What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Tag

In the past 30 days

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing Blog: The Greasy Screen, Most Recent at Top
Results 1 - 25 of 112
Visit This Blog | Login to Add to MyJacketFlap
Blog Banner
Discussing ebooks for kids, reading habits, and stuff
Statistics for The Greasy Screen

Number of Readers that added this blog to their MyJacketFlap:
1. Library Book of the Week – Making the Moose Out of Life

I apologize for the gap between postings… balancing grad school and the mood swings of a two-and-a-half year old turns out to be much trickier than I anticipated!

 

This week’s most read library book was…

 


Making the Moose Out of Life, by Nicholas Oldland

 

I’m not sure why Curly connected to this story thematically, since it centers on a moose who has a sort-of mid-life crisis after he realizes he is not taking advantage of the wonders of the world. Perhaps she herself is frustrated at not being able to go cliff diving or surfing? Still, we both enjoyed this story, and you just have to love the title.

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Kiss Me (I’m a Prince!), by Heather McLeod and Brooke Kerrigan

 


In One Ear Out the Other, by Michael Dahl and Migy

 


A Pet for Petunia, by Paul Schmid

 


Wink: The Ninja Who Wanted to Nap, by J.C. Phillipps

 


Another Mouth to Feed, by Michael Dahl and Migy

 

Have you read any of the above titles? Vote for your favorite in the comments, and tune in next week to see which book I will have committed to memory.

 

2. Library Book of the Week – Making the Moose Out of Life

I apologize for the gap between postings… balancing grad school and the mood swings of a two-and-a-half year old turns out to be much trickier than I anticipated!

 

This week’s most read library book was…

 


Making the Moose Out of Life, by Nicholas Oldland

 

I’m not sure why Curly connected to this story thematically, since it centers on a moose who has a sort-of mid-life crisis after he realizes he is not taking advantage of the wonders of the world. Perhaps she herself is frustrated at not being able to go cliff diving or surfing? Still, we both enjoyed this story, and you just have to love the title.

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Kiss Me (I’m a Prince!), by Heather McLeod and Brooke Kerrigan

 


In One Ear Out the Other, by Michael Dahl and Migy

 


A Pet for Petunia, by Paul Schmid

 


Wink: The Ninja Who Wanted to Nap, by J.C. Phillipps

 


Another Mouth to Feed, by Michael Dahl and Migy

 

Have you read any of the above titles? Vote for your favorite in the comments,

Add a Comment
3. Shake-a-Phrase

 

Title: Shake-a-Phrase

 

Publisher: Artgig

 

Format: iPad, iPhone

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: $1.99

 

Synopsis: A language app that helps build vocabulary.

 

Features:

  • Interactivity
  • Sound Effects

 

The Greasy Screen says: There seem to be a plethora of apps designed to help little ones learn their alphabet, but this is the first I’ve seen that takes reading one step further to help increase vocabulary. Shake-a-Phrase takes clever (and oftentimes ridiculous) combinations of challenging nouns, verbs, and adjectives to enable young children to step outside their vocabulary comfort zone. Every time you shake the iPad (or iPhone) a new, wacky sentence appears. Combinations such as “the furious and grotesque spider snatched the frightened hobgoblin” are a prime example of the app’s serious word-building skills via silly format.

 

Shake-a-Phrase could have easily been a one-trick pony, but there are a lot of options. Readers can choose the “start a story” option, which poses a question to lead into creative storytelling (example: “What would happen if a bad celebrity sheltered a cuddly angel…”), or try out some quizzes, which challenge one to find the different parts of speech. There are also several overall themes for the phrases, such as “monster” or “fairytale.”

 

The graphics are clean and bright, and the continuous silliness keeps the app engaging. Though this app was too advanced for my little Curly, I personally enjoyed shaking it up!

 

Add a Comment
4. Shake-a-Phrase

 

Title: Shake-a-Phrase

 

Publisher: Artgig

 

Format: iPad, iPhone

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: $1.99

 

Synopsis: A language app that helps build vocabulary.

