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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Jay Asher, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 33
1. Jay Asher Discusses Thirteen Reasons Why | 50 States Against Bullying

A conversation between Jay Asher and Trudy Ludwig the 50 States Against Bullying tour, bullying, teen suicide and how to create kinder and more caring communities.

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2. Jay Asher & Stephen Chbosky: Mystery and Grit: Writing Realistic Page Turners



Jay Asher's debut teen novel, THIRTEEN REASONS WHY, spent over two and a half years on the New York Times bestseller list (and began as a SCBWI Work-In-Progress Grant Winner!). His second book, THE FUTURE OF US, was coauthored with Carolyn Mackler.

Stephen Chbosky wrote and directed the feature film adaptation of his novel, THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER.

The mutual respect and admiration each has for the other already makes this session a great one.

When Jay thought up the idea for THIRTEEN REASONS WHY, he was afraid. It was not the type of book he thought he would want to read. That's when he decided to focus on making it a page turner.

Stephen has learned more about the page turn by watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer because it's all about what happened or what happens next.

Jay notes that his books are more plot driven suspense and Stephen's more character driven suspense.

Jay was thinking about the reader the whole time he wrote THIRTEEN REASONS WHY, thinking about what he wanted to say and what he wanted the reader to be thinking about. He wanted the reader to always be guessing what's going to happen next. If they're right, they'll be happy that they were, or if they weren't, hopefully they will be surprised by what happened in a good way.

Jay needs an ending in mind to shoot for, not that it means the ending might not change. He still needs to leave some room for the story to surprise even him as he writes it. He loves those moments. Let your characters sometimes surprise you.

Stephen echoes the same thoughts: If I know everything in the beginning then there's no room to make it better.

Jay wanted THIRTEEN REASONS WHY to read clean so that it would read quickly, building suspense and not allowing the reader to come out of the story.

Stephen on confusion: It's confusion if the reader is lost and doesn't know what's going on but
it's great suspense if the reader is guessing what the confusion is.

Jay Asher: Your book has one main thing that has to be solved that the reader knows will be solved at the end, so along the way the reader is going to need some micro-mysteries along the way to keep them reading forward to the end.




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3. Most Frequently Challenged Library Books of 2012

The American Library Association (ALA) has released its annual list of the most frequently challenged library books of the year. We’ve linked to free samples of all the books on the list–follow the links below to read these controversial books yourself.

The list was part of the ALA’s 2013 State of America’s Libraries Report. During the past year, the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom received 464 reports of challenged books. Here’s more from the report:

In California, a school committee voted to remove the Stephen King novella “Different Seasons” from Rocklin High School library shelves. The lone dissenter on that committee was 17-year-old student Amanda Wong, who continued to fight the ban and spoke against the decision at a later school board meeting. After hearing Wong’s concerns that the removal “opens a door to censoring other materials,” the district superintendent overturned the committee’s decision and returned the book to the Rocklin High School library’s collection.

continued…

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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4. Best Kids Stories – December 2013

Best Selling Kids’ Books & New Releases

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: December 1, 2012

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review and the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

20 of the Best Kids Christmas Books

Oliver Jeffers on Writing, Illustrating, and Bookmaking

Christmas Board Books for Babies and Toddlers

How Picture Books Play a Role in a Child’s Development

20 Sites to Improve Your Child’s Literacy


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Pandora the Curious (Goddess Girls)

By Joan Holub & Suzanne Williams

Ages 8-12

Huggy Kissy

By Leslie Patricelli

Ages 1-3

The Twilight Saga White Collection

By Stephenie Meyer

Ages 14 and up

The 39 Clues: Cahills vs. Vespers Book 5: Trust No One

By Linda Sue Park

Ages 9-12

Deadly Little Lessons

By Laurie Faria Stolarz

Ages 12-17


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

This Is Not My Hat

by Jon Klassen

Ages 4-8

Pete the Cat Saves Christmas

By Eric Litwin

Ages 4-8

Llama Llama Time to Share

By Anna Dewdney

Ages 3-5

Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site

By Sherri Duskey Rinker (Author), Tom Lichtenheld (Illustrator)

Ages 4-8

Olivia and the Fairy Princesses

by Ian Falconer

(Ages 3-7)

_______
CHAPTER BOOKS

“Who Could That Be at This Hour?”

