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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: william joyce, Most Recent at Top [Help]
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1. This Week in NYC: ‘Icons of Animation’ Lecture and Show Opening

Tonight in New York City, two artists who need little introduction—Bill Plympton and Peter de Sève—will discuss their work and artistic process in a discussion moderated by animation director J. J. Sedelmaier.

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2. The Numberlys

In the pre-alphabet era, numbers are enough, but what happens when five friends start inventing letters? Joyce's Numberly world is an Art Deco masterpiece, mixing rich old-Hollywoodesque black-and-whites with cheery colors to tell an imaginative tale about language, creativity, and unexpected jelly beans. Books mentioned in this post Portland Noir (Akashic Noir) Kevin Sampsell Used [...]

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3. Moonbot Has Started to Develop Feature-Length Film Projects

The Oscar-winning Louisiana animation studio Moonbot recently announced that it is developing multiple feature-length film projects. It has acquired the film rights to two YA book series: the "Olivia Kidney" trilogy by Ellen Potter, which it plans to do as a live-action/animation hybrid; and "The Extincts" by Veronica Cossanteli.

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4. Can This Picture Book Be Saved?

My library is running a little project in which the staff is asking the public's opinion about culling some picture books from the collection. We get to vote on specific titles, one of them being George Shrinks by William Joyce. I am a Joyce fan, so I expected to vote to keep it just on principle. Come on. Joyce.

It turns out, though, that George Shrinks is better than I remember, mainly because I remembered nothing about it. It's a Kafkaesque tale about a child who wakes up, not a bug, but tiny. And he manages just fine on his own, thank you very much.

Though why is he on his own? Merely an adult question, or is it significant here?

In addition to being a good book, George Shrinks inspired a PBS series that's still running. I'm a big believer in connecting series like that to their print versions. It seems like a golden opportunity to encourage a littlie with reading.

So you can guess how I'm voting.





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5. “Epic” Continues Its Unepic Box Office Run In the U.S. and Abroad

Blue Sky’s Epic continued its mild box office run last weekend with a respectable decline of 28.5% and $11.8 million in U.S. box office earnings. The film has now racked up $83.9 million over its three week U.S. run. The film has one more weekend of clear-sailing ahead of it before it will succumb to another kiddie flick, Monsters University.

Overseas, Epic placed sixth, with approx. $12.7M from over sixty international territories, pushing its overseas total to $105.4M. Blue Sky’s features tend to overperform in international markets—the studio’s last three features have averaged $582 million overseas—but Epic will be lucky to break $200 million internationally.

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6. Friday Studio Links!

Today's tour will be all about links. So sit back, click, and follow some fun. In honor of the upcoming Caldecott Award announcement on Monday, I'm putting in my vote for favorite picture of 2012. It is The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore, by William Joyce.



Take a tour studio office space and the creative team Joyce has put together at:
Moonbot Studios

You'll find more Morris Lessmore here:
morrislessmore.com

Here you'll find an interview about the app.

You can read about the Academy Award winning short film version, and even watch the film's trailer  here.

Follow this link to see a few thumbnails and the creators of this story.

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7. September 2012: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: September 3, 2012

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

Gearing Up for Kindergarten

Best Halloween Books for Kids: Scary, Spooky, and Silly

Review: Scat by Carl Hiaasen

How Picture Books Play a Role in a Child’s Development

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Llama Llama Time to Share

by Anna Dewdney

(Ages 3-5)

Pete the Cat Saves Christmas

by Eric Litwin

(Ages 4-8)

Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs: As Retold by Mo Willems

by Mo Willems

(Ages 3-7)

Shatterproof (The 39 Clues: Cahills vs. Vespers, Book 4)

by Roland Smith

(Ages 8-12)

Caught (Missing)

by Margaret Peterson Haddix

(Ages 9-12)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

by William Joyce

(Ages 4-8)

Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons

by Eric Litwin

(Ages 4-7)

I Want My Hat Back

by Jon Klassen

(Ages 4-8)

Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site

by Sherri Duskey Rinker (Author), Tom Lichtenheld (Illustrator)

(Ages 4-8)

Press Here

by Herve Tullet

(Ages 4-8)

_______
CHAPTER BOOKS

The Heroes of Olympus: The Demigod Diaries

by Rick Riordan

(Ages 10-14)

Insurgent (Divergent)

by Veronica Roth

(Ages 14 and up)

The Fault in our Stars

by John Green

(Ages 14-17)