 

Features:

  • Interactivity
  • Sound Effects

 

The Greasy Screen says: There seem to be a plethora of apps designed to help little ones learn their alphabet, but this is the first I’ve seen that takes reading one step further to help increase vocabulary. Shake-a-Phrase takes clever (and oftentimes ridiculous) combinations of challenging nouns, verbs, and adjectives to enable young children to step outside their vocabulary comfort zone. Every time you shake the iPad (or iPhone) a new, wacky sentence appears. Combinations such as “the furious and grotesque spider snatched the frightened hobgoblin” are a prime example of the app’s serious word-building skills via silly format.

 

Shake-a-Phrase could have easily been a one-trick pony, but there are a lot of options. Readers can choose the “start a story” option, which poses a question to lead into creative storytelling (example: “What would happen if a bad celebrity sheltered a cuddly angel…”), or try out some quizzes, which challenge one to find the different parts of speech. There are also several overall themes for the phrases, such as “monster” or “fairytale.”

 

The graphics are clean and bright, and the continuous silliness keeps the app engaging. Though this app was too advanced for my little Curly, I personally enjoyed shaking it up!

 

Add a Comment
5. We’ll Be Riiiiiiiight Back

Somehow, a giant mess of circumstances has proclaimed this will be THE BUSIEST WEEK OF ALL TIME. For that reason, The Greasy Screen will be on a short hiatus. Have a wonderful Memorial Day weekend, readers!

Add a Comment
6. We’ll Be Riiiiiiiight Back

Somehow, a giant mess of circumstances has proclaimed this will be THE BUSIEST WEEK OF ALL TIME. For that reason, The Greasy Screen will be on a short hiatus. Have a wonderful Memorial Day weekend, readers!

Add a Comment
7. Library Book of the Week – Flabby Tabby

 

This week’s most read library book was…

 


Flabby Tabby, by Penny McKinlay and Britta Teckentrup

 

Tabby is a chunky cat who finds herself being replaced by a sprightly little kitten. Suddenly, her food is eaten by the young kitty and affection usually reserved for her is poured over the baby cat. Finally, Tabby takes matters into her own hands and starts Tabby’s “Secret Feline Fitness Plan.” Stretching, sit-ups, and following along to the owner’s workout DVD help whip the cat into shape. A few days later, Tabby feels great, and can race around the room faster than any kitten. I wish my attempts to work out produced such quick results!

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Pelly and Mr. Harrions Visit the Moon, by Lindsay Ward

 


Giant Steps to Change the World, by Spike Lee, Tonya Lewis Lee and Sean Qualls

 


Yoko’s Show and Tell, by Rosemary Wells

 


Molly and Her Dad, by Jan Ormerod and Carol Thompson

 


Making the Moose Out of Life, by Nicholas Oldland

 

Have you read any of the above titles? Vote for your favorite in the comments, and tune in next week to see which book I will have committed to memory.

 

8. Library Book of the Week – Flabby Tabby

 

This week’s most read library book was…

 


Flabby Tabby, by Penny McKinlay and Britta Teckentrup

 

Tabby is a chunky cat who finds herself being replaced by a sprightly little kitten. Suddenly, her food is eaten by the young kitty and affection usually reserved for her is poured over the baby cat. Finally, Tabby takes matters into her own hands and starts Tabby’s “Secret Feline Fitness Plan.” Stretching, sit-ups, and following along to the owner’s workout DVD help whip the cat into shape. A few days later, Tabby feels great, and can race around the room faster than any kitten. I wish my attempts to work out produced such quick results!

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Pelly and Mr. Harrions Visit the Moon, by Lindsay Ward

 


Giant Steps to Change the World, by Spike Lee, Tonya Lewis Lee and Sean Qualls

 


Yoko’s Show and Tell, by Rosemary Wells

 


Molly and Her Dad, by Jan Ormerod and Carol Thompson

 


Making the Moose Out of Life, by Nicholas Oldland

 

Have you read any of the above titles? Vote for your fa

Add a Comment
9. Be Confident in Who You Are – Middle School Confidential

 

Title: Be Confident in Who You Are

 

Author: Annie Fox

 

Illustrator: Matt Kindt

 

Publisher: Electric Eggplant

 

Format: iPad, iPhone

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: $3.99

 

Synopsis: A group of middle school kids discuss issues that plague their age group.

