your translation, and a document showing that you have permission to publish the original work. Original, bilingual work may be submitted under the translation category; if this describes your work, please indicate this clearly in your cover letter, as the permissions requirements for your submission will be different. Please note when submitting translations that the responsibility for clearing rights and permissions for the translated works, and the payment of any related fees, lies with the translator. If you are unsure whether or not you have obtained the correct permissions, we suggest you contact ALTA, or use their resources to ensure that you are in compliance with our requirements for publication: http://www.utdallas.edu/alta/publications/alta-guides
 
The winner will receive $200, and the winning piece will be featured in the next issue of Lunch Ticket alongside the two semi-finalists.  
 
For further details and submission manager, visit our website.

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18. Call for Submissions and Contest: Consequence Magazine

CONSEQUENCE magazine, the literary magazine addressing the culture and consequences of war, is currently accepting submissions of fiction and poetry for its Spring 2015 issue. All submissions must be received by October 1st. 

Guidelines for submitting can be found on our website

CONSEQUENCE magazine, the literary magazine addressing the culture and consequences of war, announces the 2014 Consequence Prize in Fiction. The winning story will be published in the Spring 2015 issue and the author will received a cash prize of $250. 

Submissions for the contest must be received by October 1st. Please visit our website for submission guidelines.

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19. Poetry Competition: Benjamin Saltman Poetry Award

BENJAMIN SALTMAN Poetry Award.

$3000 Award. 

Deadline: August 31, 2014. 

Final Judge: Douglas Kearney.

The winner of the 2014 Benjamin Saltman Award will be announced in 2015. Established in 1998, in honor of the poet Benjamin Saltman (1927-1999), this award is for a previously unpublished original collection of poetry. Awarded collection is selected through an annual competition which is open to all poets. This year’s final judge will be Douglas Kearney. Award is $3000 and publication of the awarded collection by Red Hen Press. 

Entry fee is $25.00. Name on cover sheet only, 48 page minimum. Send SASE for notification. Entries must be postmarked by August 31.

Go here for more information.

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20. Essay Contest for Writers 18 and Younger: Creative Minds Writing Contest

Creative Minds Writing Contest

Submit here.

We invite submissions for Imagine’s Creative Minds Essay Contest.
The first-place winner will be published in the January/February issue of Imagine. Second- and third-place winners will be excerpted in print and published in full online. Winners will receive copies of the issue in which their work appears.
Winners will be announced in the Jan/Feb issue of Imagine and on the Imagine website.

Contest Guidelines:
Entrants must be 18 years old or younger.
Entries must be received by 5:00 ET on Friday, November 7, 2014.
There is no theme or topic for this competition. Essays may be any work of creative nonfiction including, but not limited to, memoirs, personal essays, travel writing, and lyric essays. We will not accept book reports, critical works, or research papers.
Essays must not exceed 1,000 words and must be titled.
Entrants may submit up to two essays.

Entries must include text only. Do not include photographs, illustrations, or background graphics or colors.
Essays must be entrant’s original work. Essays that have won other contests or that have appeared in any print or online publications are not eligible.

Save all essays in a single Microsoft Word document with your last name as the file name. Submit your entry online here.

Questions may be directed to:

mhartmanATjhuDOTedu (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

See the winning essays from previous years in our essay archives.

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21. Poetry Collection Competition and Artist Residency: The Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize

The Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize (formerly the Lexi Rudnitsky Poetry Prize) is a collaboration between Persea Books and The Lexi Rudnitsky Poetry Project. This annual competition sponsors the publication of a poetry collection by an American woman poet who has yet to publish a full-length book of poems. The winner receives an advance of $1,000.00 and publication of her collection by Persea.

In addition, the winner receives the option of an all-expenses-paid residency at the Civitella Ranieri Center, a renowned artists retreat housed in a fifteenth-century castle in Umbertide, Italy.

 

Submission and Eligibility Guidelines:
• Entrants must be women with American citizenship.
• Submitted manuscripts should include two title pages: one containing the author's name, the author's contact information, and the title of the collection; and another containing only the title of the collection.
• Submitted manuscripts should be at least 40 pages. They should be paginated, with the title of the collection included on each page as a header or footer, and fastened with a clip. Please do not staple or permanently bind submissions.
• Submissions may include a page of publication credits. However, they should not include other sorts of acknowledgments, thank-yous, or dedications.
• Submissions must be primarily in English to be considered. Translations are not accepted.
For the purposes of this contest, a previously published full-length book is defined as a volume of at least 40 pages in an edition of 500 or more copies that has been made readily available through trade distribution (i.e. local and/or on-line booksellers, including Amazon.com). Any woman who has published a book that meets these criteria is ineligible.
• Simultaneous submissions are accepted. Please contact us immediately if you must withdraw your manuscript(s) from consideration.
Submissions must be postmarked between September 1st and October 31st (or the first weekday thereafter if October 31st falls on a Sunday). They should be sent to: 


The Lexi Rudnitsky Poetry Prize, c/o Persea Books
PO Box 1388
Columbia, MO 65205

and should include a check (in U.S. funds) in the amount of $25.00, made payable to the order of The Lexi Rudnitsky Poetry Project. Please do not send submissions to Persea’s New York City office.

• Entry fees are nonrefundable.
• Submissions should be sent via USPS First Class, Priority, or Express mail. We reserve the right to disqualify submissions sent by other methods (e.g. USPS Media Mail) should they reach us after the postmark deadline.


The winner is chosen by an anonymous selection committee and announced on Persea's web site in January. Submitted manuscripts will not be returned.

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22. Poetry Book Competitions: New Issues Press

The 2015 Green Rose Prize

$2,000 and publication for a book of poems by an established poet

Guidelines:

Eligibility: Poets writing in English who have already published one or more full-length collections of poetry. We will consider individual collections and volumes of new and selected poems. Besides the winner, New Issues may publish as many as three additional manuscripts from this competition.
Please include a $25 reading fee. Checks should be made payable to New Issues Press.
Postmark Deadline: September 30, 2014. The winning manuscript will be named in January 2015 and published in the spring of 2016.

The 2014 New Issues Poetry Prize
$2,000 and publication for a first book of poems
Judge: to be determined

Guidelines:
Eligibility: Poets writing in English who have not previously published or self-published a full-length collection (48+ pages) of poems.
Please include a $20 reading fee. Checks should be made payable to New Issues Press.
Postmark Deadline: November 30, 2014. The winning manuscript will be named in May 2015 and published in the spring of 2016.

General Guidelines:
Submit a manuscript at least 48 pages in length, typed on one side, single-spaced preferred. Photocopies are acceptable. Please do not bind manuscript. Include a brief bio, relevant publication information, cover page with name, address, phone number, and title of the manuscript, and a page with only the title.
Enclose a stamped, self-addressed postcard for notification that the manuscript has been received. For notification of title and author of the winning manuscript enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Manuscripts will be recycled.

A manuscript may be submitted that is being considered elsewhere but New Issues should be notified upon the manuscript’s acceptance elsewhere.

Send manuscripts and queries to:

The New Issues Poetry Prize
(or) The Green Rose Prize
New Issues Poetry & Prose
Western Michigan University
1903 West Michigan Ave.
Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5463

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23. Fiction Competition: The Iowa Short Fiction Award and John Simmons Short Fiction Award

The Iowa Short Fiction Award & John Simmons Short Fiction Award 

Eligibility

Any writer who has not previously published a volume of prose fiction is eligible to enter the competition. Previously entered manuscripts that have been revised may be resubmitted. Writers are still eligible if they have published a volume of poetry or any work in a language other than English or if they have self-published a work in a small print run. Writers are still eligible if they are living abroad or are non-US citizens writing in English. Current University of Iowa students are not eligible.
Manuscript

The manuscript must be a collection of short stories in English of at least 150 word-processed, double-spaced pages. We do not accept e-mail submissions. The manuscript may include a cover page, contents page, etc., but these are not required. The author's name can be on every page but this is not required. Stories previously published in periodicals are eligible for inclusion. There is no reading fee; please do not send cash, checks, or money orders. Reasonable care is taken, but we are not responsible for manuscripts lost in the mail or for the return of those not accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We assume the author retains a copy of the manuscript.


Publication

Award-winning manuscripts will be published by the University of Iowa Press under the Press's standard contract.


Submission

Manuscripts should be mailed to:
Iowa Short Fiction Award
Iowa Writers' Workshop
507 North Clinton Street
102 Dey House
Iowa City IA 52242-1000

No application forms are necessary. Entries for the competition should be postmarked between August 1 and September 30; packages must be postmarked by September 30. Announcement of the winners will be made early in the following year on our Facebook page and Twitter account.


Previous Winners

Potential entrants wishing to read stories by previous winners may order The Iowa Award: The Best Stories from Twenty Years and The Iowa Award: The Best Stories, 1991ñ2000, both selected by Frank Conroy.

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24. Micro-Fiction Competition: River Styx

River Styx 2015 Schlafly Beer Micro-Brew Micro-Fiction Contest

Enter online.


$1500 First Prize plus one case of micro-brewed Schlafly Beer
Judged by the editors of River Styx
Submissions open August 1, 2014
500 words maximum per story, up to three stories per entry.

 
Entry fee: $10 or $20. $20 entry fee includes a one-year subscription (3 issues). $10 entry fee includes a copy of the issue in which the winning stories will appear.
Include name and address on the cover letter only.
All stories will be considered for publication.
Previously published stories, including those that have appeared on websites, blogs, and personal home pages, are not eligible.
Though submissions are anonymous, judges will remove from consideration any entries they recognize as having been written by writers with whom they have worked or studied.
1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners and honorable mentions will be published in the spring issue.
Contest results will be announced in April.

Enter by mail or online via Submittable. To enter by mail, include an S.A.S.E. for notification of contest results and a check payable to River Styx Magazine. Entries must be received by December 31. Mail entries to:


River Styx Schlafly Beer Micro-Brew Micro-Fiction Contest
3547 Olive Street, Suite 107
St. Louis MO 63103

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25. Short Fiction Competition: Boston Review

Submit online.

Deadline: October 1, 2014
Judge: Ruth Ozeki


Prize: $1,500

 
Complete guidelines:
The winning author will receive $1,500 and have his or her work published in the July/August 2015 issue of Boston Review. Runners up may also be published. Stories should not exceed 5,000 words and must be previously unpublished. Mailed manuscripts should be double-spaced and submitted with a cover note listing the author’s name, address, and phone number. No cover note is necessary for online submission. Names should not appear on the stories themselves. Any author writing in English is eligible, unless he or she is a current student, former student, relative, or close friend of the judge. Simultaneous submissions are not permitted, submissions will not be returned, and submissions may not be modified after entry. 


A non-refundable $20 entry fee, payable to Boston Review in the form of a check or money order or by credit card, must accompany each story entered. All submitters receive a complimentary half-year subscription (3 issues) to Boston Review. 

Submissions must be postmarked no later than October 1, 2014. The winner will be notified in the spring of 2015 and publicly announced by July on the Boston Review Web site.

Please enter online using our contest entry manager. This requires payment using a credit card.


Or mail submissions to:
Short Story Contest, Boston Review
PO Box 425786
Cambridge, MA 02142

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