What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(from the Reviews category)

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Reviews Category Blogs

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
<<November 2014>>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
      01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30      
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from the Reviews category, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 142,447
26. Mailbox Monday - 11/24/14

 
Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came into their house last week. (Library books don’t count, but eBooks & audiobooks do).    

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles, and humongous wish lists!

Mailbox Monday, created by Marcia @ A Girl and Her Books, has a permanent home now at Mailbox Monday.


 *******************
Every week Mailbox Monday will have a new linky posted for our Mailbox Monday links at Marcia's Mailbox Monday blog.

Here’s a shout out to the new administrators:

Leslie of Under My Apple Tree 
Vicki of I’d Rather Be at the Beach
Serena @ Savvy Verse And Wit 

THANKS to everyone for keeping Mailbox Monday alive. 
 ***************
I hope you had a good mailbox.  

Another lean week for me, but no complaints because this one book is a book I am really looking forward to reading.

 ***************
On Wednesday, November 19, I received:


1.  THE SILENT SISTER by Diane Chamberlain, courtesy of Katie Bassel of St. Martin's.


 I am looking forward to starting the book.

 **********
 How about your mailbox?   

Any titles in your mailbox that you were excited about seeing?
**********


 
 


0 Comments on Mailbox Monday - 11/24/14 as of 11/24/2014 2:30:00 AM
Add a Comment
27. Seed Catalogs Already

It isn’t even really winter yet and I received my first 2015 seed catalog in the mail. I’m used to getting a flood of seed catalogs around the end of December so this one took me by surprise. I normally would set it aside as the first in a pile not to be looked at until January, but it came from Pinetree Garden Seeds, one of my preferred places to order from. And it looked so colorful and inviting, so fat and full or potential that I decided to just take a little peek.

Half an hour and twenty breathless pages later when I came up for air after falling into raptures over cosmic purple and atomic red carrots, I reluctantly put the catalog aside for fear of an overdose. And I do feel like I have been drugged because it has been a couple of days and I can’t stop thinking about those carrots or the catalog. Just one vegetable, I tell myself, what if I only look at all the different kinds of cauliflower and then put the catalog aside, surely I can do that? And next thing I know I am deep into all the varieties of eggplant with only a vague recollection of how I got there.

And then I get an email from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, my other main seed squeeze, telling me their 2015 catalog is now available, click here to request it now. But wait! There is a second catalog they have, The Whole Seed Catalog. This catalog is not free. This catalog is the free catalog on steroids MiracleGro super compost tea. At 352 pages it is nearly twice as big as the free catalog.

But why should I pay for a catalog? Why indeed. Don’t be ridiculous I tell myself, just request the free one. But. But But. Articles about the history of various seeds. Recipes. Growing methods and tips. And more. You know those cartoons where there is a devil on one shoulder and an angel on the other and a fight ensues? Today the devil won and I bought the catalog.

I’m still a little stunned. The devil is grinning from ear-to-ear and the angel is grumbling about how it better be worth it and I’m jittery and wondering how long it will take to get here because the Pinetree Seeds catalog might not last long enough and what will I do if I can’t get another fix? Bookman just shakes his head and doesn’t want to be bothered with gardening stuff until spring when I tell him, these are peas, plant them there. I don’t think he realizes the danger of his hands off approach. This last spring he ended up digging me a small pond. The spring before that it was the herb spiral. It’s only the end of November so there is no telling what big garden project I will settle on by next spring.

I think it is going to be a long winter.


Filed under: gardening

Add a Comment
28. Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos

Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos  by Stephanie Roth Sisson Roaring Brook Press, 2014 ISBN: 9781596439603 Grades K-4 The reviewer borrowed a copy of the book from her local library. Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos is an engaging picture book biography that will inspire young readers to ask "why" and "how" as they wonder about the universe. Stephanie

0 Comments on Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos as of 11/24/2014 4:50:00 AM
Add a Comment
29. Many Years Ago.....


....I wrote this in response to criticism about how I treated a publisher who was a crooked con man.  I actually did not realise that years later gangster Ronnie Kray used the same line.  It is very important that if you have dealings with me you understand this:

" I am a nice man with nice people.  But I am a bastard with bastards."

Comic creator, publisher, event organiser or otherwise: word.

Add a Comment
30. Highlights from NCTE

We're sharing our presentations from NCTE with you, along with quotes I jotted down from a variety of authors and literacy leaders. ALSO, take a peek at some photos from our Slicer Dinner.

Add a Comment
31. I Could Have Been At Home Watching The Rugby!

 
 So, I got up, tidy myself and packed up all the books ready to get the bus to the event.  Miserable and depressed.  But the bus was running on time and the rain stopped.

YAY! It might just turn out to be a good day after all.

I turned up at just after 0900 hours and walking from the bus stop approached the hotel.  Immediately obvious was that there was absolutely no indication that there was an event on let alone an "International Book Fair and Comic Expo" -and no "meet-and-greeters" as you usually get at these events -in the past there have been people standing in the foyer waiting to point you in the right direction with a cheery "hello".

I looked around.  Nothing.  I approached the very polite and smiling receptionists who were more than happy to give me directions to the event.

So I got into the lift and headed for the fifth floor.  I kept thinking "Chandeliers! Chandeliers!"

Why was I thinking that?  Well, regular CBOers will remember that for one of the last good (well signed) Expos held in the Mercure, the Small Press Expo got a big room with chandelier style lights.  Never thought I'd see the SP in a fancy room.  So I was hoping that it was the same room.  It was.


And there was no one I recognised. Would this be a repeat of my disasterous Comics and Small Press event in October?  No. I said "Hello" to the two young guys from Bath on the table next to me.  Hands were shaken a few jokes spouted and that was it. So I set up the table -more books than space and walked around and there were a few more "hellos" -later from Simon Wyatt, Jason Cardy, Steve Tanner -and a lot of Welsh attendees.

With no exhibitor badges -just a coloured plastic sticker- it would have been hard to know who a good few of the people were....had I not done what I usually do: check all the exhibitors/guests blogs and websites during the week so I knew who was where and did what.

Wow. I thought "This should be good" but wanted to check the place out.

Had a nice chat with one of the hotel staff in the foyer and asked about signs for the event?  I was told "I think that is up to the organisers."  Fair enough.  Went for a quick look outside to return to the event and prepare for the thronging masses.