 

Features:

  • Musical Score
  • Sound Effects

 

The Greasy Screen says: Usually on The Greasy Screen, we read ebooks geared toward the younger set, since my little Curly is my co-reviewer. But today, Curly took a break while I sat down with Be Confident in Who You Are, a Middle School Confidential graphic novel aimed toward tweens/teens.

 

Middle school… what a wonderful time, no? Suddenly your once peaceful world filled with playgrounds and playdates is transformed into stress over clothes and being cool. This ebook tackles many pressing issues for today’s tweens, including body image, self-esteem, and peer pressure, and presents them from a middle schooler’s point of view. It’d be hard to find a reader who has not dealt with at least one of the subjects at hand. I personally connected to the chapter dealing with an overweight girl, and another showing someone lose their temper at an annoying friend. Each chapter focuses on a different theme, with a group of friends suggesting ways to overcome their troubles.

 

The graphic novel format is very accessible, with readers having the ability to zoom in and out of every frame. There are nice, subtle sound effects that enhance the reading experience without overshadowing the content. While I don’t currently know any teenage children, I felt the content was helpful and appropriate without being dorky (as many educational mediums tend to be). Be Confident in Who You Are ends with a terrific message that I think readers of every age can take to heart – “There is only one way to be like them. There are a zillion ways to be like you.” I’ll have to hang on to this ebook for when Curly gets older.

 

Add a Comment
10. Be Confident in Who You Are – Middle School Confidential

 

Title: Be Confident in Who You Are

 

Author: Annie Fox

 

Illustrator: Matt Kindt

 

Publisher: Electric Eggplant

 

Format: iPad

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: $3.99

 

Synopsis: A group of middle school kids discuss issues that plague their age group.

 

Features:

  • Musical Score
  • Sound Effects

 

The Greasy Screen says: Usually on The Greasy Screen, we read ebooks geared toward the younger set, since my little Curly is my co-reviewer. But today, Curly took a break while I sat down with Be Confident in Who You Are, a Middle School Confidential graphic novel aimed toward tweens/teens.

 

Middle school… what a wonderful time, no? Suddenly your once peaceful world filled with playgrounds and playdates is transformed into stress over clothes and being cool. This ebook tackles many pressing issues for today’s tweens, including body image, self-esteem, and peer pressure, and presents them from a middle schooler’s point of view. It’d be hard to find a reader who has not dealt with at least one of the subjects at hand. I personally connected to the chapter dealing with an overweight girl, and another showing someone lose their temper at an annoying friend. Each chapter focuses on a different theme, with a group of friends suggesting ways to overcome their troubles.

 

The graphic novel format is very accessible, with readers having the ability to zoom in and out of every frame. There are nice, subtle sound effects that enhance the reading experience without overshadowing the content. While I don’t currently know any teenage children, I felt the content was helpful and appropriate without being dorky (as many educational mediums tend to be). Be Confident in Who You Are ends with a terrific message that I think readers of every age can take to heart – “There is only one way to be like them. There are a zillion ways to be like you.” I’ll have to hang on to this ebook for when Curly gets older.

 

Add a Comment
11. Library Book of the Week – Cloudette

 

This week’s most read library book was…

 


Cloudette, by Tom Lichtenheld

 

Oh to be a sweet little cloudette, floating in the big blue sky! She normally doesn’t mind being smaller than the average cloud, but even a compact cumulus can have big dreams! Curly liked seeing the mini cloud as she hid between giraffe necks and watched fireworks, while I liked all the clever puns throughout the story (“now that’s a brainstorm!”) Cloudette is one part adventure, one part inspirational, and 100% adorable!