Wonder

by R.J. Palacio

(Ages 8-12)

Heroes of Olympus, The, Book Two: The Son of Neptune

by Rick Riordan

(Ages 9-11)

_______

PAPERBACK BOOKS

Divergent

by Veronica Roth

(Ages 14 and up)

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

by Stephen Chbosky

(Ages 14 and up)

The Book Thief The Book Thief

by Markus Zusak

(Ages 14 and up)

Thirteen Reasons Why

by Jay Asher

(Ages 12 and up)

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

by Sherman Alexie

(Ages 12 and up)

_______

SERIES BOOKS

Hunger Games Trilogy Boxset Hunger Games Trilogy

by Suzanne Collins

(Ages 12 and up)

Maximum Ride

by James Patterson

(Ages 13-17)

Dork Diaries

by Rachel Renee Russell

(Ages 9-12)

Diary of a Wimpy Kid Box of BooksDiary of a Wimpy Kid

by Jeff Kinney

(Ages 9 to 12)

Percy Jackson and the Olympians Paperback Boxed Set (Books 1-3)Percy Jackson & the Olympians

by Rick Riordan

(Ages 9 to 12)

This information was gathered from the New York Times Best Sellers list, which reflects the sales of books from books sold nationwide, including independent and chain stores. It is correct at the time of publication and presented in random order. Visit: www.nytimes.com.

Original article: September 2012: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

©2012 The Childrens Book Review. All Rights Reserved.

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8. August 2012: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: August 1, 2012

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

5 Family Favorites with Elizabeth Bard

Giveaway: Howard B. Wigglebottom Learns to Listen

Splash into Summer with 3 New Picture Books

How Picture Books Play a Role in a Child’s Development

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Olivia and the Fairy Princesses

by Ian Falconer

(Ages 3-7)

Nevermore: The Final Maximum Ride Novel

by James Patterson

(Ages 13-17)

The Heroes of Olympus: The Demigod Diaries

by Rick Riordan

(Ages 10-14)

The Secret of the Fortune Wookiee: An Origami Yoga Book

by Tom Angleberger

(Ages 8-12)

Big Nate Makes the Grade

by Lincoln Peirce

(Ages 8-12)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

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9. William Joyce & Patti Smith Get Booked

Here are some literary events to jump-start your week. To get your event posted on our calendar, visit our Facebook Your Literary Event page. Please post your event at least one week prior to its date.

Author Charity Shumway will be celebrating her debut novel, Ten Girls to Watch, at the powerHouse Arena. Join her on Tuesday, July 31st from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (Brooklyn, NY)

Author Karen Thompson Walker and writer Hannah Trini will headline a discussion event. See them on Wednesday, August 1st at the powerHouse Arena from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (Brooklyn, NY)

Meet one of the creators behind The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore, William Joyce, at a Books of Wonder event. Check it out on Saturday, August 4th from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. (New York, NY)

continued…

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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10. Cybils App Organizer Interviews Author William Joyce

Morris bookThe organizer for the Cybils Book App category, Mary Ann Scheuer, just posted a fabulous interview on her blog with William Joyce, author of The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore. Mary Ann also shares a speech that William Joyce gave about his inspiration for the story, which is currently number one on the New York Times Bestselling Children's Picture Books list. The app version of the book was a shortlist title for the Cybils this year. 

Mary Ann says:

"I was so honored to be able to sit down with him and talk about the way new technologies like the iPad can be used to share stories with children.

Thank you to Bill Joyce, for sharing these stories with us and for taking the time to talk with me. Thank you to Simon and Schuster for arranging the interview. This interview was first shared on Katie Davis's fantastic podcast, Brain Burps About Books."

We hope that you'll take a few minutes to head over to Great Kid Books to listen. 

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11. Fusenews: Rectify this sin

Well, now we’ve gone and done it.  Greedy gus that I am, I’ve always found it hugely inconvenient when my favorite authors and illustrators live in other countries.  Shaun Tan in Australia.  Kate Beaton in Canada (we had her briefly, then lost her again, consarn it).  And then there’s that charming Frances Hardinge.  When are we going to convince her to move Stateside?  Never if the publication of her latest book is any indication.  Or, shall I say, the LACK of publication since if you are looking for her latest novel A Face Like Glass here in America you are seriously out of luck.  Not entirely without options, mind you, since you can buy a Kindle edition (the hardcover claims to come out May 1st yet has “not yet been released” and has no American publisher) which is pretty much your only option if you’re a Yank.  Harper Collins has traditionally been the publisher of all the Hardinge books in the States but is eschewing her latest novel.  Unless, of course, they’re just biding their time until the spring.  However, if they do not opt for her latest I’d be more than happy to see some other publisher pick up the slack.  Recall, if you will, the fact that the last Hardinge won the 2010 Battle of the (Kids’) Books.  Just sayin’. Thanks to Dan Levy for the info.