By Lemony Snicket

Ages 9-12

LEGO Ninjago: Character Encyclopedia

by DK Publishing

Ages 6-12

Lincoln’s Last Days: The Shocking Assassination that Changed America Forever

by Bill O’Reilly

Ages 10-15

Wonder

by R.J. Palacio

Ages 8-12

Insurgent (Divergent)

by Veronica Roth

Ages 14 and up

_______

PAPERBACK BOOKS

Divergent

by Veronica Roth

Ages 14 and up

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

by Stephen Chbosky

Ages 14 and up

The Book Thief The Book Thief

by Markus Zusak

Ages 14 and up

Thirteen Reasons Why

by Jay Asher

Ages 12 and up

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

by Sherman Alexie

Ages 12 and up

_______

SERIES BOOKS

Hunger Games Trilogy Boxset Hunger Games Trilogy

By Suzanne Collins

Ages 12 and up

Dork Diaries

By Rachel Renee Russell

Ages 9-12

Diary of a Wimpy Kid Box of BooksDiary of a Wimpy Kid

By Jeff Kinney

Ages 9 to 12

The Heroes of Olympus: The Demigod Diaries

by Rick Riordan

(Ages 10-14)

Matched Trilogy

By Ally Condie

Ages 14-17

This information was gathered from the New York Times Best Sellers list, which reflects the sales of books from books sold nationwide, including independent and chain stores. It is correct at the time of publication and presented in random order. Visit: www.nytimes.com.

Original article: Best Kids Stories – December 2013

©2012 The Childrens Book Review. All Rights Reserved.

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5. September 2012: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: September 3, 2012

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

Gearing Up for Kindergarten

Best Halloween Books for Kids: Scary, Spooky, and Silly

Review: Scat by Carl Hiaasen

How Picture Books Play a Role in a Child’s Development

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Llama Llama Time to Share

by Anna Dewdney

(Ages 3-5)

Pete the Cat Saves Christmas

by Eric Litwin

(Ages 4-8)

Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs: As Retold by Mo Willems

by Mo Willems

(Ages 3-7)

Shatterproof (The 39 Clues: Cahills vs. Vespers, Book 4)

by Roland Smith

(Ages 8-12)

Caught (Missing)

by Margaret Peterson Haddix

(Ages 9-12)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

by William Joyce

(Ages 4-8)

Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons

by Eric Litwin

(Ages 4-7)

I Want My Hat Back

by Jon Klassen

(Ages 4-8)

Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site

by Sherri Duskey Rinker (Author), Tom Lichtenheld (Illustrator)

(Ages 4-8)

Press Here

by Herve Tullet

(Ages 4-8)

_______
CHAPTER BOOKS

The Heroes of Olympus: The Demigod Diaries

by Rick Riordan

(Ages 10-14)

Insurgent (Divergent)

by Veronica Roth

(Ages 14 and up)

The Fault in our Stars

by John Green

(Ages 14-17)

Wonder

by R.J. Palacio

(Ages 8-12)

Heroes of Olympus, The, Book Two: The Son of Neptune

by Rick Riordan

(Ages 9-11)

_______

PAPERBACK BOOKS

Divergent

by Veronica Roth

(Ages 14 and up)

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

by Stephen Chbosky

(Ages 14 and up)

The Book Thief The Book Thief

by Markus Zusak

(Ages 14 and up)

Thirteen Reasons Why

by Jay Asher

(Ages 12 and up)

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

by Sherman Alexie

(Ages 12 and up)

_______

SERIES BOOKS

Hunger Games Trilogy Boxset Hunger Games Trilogy

by Suzanne Collins

(Ages 12 and up)

Maximum Ride

by James Patterson

(Ages 13-17)

Dork Diaries

by Rachel Renee Russell

(Ages 9-12)

Diary of a Wimpy Kid Box of BooksDiary of a Wimpy Kid

by Jeff Kinney

(Ages 9 to 12)

Percy Jackson and the Olympians Paperback Boxed Set (Books 1-3)Percy Jackson & the Olympians

by Rick Riordan

(Ages 9 to 12)

This information was gathered from the New York Times Best Sellers list, which reflects the sales of books from books sold nationwide, including independent and chain stores. It is correct at the time of publication and presented in random order. Visit: www.nytimes.com.