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Porkelia, by Lindy Tucker

 


Flabby Tabby, by Penny McKinlay and Britta Teckentrup

 


Bubble Trouble, by Margaret Mahy and Polly Dunbar

 


Hot Hot Hot, by Neal Layton

 


Space Boy, by Leo Landry

 

Have you read any of the above titles? Vote for your favorite in the comments, and tune in next week to see which book I will have committed to memory.

 

12. Library Book of the Week – Cloudette

 

This week’s most read library book was…

 


Cloudette, by Tom Lichtenheld

 

Oh to be a sweet little cloudette, floating in the big blue sky! She normally doesn’t mind being smaller than the average cloud, but even a compact cumulus can have big dreams! Curly liked seeing the mini cloud as she hid between giraffe necks and watched fireworks, while I liked all the clever puns throughout the story (“now that’s a brainstorm!”) Cloudette is one part adventure, one part inspirational, and 100% adorable!

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Porkelia, by Lindy Tucker

 


Flabby Tabby, by Penny McKinlay and Britta Teckentrup

 


Bubble Trouble, by Margaret Mahy and Polly Dunbar

 


Hot Hot Hot, by Neal Layton

 


Space Boy, by Leo Landry

 

Have you read any of the above titles? Vote for your favorite in the comments, and tune in next week to see which book I will have committed to memory.

 

13. Spike and Orange Ball

 

Title: Spike and Orange Ball

 

Author: Allan Walker

 

Format: iPad, iPhone

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: $0.99

 

Synopsis: A dog laments over his lost ball.

 

Features:

  • Animation
  • Musical Score
  • Read-Aloud

 

The Greasy Screen says: Spike, a cuddly black dog, is sad. His “bestie,” a prickly orange ball, is lost, and his family is set to move any day. What will he do, he wonders, in a new place without his favorite companion?

 

We’ve all been in Spike’s shoes. Moving is stressful, especially when your most important items get misplaced. I have to say that hearing Spike lament over his lost friend pulled at my heart strings. “I never thought I’d lose a best friend,” he moans. *sniffle!* Read in a low, baritone voice that I often imagine would be the voice of my bulldog if she could talk, the ebook illustrates the small comforts of a dog’s life and how they, just like us, get attached to silly little things.

 

Spike and Orange Ball is a bit lacking in special features, but Curly and I enjoyed flipping through this story, particularly the final page which shows a photo of what I can only assume is the real-life Spike. This inexpensive ebook will make you smile.

 

Add a Comment
14. Spike and Orange Ball

 

Title: Spike and Orange Ball

 

Author: Allan Walker

 

Format: iPad, iPhone

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: $0.99

 

Synopsis: A dog laments over his lost ball.

 

Features:

  • Animation
  • Musical Score
  • Read-Aloud

 

The Greasy Screen says: Spike, a cuddly black dog, is sad. His “bestie,” a prickly orange ball, is lost, and his family is set to move any day. What will he do, he wonders, in a new place without his favorite companion?

 

We’ve all been in Spike’s shoes. Moving is stressful, especially when your most important items get misplaced. I have to say that hearing Spike lament over his lost friend pulled at my heart strings. “I never thought I’d lose a best friend,” he moans. *sniffle!* Read in a low, baritone voice that I often imagine would be the voice of my bulldog if she could talk, the ebook illustrates the small comforts of a dog’s life and how they, just like us, get attached to silly little things.

 

Spike and Orange Ball is a bit lacking in special features, but Curly and I enjoyed flipping through this story, particularly the final page which shows a photo of what I can only assume is the real-life Spike. This inexpensive ebook will make you smile.

 

Add a Comment
15. Library Book of the Week – Chowder

 

This week’s most read library book was…

 


Chowder, by Peter Brown

 

Sweet little Chowder-Wowder! Curly and I are crazy for this book, and not simply because we are bulldog lovers, but because this story has a lot of heart. Chowder is a bulldog with a lot of quirks, who feels like an outsider amongst the other dogs in his neighborhood. When his owners take him to a grocery store with an accompanying petting zoo, Chowder knows he is destined to be friends with the farm animals. If you ever wonder what your dog does when you’re not home (surf the internet? Sit on the toilet? Dabble in paleontology?) then you will love getting to know Chowder. I wonder if my bulldog, Eleanor, has any of the same insecurities…

 

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Peedie, by Oliver Dunrea

 


Cloudette, by Tom Lichtenheld

 


Up and Down, by Oliver Jeffers

 


Pablo Meets the Neighbours, by Hannah Giffard and Keith Tutt

 


Half of an Elephant, by Gusti

 

Have you read any of the above titles? Vote for your favorite in the comments, and tune in next week to see which book I will have committed to memory.