I found a rather worrying brown envelope on my table and the only words written on it were "Terry Hooper".  Breaking into a cold sweat I got a "How do you fancy a trip to East Germany?" flash-back. I could have swooned when I found that it was two books from Time Bomb Comics' Steve Tanner!



 THAT banner was just too scarily predicting what was to unfold.
 
Decided to double-check the table (as my old teacher drummed into us:"Never enter a room without knowing that you CAN exit it alive!") and then off to relieve Bladderking.  On my return I found a rather up-tight former hipster wannanbe who really should have pulled to the curb and taken a polaroid.  Yes, Darron Ralph Maffaking Hildegarde Northall had arrived.


Northall: "Just how come you got a red sticker and I got a yellow one, hey?  What's that supposed to mean -I'm inferior to you, hey? Hey??!!"    Once I explained that it was either a yellow sticker or walk around in his underpants all day he calmed down.

Oh! Funny story....well, more like embarassing really.  The young lady who came up to me and put the sticker on my shirt to show I was an exhibitor (the organisers knew me and I was standing there with a name tag and Black Tower logo behind an exhibitor table....meh).  I said -you'll have hysterics here- "Does that mean if I'm seen without the sticker I get tackled and thrown out by security?"  Young lady: "That would be me"   Now, she was wearing a red sweater.  She was security (!) so I reposted: "Red security sweater. Wow. Hopw brave!" (I was making a Star Trek reference there, right?)  I got THE blankest look in return.  "It's a Star Trek reference -security man in red sweater always gets killed?"  There was not the slightest breeze but the tumble weeds that rolled by.  A "Oh right." and that was it.


 Morning at the expo....don't be fooled -all these people are exhibitors!

Anyhow, the rakish Northall asked where the various events were and talks.  Nothing was well sign-posted and let me tell you even reviews from businessmen refer to how confusing the corridors are in the hotel -at one expo I ended up with three frightened expoers in a lift in the basement. I think my maniacal laugh when the lift doors opened revealing the basement might have unnerved them.

 Note to self: Do not wear a side cash pouch and camera pouch under you top because you like like a pregnant ferschlugginer!  And, yes, that little red square above the t-shirt log IS my event 'ID'!

Below: Ahh, the view.  Windows are sealed to prevent expo exhibitors jumping...well, me in particular!
Well, this was an "International Book Fair and Comic Expo" but there was one guest from the US(?) who I had never heard of before and he and his friend were sat behind a table away from everyone else looking very bored and not getting much attention.  I really felt sorry for him.   That was it.

 Afternoon: Hello! It's kicking off -two kids and their dad!  No, those other people are still the exhibitors.


 From the Black Tower table.  Yes, quite a few empty tables.  And those folk in the background are, again, exhibitors -we could all get up, walk around and talk and be confident that no one would be at our tables. This really was very, very depressing.

Below: Northall -"Okay take a photo and I'll smile just this once 'for the team'!"
 A quick re-arranging of the table just to keep us busy. Oddly, people would stop for a second or so and not even engage in conversation but walk off.  But I'll put that in perspective by saying I counted ten or twelve people who came into the room and most seemed to know people there.

From what I could see Paul Grist was not doing a great deal....

Damn that banner again -just wiping my face in it!


 Damn my camera for malfunctioning again.  I only got this one of Steve Tanner at the Time Bomb Comics table.  Okay, he at least sold something but he had driven all the way from Birmingham and been stung by the hotel parking fee of £12.50!  "What?!" you may be shouting.  I did.  An exhibitor at an event at the hotel had to pay £12.50 to PARK a car there.

That was just plain disgusting. I wonder how many people attending conferences at the hotel pay full whack to park their car?  That alone would make me never ever recommend the Mercure Holland to anyone as a conference or event venue.



 Steve is a very nice man who works hard to promote and sell his books.  Okay, so do I BUT he had travelled all the way to Bristol and had to drive all that way back.  He explains that he never has high expectations so if it isn't a good day well you can't be disappointed.

Still, as I explained to someone yesterday evening, being stung to park at an event and then really just sit about or chinwag was really bad.



Plenty of stand-up signage outside the hotel.  Usually you see signs placed out by the pavement for events.

Now, you might ask why this event was not attended by any international publishers?  I purchased a lot of books because I planned professionally for a big event.  Northall's constant "You've got too much stuff! Too many books!" was annoying but he would be right if I was the sort of person who was a dilettante.  Small Press event or a big event I treat it professionally.  I take stock so that people do not just see horror comics or super hero or whatever.

I am just glad that lulu.com somehow fouled up my order for the four prose books which would have cost me over £150.00.  I was mad that I never had the books for the event but had I then I would have been Hulking out!

WHY was there no exterior signs pointing out that an "international book fair and comic expo" was being held?  According to the organisers the hotel said there could be but then told them they could not.  If this is true then I suggest the organisers contact the company running the hotel and demand a partial refund. 


Read this from the Hotel website:


"Mercure Bristol Holland House Hotel & Spa is a luxury hotel situated in Bristol's city centre. This stylish hotel blends sophisticated meeting and conference facilities with 275 spacious bedrooms, the chic Phoenix restaurant and bar, 14 beauty treatment rooms and fitness suite with a 14m pool.

A focal point for events and business meetings in the city, Mercure Holland House provides state-of-the-art conference and banqueting facilities. The 12 luxurious suites have the flexibility to comfortably cater for intimate meetings of eight or conferences of up to 220 delegates with the added bonus of a dedicated lounge and break-out area.

Through the hotel’s Meet with Mercure offer, all delegate packages include free Wi-Fi and LCD projector plus inclusive refreshments from mid-morning breaks to afternoon tea.

The hotel’s conference and events team is enthusiastic and professional, tailoring conference arrangements to the individual customer's needs, resulting in a superlative service in luxurious surroundings. Conference organisers can be assured that whatever the event, a conference or meeting suite is available to suit their needs. Enhanced by its central location and sheer style, the hotel is the obvious choice for high profile events."

Now, I pass this hotel almost every day and I have seen stand-up signs and pointer arrow signs for events outside it.  It is quite a common sight there and you find out a lot about what is going on in the City from these.  It makes no sense that the hotel which had signage for comic expos in the past should suddenly disallow any.

The bonus event publiciser has always been the cosplayers -Abe The Alien, Star Wars troopers and so on as well as people giving out flyers.  Nothing here.