Original article: September 2012: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

©2012 The Childrens Book Review. All Rights Reserved.

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6. August 2012: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: August 1, 2012

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

5 Family Favorites with Elizabeth Bard

Giveaway: Howard B. Wigglebottom Learns to Listen

Splash into Summer with 3 New Picture Books

How Picture Books Play a Role in a Child’s Development

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Olivia and the Fairy Princesses

by Ian Falconer

(Ages 3-7)

Nevermore: The Final Maximum Ride Novel

by James Patterson

(Ages 13-17)

The Heroes of Olympus: The Demigod Diaries

by Rick Riordan

(Ages 10-14)

The Secret of the Fortune Wookiee: An Origami Yoga Book

by Tom Angleberger

(Ages 8-12)

Big Nate Makes the Grade

by Lincoln Peirce

(Ages 8-12)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

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7. July 2012: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: July 1, 2012

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

Best Young Adult Books with Galley Smith

Summer Reading List: Summer Sports, Baseball, & the Outside World

3 Kids Picture Books that Teach Good Manners

How Picture Books Play a Role in a Child’s Development

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Shadow of Night

by Deborah Harkness

(Ages 18 and up)

Artemis Fowl: The Last Guardian

by Eoin Colfer

(Ages 9-12)

Big Nate Fun Blaster

by Lincoln Peirce

(Ages 8-12)

How to Train Your Dragon: Book 9

by Cressida Cowell

(Ages 8-12)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons

by Eric Litwin

(Ages 4-7)

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8. March 2012: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: March 1, 2012

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

Award-Winning Illustrator Marla Frazee & the Best Interview Ever

Author Interview: Gary Paulsen

Newbery Medal Winners, 2012

How Picture Books Play a Role in a Child’s Development

Wonderful Winter Books for Kids


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

The Berenstain Bears: We Love Our Mom!

by Jan Berenstain

(Ages 3-7)

Tickle Time!: A Boynton on Board Board Book

by Sandra Boynton

(Ages 0-3)

Secret Agent Splat!

by Rob Scotton

(Ages 3-7)

Big Nate Goes for Broke

by Lincoln Peirce

(Ages 8-12)

Chomp

by Carl Hiaasen

(Ages 10-12)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

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9. December, 2011: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: December 1, 2011

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

Kids’ Christmas Books: For the Naughty & Nice

Cedella Marley Inspires with “One Love”

Author Interview: Gary Paulsen

Review: Scat by Carl Hiaasen

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Witch & Wizard: The Fire

by James Patterson and  Jill Dembowski

(Ages 11-15)

Big Nate and Friends

by Lincoln Peirce

(Ages 8-12)

Artemis the Loyal (Goddess Girls)

by Joan Holub and Suzanne Williams

(Ages 8-12)

Pretty Little Liars #10: Ruthless

by Sara Shepard

(Ages 14-17)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

Home for Christmas

by Jan Brett

(Ages 0-5)

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10. Trailer Tuesday: The Future of Us, The Underdogs

Today's Trailer Tuesday features The Future of Us and The Underdogs. I've been waiting for quite a while to see what the trailer would be like for The Future of Us. What do you think? Does it make you want to read the book?


The Future of Us by Jay Asher and Carolyn Mackler
Click here to read or write reviews of this book!




The Underdogs by Mike Lupica
Click here to read or write reviews of this book!




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11. November, 2011: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 1, 2011

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

Cedella Marley Inspires with “One Love”

Author Interview: Gary Paulsen

Lessons from Laura Ingalls Wilder

Review: Scat by Carl Hiaasen

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Cabin Fever

by Jeff Kinney

(Ages 8-11)

Inheritance

by Christopher Paolini

(Young Adult)

Home for Christmas

by Jan Brett

(Ages 0-5)

Ivy an Bean: No News is Good News

by Annie Barrows

(Ages 6-9)

Red Sled

by Lita Judge

(Ages 0-5)

Steps and Stones: An Anh’s Anger Story

by Gail Silver

(Ages 4-10)


THE BEST SELLERS

<

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12. Video Sunday

Thanks to @doseofsnark for the link.

Ah, Banned Books Week.  It only comes but once a year (as opposed to banning books which appears to be a year long occupation).  For the one stop shopping round-up everyone needs, bookshelves of doom has compiled just a top notch collection of links for the occasion.  One of these is to the blog for ALA’s Office of Intellectual Freedom.  They’ve started posting video testimonials from authors.  One of them?  My man Jay Asher.  Tell it like it is, Jay!

Also recommended, the Bigfoot Reads Scientific Approach to Book Banning.

Were it not Banned Books Week, of course, I would have begun with what I’m going to far as to declare the Best Book Trailer of the Year.  See if you agree:

Seriously.  That rocked my socks.

Speaking of sock rocking, I don’t know if you were aware of the creation of the animated take on Mary Norton’s The Borrowers out there, but the film is done and coming out.  Doesn’t look half shabby either.

Those of you curious as to how good it is (and how it diverges from the book) may want to visit this review over at Fantastic Reads.

I’m awfully grateful to this next video because it clarifies for me what exactly this new collection of Dr. Seuss stories being promoted right now (The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories) actually is.  As you’ll see, they weren’t some stories left in a drawer that Seuss “didn’t think were good enough” for publication.  I think that’s an important distinction to make and I love that this tells you a bit of backstory as well.

Thanks to Mary Van Akin for the link.

So I’m in my library the other day and who should just waltz through the door, easy as you please, but none other than Sam McBratney of Guess How Much I Love You?

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13. I'm back but not the same (and Bookanista love)

Yes, I'm slowly returning from the cyber dead.


And I've missed you guys. As weird as that sounds.

To be honest, I've had a few publishing world setbacks over the summer that I haven't really wanted to be honest, I've been hiding out. Embarrassed, sad, excited about new opportunities and projects, relieved, mad, frustrated, hopeful and yet totally discouraged with this industry overall.

Over the last 2 years, I've moved out of ignorant bliss into a confusing reality.
That's not to say it's bad but sometimes those realizations and changes hurt because they are not always what you want. I've realized a few things about this industry:

*not everyone good gets published
*not everyone published is good
*a great agent doesn't mean they are good for you
*as much as we love writing, it's a business and it's about money.
*It's hard to reconcile passion with money.
*Its all in the timing
* Doesn't matter who you know, its down to have a good book that hits at
the right time.
*Even though this industry feels as though it moves slow, I think it moves fast. A door that is open one month is closed the next.
*No matter what you do or how hard you work, you cant force anything.

So I guess I will come clean so I can move forward honestly and openly.

My awesome agent and I decided to part ways. To be honest, even though my agent was awesome and hardworking and communicative and fun and supportive, sometime you need a fresh perspective and something different than you did 2 years before. My writing has changed, my genre has changed, and my direction has changed. All relationships are unpredictable - some are for a r

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14. September, 2011: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: September 1, 2011

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

Back-to-School: Books About School

Best Halloween Books for Kids: Scary, Spooky, and Silly

20 Sites to Improve Your Child’s Literacy

Review: Scat by Carl Hiaasen

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Wonderstruck

by Brian Selznick

(Ages 9-12)

LEGO Star Wars Character Encyclopedia

by DK Publishing

(Ages 12 and up)

Every Thing On It

by Shel Silverstein

(Ages 8-11)

You Have to Stop This (Secret)

by Pseudonymous Bosch

(Ages 9-12)

The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories

by Dr. Seuss

(Ages 6-9)

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15. MINI-VIEW: JAY ASHER

MINI-VIEWS:
Pint-sized interviews that leave you smiling.

JAY ASHER is the author of the New York Times Bestseller's list young adult novel, THIRTEEN REASONS WHY. He got the idea for THIRTEEN REASONS WHY at a museum. While taking an audio tour, he was struck by the eeriness of the voice in his ear—a woman who described exactly what he was looking at, but wasn’t there.