Add a Comment
16. Library Book of the Week – Chowder

 

This week’s most read library book was…

 


Chowder, by Peter Brown

 

Sweet little Chowder-Wowder! Curly and I are crazy for this book, and not simply because we are bulldog lovers, but because this story has a lot of heart. Chowder is a bulldog with a lot of quirks, who feels like an outsider amongst the other dogs in his neighborhood. When his owners take him to a grocery store with an accompanying petting zoo, Chowder knows he is destined to be friends with the farm animals. If you ever wonder what your dog does when you’re not home (surf the internet? Sit on the toilet? Dabble in paleontology?) then you will love getting to know Chowder. I wonder if my bulldog, Eleanor, has any of the same insecurities…

 

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Peedie, by Oliver Dunrea

 


Cloudette, by Tom Lichtenheld

 


Up and Down, by Oliver Jeffers

 


Pablo Meets the Neighbours, by Hannah Giffard and Keith Tutt

 

Add a Comment
17. FirstWords: Deluxe Giveaway!

 

Today I’m happy to bring you an exciting giveaway of a fantastic learning tool for young readers. Learning Touch is celebrating the 1 millionth download of their excellent FirstWords app series, which helps little ones learn their letters through fun, interactive games with bright, happy graphics. For one day only, all the FirstWords apps will be available for $0.99 on the App Store (originally $1.99-$4.99), and with The Greasy Screen, you also have a chance to win a free download of FirstWords: Deluxe, which features over 150 animal, shape, and color words!

 

 

To win, leave a comment below. I will notify the winners with a promotional code for free download. To learn more about Learning Touch and their terrific FirstWords apps, you can check out my original review or click here. Have fun– and good luck!

 

Add a Comment
18. FirstWords: Deluxe Giveaway!

 

Today I’m happy to bring you an exciting giveaway of a fantastic learning tool for young readers. Learning Touch is celebrating the 1 millionth download of their excellent FirstWords app series, which helps little ones learn their letters through fun, interactive games with bright, happy graphics. For one day only, all the FirstWords apps will be available for $0.99 on the App Store (originally $1.99-$4.99), and with The Greasy Screen, you also have a chance to win a free download of FirstWords: Deluxe, which features over 150 animal, shape, and color words!

 

 

To win, leave a comment below. I will notify the winners with a promotional code for free download. To learn more about Learning Touch and their terrific FirstWords apps, you can check out my original review or click here. Have fun– and good luck!

 

Add a Comment
19. Green Splosh

 

Title: Green Splosh

 

Publisher: Emantras Inc

 

Format: iPad

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: Free

 

Synopsis: A blob of paint escapes his paint bottle and explores the world.

 

Features:

  • Animation
  • Interactivity
  • Read-Aloud
  • Sound Effects

 

The Greasy Screen says: When a boy named Ken spills a bottle of paint, a green-tinted blob decides it’s his chance to hit the road and see the world around him, as so begins Green Splosh, a semi cohesive ebook. The concept of the story was cute, but reading through the screens left me a bit confused.

 

At first I thought the story would focus on teaching colors, as early on a neat interactive feature allows readers to paint on the page along with Ken. But after the splosh escapes, we are then taken on a journey about counting, and what a crazy journey it is. The little green splosh really gets around: one minute he’s hopping lily pads, then playing with a clown, then creeping through a haunted house. There was no rhyme or reason as to where the paint would go next.