A couple quick emails and I found out that none of the Bristol comic shops had been asked to put up a flyer -they have done with the old Comic Expo.  None were invited to take part in the event.  To which I can only respond ?!?!!

So the main publicity for the event -2-3 times a week for the last couple months has been CBO.  Nothing on other comic blogs (unless you can point me in the direction of one that did mention it?)

About three times everyone went quiet as a raffle or something else was shouted out by the organisers.  Please bear that in mind for a paragraph or so.

By 1430 hours (2.30pm to you lot) Northall was talking me out of committing suicide using the sharp edge of a Black Tower book ....I looked around and people were packing up!!   People were saying they were going by 1500 hrs.  The event started at 10:00 hours which was a mistake -Mid-day would have been better -still six hours to trade.

But there was no trade.

I think Steve Tanner packed up just after 15:00 hours but by 16:00 hours, with two hours still to go others were packing up.  If it had not been for the pally atmosphere it would have been more depressing. At just after 16:00 hrs I noticed the organisers had packed up and gone.  No announcement.  Nothing.  I tried to find them and asked one of the hotel staff "They've just gone" was the reply I received.

WHAT???????

As everyone else packed up and left I made sure that my table was still fully set up.  I'm not a comic dilettante and I paid for a table until 18:00 hours (6pm) and that was it.  But someone had turned the air-conditioning units from warm to cold.  Cold air was flowing quite happily.  A very old and cynical trick to clear a venue.

 I think it was after  17:00 hours (5pm) that I packed up and Northall and I left a deserted event room.

I was told "Oh, the organisers mum felt a bit unwell so they left".

Unfortunate but I have been involved in setting up events since the 1970s, from early computer events, business marts and even comic events. I have never ever heard of an organiser just leaving their exhibitors like idiots at an event.  An announcement that someone was ill? No problem -just tell exhibitors how to contact you in an emergency and you certainly HAVE to be there to see the event draws to a close and thank exhibitors for coming.

This was probably the worst organised event I have ever been to. No real publicity outside of a Face Book page and blog and CBO, of course.  NO "international book fair" -everyone I spoke to there were Small Pressers either using one Print On Demand company or another. And all the guests announced for the cancelled "Booked!" event that were supposed to be at this re-scheduled event?  None.

But then the most galling email ever from the organisers:

"Firstly may I say a big thank you to you all for the support you have given to this venture.  The room looked great and I thought the atmosphere was very friendly and pleasant. 
 
I can only apologise for the lack of support from the general public although the few that did attend really enjoyed their time there. However, I don’t know what more I could have done in advertising the event and felt that the hotel could have given a more prominent pointer to the fair.  That said I expect that as this event coincided with the big comic expo at Birmingham NEC that many of our likely customers were there instead of in Bristol" 
 
Let me just say that comic fans and people in Bristol have always -ALWAYS- been very supportive of comic events in the City.  It is why the Bristol Comic Expo used to be the "must go to event" of the year (see my announcement in the next posting).  To seriously write  "lack of support from the general public" and give that as an excuse and not expect a Bristolian to get very very angry..... 
 
THE PEOPLE AND COMIC FANS OF BRISTOL NEEDED TO KNOW THERE WAS AN EVENT IN ORDER FOR THEM TO SUPPORT IT!

This was basically a very poorly organised comic mart and not a big international book fair or comic expo.  Arts and craft, Small Pressers and a couple fellas selling comics.  

Back Cover Promotions failed to deliver the event promised.  Okay, first time events CAN be quite messy but this is the first one where I've heard exhibitors politely -and not so politely- state that they would never attend the event again.

There were months in which to contact bloggers, comic shops, arrange flyers to distribute -music shops in Bristol and gaming stores have been more than happy to do this in the past.

If you are an underdog then Bristol is the place to get support but if you blame your failure on Bristolians the hackles WILL rise.
 
From now on, when I book a ticket with events -who ALWAYS have tones of things you have to agree to- I am going to stipulate that if an event is badly organised or publicised resulting in something like this debacle, I at least get my table money back.

Next year I am seriously thinking and costing going to Steve Tanner's new Birmingham convention.  Today I am just tired and very annoyed.  The only thing that saved the day (and no sells so I'm down £400 this year) were the exhibitors who actually made me laugh and smile.

It was a VERY long day.

Add a Comment
32. An interview with Frederick Luis Aldama regarding his new book, “The Cinema of Robert Rodriguez”

 

Frederick Luis Aldama is Arts & Humanities Distinguished Professor of English as well as University Distinguished Scholar at The Ohio State University. He is prolific: Aldama is the author and editor of more than twenty books. Aldama also founded and directs the award-winning LASER—a Latino focused academic mentor system from 9th through college.

His latest book is The Cinema of Robert Rodriguez recently published by the University of Texas Press. Aldama does more than hit his marks: he has created an exhilarating, accessible and much-needed study of one of the most inventive and multifaceted directors to come along during the last thirty years. It is a “must read” for anyone who wishes to become a filmmaker or who simply loves movies.

DANIEL OLIVAS: Can you remember the first Robert Rodriguez film you saw and your reaction to it?

FREDERICK LUIS ALDAMA:I was one of the many who sold out opening shows of El Mariachi in Berkeley. The UC Theatre double-billed it with his short, Bedhead. As an undergraduate at UC, I was finding my way to Latino popular culture. I was a grader for a Latino Cinema course with Dr. Mario Barrera. Both films blew me away. In only a few minutes Bedhead took me places only film could: a recognizable everyday but where things could happen that defied the logic of this everyday reality.

My eyes peeled wide with El Mariachi. I’d seen—and even studied—films like Born in East LA and The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez, but never seen a Latino film made in the spirit of a comic book, and yet that took me into the serious—deadly even—underworld of Mexican narcotraficantes. The intercut of a dream-like sequence with the little boy and the turtle stayed with me long after the film’s end.

DO: Rodriguez’s early filmmaking style was driven, in large part, by a lack of funding but a great deal of imagination. And you observe that his “independent” work ethic does not fit well with big studio production culture. Was Rodriguez destined to be an “indie” filmmaker?

FLA: Rodriguez seemed destined for the straight-to-VHS, B-flick Spanish-language market—all those films we used to pick up during our weekends at La Pulga/”Flea Market.” But it’s that same DIY approach (together with a huge amount of skill) that allows him to energize and make real (reel?) a vision that steps to a different beat.