  • Speaking of Brits, a fascinating article came out in The Guardian recently posing the question: “Which books offer the best introduction to New York?“  The answer was a fascinating mix of the usual suspects (Mixed-Up Files, Eloise, Little Red Lighthouse, etc.) and stuff that would never occur to me, the New York Public Library Youth Materials Specialist.  Grk and the Hot Dog Trail In the Night KitchenThe Arrival?!?  I pity the poor child that walks into Manhattan with The Arrival as their guide.  Think of their disappointment (particularly when you consider that Tan took as much inspiration from classic Australian photographs as American ones).  Almost more interesting than all of these is the recommendation to read Rosa Guy’s books.  When we think of New York we almost never take her into consideration.  As I say, fascinating.  Thanks to Playing By the Book for the link.
  • Speaking of New York City, heads up, hipsters.  Actually, a better way of putting this would be to say heads up those of you who want to hang out with famous people for a reasonable price and an even better cause.  826NYC is having its Dueling Bingos competition, and this season you’re going to have a chance to match your Bingo chops against folks like Sarah Vowell, the guy who plays “Pete” on 30 Rock, Catherine Keener, and maybe even Jon Scieszka if you’re lucky.  Are you in town August 1st?  Then you have no excuse.  Come by, come by . . .
  • Is it just me or are more people dying this

    7 Comments on Fusenews: Rectify this sin, last added: 7/19/2012
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12. June 2012: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: June 2, 2012

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

Best Young Adult Books with Forever Young Adult

Books for Boys: 5 Funny Kids Books

How Picture Books Play a Role in a Child’s Development

Author Interview: Gary Paulsen

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

by William Joyce

(Ages 4-8)

Bink and Gollie, Two for One

by Kate DiCamillo

(Ages 6-8)

Dork Diaries 4: Tales from a Not-So-Graceful Ice Princess 

by Rachel Renee Russell

(Ages 9-12)

Dragons Love Tacos

by Adam Rubin

(Ages 3-5)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

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13. Oscar Focus: William Joyce and Brandon Oldenburg Talk About “The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore”

BREWMASTERS NOTE: This week Cartoon Brew takes a closer look at each of the five Academy Award nominated animated shorts. Each day at 10am EST/7am PST we will post an exclusive interview with the director(s) of one of the films. Today, we begin with The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore:

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore is the first film from William Joyce’s Moonbot Studios in Shreveport, Louisiana. Co-directors William Joyce and Brandon Oldenburg spoke with Cartoon Brew on January 25th.

Jerry: First things first. Your studio is in Shreveport, Louisana. Why there?

Bill Joyce: That’s where I grew up, it’s a great little Southern Shangri-la. Not that far from Dallas, about 2-3 hrs away. Brandon was working at Reel EFX and started contacting me about working together, and then Lampton (Enochs, co-partner in Moonbot) moved out here after Hurricane Katrina. The movie industry is actually pretty big in Louisiana. In this weird way, Shreveport has become this film making mecca. (laughter) That sounds too kind of ludicrous to say, but it’s sort of true.

Jerry: It IS true, you can make movies anywhere, everywhere today. Now, I’m a little fuzzy on the whole origin of this project. I’m under the impression that it started as an app, or designed to be something else other than a film?

Bill: It started out as a book that I wrote a few years ago in response to my mentor at Harper Collins. His name was Bill Morris and he had been there since they were called Harper Brothers, since 1949. He was just a great old publishing titan, and a real gentleman… but he was dying and I was really bummed out about it. One of the ways I deal with the good things and the crummy things in my life is I write a story. I was flying up to see him and on the way this title just kind of tumbled into my head, called “The Fantastic Flying Books of Morris Lessmore.” It was a play on both Bill’s name and his actual physical stature… he was a diminutive guy, though a giant in the industry. And he loved books and everything about publishing. So I got to read him the story which was really sweet. He was a kind of crusty old guy but he would respond to outreaches of emotion in his crusty old way. I was going to make it into a book but then Brandon and I started working together in animation, and we wanted to create a short film around same time I was working on the book. It was then Lamptin suggested we form a company.