 

Green Splosh does have some creative interactivity, such as birds that sing on fence when tapped, but the overall usability of the app was a bit clumsy, and since I had trouble following the point of the story, I struggled to make it to the end. Curly didn’t even last that long. More attention to a linear storyline wold make this ebook more worthy of its imaginative premise.

 

Add a Comment
20. Library Book of the Week – Pink Me Up

 

Being a mom can be torturous. After story time today, we headed over to Target, where I filled up the cart with supplies (read: candy) for Easter. Curly didn’t see me sneaking the treats in behind her, and therefore has no idea what yumminess is in store for her, but now I know there is a huge bag of chocolately goodness hiding in the kitchen and I WANT TO EAT IT ALL. It would be so much easier if the Easter Bunny could take care of all this for me. Why do Cadbury eggs have to be so delicious?

 

This week’s most read library book was…

 


Pink Me Up, by Charise Mericle Harper

 

With Easter being only a few days away, I wanted to get some rabbit-themed books to get in the spirit. The favorite bunny book proved to be Pink Me Up, the story of a young rabbit anxious to go to a pink-apolooza picnic with her mother, but ends up needing to go with her father instead. In order to get him ready for the event (since all he owns is one measly pink tie), she works to “pink up” his wardrobe. Curly is not a super girly girl, but she did think it was funny to see the little bunny dress up her dad and make him “pink-abulous!”

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Smooch Your Pooch, by Teddy Slater and Arthur Howard

 


In Just One Second, by Silvio Freytes and Flavio Morais

 


The Bear Who Shared, by Catherine Rayner

 


Crunch Munch Dinosaur Lunch, by Paul Bright and Michael Terry

 

Add a Comment
21. Bunny Trouble

 

Easter can not get here soon enough. Of all the holiday-themed candy that is paraded in front of us all year, Easter’s is the most irresistible. I don’t know why chocolate tastes better when in the form of an egg or bunny, but IT DOES. Also, Easter is the only time we get Cadbury eggs, the slightly disgusting concept that is completely delicious and only appreciated by myself in this house (which is fine, because then I don’t have to share). It is actually a large miracle that I haven’t already ripped into those wrappers.

 


Yummmmmmmmm

 

To distract myself from the bag of chocolate sitting only a few feet from my desk, I’d like to remember one of my favorite Easter books, Bunny Trouble.

 


Bunny Trouble by Hans Wilhelm

 

Ralph, the story’s main character, is way less interested in Easter than me. He would rather play soccer all day then help out his bunny family and friends in preparation for the holiday. The egg-painting community gets pretty fed up with all his fancy footwork, so Ralph heads out into the wilderness, where he is captured by a farmer. Together with his sister, Ralph finds a way to escape and become more involved in the holiday.

 

As a child I loved this story, and loved seeing the illustrations of all the different painted egg designs, especially Ralph’s creative motif at the end. My favorite part was when the farmer’s children find Ralph in a cage surrounding by a rainbow of colored eggs– so pretty! I still have my copy of Bunny Trouble, with my name scrawled in my elementary school handwriting on the inside cover, and I’ve read it to Curly several times now.

 

Happy Easter!

 

Add a Comment
22. Benny the Cat

 

Title: Benny the Cat

 

Author: Tamar Hak

 

Publisher: Touchoo

 

Format: iPad, iPhone

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: $2.99

 

Synopsis: A day in the life of a kitty named Benny.

 

Features:

  • Animation
  • Interactivity
  • Read-Aloud
  • Voice Recording

 

The Greasy Screen says: Curly loves cats, while I have a slight feline fear. That, in combination with my husband’s allergies, is why we will never own a pet cat. But, with the introduction of Benny the Cat, Curly can now go through the motions of a real cat owner!

 

In this ebook, the reader is encouraged to help take care of Benny, a plump little kitty, by doing things like picking out his favorite toys and helping him find his litter box. The interactivity is really great; I especially liked throwing a pile of pillows around in attempt to find a hiding Benny, and Curly liked hearing him purr as she petted him. When asked to choose the best meal for Benny, Curly immediately wanted to feed him the plate of lollipops– she is her mother’s daughter, after all. The story itself was a little thin, with the text focused more on giving the reader instructions rather than telling a tale, but the main focus of this ebook seemed to be walking through the steps of pet maintenance, and we enjoyed taking care of Benny.