To put it in your terms, then, I’d say he’s indie but with an imagination that fills to the edges super blockbuster screens. He’s a Latino director who pushes the envelope—constantly—both in terms of story and the way he gives cinematic shape to story. But he’s not the guy we go see at an art-house fest to then have polite tête-à-têtes over the Lacanian significance of a turtle crossing the road. His films entertain—and each superbly so with each of their respective audiences in mind: kids with Spy Kids and geeked-out Fangoria crowds with From Dusk Till Dawn, for instance. They make you think but never demean or belittle us as an audience. Mostly, and this from Spy Kids to Planet Terror to Macheteto El Mariachi—they stay with us long after they’re over.

Frederick Luis Aldama

DO: If you were to choose one Rodriguez film for adults and one for children, which would they be and why?

FLA: Rodriguez hit the sweet spot with the Spy Kidsfilms. With the exception of the third installment (Game Over) that’s creatively straightjacketed by the video-game conceit, everything about the films speaks to children, tweens, and young teens: from the gadgets, to the gags, to the concerns and anxieties—and the daydreams and unrestrained imagination.  In a sea of films ostensibly made for kids (Shrek, for instance) but where the humor bites with an adult-directed sarcasm, irony, and innuendo, there’s no outdoing the Spy Kids flicks as films for kids. 

Rodriguez managed to pull off an extraordinary feat with Machete. It’s over the top, and it’s meant to be in that comic book way where anything goes. This elastic container, if you will, allows Rodriguez to bring to light some serious issues: anti-immigration laws, racial profiling, and anti-Latino racist sentiment generally. Masterfully, he makes a film that simultaneously entertains—and sometimes with bellyaching laughter—and that has us churning in our minds a reality filled increasingly with barbarous acts.

0 Comments on An interview with Frederick Luis Aldama regarding his new book, “The Cinema of Robert Rodriguez” as of 11/24/2014 3:58:00 AM
Add a Comment
33. 2015 Challenges: Newbery Reading Challenge

Host: Smiling Shelves
Name: Newbery Reading Challenge 2015 (sign up here)
Dates: January - December 2015
# of Books Points:   30 to 44 points (Spinelli) 3 points for each Newbery winner, 2 points for each Newbery Honor Book (So 30 points could be reached by 10 Newbery books, for example, or 15 Newbery Honor books)

Newbery Winners Read in 2015:

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)

Newbery Honor Books Read in 2015:

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)


© 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

0 Comments on 2015 Challenges: Newbery Reading Challenge as of 11/23/2014 3:54:00 PM
Add a Comment
34. Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore Audiobook Review

Title: Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore Author: Robin Sloan Narrated by: Ari Fliakos Publisher: Macmillan Audio Publication Date: February 26, 2013 Listening copy via local library I know I'm not the first to call this a mash-up of Umberto Eco and Doug Coupland because that's exactly what Robin Sloan's Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore is. It's a mystery about manuscripts and codes, it's a

0 Comments on Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore Audiobook Review as of 11/23/2014 4:56:00 PM
Add a Comment
35. Ripley’s Fun Facts & Silly Stories 3 | Book Giveaway

Enter to win a copy of Ripley’s Fun Facts & Silly Stories 3. Giveaway begins November 24, 2014, at 12:01 A.M. PST and ends December 23, 2014, at 11:59 P.M. PST.

Add a Comment
36. 2015 Challenges: Vintage Mystery Bingo

Host: My Reader's Block
Name: Vintage Mystery Bingo 2015 (sign up)
Dates: January - December 2015
# of Books: at least 6, preferably 12

I'll be going for the gold edition which is mystery books published before 1960.

Bingo #1

Category:
Title:
Category:
Title: 
Category:
Title: 
Category:
Title: 
Category:
Title: 
Category:
Title:

Bingo #2:

Category:
Title:
Category:
Title: 
Category:
Title: 
Category:
Title: 
Category:
Title: 
Category:
Title:

 © 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

0 Comments on 2015 Challenges: Vintage Mystery Bingo as of 11/23/2014 6:38:00 PM
Add a Comment
37. Highlights from NCTE

We're sharing our presentations from NCTE with you, along with quotes I jotted down from a variety of authors and literacy leaders. ALSO, take a peek at some photos from our Slicer Dinner.

Add a Comment
38. Characters are Key

Your book might have the best hook in the world, but it won't be published without well-written characters.

http://taralazar.com/2014/11/06/piboidmo-day-6-sudipta-bardhan-quallen/

0 Comments on Characters are Key as of 11/23/2014 2:16:00 PM
Add a Comment
39. Making Peg Dolls & More – a very satisfying craft book for families

Making Peg Dolls & More: Toys that spin, fly and bring sweet dreams is a second book by Margaret Bloom full of ideas about how to make the most delightful peg dolls.

pegdolls

Like many families, now we’re in the run up to Christmas, we’re spending time getting crafty together, making presents and decorations, and this book has given us hours of delight. Full of ideas about how to customise wooden peg dolls into adorable characters, Bloom also provides lots of tutorials for how to use your peg dolls in innovative ways, such as in mobiles, wands, wall hangings and pincushion embellishments.

Super clear and friendly instructions, made beautiful and even easier to follow by the inclusion of simple but beautiful watercolour illustrations along with many photos of all sorts of children making and playing with peg dolls made sure this book really appealed to my kids as soon as they set eyes on it.

That the instructions are easy to follow and result in items which the kids are really proud of was clearly demonstrated by the way my 9 year old, M, took the book off by herself and created her first ever felt toys:

pegdolls3

Although M was totally absorbed by herself in her sewing, as a parent I especially enjoyed Bloom’s emphasis in her instructions on how the whole family can take part in making their own peg dolls; she clearly indicates which parts even the youngest children can get involved with, and encourages us grown-ups to be involved, but also to let our kids do their own things with the dolls. This book isn’t about parents turning out coffee-table-book-worthy gorgeous ornaments (although we’re definitely encouraged to play, sew and create along side the kids); it really is about facilitating children’s exploratory play and creativity.

The book includes a list of suppliers of peg dolls, felt and one or two other items that are especially nice to use (such as artificial/millinery flower stamens) and I would heartily encourage you to gift a bundle of supplies, including some watercolours, with this book so that the recipient can dive in straight away. I’ve personally used Craftshapes for my blank wooden peg dolls in the past and they’ve always be lovely to deal with.