Jay lives on the central coast of California. THIRTEEN REASONS WHY is his first book. Find out more about him at http://www.discomermaids.blogspot.com/.

Thirteen Reasons Why has had huge success in its young life. Did you ever foresee the kind of attention it has received and how do you keep grounded with all of the attention it (and you) have gotten since its release? And possibly related to that, what project are you currently working on?
If the book found its audience (which required the help of booksellers and librarians), I thought it could be a real word-of-mouth success because of its mix of suspense, a unique structure, and the issues it discussed. I just didn't think the initial audience would be so big. From there, the teens took over and began recommending it to their friends. I definitely didn't expect to see it on the New York Times Bestseller list, though. When it first appeared on that list, it was such a shock that I actually started crying.

As far as staying grounded, a full-time job definitely helps. But, more than that, the letters I receive from teens are so heartwarming and inspiring. Many of them open up about their own lives and tell me the ways in which the book positively affected them. I can't feel anything but honored by that.

I'm working on my next novel for teens right now. There will definitely be more humorous elements in this book than Thirteen Reasons Why...but hopefully just as engaging.

Do you have a favorite novel-writing exercise, tip or piece of advice that you find most useful, and are willing to share with other writers?
Thirteen Reasons Why
was the first manuscript I wrote without anyone looking at it (other than the first 12 pages) before it was finished. Since I was writing such a personal story, I didn't want anyone swaying the emotional aspects of my words yet. But I did hold several brainstorming sessions with my wife and two writing friends (and co-bloggers) Robin and Eve. After it was finished and polished to the best of my abilities, then I let other people read it...one at a time. After each person critiqued it, I made alterations and then passed the manuscript on to the next person. That way, the story was seen through fresh eyes each time as opposed to the same people critiquing every stage of the revision process.

What's your favorite children's joke? (I know as a frequent winner of the SCBWI summer conference joke contests, you've got to have a few jokes on hand ;-).
Knock knock!

Who's there?

Interrupting cow.

Interrup----

Moooooooooooo!!!

Thanks, Jay!

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16.

The End of the Conference: Autograph Party Photos...

After half a chocolate cupcake and half a yellow cupcake, I got some shots of the autograph party (which I didn't have to participate in because the 2009 CWIM didn't make it to the bookstore which in a way was OK because I feel a little silly signing books).


Susan Patron, Sara Pennypacker, and Ann Whitford Paul look happy about autographing.


Washingtonians Holly Cupala (who is holding one of the roses from the gorgeous bouquet her husband sent in celebration of her very recent two-book deal!) with RA Jolie Stekly and her stack of books.


The awesome Paula Yoo listens to a conference-goer as she prepares to sign her first novel, Good Enough.


Authors Katherine Applegate and Jay Asher--both of whom I interviewed for Insider Reports in the 2009 CWIM.


Rachel Cohn happily passes one of her novels off to a conference goer (note the red "Reading Is Power" bracelet) while Bruce Coville concentrates on signing.


Marla Frazee and her line of autograph seekers. (I wonder if her hand got tired.)


SCBWI RAs/authors Esther Hershenhorn (Illinois) and Ellen Hopkins (Nevada).


Down the row: Linda Zuckerman, Paula Yoo, Lisa Yee, Mark Teague, and Adam Rex (who you can sort of see).

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17. Ypulse Essentials: Generation OMG, YouTube U, Online Vs. Offline Morals

American iDol (a new iPhone app offers AI fans video clips, background info on Idol contestants and the latest news about this season) (MediaPost, reg. required) - Generation OMG (New York Times' in-depth exploration of how the recession will shape... Read the rest of this post

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18. Ben Schrank's Real Deal: When Everything Goes Right

All the factors that went into success of "13 Reasons Why" (Jay Asher's amazing YA debut, which has sold nearly half a million copies!)

Special Voice +
Concept that was strong =
They bought it

"Strong package" good image, nice tape branding of cover, great backcover copy

Jay the author is great, charming, with an enormous ability to promote himself

House - Ben's imprint, recognized word of mouth building and supported that with appropriate marketing.

Book hits the NYTimes list 20 weeks in... and stayed there.

Marketplace where issue of bullying very much in consciousness - this book came at it in a strange way - book and national consciousness hit at same time.

Even after you get everything right - the change of a book hitting at this level, where he feels the book with be the "Go Ask Alice" of it's generation, like "Speak" by Laurie Halse Anderson will be the book of its generation.

The odds of something like that happening are like 1 in 100,000.


--Posted by Lee Wind

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19. Gnomes in the Garden


One week ago Saturday, I stepped into a Story Garden. Immediately, like magic, roots grew down into the ground, connecting me to a rich substrata of writers, editors, agents, all with amazing stories to tell. As I wandered the Story Garden (known to some as the SCBWI Western Washington Writing and Illustrating for Children Conference) flowers of every sort shot up out of the ground at my very feet. I watched with amazement as one particularly bright colored blossom (Genus Lainius taylorus, fuschia petals, quite lovely) began to speak. Wondrous tales of a circus troupe within her very being, struggling to emerge, wove a spell around all of us in the Story Garden, prompting great excitement at the possibilities for each of us, ready to bring forth our own fruit.

As the day wore on, and we were watered, fertilized and shone upon by Master Gardeners Jay Asher, Peter Brown, Edward Necalsulmer IV, Jordan Brown, Lisa Graff, Paul Rodeen, Michael Bourret, Sara Crowe, and so many others--voila! We bore fruit. Many of us scurried to secret corners, to quickly capture those first buds of a new story, the tentative tendrils of a plot twist.

No garden is quite complete without a Garden Gnome, and by early afternoon, our very own gnome appeared (see above), cheering us on, giving bits of writing advice to each of us who captured him before he disappeared back into his own hidden garden, once again to write.

And now each of us have returned to our own secret gardens, treasuring all we brought back from that magical weekend, seeding our own stories to bloom in due time.

Watch our gardens grow!

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20. Thirteen Reasons Why…You Shoulda Been at TLA

I know the TLA convention is supposed to stand for Texas Library Association, but it really should stand for

TOTALLY LIVE AWESOMENESS!

What happens when you connect 7,000 librarians with publishers, vendors, and authors?

A convention floor full of orthopedic shoes?

Wrong answer. Aside from the mosh pit of ARC hyenas, y0u get an amazing experience. In no particular order, here’s why you shoulda been there, Holmes…

13. The Locale: Three Words. San Antonio. Riverwalk. Fiesta.

12. Suzanne Collins: Not only did Suzanne do a question and answer session about The Hunger Games series, she also autographed books in the author’s area. She is supremely kind and gracious in greeting fans. She’s also one of the few people I’ll sprint-across-the-convention-floor-to-score-a-signing-wristband for.

Go Team Peeta!

11. Publishing People: As a library convention, TLA is second only to ALA. Most of the major publishers are there. It’s not uncommon to meet editorial staff at the booths. It’s wonderful to get a sneak peek at the wonderful new titles coming out. These folks know their stuff. They know what’s good and they know what’s hot. And they are incredibly kind to librarians! And we love them for it.

10. Maureen Johnson: Wowsa, MJ brought a million jars worth of crazy coolness to TLA this year. She spoke on a YA panel and signed at her publisher’s booth. (And don’t think I didn’t score an extra autographed copy of Suite Scarlett for a blog contest. I absolutely did!)

9. Authors, Authors, Authors: Jeff Kinney. Julie Powell. Jay Asher. We have more authors at TLA than Scarlet Whisper has jewels. The sessions and autograph area are always chock full of the very best scribes in the known universe. Don’t take my word for it, you can check out the author and speaker list here. I can’t tell you how fun it is to hear the stories and musings of these talented folks. At TLA, writers are ROCK STARS!

First Day Jackpot!

8. ARCS: Advanced Reader Copies are in no short supply on the convention floor. Publishers kindly supply librarians with books to preview. Here’s the thing, though. Nobody likes the hyena who snatches every book in sight and stuffs copies into her free tote bag. I’m not an indiscriminate ARC hog. I stop, look at the book, and decide whether I’d like to read and review it. Also, the booth folk are kind enough to give the ARCs, so I always try to get their input on what books they’re excited about. They know the good stuff. I’ve found more evergreens and wonderful titles this way. For example, Connie Hsu was

8 Comments on Thirteen Reasons Why…You Shoulda Been at TLA, last added: 5/5/2010
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21. Fusenews: “Compare and contrast Goodnight Moon with The Sun Also Rises”

Lotso hotso news today, folks.  I hardly know where to begin.  Let’s start with the big news that the illustrious editor Margaret K. McElderry passed away recently.  I had mentioned The McElderry Book of Greek Myths in my Valentine’s Day post earlier this week.  Maybe she was on my mind.  In any case, there’s a great New York Times piece from 1997 on her.  I’m fond of it, not least because Eden Ross Lispon mentions four books McElderry edited right off the bat and they are ”The Borrowers”, ”Ginger Pye”, ”The Dark Is Rising”, and ”The Changeover.”  The Changevoer!!  The book I keep hoping will be reprinted soon so as to leap on the Twilight train while there’s still time!  In any case, I was unaware that Ms. McElderry worked in my own children’s room for years.  Good to know.  Fellow librarian and novelist Sara Ryan offers her own remembrance of Ms. McElderry and The New York Times wrote up one as well.  Dunno that they needed to include the idea that We’re Going on a Bear Hunt is “un-P.C.”  Um . . . maybe if you’re Stephen Colbert, but what precisely is “un-P.C.” about that book again?  It’s not like Oxenbury depicted the kids packing heat, after all.

  • In other news the Cybils Awards (the only awards awarded by bloggers) for children’s and YA literature were announced this week.  The Cybils strive to balance great writing with child-friendliness.  With those in mind I think their selections were top notch.  You can see all the winners here.  This year none of the books I nominated made the final cut, but I see that frequent commenter on this blog Eric Carpenter got TWO of his books on there!  Well played, Eric.  Well played indeed.
  • I like it when my favorite folks end up linking to one another.  I couldn’t have been more shocked, though, with a recent posting by Kate Beaton.  She was writing a comic about Ada Lovelace (and where is the children’s biography on the fact that the first computer programmer was a woman, by the way?) and then mentioned in her notes that there were some Jules Verne illustrations out there that were “definitely worth a look”.  I love me my Verne, and lo and behold who did Kate link to but none other than Ward Jenkins, he of this season’s Chicks Run Wild (by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen).  Ward speaks of Jules Verne: The Man Who Invented the Future by Franz Born, illustrated by Peter P. Plasencia circa 1964.  Worth your time.
  • Carbon dating jackets with headless girls and cupcakes.  The book that proves that kids will buy a hardcover to infinity if they like it (and no, it’s not Wimpy Kid).

    10 Comments on Fusenews: “Compare and contrast Goodnight Moon with The Sun Also Rises”, last added: 2/18/2011
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22. Jay Asher & Carolyn Mackler to Pen New YA Novel

Thirteen Reasons Why author Jay Asher and The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big Round Things author Carolyn Mackler have signed a deal with Penguin’s Razorbill imprint for a young adult novel they co-wrote.

The Future is Us will come out in November with an initial printing of 500,000 copies. Publisher Ben Schrank negotiated the deal with two literary agents, Laura Rennert of the Andrea Brown Literary Agency and Jodi Reamer of Writers House.

Here’s more from the release: “The Future is Us is set in 1996, when less than half of all American high school students have ever used the internet. Facebook will not be invented for several more years. Emma just got a computer and an America Online CD-ROM with 100 free hours. When she and her best friend Josh log on to AOL they discover themselves on Facebook … fifteen years in the future. Everybody wonders what life has in store for them. Josh and Emma are about to find out.”

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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23. July, 2011: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: July 11, 2011

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

Best iPad Apps for Kids

Learning How To Read

Review: Scat by Carl Hiaasen

Superhero Books: Batman, Superman, Spider-Man

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Skippyjon Jones, Class Action

by Judy Schachner

(Ages 3-7)

Pete the Cat: Rocking in My School Shoes

by Eric Litwin

(Ages 3-7)

Forever

by Maggie Stiefvater

(Young Adult)

Pretty Little Liars: Twisted

by Sara Shepard

(Young Adult)

Dragon’s Oath

by P.C. Cast

(Young Adult)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

Silverlicious

by Victoria Kann

(Ages 5-8)

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24. August, 2011: Best Selling Kids’ Books, New Releases, and More …

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: August 1, 2011

Here’s the scoop on the most popular destinations on The Children’s Book Review site, the most coveted new releases and bestsellers.

THE HOT SPOTS: THE TRENDS

20 Sites to Improve Your Child’s Literacy

Learning How To Read

Review: Scat by Carl Hiaasen

Superhero Books: Batman, Superman, Spider-Man

Where to Find Free eBooks for Children Online


THE NEW RELEASES

The most coveted books that release this month:

Llama Llama Home with Mama

by Anna Dewdney

(Ages 1-5)

The 39 Clues: Cahills vs. Vespers: Book 1: The Medusa Plot

by Gordon Korman

(Ages 8-12)

Big Nate on a Roll

by Lincoln Peirce

(Ages 8-11)

Darth Paper Strikes Back: An Origami Yoda Book

by Tom Angleberger

(Ages 9-12)

Aphrodite the Diva (Goddess Girls)

by Joan Holub

(Ages 8-12)


THE BEST SELLERS

The best selling children’s books this month:

PICTURE BOOKS

Skippyjon Jones, Class Action

by Judy Schachner

(Ages 3-7)

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25. 13 Reasons, Being Pleasant and not Playing with Fire!

Hi all in "The Land of Blog" ti's your forever wandering and trustworthy guide Library Ninja Bill with more news on the latest, at least to him, and greatest, a matter surely open to debate, reads out there.  Okay got a bunch of good stuff this go-round so let's jump into the deep end of the pool (hope everyone can swim).

First things first. I recently heard from my most excellent friend Kirsten Cappy from the great state of Maine. She had this to share with me so check it out:



Pretty funny right! Thanks Kirsten, you Rock!!!! Can't wait to give this book a spin! Now on to more serious. yea right, business:

Skulduggery Pleasant, Playing with Fire by Derek Landy - This is the second book in The Skulduggery Pleasant Series and it is just as fun and full of action as the first. Now is the time to pause reading this review and skip to the next review I made sometime back on another blog. It's all about the first book and some cool stuff. Take your time I promise to wait with this review until you finish that one. All right see you back soon.......Hum, Hum, Hum , Hum, Hummm. Ah back are you? Sounds like great stuff doesn't it? Well, um, now about the second book. Skulduggery is back with his allies Stephanie , or should I say Valkyrie Cain, the kick-butt ninja stylized Tanith Low and others. An old foe of Skulduggery's, Barron Vengeous, has escaped his prison which just happens to be the very same one Skulduggery put him in 80 years ago. He has recruited sinister allies in Billy Ray Sanguine - a Cowboy of the supernatural plains whose power makes everything come undone around him (sounds confusing I know, but man this guy is dangerous), Mr. Dusk - a vampire of the utmost power, and others to bring the Faceless Ones to this dimensional Realm (if you thought Vengeous and his crew was bad, they got nothing on the Faceless Ones). On top of stopping the Barron and his allies from bringing back the Faceless Ones, Skulduggery and crew must defeat the resurrected Grotesquery - a fearsome and vicious creature assembled from various spine chilling monsters, who is also a key to bringing the Faceless Ones into our dimension. Did I mention if the Faceless Ones are brought back to our dimension that it's the end of everything. Oh well, as you can see this book has got it going at 110 ten miles per hour and it won't let you go till it's over!!!! Highly recommended for those 9 and older!!!!!!

All right let's take a trip into Bill's past:

Skulduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy - Who is the best detective ever? Did you guess Sherlock Holmes or Inspector Jacques Clouseau or perhaps The Hardy Boys? Well if you guessed any of those you would be wrong!!!!! The greatest detective ever is none other than 0 Comments on 13 Reasons, Being Pleasant and not Playing with Fire! as of 1/1/1900

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