Jerry: I love how the film combines CG with hand drawn and miniatures…

Bill: Well, we kind of decided early on we wanted to play with all different kinds of animation, and it seemed that just to think of it in terms of computer animation seemed too limiting. Brandon and I were just so stoked about building miniatures and having CG characters, and doing 2D for some of it, and just doing everything we loved. It just seemed to apply to the story.

Brandon Oldenburg: And we love those old Popeyes, man. You know, we just wanted to just see if it would work. We had gotten a taste of building sets back in 1998 on a test film that we did called The Man In The Moon, where we built miniatures and took them down to New Orleans to an old vaudevillian theater that had been converted into a sound stage. And you know, that short test piece actually evolved into the upcoming Dreamworks project, The Rise of the Guardians.

Jerry: It seems you really put what you wanted into this film and you weren’t aiming for it being a 6 minute short, a 12 minute film, or a 22 minute TV special.

Bill: Going in, we were all “OK. We can’t afford anything over 7 minutes. We have to make this work for 7 minutes.” (laughter) And then we made an animatic completely disregarding time frame. “OK, how long does it time out? Oh! Oh crap! It’s 16 minutes!

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14. This animated short turned out even better than I imagined when...



This animated short turned out even better than I imagined when I first saw the trailer that John posted just over a year ago (and I had high hopes!) It is a lovingly crafted celebration of the power of books to enhance our lives, heal our wounds, and simply delight us over and over. Bravo!

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore (by Moonbot Studios)



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15. William Joyce

Please stop what you are doing and watch this!
I had the pleasure of seeing William Joyce talk about his new series Guardians of Childhood at the Texas Book Festival.

Thanks to Alan Silberberg and Annette Dauphin Simon for sharing this link to The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore from his Moonbot Studios. It has been nominated for an Academy Award.
Using a variety of techniques, including miniatures, computer animation, and 2D animation, award‐winning author and illustrator William Joyce and co‐director Brandon Oldenburg present a hybrid style of animation that harkens back to silent films and MGM Technicolor musicals.


The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore from Moonbot Studios on Vimeo.

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16. Fusenews: Horton hears too much. He must be dealt with.

As you may have heard, last week author William Sleator passed away.  I met him once during the Midwinter ALA Conference in Philadelphia.  He was part of an Abrams brunch in which librarians munched on food and spoke to various authors.  I was pleased to get Mr. Sleator’s autograph on a book for a friend and remember him as a nice guy.  I also remember another fellow there who spoke to the occasional librarian but was by no means hounded by them.  Since that brunch Jeff Kinney and his Diary of a Wimpy Kid books have gone on to fame and fortune but Mr. Sleator was big in his own way and his last book, The Phantom Limb, will be published this October by Amulet Books.  A page in remembrance of Mr. Sleator is up here.  If you’d like to leave a comment, please do.

  • Speaking of ALA Conferences, when I attend one there’s nothing I like better than to slip into an ALA Notables meeting to watch the crew eviscerate the unworthy and laud the laudable.  Now the ALSC blog informs us that “The 2012 Notable Children’s Books Committee invites ALSC members to suggest titles for consideration for our annual list of notable children’s books.”  Awesome!  If there are titles that you think are particularly worthy, please be so good as to visit the blog to find out how to nominate them.  I’ve already a couple of my own favorites in mind . . .
  • And if it’s “Best” lists you’re looking for, why not check out a new one compiled by the two most prominent young, male, web-savvy children’s librarians out there.  You can probably already guess who they are, cantcha?  Yes, Mr. Schu and Mr. Jonker have joined forces (when you say their names like that, don’t they sound like Batman villains?) and produced their Top 20 Children’s Books of 2010.  A remarkable list, it pays homage to books I adored (The Night Fairy, Farm, etc.) though there will always inevitably be one or two you love that get missed (Hereville, man, Hereville!).  Well worth checking out.
  • Now it is time to brag.  Because while I’m sure your moms are awesome and everything, only one mom won the Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Poetry for 2011.  Yup.  That would be mine.  Her manuscript, A Mind Like This, will now be published by the University of Nebraska Press.  Because, naturally, she’s one of our greatest living poets.  Just sayin’.
  • This one goes out to the librarians in the field.  The Oxford University Press blog has revealed info on 120 years of census data on American librarians.  There’s lots of fun info to be culled.  Personally I like the fact that “Today, the marriage rate among librarians is the highest it has ever been with 62 percent of librarians married in 2009.&

    7 Comments on Fusenews: Horton hears too much. He must be dealt with., last added: 8/9/2011
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17. Children’s Illustrators and The New Yorker

Drooker 223x300 Childrens Illustrators and The New YorkerMy husband Matt pairs well with me for a number of reasons.  Amongst them is our mutual inclination to collect things we love.  As such, Matt has systematically been holding onto all his issues of The New Yorker ever since he got his subscription in college.  Over the years these issues have piled up piled up piled up.  I was a Serials Manager before I got my library degree and one of the perks of the job was getting lots of lovely magazine holders. For years these holders graced the tops of our bookshelves and even came along with us when we moved into our current apartment a year ago.  Yet with the arrival of our puir wee bairn, we decided to do the unthinkable.

Yes.  We ripped off all their covers.

Well, most anyway.  We have the complete run of New Yorker text on CD-ROM anyway, and anything published after the CD-ROM’s release would be online anyway.  Thus does the internet discourage hoarding.

In the meantime, we now are the proud owners of only three boxes worth of New Yorker covers.  They’re very fun to look at.  I once had the desire to wallpaper my bathroom in such covers, but that dream will have to wait (as much as I love New York apartments and all . . .).  For now, it’s just fun to flip through the covers themselves and, in flipping, I discovered something.  Sure, I knew that the overlap between illustrators of children’s books and illustrators of New Yorkers was frequent.  I just didn’t know how frequent it was.  Here then is a quickie encapsulation of some of the folks I discovered in the course of my cover removal.

Istan Banyai

Zoom and Re-Zoom continue to circulate heavily in my library, all thanks to Banyai.  I had a patron the other day ask if we had anything else that was similar but aside from Barbara Lehman all I could think of was Wiesner’s Flotsam.  Banyai is well known in a different way for New Yorker covers, including this controversial one.  As I recall, a bit of a kerfuffle happened when it was published back in the day.

Banyai Childrens Illustrators and The New Yorker

Harry Bliss

Author and illustrator of many many picture books, it’s little wonder that the Art Editor of The New Yorker, Ms. Francoise Mouly, managed to get the man to do a TOON Book (Luke on the Loose) as well.  And when it comes to his covers, this is the one I always think of first.

Bliss Childrens Illustrators and The New Yorker

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18. Video Sunday: Trailer Bonanza

LiterarySalon Video Sunday: Trailer Bonanza

A little more than a year ago I conducted a Children’s Literary Salon at NYPL with a bunch of talented female graphic novelists of children’s literature (Colleen AF Venable (Hamster and Cheese), Raina Telegemeier (Smile), and Tracy White (How I Made it to Eighteen)).  It was recorded for posterity (unlike most of my Salons) and that was the last I heard of it.  Then the other day I find out from J.L. Bell on Twitter that it’s up and running on the NYPL website.  Glory be, who knew!  So if you’ve ever been curious as to what a Literary Salon consists of, have at it.

Again, this was yet another pretty darn good week for videos.  Trailers abounded, and not just for movies.  The big news of the week was that a Bill Joyce picture book had been turned into what may be the most cinematic picture book app we’ve seen yet.  It’s called The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore and is so gorgeous, in fact, that I’m going to do something I’ve managed to avoid until now.  I’ll buy it.  Here’s why:

Thanks to Ben Rubin and Paul Schmid for the link!

On the book trailer side of things is this one for what I’m going to call the most anticipated fall children’s book of 2011, I Want My Hat Back:

And then on the actual movie world, two trailers were released this week.  One gives me hope.  The other . . . not so much.  So on the hope side of things is this new, longer Tintin trailer.  I was always convinced that Tintin could never be done well because who’s going to allow a kid like him to handle a gun onscreen?  I never counted on CGI to save the day.  I usually hate this style of animation but here . . . it kinda works because it acknowledges how cartoony it can be.  Oddly, I could only find a trailer online that had French subtitles.  Ah well.

Nice yes?  Well retain that happy feeling because the other trailer released was a bit of a disappointment.  I don’t know why Martin Scorsese got it into his head that the title “Hugo” sounds better than “The Invention of Hugo Cabret”.  Plain old &ldquo

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19. Fat Tuesday


KATRINARITA GRAS, February 2006, by William Joyce (via Reading Rockets, a terrific source for interviews, and http://www.williamjoyce.com/)

If you are exposed to it as a kid you will never be quite like other people. How could you be?
You’ve watched an entire adult population, your parents, your aunts and uncles, your teachers or your school principles; all your authority figures, suddenly transform into Poseidon, or Mae West or a cross-dressing Santa Claus. Everyday life becomes an overnight Technicolor fever dream. Schools close. The daily schedule is thrown out for a new schedule of parties and parades that become an unending delirium where it’s not inconceivable but in fact highly likely that you might look out the den window at any given moment and see several dozen men and women dressed as Yogi Bear drift nonchalantly by in a papier-mâché galleon.

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20. On The Drawing Table Today

Here's what's on my drawing table currently. I'm working like mad right now, filling sketchbooks,penciling and inking comics, sketching etc. etc.I haven't painted anything in a while and was surprised how bright my palette has become, really rich hues. I paint using a method William Joyce describes in his World Of William Joyce Scrapbook, which might be a kid's book but the painting advice is awesome.I've penciled the first ten pages of Harry and Silvio and will finish the other four or five tomorrow and start inking them this weekend as well.

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21. Un-Forgettable Friday: Santa Calls by William Joyce

photo by Thomas Ott www.flickr.com

*Picture book, Kindergartners to third graders, contemporary, Christmas
*Three children (two boys and one younger girl) as main characters
*Rating: Santa Calls is a great adventure Christmas story for children.

Short, short summary: Art Atchinson Aimesworth receives a call from Santa to go to Toyland in the North Pole. He takes with him Esther (his sister after she begs and cries) and Spaulding (his buddy). They have a fabulous adventure in the North Pole, and they meet Santa and Mrs. Claus as well as the Dark Queen and her elves (and they defeat her, of course). However, they can’t figure out why Santa called them to come to the North Pole. He’s just so secretive; and every time Art asks, Santa doesn’t answer the question. In the end, Esther and the reader figure it out!

So, what do I do with this book?

1. Try to decide before you and your child read the last page why Santa called. It may be hard, but read carefully and look for clues. :)

2. Use the map of the North Pole in the front of the book and make up a story (as a class or as individual students) about the North Pole and an adventure other kids could have there.

3. Write a descriptive paragraph about what Toyland looks like. Use the illustrations of Toyland from the book.

Have a Merry Christmas!

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22. Flying Boat Cover Process Seven



1
2
3
4One is the final inks again. This is on Arches 140 pound hot pressed paper which is great for both ink and watercolour. The drawback for using watercolour with hot pressed paper as opposed to cold pressed (or "non pressed") is that it's harder to do an even wash of colour. In cold pressed papers there is enough texture that the watercolour washes will fill large areas without any difficulty but this is harder in a paper with a smooth surface. However nibs catch and spatter in the tooth of a cold pressed paper making it less ideal for inks. I end up using gouache to solve this problem.

Two, three and four are the order in which I apply colour which is taken from this book (five) , more or less. William Joyce is one of my heroes and his process in amazing.

Two: I start with yellow and then red. At this point I already have an interesting almost monochrome picture. With each successive layer of colour more of the image is revealed.

Three: I start to add blues to the mix, in this image just concentrating om making the boat and the clouds purple. This photo doesn't quite show the richness of the three colours but it's quite astounding what can be done with a minimal palette.

And finally four, the sky. This illustrates the difficulty I have in getting an even wash on hot pressed paper. Instead of an even wash I end up with whorls of colour and variations in the density of the pigment. Ins stead of worry about this too much I try and use it. The unevenness suggests a Van Gogh-like movement in the sky and clouds that I use. Here I see another "mistake" I've made; the ultramarine wash has obscured my inking in the sky to the point where it looks terrible. I worried about this for some time because I had spent a long time inking the sky and was quite attached to the way it had tur

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23. The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore (by Moonbot...



The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore (by Moonbot Studios)

An intriguing trailer for a 13-minute short by Moonbot Studios. They describe it as being inspired “in equal measures, by Hurricane Katrina, Buster Keaton, The Wizard of Oz, and a love for books.”

Sold.

It looks like it strikes a nice balance between 3D animation and a more handcrafted look, which is something I can always get behind. I’m told we can expect to see the full thing in a few months.



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24. The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

Well this is pretty darned charming.  William Joyce's The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore is available as an iPad app.





I particularly love the whole Buster Keaton vibe.

You can read more about the app from Moonbot Studios in this write-up in The Atlantic.  And you can read about further William Joyce fabulousness in this earlier post on the title credits he created for Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium.

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