What we started with

What we started with

Here are some of the characters we created:

pegdolls1

pegdolls2

Whilst painting, sewing, sticking and playing we listened to:

  • Wedding of the Painted Doll, one of the hit songs from the musical “The Broadway Melody” – indeed, it reach #1 in the charts in 1929! Another version with more lyrics can be heard here.
  • The doll dance from Delibe’s ballet Coppélia
  • Come Over To My Dollhouse by Lunch Money. Whilst in some ways this is a world away from the lovely peg dolls made by Bloom (which are the antithesis to Barbie, who does feature in this song), the video is enormous fun and might inspire you and your kids to make your own video for your favourite music.

  • If you want ideas about how to take things a step further with your peg dolls take a look at:

  • Using corks instead of wooden peg doll blanks. Especially good if you drink a lot of champagne…
  • Using acorns instead of wooden peg doll blanks – I really love these!
  • Turning pinecones and wooden beads into dolls – a priceless idea from Margaret Bloom herself. In fact there are lots of lovely free tutorials on Bloom’s website – I encourage you to take a look! I particularly like the bat tutorial.
  • We’ve thoroughly enjoyed Making Peg Dolls & More: Toys that spin, fly and bring sweet dreams: It is beautiful to look at and filled with enticing projects, which are both achievable and give results to delight in. It is also a book which is very proud to be just a starting point; it’s really about giving you ideas which will bloom in you and your kids’ imaginations.

    What family craft books would you recommend?

    Disclosure: I received a free review copy of this book from the publisher.

    1 Comments on Making Peg Dolls & More – a very satisfying craft book for families, last added: 11/24/2014
    Display Comments Add a Comment
    40. Library Loot: Fourth Trip in November

    New Loot:
    • A Medal for Murder by Frances Brody
    • The Art of the English Murder by Lucy Worsley
    • Goodbye, Piccadilly: War at Home, 1914 by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles
    • Operation Bunny by Sally Gardner
    • Birds of a Feather by Jacqueline Winspear
    • Pardonable Lies by Jacqueline Winspear
    • Cartwheeling in Thunderstorms by Katherine Rundell
    • What If...? by Anthony Browne

    Leftover Loot:

    • Hero on a Bicycle by Shirley Hughes
    • Hercule Poirot's Christmas by Agatha Christie
    • Follow Follow: A Book of Reverso Poems by Marilyn Singer
    • McElligot's Pool by Dr. Seuss
    • Horton Hatches The Egg by Dr. Seuss
    • And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street by Dr. Seuss
    • The King's Stilts by Dr. Seuss
    • The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins by Dr. Seuss
    • Death at Buckingham Palace by C.C. Benison
    • Keepers of the Covenant by Lynn Austin
    • The Daring Ladies of Lowell by Kate Alcott
    • Train by Judi Abbot
    • Waiting is Not Easy by Mo Willems
    • The Time Traveler's Almanac ed. by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer
    • Sleep in Peace Tonight by James MacManus
    • The Princess Spy by Melanie Dickerson
    • A Great and Glorious Adventure by Gordon Corrigan
    • Murder at Honeychurch Hall by Hannah Dennison
        Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.  

    © 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

    0 Comments on Library Loot: Fourth Trip in November as of 11/23/2014 6:38:00 PM
    Add a Comment
    41. Perpetual Challenge: Victorian Bingo

    Host: Becky's Book Reviews
    Name: Perpetual Victorian Bingo (sign up)
    Dates: for me--any book read from January 1, 2014 on
    # of books: minimum 8, I'd love to get multiple bingos or even fill up the whole card!!!

    My card for 2014.

    1837
    1838
    1839
    1840
    1841
    1842
    1843
    A Christmas Carol. Charles Dickens. 1843. 96 pages. [Source: Bought] (review coming late November)
    1844
    1845
    1846
    1847
    Jane Eyre. Charlotte Bronte. 1847.  300 pages. [Source: Own] (review coming late December)
    1849
    1850
    1851
    1852
    1853
    1854
    A Tale of Two Cities. Charles Dickens. 1854/2003. Bantam Classics. 382 pages. [Source: Bought]
    North and South. Elizabeth Gaskell. 1854-1855. 452 pages. [Source: Bought]
    1855
    1856
    A Rogue's Life. Wilkie Collins. 1856. 159 pages. [Source: Book I bought]
    1857
    1858
    1859
    1860
    1861
    1862
    No Name. Wilkie Collins. 1862/1998. Oxford University Press. 748 pages.
    1863
    1864
    1865
    1866
    The Belton Estate. Anthony Trollope. 1866/1993. Penguin. 432 pages. [Source: Bought]
    1867
    1868
    1869
    Stepping Heavenward. Mrs. Elizabeth Prentiss. 1869/1998. Barbour Books. 352 pages. [Source: Bought]   
    1870
    1871
    1872
    1873
    The Eustace Diamonds. Anthony Trollope. 1873. 794 pages. [Source: Book I Bought]
    1874
    Phineas Redux. Anthony Trollope. 1874. 768 pages. [Source: Book I bought]
    1875
    The Law and the Lady. Wilkie Collins. 1875. 430 pages. [Source: Book I Bought]
    1876
    The Prime Minister. Anthony Trollope. 1876. 864 pages. [Source: Book I Bought]   
    1877
    Black Beauty. Anna Sewell. 1877. 245 pages. [Source: Bought] 
    1878
    Is He Popenjoy? Anthony Trollope. 1878/1993. Penguin. 632 pages. [Source: Bought]
    1879
    1880
    The Duke's Children. Anthony Trollope. 1880. 560 pages. [Source: Book I Bought]
    1881
    1882
    1883
    1884
    1885
    1886
    1887
    1888
    1889
    1890
    1891
    1892
    1893
    1894
    1895
    1896
    1897
    1898
    1899
    The Story of the Treasure Seekers. E. Nesbit. 1899. Puffin. 250 pages. [Source: Bought]
    1900
    1901
    Melisande. E. Nesbit. Illustrated by P.J. Lynch. 1901/1988/1999. Candlewick. 48 pages. [Source: Book I Bought]


    © 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

    0 Comments on Perpetual Challenge: Victorian Bingo as of 11/24/2014 11:06:00 AM
    Add a Comment
    42. 2015 Challenges: Alphabet Soup