 

My favorite part of Benny the Cat was the hand-drawn illustrations; so often, ebooks are accompanied by more stark, computer graphics. This is a fun ebook for cat lovers and cat cowards alike.

 

Add a Comment
23. The Competition

 

Title: The Competition

 

Publisher: Piccolo Picture Books

 

Format: iPad

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: $4.99

 

Synopsis: A goldfish swims with all his might to win a competition.

 

Features:

  • English/Dutch/French/German/Spanish
  • Read-Aloud
  • Sound Effects

 

The Greasy Screen says: The Competition gets off to a jolting start: a young boy’s parents force him to dump his pet goldfish, Harry, in a canal because they are going away on vacation for the summer. What completely awful parenting! Who would ask their child to dispose of his pet? Goodness! Luckily, the story ends on a much happier note, but still, I started off simply horrified.

 

Harry overhears that the family is off to take part in a competition, and he decides to faithfully head after them, even though they totally just abandoned him. He feels his swimming skills would be great for any tournament and knows he could win. Harry swims though a variety of waters and meets some interesting critters along the way, including a not too trustworthy rat. Though many obstacles get in his way, Harry stays true to his mission.

 

The Competition does not have any animation or interactivity– though each scene’s illustrations can be dragged from side to side to reveal extra artwork that does not fit on the iPad’s screen. For $4.99, I wish there were some additional features, still, I wouldn’t drop this ebook in a canal.

 

Add a Comment
24. Library Book of the Week – Smooch Your Pooch

 

With the never-ending rain here in Chicago, the days are starting to blob into each other. Is it already Thursday? I know we went to the library yesterday, and yet, somehow I failed in unveiling our Library Book of the Week. Strange.

 

Without further ado, this week’s most read library book was…

 


Smooch Your Pooch, by Teddy Slater and Arthur Howard

 

Smooch your pooch to show him you care/Give him a hug anytime, anywhere is how Smooch Your Pooch, a tale about how to give your four-legged friend some TLC, begins. I wish Curly, who enjoyed this story immensely, would take the text to heart, as she is constantly smacking our English bulldog, Eleanor, in the face. I mean, seriously, how could you not be in love with a face like this?

 

 

But library rentals can’t last forever. Here are the titles we stuffed into our Tinkerbell backpack today. Which one will be our most-read pick of the week?

 


Zuzu’s Wishing Cake, by Linda Michelin and D.B. Johnson

 


Say Hello to Zorro!, by Carter Goodrich

 


Everything but the Horse, by Holly Hobbie

 


Sally Goes to the Beach, by Stephen Huneck

 


Add a Comment
25. The Competition

 

Title: The Competition

 

Publisher: Piccolo Picture Books

 

Format: iPad

 

Rated: 4+

 

Current Price: $4.99

 

Synopsis: A goldfish swims with all his might to win a competition.

 

Features:

  • English/Dutch/French/German/Spanish
  • Read-Aloud
  • Sound Effects

 

The Greasy Screen says: The Competition gets off to a jolting start: a young boy’s parents force him to dump his pet goldfish, Harry, in a canal because they are going away on vacation for the summer. What completely awful parenting! Who would ask their child to dispose of his pet? Goodness! Luckily, the story ends on a much happier note, but still, I started off simply horrified.

 

Harry overhears that the family is off to take part in a competition, and he decides to faithfully head after them, even though they totally just abandoned him. He feels his swimming skills would be great for any tournament and knows he could win. Harry swims though a variety of waters and meets some interesting critters along the way, including a not too trustworthy rat. Though many obstacles get in his way, Harry stays true to his mission.

 

The Competition does not have any animation or interactivity– though each scene’s illustrations can be dragged from side to side to reveal extra artwork that does not fit on the iPad’s screen. For $4.99, I wish there were some additional features, still, I wouldn’t drop this ebook in a canal.

 

Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts