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1. Agent Looking for Clients

MarykAgent Mary Krienke: Mary joined Sterling Lord Literistic in 2006 after receiving her MFA in Fiction from Columbia University. She now lives in Brooklyn.

Mary works with Sterling Lord and represents literary fiction, creative nonfiction, and realistic YA that pays close attention to craft and voice. She is especially drawn to new and emerging writers who seek to push boundaries of form and content, and she responds most strongly to writing that reaches great emotional and psychological depths. She is equally interested in work that illuminates through humor or by playing with genre. Her other interests include psychology, art, and design.

How to submit: You can email Mary with your submissions. For fiction, please send a synopsis and the first three chapters or a 50 page sample. If submitting non-fiction, send a detailed proposal.

Queries should be sent to info @ sll.com with “Attn: Mary Krienke” in the email subject line. Cover letters should be in the body of the email but send the actual submission as a Word document attachment.

You can find Mary on Twitter: @MaryKrienke.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Agent, authors and illustrators, Editor & Agent Info, opportunity, Places to sumit, Publishers and Agencies, Young Adult Novel Tagged: Mary Krienke, Sterling Lord Literistic

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2. No Fee Short Story Contest

KendraShedenhelm_YouTheMagician_Space

Kendra Shedenhelm sent in this “out-of this world” illustration from an upcoming book she illustrated titled, “You, the Magician.” You can visit her site at http://kendrashedenhelm.com/.

Creative Writing Institute’s

International Short Story Contest Now Open

No Entry Fee

DIRECTIONS: Read all guidelines (rules) carefully.

CASH PRIZES!

First place: $200 USD or a free writing course with a personal tutor, valued at $260, + publication in our anthology and eBook.

Second place: $100 USD or a credit of $150 toward a writing course with a personal tutor, valued at $260, + publication in our anthology and eBook.

Third place: $50 USD or a credit of $100 toward a writing course with a personal tutor, valued at $260, + publication in our anthology and eBook.

Plus: seven additional Judge’s Choice stories will receive publication in our anthology & Ebook, entitledWhat Could Possibly go Wrong?

ONE submission per person

  • When you’re ready to submit, scroll to the bottom of the page at http://CreativeWritingInstitute.Submittable.com/submit and click on SUBMIT. Entries will only be accepted on that form. Fill out your name and address, and follow the prompts to a space where you can copy and paste your document into it.  Do NOT send attachments or emailed entries as these will NOT be accepted.
  • Especially note our requirements for G-rated literature. Please see #1 below for further definition.
  • By entering this contest, you are saying this story has not been previously published, you grant minor editing rights for publication, and Creative Writing Institute has first, non-exclusive, electronic rights and First North American Print Rights to publish the winners and Judge’s Choice stories in our anthology, “What Could Possibly go Wrong?” All Rights return to the author upon publication.

This is a themed contest. Your story must be original and unpublished (except on personal blogs, critique groups, or personal web pages) and must be between 1,000 and 2,000 words.

Your story may be any genre, but these exact sentences must appear together in the story:

I have a list and a map. What could possibly go wrong?

Accepting submissions until midnight, August 9, 2014, USA Eastern Standard Time.

  • Entries will only be accepted through the submission form. As you go through the submission process, there will be a space for you to copy and paste your document into. Do NOT send attachments or emailed entries as these will NOT be accepted.

ENTRIES MUST FOLLOW THESE GUIDELINES OR BE DISQUALIFIED.

1. Any genre: Horror, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Humor, Romance, Children, etc., No erotica, profanity, swearing, or gore. (Swearing includes but is not limited to the following: hell, damn, bitch, taking God’s name in vain, and other similar words.) This is a “G” rated contest. One swear word will disqualify your entry. Good writers can make their point by showing the character’s attitudes. Questions? Query the head judge at cwicontests@gmail.com.

2. Entries must be 1,000 to 2,000 words. (This is a strict word count, but don’t count the title or personal information in the word count.) Place the word count at the top of page 1 before submitting.

3. One entry per person, please.

4. By entering this contest, you are stating that the story is your own copyright. You are stating that it has NOT been previously published by a professional or semi-professional publication. You are stating that you grant minor editing rights for publication, and if chosen, Creative Writing Institute has first, non-exclusive, electronic rights and First North American Print Rights to publish the winners and Judge’s Choice stories in our anthology, “What Could Possibly go Wrong?” All Rights return to the author upon publication.

5. Entries will be judged on originality, creativity, style, and technique.

6. Be sure that your entry has been proofread and edited. Points will be deducted for poorly structured sentences, spelling mistakes, and grammatical errors. Your entry should reflect your commitment to writing.

7. Read tips and tricks on how to win a contest on http://www.cwinst.com .

Winners will be notified by email on or before September 12, 2014.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Competition, Contest, opportunity, Places to sumit, writing Tagged: Cash Prizes, Creative Writing, No Entry Fee, Publication in anthology, Publication in ebook, Short Story contest

0 Comments on No Fee Short Story Contest as of 7/28/2014 2:32:00 AM
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3. The New Vision Award – Get Published

AiWS final

Another great illustration from the Artist Showcase at the NJSCBWI Conference. It was created by Lynnor Bontigao and is titled, “Alice’s Adventure in WonderShore”. You can visit Lynoor at: www.lynnorbontigao.com

Tu Books is accepting submissions for their second New Visions Second Annual New Vision Awards. The New Visions Award, established in 2012 by the Tu Books imprint of LEE & LOW BOOKS, is given to a middle grade or young adult fantasy, science fiction, or mystery novel by a writer of color. It’s a fantastic chance for new authors of color to break into the world of publishing for young readers.

Eligibility and Contest Submission

The New Visions contest is open to writers of color who are residents of the United States and who have not previously had a middle grade or young adult novel published.

The Award winner receives a cash prize of $1000 and our standard publication contract, including our basic advance and royalties for a first time author. An Honor Award winner will receive a cash prize of $500.

Manuscripts will be accepted through October 31st, 2014. See the full submissions guidelines here.

Spread the Word

Did you know that last year, books written by authors of color made up less than seven percent of the total number of books published (see these CCBC stats)?

Change requires more than just goodwill; it requires concrete action. We were heartened by First Book’s recent commitment to purchasing 10,000 copies of select books from “new and underrepresented voices” and the success of the passionate #weneeddiversebooks movement.

Likewise, the New Visions Award is a concrete step toward evening the playing field by seeking out talented new authors of color who might otherwise remain under the radar of mainstream publishing.

We hope you’ll help us spread the word by forwarding on this email; sharing the contest on Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr; and of course, letting people know through good old word-of-mouth.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: authors and illustrators, awards, Competition, Middle Grade Novels, opportunity, Places to sumit, Publishers and Agencies, Young Adult Novel Tagged: New Vision Award, Tor Books

3 Comments on The New Vision Award – Get Published, last added: 7/10/2014
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4. Women In Nature Books: Call For Submissions

Women in Nature: An Anthology, is the first book in the WIN-Women in Nature Series.  The WIN series are collections of stories from women all across the North American continent… and beyond!  These are true stories about the varied ways in which these women relate to ‘nature’ and our natural environment.  Each book also contains complete chapters by prominent and passionate women, experienced in related aspects of ‘nature’.  Subsequent WIN books will include: WIN on Dwelling; WIN on Indigenous Ways; WIN on Food, WIN on Adventure; WIN on Water;  WIN on Healing; WIN on Children; and more!

 

OPEN FOR SUBMISSIONS!
We have received some amazing stories for our first WIN – Women in Nature book.   

We are looking for good fun engaging stories!  Inspiring, uplifting, adventurous, funny, stories … of your relationship with ‘nature’!

 

CALL FOR  Your True Nature Stories!!!

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

Picture

From wilderness living to urban gardening, we want your personal stories that reflect a transforming or transcending connection to ‘nature’.  We are looking for stories that can open our perspectives conceptually, or ‘show us how’ to do something experientially.  We’re talking about living with the earth, not on her.  How do women connect with nature, and the reciprocal and essential relationship with the earth and all that is in it?

Guidelines:

  1. Your story must be true.
  2. Your story should be told in first person
  3. Good quality writing is as essential to your story, as is your story.
  4. Your story should relate to a personal experience that then translates into insight, advice, creative ideas, or transcending awareness!
  5. Your (funny, somber, endearing, emotional or otherwise) story should be between 750 – 2000 words
  6. If your story is chosen, you will be given author exposure, as well as varied options for compensation including copies of the book, discounts, (and other monetary and non-monetary rewards to be further specified.)
  7. We are currently accepting stories from women (as this is a women’s anthology) from ages 18 and on…. however, we are open to stories from men… about women.

Submissions should include: Your story and a brief (50 word) author bio..

SUBMIT TO SPECIFIC WIN BOOKS AS FOLLOWS:


FOOD
The objective of the WIN – Women in Nature on Food book, is to generate an awareness of the food we eat, where it comes from, and how what we eat affects all life on this planet.
We are looking for your true stories about food, particularly stories that celebrate sustainable and organic food and food sources as they relate to our natural environment.  We also welcome stories that reflect the emotional relationship humans have with food, as well as stories that encourage an awareness of connection.

 

SUBMIT YOUR STORIES ON FOOD TO    carly.womeninnature@gmail.com     DEADLINE foe submissions 1 September 2014

 

ADVENTURE
The objective of the WIN – Women in Nature on Adventure book is to encourage awareness, respect and intimacy as we seek out adventure.  We are looking for your true stories about your adventures in, and more significantly ‘with’, nature.  Adventures – hiking, climbing, deep sea diving, dog sledding, kayaking, spelunking, wilderness research, horseback riding, swimming, mountaineering, skiing, surfing – can unfortunately sometimes become an activity of disregard and disrespect.  We are looking for experiences that celebrate and appreciate the beauty and awe of the natural environment – and instill an intimacy and awareness of reciprocity – while experiencing all of the challenges, adventures, and inspiration nature has to offer!

 

SUBMIT YOUR STORIES ON ADVENTURE TO    carol.womeninnature@yahoo.com      DEADLINE foe submissions 1 September 2014
 
CHILDREN
The objective of the WIN – Women in Nature on Children book is to encourage the engagement of children with the natural environment, and to nurture an understanding of their existential and intimate relationship with all living things. We are looking for your true stories about children and their relationship with nature. We welcome stories about your childhood experiences in nature, as well as stories about getting children into nature, and your experiences observing children in nature. All stories should move beyond children merely playing an activity outdoors and should focus on the interaction with nature.
 
SUBMIT YOUR STORIES ON CHILDREN TO   
roslyn.womeninnature@gmail.com       DEADLINE for submissions 1 September 2014
 
HEALING
The objective of the WIN – Women in Nature on Healing book is to encourage an understanding of our reciprocal relationship with the nature, and how the health of the earth and our own health are intimately intertwined.  We are looking for your true stories about healing, both the healing of nature and how nature heals us.  This includes both physical and emotional healing through anything from plants and animals, to the healing power of simply being in nature’s bliss.

SUBMIT YOUR STORIES ON HEALING TO    carol.womeninnature@yahoo.com        DEADLINE foe submissions 1 October 2014

GENERAL – For stories that do not fit into any of the above categories, please submit through our standard contact form below.
And, watch for more WIN titles and varying submission deadlines.

IDEAS… to get you started
We are looking for any  personal story that connects you to ‘nature’.organic or urban gardening  FOOD
foraging for wild edibles  FOOD
camping under the stars  ADVENTURE
live trapping bugs and setting them free outside
kayaking and white water rafting  ADVENTURE
rock climbing and mountaineering  ADVENTURE
nurturing a wounded critter  HEALING
painting your house with natural pigments  DWELLING
natural everday living stuff  CHILDREN
hiking and backpacking  ADVENTURE
mushrooming  FOOD
natural horseback riding  ADVENTURE
collecting rainwater  FOOD
composting  DWELLING/HEALING/FOOD
passive solar heating  DWELLING/ENERGY
getting fire from friction  DWELLING/ENERGY
building a natural shelter  DWELLING
cooking on an open fire  FOOD
hunting and fishing  FOOD/CHILDREN
creating an outdoor labyrinth  HEALING
braintanning hides  DWELLING
working with animals  ANIMALS/HEALING
water – rivers, snow, streams, oceans  WATER/HEALING
shearing and spinning wool  ANIMALS/DWELLING
teaching children about nature  CHILDREN
research field work  ADVENTURE/HEALING
building a sweatliodge  HEALING
sleeping outside on your back deck  CHILDREN

etc…. etc
 
A story about anything that
connects you
to the earth!

 
Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Author, Book, need to know, opportunity, Places to sumit Tagged: Anthology, Book Series, Call for Submissions, Get published opportunity, Women in Nature

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5. Price Drop – Revise Your Novel in a Month

jillandmarthaSince, agent Jill Corcoran is such a good marketer, I am sure most of you already know about the video series that author of the PLOT WHISPERER, Martha Alderson and literary agent Jill Corcoran released three months ago.

You can watch the first video in the series for free, which I did last week. It was very good and since I watched it, I’ve been wondering how I could come up with the money to rent the rest of the series.

Today, Martha and Jill lowered the price to $75.00 to rent the 8 part series for a whole year, so now I can afford to buy the series and learn from what they have put together.

If you are a picture book writer, they even have something for you. You can pre-order: How to Write & Sell A Picture Book- Pre-Order and SAVE $25 https://vimeo.com/ondemand/writesellpicturebook

Here is the information for the Revising Your Novel in a Month: http://vimeo.com/ondemand/reviseyournovelinamonth

In this 8 Video (5.5 hours) Series, Plot Whisperer Martha Alderson and Literary Agent Jill Corcoran provide step-by-step instruction on how to revise your
• Concept
• Structure and design
• Tension and conflict
• Character growth and transformation
• Pacing
• Cause and effect
• Meaning
• Hook
• Polish
• Prose
in preparation for a major rewrite of your novel.

To complete the course in a month, watch two videos a week. Or, work at your own pace and take more or less time on the step-by-step exercises. You decide your revision pace as you explore and complete each video exercise based on your own individual needs in preparation for a major rewrite.
• 8 videos (available for viewing as many times as you would like for 1 year)
• 30 writing exercises- one for each day of the Revise Your Novel Month

apathtopublishing.com/for-those-who-purchased-aptp-videos/

PlotWriMo: REVISE YOUR NOVEL IN A MONTH
I. TRAILER
a. Introduction
II. OVERALL STORY LEVEL
a. Video #1: HOW TO REVISE + CONCEPT & CHARACTERS
• Welcome
• How to Approach Revision
• Organization
• Concept
• Characters
• Story Titles
III. PLOT AND STRUCTURE LEVEL
a. Video #2: TRANSFORMATION + GOALS
• Review
• Layers of Plot
• Transformation / Change
• Goals
b. Video #3: CONCEPT + ENERGETIC MARKERS
• Review
• Concept
• Energetic Markers
• Plot Planner
IV. SCENE LEVEL
a. Video #4: SCENES AND THEMES
• Review
• Scene and Summary
• Themes
• Character Motivation
• Antagonist
b. Video #5: CLIMAX
• Review
• Preparation
• Anticipation
• Event
• Reaction
• 3 Major Plot Lines
• Antagonist Crisis
c. Video #6: BEGINNING & END
• Review
• Beginning
• Traits, Skills, Knowledge, Beliefs
• Cause and Effect
• Antagonists
V. WORD LEVEL
a. Video #7: MANUSCRIPT VOICE + CHARACTER & ACTION
• Voice
• Transformational Journey
• Backstory Wound
• Subplots and Theme
• Crisis

b. Video #8: FIRST PAGES + FINAL TEST
• Every Word Perfect
• Sentence structure
• Dialog
• Prepare for Rewrite
• Rewrite
• Concept
• Structure and design
• Tension and conflict
• Character growth and transformation
• Pacing
• Cause and effect
• Meaning
• Hook
• Polish
• Prose
To complete the course in a month, watch two videos a week. Or, work at your own pace and take more or less time on the step-by-step exercises. You decide your revision pace as you explore and complete each video exercise based on your own individual needs in preparation for a major rewrite.
• 8 Instructional videos (available for viewing as many times as you would like for 1 year)
• 30 writing exercises- one for each day of the Revise Your Novel Month
Who will benefit from PlotWriMo: Revise Your Novel in a Month:
• Writers seeking to write a great novel
• Writers with a draft of a novel and uncertain how to proceed
• Writers with story problems
• Writers who feel blocked
• Writers who wish to move from where they are to where you wish to be
• Writers committed to improving your craft
• Writers interested in digging deeper into your story
• Writers needing help organizing for a major rewrite

Dolly D. Napal watched the series and said, “Don’t let the title fool you. This is not only a revision course. It’s a fully comprehensive writing course for PB, MG, YA, and Adult writers, at any point in their career.”

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Advice, Agent, Author, opportunity, Process, reference, revisions, video Tagged: Jill Corcoran, Martha Alderson, Novel Revsion Video series, Plot Whisperer

3 Comments on Price Drop – Revise Your Novel in a Month, last added: 7/25/2014
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6. Free Fall Friday – Possible Opening & Kudos

amal10_small
Another wonderful illustration by Amal Karzai. Thought it showed the feeling of this post. Website: http://www.amalillustration.com Blog: http://amalimages.blogspot.co.uk/

There might be a spot opening up at the Avalon Full Manuscript Critique Writer’s Retreat. If you are one of the people who have been kicking yourself for not getting in for this opportunity to get a critique with Agent Ammi-Joan Pacquette from Erin Murphy Agency or Agent Heather Alexander from Pippin Properties, send me an email and I will get back with you.

WOO HOO! It seems like a number of you jumped on the post where I told you about Schoolwide.com had a call out for submissions, because I’ve heard from a number of writers this week who have heard back from them. Most have received very nice letters showing interest in their manuscript and asking for revisions, which is great and could be a start of something big, but Sheila Fuller had her book ALL NIGHT SINGING accepted. Congratulations Sheila!

Christopher Behrens’ finished his book, found an illustrator whose work has been on The Today Show, used Jim Whiting and Writer’s Digest for editing, then self-published his book Savanna’s Treasure this past spring.

Kirkus gave him a good review in June and now The Community Life Newspaper wrote an article the book.  If you would like to read the article, here is the link: http://www.northjersey.com/arts-and-entertainment/books/longtime-dpw-employee-pens-first-children-s-book-1.1052358

Savanna’s Treasure is available everywhere online and in all formats, including the ebook.

Two of the comments from Kirkus:

“…story enriched by an inspiring animal alliance….a good fit for early readers.” —Kirkus Reviews

 

Good job Chris!

 

Check back next Friday for the First Page Results.

 

Talk tomorrow,

 

Kathy

Filed under: authors and illustrators, Conferences and Workshops, Illustrator Sites, Kudos, opportunity Tagged: Amal Karzai, Christopher Behrens, Free Fall Friday, Schoolwide.com, Sheila Fuller

6 Comments on Free Fall Friday – Possible Opening & Kudos, last added: 7/25/2014
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7. Get Published: Tuscany Prize for Catholic Fiction Contest

happy father day

Tuscany Prize for Catholic Fiction

tuscany-prize-23

The Tuscany Prize for Catholic Fiction is a literary prize to promote writers and great undiscovered stories of Catholic fiction.

What is Catholic fiction? Stories that capture the imagination of the reader and are infused with the presence of God and faith — subtly, symbolically or deliberately.

Think of Flannery O’Connor, Graham Greene, J.R.R. Tolkien and G.K. Chesterton and many others whose writings reflected the thoughts of the great writer Gerard Manley Hopkins: “The world is charged with the grandeur of God.”

This is the “stuff” of literature that wins the Tuscany Prize.

tuscanyright_sidebarDo you have a manuscript? A Novel? A Young Adult Novel? A short story? Would you like it published?

Does your story have themes of faith and struggle, of grace and nature, atonement, courage, redemption and hope? Whether it is fiction, historical fiction, mystery, fantasy or humor, the Tuscany Press is open to all genres.

FEE: $10

DEADLINE: June 30th

We seek original great stories of unpublished/self-published works of fiction. 

Are you the next great writer of Catholic fiction?

We invite you to send in your manuscript. 

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT

Tuscany Press publishes young adult (YA) novels that parents can trust and which young people, ages 12–17, will enjoy and want to read. Our goal is to provide passionate authors an avenue to reach a young adult audience with well-written stories of challenge and growth within a Catholic worldview. Our young adult fiction earns the trust of parents. Please read our “novel guidelines” for an explanation of what makes Catholic fiction. Guidelines for a Tuscany Press Catholic Young Adult Novel:

More than 50,000 words.

  • The protagonist/narrator must be young (between the ages of 12 and 17). The best way to appeal to the YA audience is to present fiction focused through the point of view (POV) of a young protagonist who is in roughly the same age bracket as our target audience. Young adults want to be able to relate to the protagonist.
  • Characters must be well drawn and believable.  The actions and dialogue should be appropriate for the ages of the characters.
  •  The story must contain a Catholic perspective. Our young adult fiction must have characters or heroes that support and exemplify a Catholic worldview. (See our “novel guidelines” for an explanation of what makes Catholic fiction.) The characters may not start out with a Catholic perspective, but should end with a Catholic perspective.  Also, not all characters will have a Catholic perspective.  Good fiction contains conflict.  Young adults understand that not everyone or every action is morally good.

Please note that good Catholic young adult fiction might never mention Christ, the Church, or the faith. Instead, Tuscany Press YA fiction is infused with grace and a morality consistent (through characters and their actions) with Catholic teaching.

  • Tuscany Press YA fiction must be good writing for a YA audience. Young adult fiction is not an excuse for poor writing. Teens don’t appreciate (or tolerate) being talked down to. Don’t shy away from or sanitize real life. The story must be entertaining. The story must capture readers’ imaginations, engage their interest immediately and be well paced throughout the book and chapters.

Please note that one boring (e.g., informational) chapter may lose a reader. Also note that our stories should offer hope. Humorous scenes are not a requirement, but we believe that humor makes a better YA story.

  • Our young adult novels will ideally appeal to both genders and the entire span of our readers’ age range. However, it is difficult to write for both boys and girls.  Do not shy away from making the story appeal to either boys or girls.  Remember, if the main protagonist is a boy, then the story will likely appeal to boys.  If the protagonist is a girl, then the story will likely appeal to girls.

A story should have Catholic meaning—that is, small instances of the theme(s) being explored, sprinkled throughout the story, culminating in a Catholic theme that somehow presents a Catholic message or truth that we (and maybe the protagonist) can discover or realize more fully or in a new way.

For more information, please see the Tuscany Press website, the Writers Resources tab on the menu bar: Required Reading for Writers of Catholic Fiction.  We strongly recommend you read Pope John Paul II’s Letter to Artists and the recommended books.

At Tuscany Press, we believe the Catholic literary revival is upon us and we invite you to be a part of it.

Note: All submitted manuscripts, not just the prize-winner, are considered for a publishing contract. 

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: authors and illustrators, awards, children writing, Contest, opportunity, Places to sumit, publishers Tagged: 2014 Tuscany Prizes, Catholic Fiction, Get Published

2 Comments on Get Published: Tuscany Prize for Catholic Fiction Contest, last added: 6/16/2014
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8. Avalon Full Manuscript Writer’s Retreat

Each fall I put on a Writer’s Retreat in Avalon, NJ. The nice thing about this retreat is that it consists of a small group of advanced children’s writers with two children’s publishing agents, plus everyone receives:

1. A full manuscript critique from one of the agents

2. A full manuscript group critique

3. A 30-50 page critique with the other agent

4. A first page session with agents,

5. Additional fun group activities, plus lots of time with the agents.

I have two available spots, if you are interested.

There are Two Retreat Sessions – Each with two groups of five -  All agents are interested in MG and YA. Here are the main details.

Place: An upscale house with 8 bedrooms, 7.5 baths, heated pool, and elevator in Avalon, NJ

Cost: $795 – $910 according to room. Cost includes room, food, and critiques.

First Session Dates: Arriving noon on September 21st – departing by 10 am on September 24th.

carly-watters-p-s-literary-agencyAgent Carly Watters from PS Literary

Carly is actively looking for new Middle Grade and Young Adult clients. She is a hands-on agent that develops proposals and manuscripts with attention to detail and the relevant markets. PSLA’s mission is to manage authors’ literary brands for their entire career.

Never without a book on hand she reads across categories which is reflected in the genres she represents and is actively seeking new authors in including women’s fiction, commercial fiction, literary thrillers, upmarket non fiction, and all genres of YA. Carly is drawn to emotional, well-paced narratives, with a great voice and characters that readers can get invested in.

She has sold 5 books 2-YA(both two book deals), 1-MG(two book deal), and 2-nonfiction in the past year. They were all very nice deals. Visit http://www.carlywatters.com for a more extensive list of books sold.

Sarah-Bradford-Lit-photoAgent Sarah LaPolla from Bradford Literary

Sarah represents YA and adult fiction. On the adult side, she is looking for literary fiction, science fiction, magical realism, dark/psychological mystery, and upmarket commercial and/or women’s fiction. For YA, she is interested in contemporary/realistic fiction that doesn’t shy away from the darker side of adolescence. YA sci-fi, horror, mystery, and magical realism are also welcome; and she would love to find a modern Judy Blume for the MG market. No matter what genre, Sarah is drawn to layered/strong characters, engaging narrators, and a story that’s impossible to put down.

Sarah has sold 4 books in the last six month 3 YA and 1 MG, which was a two book deal

Second Session Dates: Arriving noon on September 25th – departing by September 28th by 10 am.

ammi-joan-paquette-150Agent Ammi-Joan Paquette from Erin Murphy Literary

Amy specializes in children’s publishing. She has sold 12 MG’s and 4 YA’s and numerous picture books in the last year.

She also is a published author and her new book, PETEY AND PRU AND THE HULLABALOO was on the Kirkus Review 2014 Nominated books.

Heather AlexanderAgent Heather Alexander from Pippin Properties

Heather who was an editor at Dial just started with Holly McGhee at Pippin Properties and of course is looking for clients.

Heather is looking for new talent from a broad range of children’s book authors and illustrators, from picture books through young adult, including graphic novels. She’s most interested in unique characters, strong voices, and quirky humor.

Each year I open a few spots to new writers. If you are interested in joining us, please email me if you want one of the open spots. I will need to know what you will submit – MG, YA, NA, genre such as sci-fi, fantasy, contemporary, romance, thrillers, mystery, etc. The first five pages and a synopsis (if you have not written a synopsis, then just write something up about the story).

Please email me with a little blurb about you, two pages and a synopsis, plus what you are writing. Example: MG Contemporary Time travel book – 40,000 words – 160 pages. If you are interested in joining the group. Click here to see pictures from last year: http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2013/10/07/recap-of-avalon-writers-retreat/

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Agent, authors and illustrators, Editor & Agent Info, Events, opportunity, revisions, Young Adult Novel Tagged: Ammi-Joan Paquette, Carly Watters, Heather Alexander, Sarah LaPolla

4 Comments on Avalon Full Manuscript Writer’s Retreat, last added: 6/19/2014
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9. Sheldon Fogelman Agency

Sean McCarthy left the Sheldon Fogelman Agency at the end of last year to start his own agency. There are two opportunities to get your foot in the door with an agent. You should consider querying one of them.

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Janie Hauber 2013small

Janine Le joined the agency after graduating from Bucknell Unversity with honors in English (Creative Writing) and completing NYU’s program at its Summer Publishing Institute. She enjoys working with the agency’s clients as an assistant agent and as the agency’s foreign rights manager. Janine has licensed translation rights in over 20 languages and has represented the agency and its clients annually at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair. Janine is building her list of clients and is open to picture books through YA. She is most drawn to stories with a strong emotional core that influence the way readers view the world, themselves, and the people around them. She is also fond of complex characters and relationships, unique cultural perspectives, and stories with a touch of humor, romance, or both.

sternpiccroppedWithout realizing it, Amy Stern spent most of her life preparing to be a literary agent. After receiving degrees in creative writing and English at Bryn Mawr College, she earned masters degrees in children’s literature and library science at Simmons College, while working as a librarian and a bookseller. In addition to her job as Assistant Agent at the agency, Amy has mentored writing students at Simmons’s Center for the Study of Children’s Literature, and taught a graduate course there on science fiction and fantasy in children’s and young adult lit. Her favorite novel topics include summer camp, giftedness, mental health issues, queerness, and reality television, but more than anything, she likes sympathetic characters in a good story. She often stays up all night reading the newest YA novels while claiming it’s “for work.”

SUBMISSIONS POLICY

Sheldon Fogelman Agency, Inc. specializes in children’s books of all genres, from picture books through young adult literature. The agency represents both authors and illustrators.

We always welcome submissions, and look forward to adding new people to our client list each year. However, we receive thousands of submissions each year, and are very selective in offering representation. We consider each submission carefully, and do our best to respond quickly; however, please be aware that it takes time to read and consider each manuscript. It may take us up to six weeks to consider an initial query, and if we request more work, the process can take even longer. Please note that we do not charge a reading fee.

If you are interested in submitting, please adhere to the following guidelines:

    • Send a single page cover letter that includes a brief synopsis of your work, your publication history, and how you were referred to us, if at all. (If you are querying electronically, please paste the body of this cover letter into the email.) If you are querying several other agencies simultaneously, we ask that you mention this in your query letter.
    • If you are a novelist, you may include the first three (3) chapters of the work and a synopsis. Please do not submit the entire work or include chapters from more than one work unless specifically requested.
    • If you are a picture book writer, you may include two (2) manuscripts. Please do not submit any additional manuscripts unless specifically requested. If you are not an illustrator, it is not necessary to include images in your submission.
    • If you are an illustrator, please include information regarding website portfolio links, if applicable. Otherwise, send a limited sampling of copies of your work. Please do not send original artwork under any circumstance. We do not take responsibility for damage or loss of any original artwork that may be erroneously sent to us.
    • If you would like to send your work to a specific agent, address your query to that agent. Otherwise, simply put your work to the attention of the submissions coordinator. Please note, however, that a submission to one agent in our office is considered a submission to all.
    • If you are submitting by mail, please include a self-addressed stamped envelope with all submissions. Please be sure to include an envelope of sufficient size with proper postage to accommodate any work you would like returned; mail submissions without an appropriate SASE may not be replied to, and due to space constraints, your work may be disposed of. All hard copy submissions should be sent to the following address:
       

Sheldon Fogelman Agency
10 East 40th Street, Suite 3205
New York, NY 10016

  • If you are submitting electronically, make sure that all text attachments are accessible via Microsoft Word (.rtf and .doc preferred). We prefer illustrations in .jpg or .pdf format, and all files sent should not total more than 5 MB combined. All electronic submissions should be sent to submissions@sheldonfogelmanagency.com. While every submission will be read and considered, please understand that due to time constraints, we can only reply if we are interested in seeing more of your work.
    • If additional work is requested following the cover letter, we prefer exclusive consideration of the requested work for at least one (1) month.

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Agent, authors and illustrators, Editor & Agent Info, Middle Grade Novels, opportunity, picture books, Places to sumit, Publishers and Agencies, Young Adult Novel Tagged: Agent Sean McCarthy, Sheldon Fogelman Agency

    4 Comments on Sheldon Fogelman Agency, last added: 6/20/2014
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    10. NO FEE: Good Housekeeping Writing Contest

    New Writing Contest: “All About Love”

    Tell us your tale — a first crush, an old flame, a treasured friend or family member, a passion for a special place…

    goodhk-writing-contest-de

    HOW IT WORKS
    Starting June 1, 2014, email your story of 2,500 to 3,000 words to lovestorycontest@goodhousekeeping.com, and you’ll be entered for a chance to win $2,000 and possible publication in a future issue of Good Housekeeping or on goodhousekeeping.com. Be sure to provide your full name, phone number, and mailing address both in the email and on the submission itself.

    DEADLINES
    Entries must be received by midnight September 1, 2014. One entry per person allowed. Submitted material cannot be returned or acknowledged. Winner will be notified by March 1, 2015.

    ELIGIBILITY
    Contest is open to anyone age 21 or older who is a legal resident of the United States, the District of Columbia or Canada (excluding Quebec).

    PRIZES
    One winner will receive $2,000 and possible publication of the winning story in a future issue or on goodhousekeeping.com.

    Read the official contest rules »

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: authors and illustrators, Contest, magazine, opportunity, publishers, writing Tagged: All About Love, Get Published, Good Housekeeping Magazine, Win $2000, Writing Contest

    1 Comments on NO FEE: Good Housekeeping Writing Contest, last added: 6/24/2014
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    11. Bard Fiction Prize

    Are you American, 39 years old or younger, and have a published book? If so, then you should consider submitting it for the Bard Fiction Prize.

    Bard Fiction Prize

    What Is the Bard Fiction Prize?

    The Bard Fiction Prize is awarded to a promising, emerging writer who is an American citizen aged 39 years or younger at the time of application. In addition to the monetary award, the winner receives an appointment as writer in residence at Bard College for one semester, without the expectation that he or she teach traditional courses. The recipient gives at least one public lecture and meets informally with students.

    2014 Bard Fiction Prize Recipient:
    Bennett Sims

    About the Bard Fiction Prize

    The creation of the Bard Fiction Prize, presented each October, continues Bard’s long-standing position as a center for creative, groundbreaking literary work by both faculty and students. From Saul Bellow, William Gaddis, Mary McCarthy, and Ralph Ellison to John Ashbery, Philip Roth, William Weaver, and Chinua Achebe, Bard’s literature faculty, past and present, represents some of the most important writers of our time. The prize is intended to encourage and support young writers of fiction to pursue their creative goals and provide an opportunity to work in a fertile and intellectual environment. Last year’s Bard Fiction Prize was awarded to Brian Conn for his book, The Fixed Stars (Fiction Collective 2, 2010).

    Bard Invites Submissions for Its Annual Fiction Prize for Young Writers

    To apply, candidates should write a cover letter explaining the project they plan to work on while at Bard and submit a C.V., along with three copies of the published book they feel best represents their work. No manuscripts will be accepted. Applications for the 2015 prize must be received by July 15, 2014. For more information about the Bard Fiction Prize, call 845-758-7087 or send an e-mail to bfp@bard.edu. Applicants may also request information by writing to the Bard Fiction Prize, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-5000.

    Good Luck!

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Book, Competition, Contests, opportunity, Places to sumit Tagged: Bard Fiction Prize, Bennett Sims, The Fixed Stars, Writer in Residence, Young Writers of fiction

    0 Comments on Bard Fiction Prize as of 6/23/2014 2:19:00 AM
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    12. Free Fall Friday: July – Jenny Bent & More

    HAPPY 4TH!

    artshowclairLousyDay

    This wonderful illustration is by Claire Lordon, who exhibited her work at the New Jersey SCBWI Art Show. If you would like to see more of Claire’s art here is her website: www.clairelordon.com

    jenny_bentIt is my pleasure to let you know that Jenny Bent has agreed to be our critique our first pages in July. Each month four first pages are picked for critique.

    See Bottom of Post for submission Guidelines.

    Jenny represents literary and commercial adult, young adult, and middle grade fiction. She also represents nonfiction in the areas of memoir, humor and select narrative nonfiction.

    In 2003 Jenny joined Trident Media Group, where she was promoted to Vice President before leaving to found the Bent Agency in 2009. She lives in Brooklyn in an apartment full of books and while there are not quite so many lazy reading afternoons, she manages to fit one in now and then.

    My list is varied and includes commercial and literary fiction as well as memoir and select humor titles. In adult fiction, I particularly enjoy women’s fiction and crime/suspense. I also love novels—for grown-ups or children—that have an element of magic or fantasy to them or that take me into a strange and new world, whether real or imaginary. All of the books that I represent speak to the heart in some way: they are linked by genuine emotion, inspiration and great writing and story telling. I love books that make me laugh, make me cry, or ideally do both.

    ____________________________________________________________________________________

    Thought the writers on the West Coast might be interested in this Writer’s Retreat.

    It certainly had two great industry professionals on the faculty with:

    Editor Melanie Cecka is Associate Publishing Director at Knopf Books for Young Readers.

    Agent Scott Treimel heads the full service S©ott Treimel NY Agency, established 1995. The agency represents exclusively children’s books and it give the attendees a chance for a full novel critique.

    FEES: Basic seminar is $769 (Early Bird, extended to July 5th); adults’ critiques are additional (15 to 30 pages, or full novel; all $3 per page). Basic fee includes Thursday through Saturday nights’ beachfront, double-occupancy lodging and most meals.

    WHOLE-NOVEL SEMINAR & RETREAT

    12th Annual Pacific Coast Children’s Writers Workshop:

    October 17-19, 2014 Coastal Santa Cruz, CA.

    http://www.childrenswritersworkshop.com/

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    Here are the submission guidelines for submitting a First Page in July:

    Please “July First Page Critique” in the subject line. Please make sure you include your name, the title of the piece, and whether it is as picture book, middle grade, or young adult, etc. at the top.

    Please attach your first page submission using one inch margins and 12 point font – double spaced, no more than 23 lines to an e-mail and send it to: kathy(dot)temean(at)gmail(dot)com. Also cut and paste it into the body of the e-mail and then also attach it in a Word document to the email.

    DEADLINE: July 24th.

    RESULTS: August 1st.

    Use inch margins – double space your text – 12 pt. New Times Roman font – no more than 23 lines – paste into body of the email

    You can only send in one first page each month. It can be the same first page each month or a different one, but if you sent it to me last month and it didn’t get chosen, you need to send it again using the July’s directions. Of course, it doesn’t have to be the same submission.

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy

     


    Filed under: Agent, Conferences and Workshops, Editor & Agent Info, opportunity, Places to sumit Tagged: Claire Lordon, First Page Critiques, Free Fall Friday, West Coast Writer's Retreat

    2 Comments on Free Fall Friday: July – Jenny Bent & More, last added: 7/4/2014
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    13. Schoolwide Submission & TeenSpeak Novel Workshop &

    rebeccaCaridad_DownTheShore_web
    The art show exhibit continues with this illustration created by Rebecca Caridad. Hope some of you get to enjoy the sun, sand, and fun by the ocean. Here is Rebecca’s link: rebeccacaridad.crevado.com

    Back in April I had a post about Schoolwide, Inc.call for submissions: http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2014/04/03/educational-publisher-looking-for-submissions/

    Susan Tierney is the Acquisitions and Development Editor at Schoolwide, Inc. She contacted me saying they are still receiving submissions, but they have updated their policy and would like authors to submit their work to us via their submissions manager, at http://www.schoolwide.com/publishing. Authors should no longer email Susan directly with submissions. You need to use their our website. Manuscripts are uploaded directly into their database and enter the editorial review process from there.

    Illustrators who wish to contact Susan may continue to do so, providing links to their portfolios, and an idea of their fees if possible, at Susan’s Schoolwide email address: stierney@schoolwide.com.

    They are currently looking to build a network of illustrators for their new digital K-8 library, for everything from picture books and story art to spot illustrations, from project – based arrangements to royalties.
    _________________________________________________________________

    I know many of you have teens who want to write and are encouraging them to do so. Here is a Novel Workshop on the West Coast whose purpose is to foster our future authors. Here is the information:

    TeenSpeak Novel Workshop

    Convenes October 17-19, 2014 in coastal Santa Cruz, CA.

     

    TeenSpeak offers a rare opportunity for international teens to interact with top level East Coast editors and agents, and adults who write for the teen/tween market. Open to 10 teens in an intimate setting, the event dovetails with 20 supportive adults in a concurrent, partly overlapping workshop.

     

    FACULTY: Core teen instructor is Helen Pyne, MFA (Vermont College of Fine Arts), a former Doubleday children’s/YA book editor. Along with adult enrollees, teens enjoy novelcrafting sessions with Knopf Associate Publishing Director Melanie Cecka (also an award-winning children’s book author) and agent Scott Treimel (former children’s book editor), president of Scott Treimel New York. 

     

    CONTENT: TeenSpeak workshop focuses on craft through dramatic improv and other vehicles. Teens receive in-person, mini critiques with editor and agent—and full critiques from their own instructor, and volunteer adult enrollees.

     

    In reciprocity, teens offer adults target-reader feedback. After teens edit selected adults’ partial and full novels, they hear our editor and agent critique the same manuscripts. Lively discussion follows, for the benefit of all: “I loved the teens’ insights at this workshop,” says ErinClarke, executive editor atKnopf Children’s Books. Well before the event, teens are offered tools to sharpen their critiquing skills, and may be paid for a job well done.

     

    FEE: $549 covers up to three nights’ beachfront condo lodging with chaperone, kid-friendly meals, all critiques, and focus sessions.

     

    TeenSpeak Scholarship Fund: This year’s donations will honor renowned children’s author, Elaine Marie Alphin. Teens (and adults) will apply exercises in her book, Creating Characters Kids Will Love. To contribute any amount to support a young person passionate about writing, contact us via the website, where you’ll find mixed testimonials from scholarship beneficiaries and other enthusiastic teens. (Alternately, ask about possible jobs for teens or parents, or split payments.) Teens appreciate your generous donation!

     

    ENROLLING: Recommended enrollment date for maximum options: July 20. Details and contact: www.ChildrensWritersWorkshop.com(click FOR TEENS). TeenSpeak is an outgrowth of the Pacific Coast Children’s Writers Workshop, established 2003. Don’t delay; we fill fast!

    .

    “At these two workshops, I learned to create realistic characters and got tips
    on my college essays. It’s exciting to know there’s a job market out there
    for something I love so much!”— Jacqueline, age 17 (now at Stanford)

     
    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: authors and illustrators, Conferences and Workshops, Editor & Agent Info, opportunity, Places to sumit Tagged: Acquisitions and Development Editor, Rebecca Caridad, Schoolwide, Susan Tierney, Teen Writing Workshop

    1 Comments on Schoolwide Submission & TeenSpeak Novel Workshop &, last added: 7/6/2014
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    14. Book Give-a-Way & Interview With Shannon Wiersbitzky: What Flowers Remember

    Shannon_Wiersbitzky_Author_Photo_2012Shannon Wiersbitzky is a middle-grade author, a hopeless optimist, and a lover of the outdoors. The Summer of Hammers and Angels, nominated for the William Allen White award, was her first novel.

    Born in North Dakota, Shannon has called West Virginia, Florida, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Michigan “home” at some point in her life.She currently lives in Pennsylvania with her husband, two sons, one rather dull fish and her always entertaining dog Benson.

    I interviewed Shannon about her new book WHAT FLOWERS REMEMBER, and asked her if she would do a give-a-way of the book for anyone who leaves a comment. If you tweet or post something about the book on facebook or your blog, you will receive an extra entry to increase your chances to win.

    Book Notes: What Flowers Remember

    shannonflowersMost folks probably think gardens only get tended when they’re blooming. But most folks would be wrong. According to the almanac, a proper gardener does something every single month. Old Red Clancy was definitely a proper gardener. That’s why I enrolled myself in the Clancy School of Gardening. If I was going to learn about flowers, I wanted to learn from the best.

    Delia and Old Red Clancy make quite a pair. He has the know-how and she has the get-up-and-go. When they dream up a seed- and flower-selling business, well, look out, Tucker’s Ferry, because here they come.

    But something is happening to Old Red. And the doctors say he
can’t be cured. He’s forgetting places and names and getting cranky for
no reason. As his condition worsens, Delia takes it upon herself to save
as many memories as she can. Her mission is to gather Old Red’s stories so that no one will forget, and she corrals everybody in town to help her.

    What Flowers Remember is a story of love and loss, of a young girl coming to understand that even when people die, they live on in our minds, our hearts, and our stories.

    *Note: A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this book are donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

    In addition to win and read a good book, I think you will find Shannon’s answers to my interview questions below interesting.

    I see you have published two middle grade books with namelos. Did you sign a two book deal when you sold  THE SUMMER OF HAMMERS AND ANGELS?

    No. My initial contract with Namelos only included my first book. I didn’t even know there would be a sequel!

    Can you tell us the story behind how you sold your first book and the journey you took to get there?

    Writing IS a journey isn’t it! I’ll say that it was a ten year path of discovering my voice and what kind of narrative suits me best. When I began writing books for children, I focused first on picture books. Then I began to dabble in novels. I met my editor, Stephen Roxburgh, at a picture book workshop at Highlights in 2009. He had just started Namelos earlier that year. We hit it off and after the workshop I sent him the manuscript for THE SUMMER OF HAMMERS AND ANGELS. We’ve been working together ever since.

    Was that your debut book?

    Yes. While I’ve had a variety of picture books garner significant interest over the years, HAMMERS was the first book I had published. It was a real thrill to see it in print. I’ve got a copy hanging on the wall in my writing studio. My husband had it framed.

    How well did the book sell?

    The book has sold well. I don’t know an exact number of copies. It always helps when a novel gets noticed by organizations and award committees, and THE SUMMER OF HAMMERS AND ANGELS did. It was nominated for the William Allen White award, and was a recommended title by the Kansas NEA Reading Circle. Scholastic bought copies for its book club too. Anytime a story is recognized, it’s an honor.

    Has the publishing of WHAT FLOWERS REMEMBER, increased the sales of THE SUMMER OF HAMMERS AND ANGELS?

    Yes, I think the benefit of having multiple books out is that people naturally see or seek out your other titles. At least they do if they like what they read!

    Had you written WHAT FLOWERS REMEMBER when you sold the first book?

    No, I hadn’t. In fact, after HAMMERS came out, when asked if there might be a sequel, I confidently said that Delia’s story was finished. Ha! That just shows you that characters are really in charge, not the writers.

    How did the idea of the book come to you?

    In terms of the actual time and place when I realized Delia had another story to tell, I was literally on a flight from PA to CA. I’d written a novel dealing with Alzheimer’s several years earlier (it was terrible and I never tried to publish it) and all of a sudden, I realized that I’d given the story to the wrong character. It was Delia’s story to tell. I plotted out the entire novel on the back of a single sheet of paper and about six months later I started writing it.

    The inspiration to write about Alzheimer’s came from my own life. My grandfather had the disease and ultimately he forgot me. He and I were very close and it broke my heart to realize I had been erased. I wanted to capture the truth of that in a story.

    Sadly, dementia is so common, and we have a real lack of stories that deal with it in an honest way. For some reason, we don’t talk about Alzheimer’s as openly as we do other diseases. Kids (and adults) need to be able to have everyday conversations about what they might be experiencing with their own grandparents or others in their life. My hope is that books like FLOWERS can help.

    Do you have an agent? If so, who? If not, would you like to find one?

    I don’t have an agent. I’ve worked directly with Stephen and his Namelos team for both books. I would like to find an agent, but it hasn’t been my focus lately. It’s so difficult to find someone that exactly fits your personality and writing style!

    I have some picture book and early reader manuscripts I’d love to see published, and down the road, there may be other novels that aren’t right for Namelos, but are right for another publisher. Reviewers have compared my writing to Chicken Soup for the Soul and Patricia MacLachlan. If you know of any agents that might lean that way, let me know!

    What type of things have you been doing to promote your books?

    I have a full-time job that is fairly demanding, so I try to pick and choose things I can tackle in odd hours or that don’t require a full day. I regularly do web interviews with bloggers or write guest posts. I’ve visited local schools and done Skype visits with classrooms. There have been radio interviews. I’ve done a few book signings too.

    Did namelos help market your book and get reviews?

    Absolutely! They work the official reviewers and send copies out to various awards committees and all that usual stuff that publishers do. Stephen Roxburgh is highly regarded in the industry, so books he publishes typically do get picked up for review by folks like Kirkus. That’s a big plus.

    What are you working on now?

    Right now I’m working on a few things. I’m editing a new novel which is totally different from my first two. High action, high comedy, high levels of exaggeration. I think I needed a break from the realistic fiction. I’m working on a few picture books as well. I’d love for them to find a good home. And I’m jotting notes for a novel that I haven’t started yet, but that I’ve been thinking about for two years. As soon as I can get the action manuscript out the door, this one is next in line. I like to have a host of projects in the hopper. My brain seems to work best that way. 

    Review Excerpts

    “There are echoes of Patricia MacLachlan in the book’s period flavor (the story seems to be set thirty years or so in the past), the tenderness, and the deft writing that keeps a heart-tugging plot lovely as well as brimming with sentiment. Delia’s move from grief for what she’s losing to a deeper understanding of her old friend is smoothly depicted…. The story will bring new perspective for readers struggling with their own beloved elders, and the liquid joy of a serious tearjerker to anybody who likes a poignant human drama.”

    –The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Recommended

    “Wiersbitzky organizes the book gracefully by naming the chapters after months of the year. …The ebb and flow of life is shown, grief is addressed, and the power of what one person can do is celebrated. Teachers may wish to consider this book for reading lists in middle school.”

    –Children’s Literature

    “What do flowers remember? The stories of the people who cared for them, of course, as Wiersbitzky’s sensitive novel compassionately conveys.” – Kirkus Reviews

    “Fans of wholesome, uplifting stories similar to Canfield’s Chicken Soup for the Soul collections, will best enjoy this gentle reminder of the goodness of life and people.” — Voice of Youth Advocates

    Shannon Wiersbitzky Links:

    Website: www.shannonwiersbitzky.com

    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ShannonWiersbitzky

    Twitter: @SWiersbitzky

    Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/ShannonWiersbitzky

    Shannon thank you for sharing your journey with us and introducing us to your book.

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy

     


    Filed under: Author, awards, Book, children writing, Contest, inspiration, Kudos, Middle Grade Novels, opportunity Tagged: book give-a-way, Leave Comment, Shannon Wiersbitzky

    14 Comments on Book Give-a-Way & Interview With Shannon Wiersbitzky: What Flowers Remember, last added: 7/10/2014
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    15. Free Fall Friday – Results – Marie Lamba

    I want to thank Agent Marie Lamba from Jennifer DeChiara Literary Agency for taking the time out of her busy schedule to critique 4 first pages that were sent in for May. Having her share her expertise is a huge help to all of us.
     
    QUINLAN LEE, Agent, Adams Literary  will end MAY with her four critiques posted on May 30th. Deadline to submit: May 22nd.

     

    Here are the Results:

     

    Jennifer Kirkeby / PEACEFUL ACRES / YA Magical Realism

     
    “David, we’re here.” The voice jolts me awake. The bus driver’s eyes stare back at me through the large mirror they always use to catch kids smoking, eating, making out, or punching each other. Her eyes are glassy and tired with dark bags hanging underneath them as proof. Must have been a long drive. Below the mirror swings an assortment of crucifixes that she begins to untangle.

    I wipe the drool off the side of my mouth and scan the inside of the bus. I’m three rows back on the right side, and unless someone’s sleeping in one of the seats, the only passenger. Weird. I look outside to my right, and am surprised to see a huge white mansion. Gardens out front, a gigantic fountain – real Great Gatsby stuff. Squeezing my eyes shut, I shake my head trying to rattle my brain cells into functioning order to tell me where I am. When I open them, I have a vague memory of going somewhere to do community service.

    “Do you need help with your bags?” the bus driver asks while rubbing the back of her sizable neck.

    “Uh, no. I got it, thanks,” I tell her, while looking around for my stuff. Noticing my confusion, she points to the floor under the front seat where I see my suitcase and backpack. Guess I’m staying a while. When I stand up, my body alerts me that I’ve been sitting forever. My legs practically fold underneath me, my muscles hurt, and my head throbs. I slide my bags out while the driver opens the door. The swooshing sound is like a giant vacuum seal releasing me into the unknown.

    “I’ll see you in six months, David. Stay strong.” My stomach drops. Six months? Her eyes are apologetic. In seconds, her face shifts to genuine concern, and then… is that fear? What does she know that I don’t?

    HERE’S MARIE’S THOUGHTS:

    PEACEFUL ACRES

    This first page raises lots of questions for the reader, which is always a good thing. It makes me wonder where he is and why? What will happen next? That’s the sort of thing that might make me want to read on. The other piece of that “want to read on” puzzle consists of character. Who is this character? Why might I care or worry about him? Get that right, and you’ll definitely have me on board to continue.

    But in this first page (which, I realize, is just ONE page), I know far more about the bus driver and the setting than about the boy. So make sure your focus in this scene is where you truly want it to be.

    The boy’s character is starting to be revealed when he describes the mansion as “real Great Gatsby stuff” – I like that. That’s the sort of detail seen through the character’s eye and said in his voice that not only reveals what he sees, but starts to reveal who he really is. I’d love to see more of his point of view.

    First person can be tricky. It results in lots of “I” sentences. I wipe the drool… I look outside… I slide my bags… Make sure you vary your sentence structure throughout, or this will grow tiresome quickly. Also, once you’ve quickly established that something is in first person, you don’t have to say “I look outside to my right…” Just say, “Outside to my right…” He’s your point of view character, so how else would he see that? You can pull out most, if not all, of the “I see” and “I look” and “I notice” in a story by keeping this in mind. Also try to avoid phrases like, “When I stand up, my body alerts me…” Instead, consider something more direct like, “When I stand, my legs practically fold underneath me…”

    My favorite line in this is: “The swooshing sound is like a giant vacuum seal releasing me into the unknown.” It’s a great lead in to a mysterious tale.

    _______________________________________________________________________________________

     

    GAMBLER’S DAUGHTER, YA Novel, by Orel Protopopescu

    PART ONE: January, 1968/   Chapter One

    Six days out of seven, I didn’t know if my father would come home. Sometimes he stayed in the city, gambling, for three nights in a row, nights I was often alone in our house on the edge of a parkway in the middle of Long Island. But every Friday evening he met my train at Penn Station, took me to his club and some place for dinner, and then drove me home by dawn.   This routine was my idea. One day a week, at least, I knew that he’d quit before the sun came up, no matter how much he’d lost. One day a week, we’d share a meal and a few laughs.

    Plenty of girls would think I was lucky to be so free, those who didn’t know what it was like to be your own mother and father.   They’d probably never met anybody like my dad, who’d let me do as I pleased since I was fifteen. If he ever found me in bed with Jimi Hendrix and his guitar, he’d just ask Jimi, politely, if he would play us a song. But my Jimmy wasn’t singing to me, unless you count choir practice, when he sang for everyone and no one. He wasn’t even talking to me anymore, so there was little chance of him ending up in my bed and there was nobody else I wanted to share it with. The world was full of boys and men, but I only longed for a boy who wasn’t even a friend anymore and a father who was almost never home.

    It could have been worse, I told myself. Some kids were orphans, living in shelters, foster care, or even on the streets. That happened to the unlucky ones. But I could look across a table at my dad, no matter how late or early, and know that I still had a sort of family.   That’s why I was making my way over the icy sidewalks between my high school and the train station on a freezing Friday afternoon. The winds were so fierce, I bowed my head to tunnel my way through them. This wasn’t the hard part.  Being at the club would be harder.   I was tired of being my father’s luck.

    HERES MARIE”S THOUGHTS:

    GAMBLER’S DAUGHTER

    Right away, I was drawn into the voice and point of view here. Very important elements to sustain a novel, so this is a great thing!

    One thing I suggest, though, is that the story start out within a scene, instead of with narration. I really feel I could have been pulled firmly into this tale better at the outset if it had instead started out with the line: It could have been worse, I told myself as I made my way over the icy sidewalks. Then pepper the action of the scene with the needed details and we are all on our way, instead of stuck on pause, waiting for the scene to form and begin through narration.

    Two other suggestions. One: I might change the boyfriend’s name from Jimmy to something different, since I found myself stumbling over the Jimmi-Jimmy reference. Also, I thought that the character was a bit too self-aware when she said: “The world was full of boys and men, but I only longed for a boy who wasn’t even a friend anymore and a father who was almost never home.” Part of the fun of a novel is that the characters (like real people) aren’t so self-aware and through the course of the novel we, and they, start to learn how they really tick and why. I personally think it’s more intriguing to have the story and the character nibble around the edges of these sorts of facts.

    But overall, a solid start.

    ______________________________________________________________________________

    Middle Grade novel: THE WOUNDED BOOK by Laurel Decher

    In the year of our Lord 1006, on the eve of Ascension Day, the morning star rose over Arezzo, and Bella jumped from her window into the back of the woolman’s cart. The driver glanced over his shoulder.

    Had he seen her?

    He crossed himself, scolded his donkey, and drove a bit faster.

    Bella wriggled herself in between two firm sacks of wool, and pulled her knees up to her chin. It had been easy enough to leap out the window of Uncle’s house. Had Papa passed as easily through heaven’s gate? Bella hoped so.

    A tuft of wool tickled her nose and she sneezed. She held her breath. If the driver threw her off, how could she get to the market and back before the bells rang for Terce, so that Uncle did not notice her absence?

    The cart slowed. Bella still did not dare to breathe. The cart stopped. She pressed her hands over her mouth and nose, praying that she would not be discovered. The driver called out. The cart turned the corner and rumbled on.

    The rush of Bella’s pent-up breath set wool puffs dancing. She caught them, rolled them into balls, and pelted the woolsacks, singing under her breath. The third time through the Agnus Dei—backwards and a bit louder—she laughed.

    “Do all you woolsacks think I am singing to you? Does every lamb think it is the Lamb of God? Come, I will sing you a psalm.”

    Bella crooned three verses and stopped on the Paths of Righteousness, well before the Valley of Death. She laid her cheek against a rough sack.

    HERE’S MARIE’S THOUGHTS: 

    THE WOUNDED BOOK

    First of all, LOVE the title. How cool is that? And this story starts off fun too, raising good story questions. Why is she jumping out her window?

    Who wouldn’t want an answer to that?

    Some things could use tightening and clarifying here. Like – was the cart moving when she jumped into it? I had no idea and was a little thrown when I read “drove a bit faster.” Another thing that confused me was how at first she was so afraid to be discovered that she “did not dare to breathe,” but then she’s singing under her breath, then laughing, then talking, then crooning. What happened? No cone of silence here, right?

    There are a number of sentences that start with “She,” so the writer could vary her sentence structure a bit more. And at one point the character spells out the stakes: “If the driver threw her off, how could she get to the market and back before the bells rang Terce, so that Uncle did not notice her absence?” I think this info could be conveyed a bit more artfully by pulling away from telling and putting the thought more into the scene and keeping the reader more engaged. Something like: If the driver threw her off now and she were late getting back… She shivered imagining her Uncle, his face red with fury, his hand raised in anger.

    Intriguing start.

    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    When Storms Surge in August by Lauren Rizzuto

    In August, the heat always arrived before the sun did. It didn’t mind that the sky was still dark; the light would get there soon enough. Meanwhile, the heat was content to settle in, unannounced, easing into the streets and lawns and sidewalks, all the way up to the doors and windows of the houses. It didn’t knock because–well, it didn’t need to. Like a too-early guest, the heat just made its heavy self at home before anyone was prepared to wake up and greet it properly.

    Inside the house at 39 Thornton Drive, an eight-year-old Ernestine Deveraux kicked off the covers to the double bed she shared with her little sister, Sarah. Her oversized tshirt stuck to her skin with sweat, bunching around her middle. Yanking it down, she flipped over onto her side and ferreted about the pillow with her cheek, trying to find a cool spot, but the cloth was too warm to be comfortable anymore. The clock on her nightstand read 5:56 a.m. Sighing, she turned onto her back and stared pointedly at the ceiling. She might as well get up. It wouldn’t do to be late on the first day of school.

    Next to her, Sarah grunted sleepily. “You awake?” Ernie asked. No reply. Sarah never seemed to have as much trouble sleeping in the hot little room. Carefully, Ernie brushed her sister’s hair back from her damp forehead, with intentions as tender as they were curious. It looked like that birthmark was getting even weirder looking. Unfortunate.

    “You can sleep for a little while longer,” Ernie whispered. Sarah continued playing possum, and so, being older and bigger, Ernie felt compelled to shove her, just a little, as she inched her way out of the bed and walked to the window. If she squinted, she could just make out the plump figure of Mrs. Demares, who was similarly standing and watching from inside her dark house, blowing cigarette smoke through her screen door.

    HERE ARE MARIE’S THOUGHTS: 

    WHEN STORMS SURGE IN AUGUST

    This first page, while clearly written and showing touches of the lyrical, is slow on the start. We writers often tend to write ourselves into a scene. Zooming from a large shot (the weather, the landscape), into a room (entering the house), focusing on a still unnamed child (an eight-year-old), and starting at the moment of the day beginning, but not, really, the beginning of the true story. I’m a writer too, and I’ve done this myself – and in very nearly the same form – on a middle grade manuscript I wrote early in my career.

    Here’s what I found out through my own writing: most, if not all of this lead-in stuff can be cut.

    Chances are good that this story will start cooking for real on page two or even further along. It’s always great to start right there with the character, and right at the inciting incident, or as close to it as the writer can begin. That doesn’t mean there won’t be room to add details about the heat or the neighborhood as the story moves along, but with tightening up the story the reader won’t have to wonder what is new or interesting here.

    Imagine how potent this start would be if it instead started with something revealing and active like your heroine tugging her sister down the street, telling her, “Come on. You know what’ll happen if we’re late.” Then we are hearing her voice, we are in motion, we sense tension, we have questions we want answered. We turn the page.

    In this sample, an intriguing detail involves that birthmark. I’m guessing it’s significant. Is this some paranormal sort of mark? A hint of illness? Something that will lead to teasing? Right now I have no idea, but it does add a question mark in my mind, which is always good. The title and the word choices hint at literary, but aren’t firmly in that genre either, so I’m not sure what sort of journey is being promised. You DO want the reader to have a sense of that.

    One other thing to note: I’m assuming this is a middle grade novel. If so, the 8-year-old main character is very young. While middle grade is aimed at the 8-12 year old reader, kids typically want to read books about kids who are older than they are. So, by setting your character at age 8, you are cutting off a decent share of this market and editors must be very mindful of who will be reading this book – and if it will be profitable. That’s why you’ll find 7- and 8-year-old heroes starring more in chapter books and easy readers. If this is, indeed, a middle grade novel, then do consider making your main character older. Just something important to keep in mind.

     

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Advice, authors and illustrators, demystify, inspiration, opportunity, revisions Tagged: Agent Marie Lamba, First Page Critiques, Free Fall Friday - Results

    4 Comments on Free Fall Friday – Results – Marie Lamba, last added: 5/16/2014
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    16. Agent’s wish List

    Nikki Terpilowski of Holloway Literary

    About Nikki: Nikki has degrees in English and International Relations and is a member of Romance Writers of America and International Thriller Writers. Some of her favorite writers include: Barbara Erskine, Diana Gabaldon, Cherry Adair, Karen Marie Moning, Steve Berry, Brad Thor, Daniel Silva, Vince Flynn, Tom Clancy, Isabel Allende, Jewell Parker Rhodes and Tananarive Due. Readers can follow her at @HollowayLit and @AWomanReading, and read her blog at AWomanReading.wordpress.com. See the agency website here.

    She is seeking: women’s fiction, southern fiction, multicultural literary fiction, upmarket African-American fiction, steam funk, romance (all kinds except category), military and espionage thrillers, historical fiction, nonfiction with a strong platform and academic assessments of popular culture. Additionally, Nikki seeks graphic novels, Manga, YA, MG and children’s picture books.

    Nikki is especially interested in time travel, reincarnation, mythology, ancient civilizations, magical and animist realism, Japan, American history (especially hidden African-American history, interesting women in history, as well as the antebellum period, and the Civil and Revolutionary wars), the military (all branches, but especially the U.S. Marine Corp, Army and all Special Forces), espionage, martial arts, narrative nonfiction about food and beverage (especially organic food, wine and coffee), travel or expat life, international relations and foreign policy,and prescriptive nonfiction on spirituality, parenting, health and well-being.

    Here is the Agencies Submission Wish List: You can click the links to read more.

    We are accepting submissions.

    Send us your query and the first fifteen pages of your novel  in the body of your email, or attach your non-fiction proposal as a PDF and email to the attention of:  Submissions Editor, at submissions @ holloway literary agency . com.  In the subject header, write:  Query: (insert your title/genre). You can expect a response to your query in one to two weeks. For nonfiction: send a proposal (and if relevant, link to related blog). Include a brief bio and social media links.

    Please note, we do not represent previously published material.

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Agent, authors and illustrators, Editor & Agent Info, opportunity, Places to sumit, Publishers and Agencies Tagged: Holloway Literary, Nikki Terpilowshki

    3 Comments on Agent’s wish List, last added: 5/20/2014
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    17. Free Fall Friday – Quinlan Lee

    quinlanStop back next Friday to read the four first pages that agent Quinlan Lee at Adams Literary will critique this coming week.

    Quinlan is a published author of numerous books for young readers and more than 15 years of business and project management expertise. She has been a part of the Adams Literary team since 2008, representing clients in all genres from picture books to YA. She enjoys meeting others who share her love of children’s literature and is an active member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) and a founding board member of the Charlotte Chapter of the Women’s National Book Association (WNBA).

    You can meet her at the New Jersey SCBWI June Conference this year.

    Quinlan graduated from Tulane Univeristy and has lived all over the United States—from the mountains of Western Colorado to the Garden District of New Orleans to downtown Chicago—and for the past eleven years she’s been raising her family in Charlotte with her husband, Steve. She has three children who keep her busy with book clubs, homework and identifying creatures in the creek behind their home.

    In other news:

    At Simon & Schuster Children’s, Alyson Heller has been promoted to editor at Aladdin. In addition, Krista Vossen has been promoted to art director, while Michael McCartney moves up to associate art director and Karina Granda has been promoted to designer.

    At Macmillan, Jill Freshney has been promoted to the new position of senior executive managing editor at Macmillan Children’s.

    Liesa Abrams has been promoted to associate editorial director,  Aladdin and Simon Pulse.

    At Putnam, Liz Stein has been promoted to associate editor.

    At Random House Children’s Books, Sharon Burkle and Lora Grisafi have both been promoted to associate art director, while Krister Engstrom moves up to senior designer.

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Agent, Editor & Agent Info, opportunity Tagged: Adams Literary, Aladdin, Alyson Heller, Free Fall Friday, Krista Vossen, Quinlan Lee, Simon & Schuster Children's

    1 Comments on Free Fall Friday – Quinlan Lee, last added: 5/23/2014
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    18. Bacopa Literary Review Contest

    bacopa2565

    Bacopa Literary Review will award publication & cash to 9 winning submissions:

    1st Prize = $350 (1 each for Poetry, Fic & Creative Nonfiction)
    2nd = $200 (1 each for Poetry, Fic & Creative Nonfiction)
    3rd = $100 (1 each for Poetry, Fic & Creative Nonfiction)

    FALL CONTEST SUBMISSIONS DEADLINE: Midnight, June 30, 2014

    Make sure you Click the +Show Guidelines text underneath genre/category name to see submission guidelines for that genre.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    FICTION CONTEST – Bacopa

    + Show Guidelines

    $11.00 USD

    SUBMIT

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    POETRY CONTEST – Bacopa

    + Show Guidelines

    $11.00 USD

    SUBMIT

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    NONFICTION/CREATIVE NONFICTION-CONTEST-Bacopa

    + Show Guidelines

    $11.00 USD

    SUBMIT

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    There is no charge for anyone who is a member of the Writer’s Alliance of Gainesville. You can check out that info at: http://www.writersalliance.org/membership.html

    Good Luck!

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Contest, magazine, opportunity, poetry, submissions Tagged: Creative Nonfiction Contest, Fiction Contest, Litary Review Publication, Poetry Contest, Writer's Alliance of Gainesville

    0 Comments on Bacopa Literary Review Contest as of 5/25/2014 3:38:00 AM
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    19. Agent Looking for New Clients

    ReneeHeadshotvivid-sq-300x300kt literary is a full-service literary agency operating out of Highlands Ranch, in the suburbs of Denver, Colorado, where every major publishing house is merely an email or phone call away. We believe in the power of new technology to connect writers to readers, and authors to editors. We bring over a decade of experience in the New York publishing scene, an extensive list of contacts, and a lifetime love of reading to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains.

    Renee Nyen: Several years in the editorial department at Random House’s Colorado division provided Renee with the opportunity to work with bestselling and debut authors alike. After leaving Random House, she came to KT Literary in early 2013. Drawing on her editorial experience, she loves digging into manuscripts and helping the author shape the best story possible. Though this is great for her profession, it tends to frustrate people watching movies with her. You can follow her on twitter @Renee_Nyen.

    She is interested in: Young Adult and Middle Grade fiction. “I’m always interested in YA historical fiction, mystery, sci-fi, and thrillers, but genre is not as important to me as strong prose and compelling characters.”

    Submission Guidelines: Please submit a query letter with the first three pages of your manuscript pasted in the email to queries (at) ktliterary.com.

    With a penchant for depressing hipster music and an abiding love for a good adventure story, Renee is always looking for book recommendations. Even if that means creeping on people reading in public. Which she does frequently.

    She makes her home in Colorado with her husband, their young daughter, and their hygienically-challenged basset hound.

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Agent, authors and illustrators, Editor & Agent Info, Middle Grade Novels, opportunity, Places to sumit, Publishers and Agencies, Young Adult Novel Tagged: Agent Renee Nyen, kt literary, Middle grade Books, Young Adult Books

    5 Comments on Agent Looking for New Clients, last added: 6/4/2014
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    20. Three Paragraphs = $150 and Publication

    “Miracles of Kindness” is nearing completion but we are looking for a last few stories to fill out the full scope of our book. Have you ever been in a predicament, clueless how to proceed, only to be saved by a person you never knew before? Has your life been changed significantly by a simple act of kindness from someone you did know, someone who, aware of your need, decided to step in and help. These are the kind of stories we are looking for, although two kinds of stories top our priority list:

    • if you’ve been helped, guided or assisted by a teacher or a mentor in some significant way, if a person you knew through school or through some other connection stepped up and helped you achieve your potential or reach a specific dream, let us know.

    • if you have reached sobriety with someone else’s help … a sponsor or a therapist or just a friend, if you’re life was brought back to order and normalcy after an addiction to either drugs or alcohol by some one other person who cared enough to get involved, let us know.

    “Miracles of Kindness” is intended to be a collection of stories, told by people around the world, that chronicle acts of help, courage, influence and perseverance. They are, as well, “two-pagers”, tales that tell, in two pages or so of ebook space, an act of kindness that resulted in something positive happening, some small miracle, always from the viewpoint of the recipient of the act. These will be stories about how both friends & family and total strangers came to the aid of a person in need, when no other help was available. They will be stories that show how the human race reacts to tragedy, misfortune, even catastrophe. These will be stories about all of us at our finest hour.

    Email back to this address with your story. For help and inspiration, you can visit our Website, http://www.themiraclespage.com, and see sample of stories that are already part of the book. Write no more than three paragraphs. ∆ If we find that your story fits our vision of the book, we will email back and setup a more in-depth phone, Skype or email interview. If your story makes it into the book, you will be paid $150, not bad for three paragraphs and a little one-to-one time.

    Sometimes it seems we are forever shackled by senseless violence and acts of hate and lunacy. Sometimes it seems the rush to embrace the future makes the achievement of real human contact impossible, when our connecting events are no more than an exchange of pictures and a quick text. No matter what the nature of the dark cloud in our lives, the urgency to remain strong, empathetic and willing to reach out and help has never been greater.

    It’s time to inspire.

    Ann & Mark Wright

    ∆ Remember that your story will be rewritten, for a consistency in storytelling, so please don’t waste a lot of time on style. Give us the facts and how it made you feel, perhaps with a beginning, middle and end. Historical context is appreciated as well.

    Contact Link: http://www.themiraclespage.com/contact-us.htm

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy

     

    http://www.themiraclespage.com/contact-us.html


    Filed under: inspiration, Interview, opportunity, Places to sumit, writing Tagged: Ann & Mark Wright, ebook, Miracles of Kindness

    0 Comments on Three Paragraphs = $150 and Publication as of 6/4/2014 1:31:00 AM
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    21. Heather Alexander Joins Pippin Properties

    pippincropped

    Heather AlexanderI was so excited when I read about Heather Alexander becoming an agent at Pippin Properties with Holly McGhee this morning. Over the years that I ran the New Jersey SCBWI, I got to know Heather and she is the whole package. She is as nice as she looks and is very savvy on everything in the children’s publishing industry. Everyone who meets her is impressed and loves her. I know everyone will wish her a long and successful career with Holly and the other agents at Pippin. WONDERFUL NEWS! I know she will make a great agent.

     

    Here is Holly’s Announcement:

     

    HEATHER ALEXANDER TO JOIN PIPPIN PROPERTIES AS LITERARY AGENT

     

    Prior to joining Pippin, Heather spent six years in editorial at Dial, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers. The authors she worked with include Batchelder Award winner Anne C. Voorhoeve, Jeanne Ryan, and debut authors Scott McCormick, Kim Reeder, and Jenny Martin. She worked with illustrators Lincoln Agnew, Stephanie Graegin, Henry Cole, Sophie Blackall, and R.H. Lazzell among others.

    Heather is looking for new talent from a broad range of children’s book authors and illustrators, from picture books through young adult, including graphic novels. She’s most interested in unique characters, strong voices, and quirky humor.

    And of course, don’t forget Elena (Mechlin) Giovinazzo round out the dynamic trio, making Pippin a great place to land.

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Agent, Editor & Agent Info, News, opportunity, Publishers and Agencies, Publishing Industry Tagged: Heather Alexander, Holly McGhee, New Agent at Pippin Properties, Pippin Properties

    1 Comments on Heather Alexander Joins Pippin Properties, last added: 6/6/2014
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    22. Free Fall Friday – June’s Guest Critiquer & Book Give-A-Way Winners

    CALL FOR SUMMER ILLUSTRATIONS!

    This month we had three give-a-way books:

    A picture book titled S IS FOR SEAGLASS written by Poet Richard Michelson and illustrator Doris Ettlinger
    A Young Adult novel titled, PANDEMIC written by Yvonne Ventresca
    A Young Adult thriller titled, KILLER INSTINCT written by S.E. Green

    Here are the three winners:

    Nancy Furstinger
    Heather Ayris Burnell
    Karen Lee Hallam

    If you are a winner, please email me your name and address and list the three books in order of preference. Number one being your first choice. First come first serve.

    Sarah LaPolla from the Bradford Literary Agency is our Guest Critiquer for June. If you are attending the NJSCBWI Conference make sure you look for her. She is on the faculty.

    See Submission Guidelines at the bottom of this post.

    Sarah-Bradford-Lit-photoSarah LaPolla joined Bradford Literary Agency in May 2013. Prior to joining forces with Laura and Natalie, Sarah worked for five years in the foreign rights department at Curtis Brown, Ltd., and became an associate agent there in 2010. She received her MFA in Creative Writing (Nonfiction) from The New School in 2008 and has a B.A. in Creative Writing from Ithaca College.

    Sarah represents YA and adult fiction. On the adult side, she is looking for literary fiction, science fiction, magical realism, dark/psychological mystery, and upmarket commercial and/or women’s fiction. For YA, she is interested in contemporary/realistic fiction that doesn’t shy away from the darker side of adolescence. YA sci-fi, horror, mystery, and magical realism are also welcome; and she would love to find a modern Judy Blume for the MG market. No matter what genre, Sarah is drawn to layered/strong characters, engaging narrators, and a story that’s impossible to put down.

    Sarah is not looking for: picture books/children’s, inspirational/spiritual novels, romance, or erotica

    Blog: http://glasscasesblog.blogspot.com/

    Twitter: @sarahlapolla

    Grabbing Sarah’s attention:

    There are two things I’ve been searching for in my submissions and am having a hard time finding lately. The first is the element of surprise. I’m not talking about a shocking plot twist, necessarily. Or at least I’m not just talking about that. I need to be surprised by what I’m reading. That could mean a plot twist I didn’t see coming, but it can also mean a number of things. Am I feeling a range of emotions I didn’t expect to experience? Has the main
    character grown and changed in a way they didn’t seem capable of at the beginning of the novel? Did the writing itself surprise me in its style, quality, or form? I like knowing what type of novel I’m getting into when I request a submission, but the last thing I want that manuscript to be is predictable.

    The other thing I’m not seeing as much of lately are strong male characters. We talk a lot about what makes a female character “strong.” I, for one, talk about it a lot. But, the boys in YA are being forgotten. I see too many perfect boyfriends, perfectly imperfect bad boys, “nice guy” best friends, and sassy gay friends. Maybe it’s because I read a lot of submissions with female main characters, and boys are generally cast as friend, enemy, or love interest to the main character. That’s all well and good, but that doesn’t mean they have to be one-dimensional. Whether it’s a male or female character, I need them to be strong… meaning, they should be able to stand on their own and have just as many complexities as humans in real life.

    Here are the submission guidelines for submitting a First Page in June:

    Please put “June First Page Critique” in the subject line. Please make sure you include your name, the title of the piece, and whether it is as picture book, middle grade, or young adult, etc. at the top.

    Besides pasting it into the body of the email, please attach your first page submission in a Word doc using one inch margins and 12 point font – double spaced, no more than 23 lines and e-mail and send it to: kathy(dot)temean(at)gmail(dot)com. So it should be cut and pasted into the body of the e-mail and then also attached as a Word document to the email.

    DEADLINE: June 19th.

    RESULTS: June 27th.

    Use inch margins – double space your text – 12 pt. New Times Roman font – no more than 23 lines – paste into body of the email and attach.

    CALL FOR ILLUSTRATIONS: Still need illustrations for summer. Would love to show off your illustrations during one of my daily posts. So please submit your illustrations: To kathy (dot) temean (at) gmail (dot) com. Illustrations must be at least 500 pixels wide and include a blurb about you that I can use. Put Summer Illustration in the subject area. Thanks!

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Agent, opportunity, Places to sumit Tagged: Bradford Literary, Call for Illustrations, Doris Ettlinger, First Page Critiques, S.E. Green, Sarah LaPolla, Yvonne Ventresca

    3 Comments on Free Fall Friday – June’s Guest Critiquer & Book Give-A-Way Winners, last added: 6/7/2014
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    23. Agent Looking For Writers

    Madeleine_clark_literary_agent

    Madeleine Clark: After working for several years in the editorial department at Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, Madeleine Clark joined Sterling Lord Literistic in 2011. Madeleine was born in London, but raised in Virginia. She is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill., Madeleine is an unabashed anglophile, so some of England has rubbed off on her. She lives in Brooklyn.

    Interested in: Madeleine is interested in commercial and literary fiction as well as narrative nonfiction. She is drawn to realistic YA, literary thrillers, novels that can believably introduce a bit of fantasy/sci-fi, and books that draw heavily from their environment whether that is geographical or cultural.

    How to submit: If you have a manuscript that seems to fit what Madeleine is looking for, you can email her at: info (at) sll.com with “Attn: Madeleine Clark” in the e-mail subject line. For fiction, please send a synopsis and the first three chapters or a 50 page sample. For nonfiction, send a detailed proposal. Cover letters should be in the body of the email but send the actual submission as a Word document attachment.

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: Agent, opportunity, Places to sumit, Young Adult Novel Tagged: contemporary/realistic fiction, fantasy, Madeleine Clark, Sci-fi, Sterling Lord Literistic

    0 Comments on Agent Looking For Writers as of 1/1/1900
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    24. Poetry Contest & Poetry and Prose Reminder

    mindThe Mind Magazine First Annual Insight Poetry Competition:

    General information:

    Mind Magazine’s First Annual Insight Poetry Competition is now accepting entries. Deadline is August 15th. The winners will receive prize money and publication on the “Mind Magazine Top Talent” page, created to showcase the work of the finalists.

    Fee: $10

    Prizes:

    First place: $300.00, Gold Medal Standing on-line presentation, and publication as specified.

    Second place: $150.00, Silver Medal Standing on-line presentation and publication as specified.

    Third place: $50.00, Bronze Medal Standing on-line presentation and publication as specified.

    Forth place: $50.00, Mind Magazine T-Shirt and publication as specified.

    Fifth place: $50.00 and publication as specified.

    Electronic submissions are preferred, and can be purchased in the Mind Magazine store. Please be sure to include the entry identification number provided with your entry purchase, your return email, and the author’s name with each poem entered.

    Send all entries clearly marked with the email heading, “Contest Entry” to: mindmagazinesubmissions@gmail.com Up to three poems may be submitted per $10 entry.

    Entries may be mailed to:

    Mind Magazine

    PO Box 387

    O’Brien, OR. 97534

    Checks must be made out to Mind Magazine.

    Entry Fees:

    One to three poems: $10 All entry fees are non-refundable.

    Submissions:

    Mind Magazine is accepting submissions of poetry, prose, scientific articles and scientific papers. Poetry should be no more than three pages in length per poem, single spaced, #12 Times or Times New Roman font, two poems maximum per submission, one submission per month. Send submissions of poetry in electronic form, rtf or Word format, with the email heading clearly marked, “Poetry Submission” to Michael Spring at: bluecrow_4@yahoo.com  Include your return email and contact information.

    Submissions of prose, scientific articles and papers must be provided single spaced, #12 Times or Times New Roman font, one submission per month, in electronic form, rtf or Word format, with the email heading clearly marked, “Prose/Science submission” to Rich Norman at: mindmagazinesubmissions@gmail.com  Include your return email and contact information.

    http://media.wix.com/ugd/cf8614_d2ea7f4b33f94026b853386cea6380aa.pdf

    Dream Quest One Writing and Poetry Contest See April Post

    Postmark deadline: July 31, 2014 All contest winners will be published online in the Dare to Dream pages, on September 20, 2014. Entry Form: http://www.dreamquestone.com/entryform.html

    Prizes: Writing Contest First Prize is $500. Second Prize: $250. Third Prize: $100. Poetry Contest First Prize is $250. Second Prize: $125.  Third Prize: $50. Entry fees: $10 per short story. $5 per poem.

    To send entries: Include title(s) with your story (ies) or poem(s), along with your name, address, phone#, email, brief biographical  info. (Tell us a little about yourself), on the coversheet. Add a self-addressed stamped envelope for entry confirmation.

    Mail entries/fees payable to: “DREAMQUESTONE.COM” Dream Quest One Poetry & Writing Contest P.O. Box 3141 Chicago, IL  60654

    Visit http://www.dreamquestone.com for details on how to enter!

    http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2014/04/21/writing-poetry-contest/

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: authors and illustrators, Competition, Contests, earn money, inspiration, opportunity, Places to sumit, Poems Tagged: Magazine Contest, Money and Publication, The Mind Magazine Poetry Contest

    0 Comments on Poetry Contest & Poetry and Prose Reminder as of 6/11/2014 2:25:00 PM
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    25. Free Fall Friday – New Imprints

    Andreja PeklarArk

    I thought this fun illustration by Andreja Peklar went well with the publishing news of new imprints. It helps float all our boats. Andreja was born in a small medieval town of Kamnik in Slovenvia. When she grew up she moved to Lijubijana and studied art history, then switched to painting at the Academy of Fine Arts. She illustrates children’s books. http://www.andrejapeklar.si

    Sarah LaPolla from the Bradford Literary Agency is our Guest Critiquer for June. See bottom of post for Submission Guidelines and Deadline.

     

    New Imprints:
     
    HarperCollins’ science fiction & fantasy imprint Voyager is expanding its digital-first Impulse program with 31 new titles set for publication between July 2014 through Winter 2015. These digital-first publications, the “vast majority” of which were acquired from an open global submissions call in 2012, will be followed by short-run paperback editions.”Voyager Impulse gives us the opportunity to expand our frontlist in new directions and offer a more diverse selection of imaginative fiction to readers,” said svp, executive editor and director of editorial development at Morrow and Voyager Jennifer Brehl in the announcement. “I for one am energized by the vast potential opened up by digital publishing.” Voyager will also publish the first US title acquired through the submissions call, THORN JACK by Katherine Harbour, as a hardcover next month.

    Harper Canada will launch a new imprint, Harper Avenue, in fall 2014 devoted to fiction and non-fiction “that capture readers with strong storytelling and unique, memorable voices, and will feature ‘must-read’ works.” Titles on the launch list include fiction from David Nicholls, Caitlin Moran, Emily St. John Mandel, Jacqueline Baker and Graeme Simsion, and non-fiction from Amy Poehler and Andrea Martin. “Harper Avenue will give further shape and focus to an exciting part of our Canadian publishing program by highlighting books that speak directly to readers’ desire for compelling storytelling,” said vp, executive publisher and editor-in-chief at Harper Canada Iris Tupholme in the announcement. “Featuring books that readers will fall in love with and recommend to their friends, Harper Avenue gives special positioning to a select group of titles within the larger framework of one of the largest and most successful publishers in the country.

    “Another new imprint, Fig Tree Books, for which we carried our first deal report yesterday (it’s separate from the UK imprint Fig Tree), will launch in March 2015, distributed by PGW. Founded and financed by former pharmaceutical businessman and inventor Fredric Price, the new house will focus on literary fiction about the American Jewish experience. Editor-in-chief Michelle Caplan says, “The American Jewish experience is a rich and broad category with a long history of compelling literature as well as an area that many talented contemporary writers are dynamically exploring. Our goal is to make Fig Tree the first place readers turn to in order to find new voices as well as classics that will still appeal to current readers.”

    Here are the submission guidelines for submitting a First Page in June:

    Please put “June First Page Critique” in the subject line. Please make sure you include your name, the title of the piece, and whether it is as picture book, middle grade, or young adult, etc. at the top.

    Besides pasting it into the body of the email, please attach your first page submission in a Word doc using one inch margins and 12 point font – double spaced, no more than 23 lines and e-mail and send it to: kathy(dot)temean(at)gmail(dot)com. So it should be cut and pasted into the body of the e-mail and then also attached as a Word document to the email.

    DEADLINE: June 19th.

    RESULTS: June 27th.

    Use inch margins – double space your text – 12 pt. New Times Roman font – no more than 23 lines – paste into body of the email and attach.

    CALL FOR ILLUSTRATIONS: Still need illustrations for summer. Would love to show off your illustrations during one of my daily posts. So please submit your illustrations: To kathy (dot) temean (at) gmail (dot) com. Illustrations must be at least 500 pixels wide and include a blurb about you that I can use. Put Summer Illustration in the subject area. Thanks!

    Talk tomorrow,

    Kathy


    Filed under: New Imprint, News, opportunity, Places to sumit, publishers Tagged: Andreja Peklar, Fig Tree Books, Harper Avenue, Harper Canada, HarperCollins Voyager Imprint, Voyager Impulse

    1 Comments on Free Fall Friday – New Imprints, last added: 6/13/2014
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