    Host: Escape With Dollycas Into A Good Book
    Name: Alphabet Soup Reading Challenge (sign-up)
    Dates: January - December 2015
    # of books: 26

    Titles
    A
    B
    C
    D
    E
    F
    G
    H
    I
    J
    K
    L
    M
    N
    O
    P
    Q
    R
    S
    T
    U
    V
    W
    X
    Y
    Z

    © 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

    0 Comments on 2015 Challenges: Alphabet Soup as of 11/23/2014 6:38:00 PM
    Add a Comment
    43. The Fourteenth Goldfish, by Jennifer L. Holm: curiosity & discovery, believing in the possible (ages 8-12)

    Kids and teachers are loving a new book, The Fourteenth Goldfish, and it makes me so happy to hear them raving about it. I had a chance this weekend to sit down with Milana, a ten year old I lent my copy to, and we really had fun talking about this book. Talking about books together really helps us deepen our appreciation, deepen our thinking about the layers in a story.
    The Fourteenth Goldfish
    by Jennifer L. Holm
    Random House, 2014
    Your local library
    Amazon
    ages 8-12
    *best new book*
    Sixth grade is tricky for Ellie, but the day her mom brings home a new kid turns everything upside down. At first, he seems like a typical surly teenager, but something "tickles at (her) memory." Ellie is shocked when she realizes this is her grandfather Melvin, somehow turned into a thirteen year old boy. "I discovered a cure for aging... the fountain of youth!" he shouts. But he's stuck in this new body and can't get into his lab to recover the T. melvinus specimen, the species of jellyfish that helped him change back into a teen.

    My young friend, Milana, loved reading this so much that she bought one of her good friends a copy. "I got it for my friend because she's really into science and she really likes sea life. Now she's started it and won't stop reading it."

    Holm seamlessly weaves into the story a love of science and Milana picked up on this. Right away, she talked about wanting to learn more about Salk's discovery of the cure for polio and Oppenheimer's race to build the atomic bomb. As I've been rereading this, I love how much science Holm incorporates, especially as Ellie gets to know her grandfather.
    Melvin tells Ellie, "Scientists fail again and again and again. Sometimes for our whole lives. But we don’t give up, because we want to solve the puzzle... Scientists never give up. They keep trying because they believe in the possible."
    The relationship between Ellie and her grandfather is what makes this book special for me. Holms creates believable, nuanced characters and I think that's one reason so many readers are responding to this story.
    When Melvin, Ellie's grandfather, tells her mother, "'Your daughter’s interested in science. She shows great aptitude. You should encourage her.' I feel a flush of pride. Maybe this part of me—the science part—was there all along, like the seeds of an apple. I just needed someone to water it, help it grow. Someone like my grandfather."
    As Milana and I were talking more about the characters, I asked her if Melvin reminded her of any of her grandparents. I wish Jenni Holm could hear this young girl talking about her grandfather, a doctor who's always busy thinking and talking on the phone -- and how this story helps her see a different side of him. Milana told me, "It makes me wonder what my grandfather looked like, how he acted and what he was interested in when he was my age."

    The Fourteenth Goldfish left me thinking most about the themes essential to science: curiosity, discovery, possibility. A recent TED Radio Hour explores these same things, albeit more for adults. It starts with James Cameron talking about his childhood, when he loved collecting and studying all sorts of things, curious about everything. "It's almost like the more we know about the world, the limits of what's possible start to crowd in on us." But this curiosity stayed with him--and imbues both his movies and his love of oceanography.

    The real power of The Fourteenth Goldfish? It's like so many well-crafted stories: creating conversation, creating a moment to think a little more deeply about those around us, creating an ah-ha moment that curiosity and a passion for discovery lay at the heart of science--believing in the possible.

    More reviews:
    The review copy came from my home collection and our library collection and Milana's collection (I've already purchased many many copies!). If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.

    ©2014 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

    0 Comments on The Fourteenth Goldfish, by Jennifer L. Holm: curiosity & discovery, believing in the possible (ages 8-12) as of 11/24/2014 1:14:00 AM
    Add a Comment
    44. 2015 Challenges: Victorian Bingo

    Host: Becky's Book Reviews
    Name: Victorian Bingo (Sign-Up)
    Dates: January - December 2015 (you can start reading now)
    # of books: minimum of 5, I'm going to try to read 10 books


    First Bingo

    Category:
    Title:
    Category:
    Title: 
    Category:
    Title: 
    Category:
    Title: 
    Category:
    Title:
    Second Bingo

    Category:
    Title:
    Category:
    Title: 
    Category:
    Title: 
    Category:
    Title: 
    Category:
    Title:


    © 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

    0 Comments on 2015 Challenges: Victorian Bingo as of 11/23/2014 6:38:00 PM
    Add a Comment
    45. A Letter to THE WALLED CITY by Ryan Graudin

    by Becca THE WALLED CITYby Ryan GraudinHardcover: 448 pagesPublisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (November 4, 2014)Language: EnglishGoodreads | Amazon 730. That's how many days I've been trapped.18. That's how many days I have left to find a way out. DAI, trying to escape a haunting past, traffics drugs for the most ruthless kingpin in the Walled City. But in order to find the key

    0 Comments on A Letter to THE WALLED CITY by Ryan Graudin as of 11/24/2014 2:36:00 AM
    Add a Comment
    46. BilBOlbul Newsletter


     
    NEWSLETTER 23/11/2014
      
     
     
    BILBOLBUL 2014
     
    Perchè non passare la domenica mattina visitando le mostre dei nuovi artisti presenti a BilBOlbul? Anche quest’anno il festival ha deciso di sostenere il loro lavoro: vincitrice del premio Coop for Words 2014, Serena Schinaia allestisce a Ram Hotel Deriva. All’Accademia di Belle Arti di Bologna è aperta invece la mostra Prime Visioni dedicata a quattro giovani autori e ai suoi lavori tratti dalle tesi di laurea: Vincenzo Bizzarri, Lorenzo De Luca, Elena Guidolin e Mattia Moro.

     
     
    BILBOLZINE
     
    Domenica 23 novembre dalle 14,30 alle 19, la piazza coperta di SalaBorsa si trasforma in BilBOlZine.

    Un mercatino dove si potranno acquistare alcune autoproduzioni selezionate e legate agli artisti, italiani e internazionali, invitati al festival: L’Employé du Moi, Icinori, Oily Comics, Yellow Zine, Papier Gaché, Josephin Ritschel, Teiera.
     
     
    ANNA E FROGA
     
    Domenica 23 novembre alle 17 inaugura con una merenda alla Cineteca di Bologna la mostra Anna e Froga di Anouk Ricard.

    L'autrice mette in scena le piccole cose del mondo dei bambini, calandosi perfettamente nelle loro passioni, nella noia da cui nascono le più incredibili scoperte, nei problemi giganteschi di cui la vita di chi è piccolo è costellata, attraverso le avventure di una bambina e una rana e dei loro amici,

    Clicca qui per saperne di più.
     
     
    DEFLORIAN DELUXE
     
    Domenica 23 novembre alle 19.30 Anna Deflorian inaugura la mostra Deflorian Deluxe, progetto ad hoc di stanza a tema per l'hotel Al Cappello Rosso..

    Clicca qui per maggiori informazioni.



     
     
    BILBOLBUL CLOSING PARTY
     
    Domenica 23 novembre, siete tutti invitati ad AtelierSi, per la festa finale di BBB14!
    Alle 22, si aprirà l'asta degli originali donati a BilBOlbul dagli artisti ospiti, tra i quali le opere realizzate da Manuele Fior e Stefano Ricci durante la performance Il Battello Brillo che si è tenuta venerdì 21 presso AtelierSi.
    Il ricavato andrà a sostegno del festival.

    A partire dalle 23, musica a cura di Bologna Calibro 7 Pollici,100% original black music da vinile
     
     
    MONARCH: REPLICA ANNULLATA
     
    Ci spiace dover comunicare che la replica di Monarch di AkaB, prevista per il 28 e 29 novembre presso Maison22, è annullata.






     
     
    BilBOlbul Festival internazionale di fumetto fa parte della
    Rete dei Festival del Contemporaneo di Bologna

    Future Film Festival: 1 > 6 aprile 2014 - futurefilmfestival.org :: Live Arts Week: 8 > 13 aprile 2014 - liveartsweek.it :: Angelica- Festival Internazionale di musica: 2 > 31 maggio 2014 - aaa-angelica.com :: Biografilm: 6 > 16 giugno 2014 - biografilm.it :: Gender Bender: 25 ottobre > 1 novembre 2014 www.genderbender.it :: BilBOlBul: 20 > 23 novembre 2014 - bilbolbulnet

    Add a Comment
    47. Bristol Comic Expo No More

    For those who attended Mike Allwood organised Bristol International Comic Expos you will know they were the events of the year.  Comic stars and personalities and fans flocked to them.

    Fallen Agel Media took over the event and in the first year it nose-dived. Second year....very bad.  Well, I have been asked about 2015s event.

    After the way I was treated I withdrew my support for the event clearly and publicly.  That writ, I have to announced that three traders who normally attended the event have been told there is no longer a Bristol Comic Expo.  I can seriously write that "For the first time since last century (!) there will be no Comic Expo in Bristol in May or any other month of 2015".

    That is just sad.

    But I never attended 2014s and had no plans for 2015 anyway.

    Add a Comment
    48. Book Review: Purity by Jackson Pearce

    Title: Purity
     Author: Jackson Pearce
    Series:  N/A
    Published:   6 March 2014 by Hodder
    Length: 224 pages
    Source: publisher
    Summary : A novel about love, loss, and sex -- but not necessarily in that order.
    Before her mother died, Shelby promised three things: to listen to her father, to love as much as possible, and to live without restraint. Those Promises become harder to keep when Shelby's father joins the planning committee for the Princess Ball, an annual dance that ends with a ceremonial vow to live pure lives -- in other words, no "bad behavior," no breaking the rules, and definitely no sex.
    Torn between Promises One and Three, Shelby makes a decision -- to exploit a loophole and lose her virginity before taking the vow. But somewhere between failed hookup attempts and helping her dad plan the ball, Shelby starts to understand what her mother really meant, what her father really needs, and who really has the right to her purity

    Review: Shelby promised her dying mother that she would listen to her father, love as much as posible, and live without restraint. She's done quite well in the five years since then, but when her father wants to arrange her part in a purity ball, in which she promises her purity to her father, which is essentially no drugs, drink or sex. Shelby doesn't want this. So she tries to find a loophole; if she has sex before then, she won't have purity to give. Thus begins a five week search for someone to lose her virginity to.
    I wanted to read this obok because commentry on the value of virginity and women in society is an important one to me, and I quite liked Sisters Red, even though I knew from the presmise that this would be completely different. 
    The characters are funny, not particularly bright, but the friendships are nice and supportive, even if the end “revalation” isn't that surprising or enjoyable. I liked watching the relationship between Shelby and her dad develop.I think Shelby could have developed more.
    I like the fact there's humour throughout, without which Purity would be much less lighthearted, and either too sad or too serious.
    I find it a bit weird that Shelby goes from not really caring about sex to wanting to do it without caring about who it is as long as they're not diseased. Sure, the possiblity of lack of sex for years is obviously going to make her try and find someone, (it would me if I were in that situation) but there are other ways she could have dealt iwht it, and other parts in the novel when she could have done something else.
    I like the fact that faith is a theme. It's not there too much to make it into a preachy book, but it did add a bit of depth to Shelby.
    Finally, I just want to ask; since when was “listen to” synonymous with “completely obey”?

    Overall:  Strength 3 tea to a book that opens discussions for lots of things.


    0 Comments on Book Review: Purity by Jackson Pearce as of 11/23/2014 11:04:00 PM
    Add a Comment
    49. Interview with Catherine Scully: Map Design

    Industry Life

    Kat Zhang with Catherine Scully

    Hey guys! I’m here today with the awesome Catherine Scully, who designed the gorgeous map for Claire Legrand’s  WINTERSPELL. Let’s see what she has to say about map-making :)

    Scully_headshot

    I’m sure I’m not the only one who has always loved not only drawing maps, but staring at the maps in fantasy books, following the heroes along on their journey. How did you first get into map-making? Is Claire’s map the first one you created, or have you been creating maps for your own stories?
     .
    The first time I really wanted to do a map was when I read the Hobbit as a kid. I wanted to follow Bilbo along his journey and visit the elves, face the dragon, and return home to the Shire. I used to come up with these stories when I would build these Lego cities, draw a map of what I built and where it went, and then write the entire storyline I made up that day. I should have realized then I wanted to be an author/illustrator! I remember even drawing a map of my favorite stretch of woods with land markers. I was always into fantasy and very much still am, even though I’m more known in the community for horror. The first book I ever wrote was this epic fantasy with world maps and comic panels. I plan on returning to it when I finish working on my current MG horror.
     .
    Claire’s map was the first I created for publication then, which was an interesting challenge since I needed to have something to show in my portfolio in the way of world maps in order to get the job at all. I ended up drawing it and finishing it on the hope it would go over well. Needless to say, this story had a very happy ending! Yes, that was nerve-wracking. But after five years working my way up from a graphic designer to a brand manager, I had a pretty tough skin. I knew I could take any criticism thrown at me really well because I’m much more interested in the process of collaborating on a project than an artistic ego.
     .
    Can you summarize what was the process like? 
      .
    Claire actually first approached me to do collectible cards for four of her WINTERSPELL characters after she saw the work I did for Stefan Bachmann’s bookmarks for his THE WHAT NOT book tour. She ended up loving them so much, she asked if I would be interested in doing a world map as well. After all four characters were finalized, we got started on the map next. Claire had a really clear idea of what she wanted for the map and border, so she sent me a preliminary sketch just to give me an idea of where to place elements. This was immensely helpful! Not to say you can’t start from scratch, but since we were on a tight deadline, a lot of the map back and forth was wonderful and easy because she really knew what she wanted and my job was to make that come alive.
      .
     .
    Map1
    Map2
    Map3
    In my first sketch, the map was tightly drawn, with the border elements close to the island. I went ahead and sketched portions on a piece of bristol board and sent them to Claire before I inked. As we went along, we researched a lot of maps. We looked at the Westeros map, the Grisha map, and a dozen others. I sent sketches and would ink them once they were approved. I work by hand first and ink with Micron pens before my illustrations ever see photoshop. When the ink was ready and Claire was happy, I painted it in Photoshop and we sent it off to her publisher. We went through some back and forth before print, mostly trying to extend the border to not crowd the island and balance it out well. I ended up loving the final draft even more and couldn’t be happier with what went to print! It was seriously a dream to get to collaborate with their publishing department.
      .
    Maps often seem stylized base on the genre of the book, or the type of world described in the story. Did you draw on any particular style to create Claire’s map? 
     .
    Final
    For Claire’s map, I mentioned looking at Westeros and especially the Grisha map, but I had another source of inspiration that I brought to the table for WINTERSPELL. My sister is a ballerina and has performed in the Nutcracker since she was four. As my sister is now nineteen, that means I’ve seen almost two decades worth of performances every year. I’m a huge fan. I’m also the sort of person that likes to read the book, or at least the synopsis and a few chapters, before I start on any piece I illustrate for an author. This is so I can really hear the voice of the characters, the world, and place “Easter eggs” or clues to the story. So, before I even started on the character cards much less the map, I got to read an advanced copy and really see the world and characters before I drew them. I also personally really drew inspiration from the Hobbit and surprisingly the end credits to the Secret of Nimh movie, which really influenced how I ended up spacing out the elements towards the final version.
      .
    Now that you’ve had a map published (congrats!), what do you see yourself doing next?  What would be your dream project?
      .
    Right now, I’m commissioned to do another world map for a friend and a publisher is working with me on starting to illustrate some covers for their middle grade books. Honestly, I’d love to work with more authors on more amazing things! Bookmarks, character cards, world maps, book covers, illustrated web sites, you name it, I’d probably want to work with you on it. One dream project I have is to work on chapter headings for a YA or MG book (regardless of genre) or even a short story collection. Please drop me a line if you’ve got a project in mind! I’d love to hear from you and make something beautiful for your book or author platform together.
      .
    Thanks for chatting with us today, Catherine!
      .
    Do you guys have any more questions about illustrating, or map design?

    Catherine Scully is a writer, illustrator, and graphic designer with her work featured in magazines, anthologies, and in Simon and Schuster’s Young Adult book Winterspell by Claire Legrand. Catherine is represented for Young Adult and Middle Grade fiction by Carrie Howland of Donadio and Olson and is currently working on a horror series for Middle Grade. 

    As the Young Adult Editor for the Horror Writer Association, she runs a blog at yahorror.com called “Scary Out There: What is Horror in Young Adult Fiction?” with multiple Bram Stoker Award-winning author Jonathan Maberry, which was featured on CNN.com in an interview with R.L. Stine. She’s also a member of the YA Scream Queens, a group of nine women who write horror for kids and teens. 

    When she’s not writing and illustrating, Catherine can usually be found practicing on her drums.

    You can follow her on twitter @CatMScully or check out her art at cscullyillustrate.tumblr.com

    Kat Zhang loves traveling to places both real and fictional–the former allows for better souvenirs, but the latter allows for dragons, so it’s a tough pick. Her novel WHAT’S LEFT OF ME is about a girl struggling to survive in an alternate universe where people are born with two souls, and one is doomed to disappear. It is the first book in a trilogy and was published by HarperCollins in September of 2012.  Book 2, ONCE WE WERE, released September 2013, and Book 3, ECHOES OF US, came out September 16, 2014. You can learn all about Kat at her site, or listen to her ramblings on twitter.

    Add a Comment
    50. 2015 Challenges: 42 Challenge

    Host: 42 Challenge
    Name: 42 Challenge (sign up)
    Dates: Officially January 1- December 31, 2015
    # of "items": 42+

    About the challenge: Review 42 sci-fi related items: short stories, novellas, novels, radio show episodes, television show episodes, movies, graphic novels, comic books, audio books, essays about science fiction, biographies about sci-fi authors, etc.

    What I Read:

    1)
    2)
    3)
    4)
    5)
    6)
    7)
    8)
    9)
    10)
    11)
    12)
    13)
    14)
    15)
    16)
    17)
    18)
    19)
    20)
    21)

    What I Watch:

    1)
    2)
    3)
    4)
    5)
    6)
    7)
    8)
    9)
    10)
    11)
    12)
    13)
    14)
    15)
    16)
    17)
    18)
    19)
    20)
    21)

    © 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

    0 Comments on 2015 Challenges: 42 Challenge as of 11/23/2014 3:54:00 PM
    Add a Comment

    View Next 25 Posts