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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: quiz, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 76
1. Whose muse mews?

The final, quiet days of summer before the turning of the season and the chill of back-to-work autumn are a perfect time to slow down, turn off the electronics, and refresh the soul by reading poetry. On the other hand, what could be more fun than an internet quiz about cats?

We sat down with Oxford Scholarly Editions Online, and fired up the search, looking for cats stalking the pages of literature. We found some lovely stuff, and something more – a literary reflection of the cat’s unstoppable gambol up the social ladder: a mouser and rat-catcher in the seventeenth century, he springs up the stairs in the eighteenth century to become the plaything of smart young ladies and companion of literary lions such as Cowper, Dr Johnson, and Horace Walpole.

cat oseo

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Image credit: Cat with OSEO, © Oxford University Press. Do not re-use without permission.

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2. How much do you know about investment arbitration?

Int Court Justice law robesInvestment arbitration is a growing and important area of law, in which states and companies often find themselves involved in. In recognition of the one year anniversary of Investment Claims moving to a new platform, we have created a quiz we hope will test your knowledge of arbitration law and multilateral treaties. Good luck!

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Investment Claims (IC) is an acclaimed service for both practitioners and academic users. Regular updates mean that subscribers have access to a fully integrated suite of current and high quality content. This content comes with the guarantee of preparation and validation by experts.

Oxford University Press is a leading publisher in arbitration law, including Investment Claims, latest books from thought leaders in the field, and a range of other journals and online products. We publish original works across key areas, from international commercial arbitration to investment arbitration, dispute resolution and energy law, developing outstanding resources to support practitioners, scholars, and students worldwide. For the latest news, commentary, and insights follow the Commercial Law team @OUPCommLaw, and the International Law team @OUPIntLaw on Twitter.

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Image credit: ICJ Robes, by International Organisation. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

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3. So you think you know Jane Austen?

How much do you know about the works of one of our best-loved classic authors? What really motivates the characters, and what is going on beneath the surface of the story? Using So You Think You Know Jane Austen? A Literary Quizbook by John Sutherland and Deirdre La Faye, we’ve selected twelve questions covering all six of Austen’s major novels for you to pit your wits against. Whether you are an expert or an enthusiast, we hope you’ll learn a little extra than you already knew.

Jane Austen coloured version.jpg

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For over 100 years Oxford World’s Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford’s commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more. You can follow Oxford World’s Classics on Twitter and Facebook.

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Image credit: Jane Austen. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

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4. The Book of Common Prayer Quiz

By Alyssa Bender


An image of the Book of Common Prayer We print many different types of bibles here at Oxford University Press, one popular line being our Book of Common Prayer. While this text is used worldwide, you may not know about its interesting history. From the fact that there are a half a dozen books in print with this title, or perhaps that it is not so much a collection of prayers as a sort of “script” to be used, there is much you may not know about this text. Take our quiz below to learn more.

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Alyssa Bender is a marketing coordinator at Oxford University Press. She works on religion books in the Academic/Trade and Reference divisions, as well as Bibles.

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5. How much do you know about the First World War?

Douglas_HaigFrom Haig to Kitchener, and Vera Lynn to Wilfred Owen, how well you know the figures of the First World War? Who’s Who highlights the individuals who had an impact on the events of the Great War. Looking through Who’s Who, we are able to gain a snapshot of the talents and achievements of these individuals, and how they went on to influence history.

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 Who’s Who is the essential directory of the noteworthy and influential in every area of public life, published worldwide, and written by the entrants themselves. Who’s Who and Who Was Who 2014 includes autobiographical information on over 134,000 influential people from all walks of life. You can browse by people, education, and even recreation. Check out the latest feature article, which offers article content on those who shaped history between the years 1897 and 1940. For free lives of the day, follow Who’s Who on Twitter @ukwhoswho

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Image credit: Field Marshal Douglas Haig. Image available via Wikimedia Commons.

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6. How much do you know about the Law of the Sea?

Of the many things in our world that require protection, we sometimes forget the vast expanses of the oceans. However, they are also vulnerable and deserve our protection, including under the law. In recognition of World Oceans Day, we pulled together a collection of international law questions on the Law of the Sea from our books, journals, and online products. Test your knowledge of maritime law!

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Oxford University Press is a leading publisher in international law, including the Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law, latest titles from thought leaders in the field, and a wide range of law journals and online products. We publish original works across key areas of study, from humanitarian to international economic to environmental law, developing outstanding resources to support students, scholars, and practitioners worldwide. For the latest news, commentary, and insights follow the International Law team on Twitter @OUPIntLaw.

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The post How much do you know about the Law of the Sea? appeared first on OUPblog.

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7. How well do you know short stories?

By Maggie Belnap


Short stories populate many childhoods, with the aim to instill morals and virtues in undeveloped and wandering minds. Whether it’s the tale of Rumpelstiltskin or the Boy Who Cried Wolf, these tales make a powerful impression. Take our short stories quiz, based off of Oscar Wilde’s The Complete Short Stories and The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, 2nd ed, edited by Joyce Carol Oates, and see if you really know your short stories.

Scene on the Hudson (Rip Van Winkle) by James Hamilton. Public Domain, via Wikimedia Commons

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Maggie Belnap is a Social Media Intern at Oxford University Press. She attends Amherst College.

The Complete Short Stories by Oscar Wilde is edited by John Sloan. He is Fellow and Tutor in English, Harris Manchester College, Oxford. The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, 2nd ed, is edited by Joyce Carol Oates. Oates is the National Book Award-winning author of over fifty novels, including bestsellers We Were the Mulvaneys, Blonde, and The Gravedigger’s Daughter. She is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University.

Oscar Wilde is the author of “The Happy Prince,” “The Fisherman and His Soul,” “The Nightengale and the Rose,” “The Star Child,” and “The Young King.” Washington Irving is the author of “Rip Van Winkle.” James Baldwin is the author of “Sonny’s Blues.”

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8. Summer Name Generator

Question marks

It’s sweet, sweet summertime! What is your summer name?

You know me. I’ll take any excuse to create a name generator. (Maybe I’ve read too many Captain Underpants books!) So I’ve put together a SUMMER NAME GENERATOR!

Find the first letter of your first name in the left column below, and the word next to it is your new summer first name. Find the first letter of your last name in the right column below, and the word next to it is your new summer last name. So if your regular name was, say, Francine Pascal, your new summer name is Pineapple Bucket.

Generate your own summer name, names for your friends, names for your parents and pets . . . Anyone can have a silly summertime name. Here we go!

 
First letter of your first nameFirst letter of your last name ASUNNYTULIPABGRASSYCRUISERBC
PEACHYLEMONADECDLEAFYSUNFLOWERDESUNSHINYPOPSICLEEFPINEAPPLEICE CREAMFGBEACHYBUBBLEGHSANDYSPARKLERHIOCEANBALLOONIJSEASHELLCORN DOGJKCAMPFIREBOARDWALKKLSQUIRRELFERRIS WHEELLMFIREFLYROAD TRIPMNWATER PARKPUNCHYNODOLPHINROLLER COASTEROPBREEZYBUCKETPQSTARRYCAROUSELQRMOONSLIP ‘N’ SLIDERSBIRDYFIREWORKSSTSKYBASKETTUBICYCLESANDCASTLEUVWAVEFLIP FLOPVWBASEBALLBEEWXFRISBEESANDALXYRIVERBUTTERFLYYZGOLDSNAILZ

What’s your summertime

name? Share it in the Comments below! (And don’t forget to get your official silly Captain Underpants name, too!)

See ya soon,

image from kids.scholastic.com — En-Szu, STACKS Staffer

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9. Are you a tax expert?

Tax calculator and penToday is 15 April or Tax Day in the United States. In recognition of this day we compiled a free virtual issue on taxation bringing together content from books, online products, and journals. The material covers a wide range of specific tax-related topics including income tax, austerity, tax structure, tax reform, and more. The collection is not US-centered, but includes information on economies across the globe. Be sure to take a moment to view this useful online resource today.

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Oxford University Press has compiled a new virtual issue on taxation that brings together content from books, online products, and journals. Start browsing this timely and useful resource today!

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Image credit: Tax calculator and pen. © Elenathewise via iStockphoto.

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10. The ADHD explosion: How much do you know about the disorder?

The push for performance has never been higher. Students today are faced with a grueling course load, extra-curriculars, and standardized tests. In the wake of this competitive atmosphere, the United States has seen a spike in both ADHD diagnoses and increased demand for prescription medicine. But who’s to blame? The fast-paced, technophilic culture that young people are subjected to, or the parents who are quick to medicate a child who is under-performing at school?
Preschool

In The ADHD Explosion: Myths, Medication, Money, and Today’s Push for Performance, Stephen P. Hinshaw and Richard M. Scheffler offer new insight into the origins, science, and troubling trends behind this ever-increasing disorder. Take our quiz to find out how much you know about ADHD, and learn more about some of the new research published in the book.

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Stephen P. Hinshaw and Richard M. Scheffler are the authors of The ADHD Explosion: Myths, Medication, Money, and Today’s Push for Performance. Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and Vice-Chair for Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. He is also editor of Psychological Bulletin. Richard M. Scheffler, PhD, is Distinguished Professor of Health Economics and Public Policy in the School of Public Health and the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Image credit: Young teacher explaining the world to preschoolers via iStockphoto.

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11. A Valentine’s Day Quiz

It’s that time of the year again where the greeting cards, roses and chocolates fly off the shelves. What is it about Valentine’s Day that inspires us (and many of the great literary authors) to partake in all kinds of romantic gestures?

This month Oxford Reference, the American National Biography Online, the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and Who’s Who have joined together to create a quiz to see how knowledgeable you are in Valentine traditions.

Do you know who grows some of the most fragrant roses or hand-dips the sweetest treats? Find out with our quiz.

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Answers to all these questions can be found using Oxford Reference, the Oxford DNBWho’s Who, and the American National Biography Online. Both Oxford Reference and the Oxford DNB are freely available via public libraries across the UK. Libraries offer ‘remote access’ allowing members to log-on to the resources, for free, from home (or any other computer) twenty-four hours a day.

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12. Quiz on the word origins of food and drink

Did you know that ‘croissant’ literally means ‘crescent’ or that oranges are native to China? Do you realize that the word ‘pie’ has been around for seven hundred years in English or that ‘toast’ comes from the Latin word for ‘scorch’? John Ayto explores the word origins of food and drink in The Diner’s Dictionary. We’ve made a little quiz based on the book. Are you hungry for it?

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John Ayto is a freelance writer and the author of many reference works, including the Dictionary of Slang, the Dictionary of Modern Slang, and Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Seasoned generously with literary wit, The Diner’s Dictionary is a veritable feast, tracing the origins and history of over 2,300 gastronomical words and phrases.

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13. Public International Law Quiz

In the last fifty years, public international law has undergone a radical transformation, moving from a discipline which ‘the great majority of lawyers of all states [knew] little or nothing’ about (Oppenheim) to the fastest growing legal discipline. To celebrate the recent update to the Max Planck Encyclopedia of International Law, we present this quiz. Can you separate the Treaty of Tordesillas from the Treaty of Trianon? Do you know how to go about buying a piece of the moon? Happy quizzing — no adjournment required.

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The Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law is a comprehensive online resource containing peer-reviewed articles on every aspect of public international law. Written and edited by an incomparable team of over 800 scholars and practitioners, published in partnership with the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, and updated through-out the year, this major reference work is essential for anyone researching or teaching international law. The articles in the quiz above are available to read for free for a limited time.

Oxford University Press is a leading publisher in Public International Law, including the Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law, latest titles from thought leaders in the field, and a wide range of law journals and online products. We publish original works across key areas of study, from humanitarian to international economic to environmental law, developing outstanding resources to support students, scholars, and practitioners worldwide.

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14. Do you really know Who’s Who?

Do you know for how long Boris Johnson held his first job, or which music video The IT Crowd’s Richard Ayoade has produced? Who’s Who has become a phrase incorporated into our everyday language. With the iconic red-covered book or its online counterpart, you can get the lowdown of Who’s Who in politics, Who’s Who at the Oscars, even the Who’s Who of the cooking world. Written by the entrants themselves, the biographies not only walk you through their career and education but also, in some cases, reveal some interesting and unusual recreations! Take our quiz to see if you really know Who’s Who.

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Who’s Who is the essential directory of the noteworthy and influential in every area of public life, published worldwide, and written by the entrants themselves. Who’s Who 2013  includes autobiographical information on over 33,000 influential people from all walks of life. The 165th edition includes a foreword by Arianna Huffington on ways technology is rapidly transforming the media.

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15. Atlas of the World Quiz

School might be out for the holidays, but there’s still lots to learn. Since education never ends, we’ve prepared this geography quiz drawn from facts from the Oxford Atlas of the World, 19th edition. The only atlas to be updated annually,   Oxford’s Atlas of the World combines gorgeous satellite images with the most up-to-date geographic and census information.

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Oxford’s Atlas of the World — the only world atlas updated annually, guaranteeing that users will find the most current geographic information — is the most authoritative resource on the market. The Nineteenth Edition includes new census information, dozens of city maps, gorgeous satellite images of Earth, and a geographical glossary, once again offering exceptional value at a reasonable price.

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Image credit: From Atlas of the World, 19th edition. 

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16. News from Wisdom

Once in a while, it’s time for Shameless Commerce and Book Plugs. That’s today.

Free Book for 48 Hours

FREE: GET my latest book, WISDOM, THE MIDWAY ALBATROSS: Surviving the Japanese Tsunami and other Disasters for Over 60 Years this weekend for free.

    ONLY AVAILABLE FREE FOR 48 HOURS – 12 am on March 9 to midnight on March 10.


    Read the story of the oldest known wild bird in the world–over 60 years old–and how she and her chick survived the Japanese Tsunami.
    For 48 hours before the March 11 Japanese tsunami, this will be a free Kindle download.

    No color Kindle? No problem.
    This book shows up well on any Kindle desktop program or app. Get the free programs here:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771

TEACHERS & PARENTS
Download your Kindle program now and on March 9 or 10, download the book. Read with your kids to commemorate the tsunami and discuss natural disasters. Gentle introduction to the disaster.

  • Goodreads Giveaway Ends Soon!
  • Goodreads Book Giveaway

    Wisdom, the Midway Albatross by Darcy Pattison

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    17. Can you speak American?

    A wide-ranging account of American English, Richard Bailey’s Speaking American investigates the history and continuing evolution of our language from the sixteenth century to the present. When did English become American? What distinctive qualities made it American? What role have America’s democratizing impulses, and its vibrantly heterogeneous speakers, played in shaping our language and separating it from the mother tongue? Bailey asked himself these questions, now it’s time to ask yourself how well you really know your American English. We’ve composed a quiz for some Friday fun. Now, can you speak American? –Alice & Justyna

    What’s “the blab of the pave”?

    a. A description of the talk of Okies and others moving west during the Great Depression, typically used by urbanites in a derogatory way
    b. A popular expression for how young “delinquents” talked in Northern California during the 1950s
    c. Walt Whitman’s description of the way New Yorkers speak
    d. A description of the way cement settles in intense heat used in the South, particularly around New Orleans

    Which great event determined whether Shakespeare should be performed in American or British English in the US?

    a. American. The Astor Place Riot in New York in 1849, which pitted actor Edwin Forrest (American) against actor William Charles Macready (English).
    b. English. 1823 legislation, for which aristocratic Carolinians educated in England lobbied, that Shakespeare’s plays be performed “in the manner in which they were written.”
    c. American. Competing theaters set each other alight during the Great Chicago Fire, but the Wicker Park neighborhood rallied to save the Liberty Theater, then staging an American English production of Hamlet.
    d. English. Following the introduction of sound in the 1920s, MGM’s British English movie production of Romeo & Juliet out-earned its American English competitors, so all studioes switched to English actors for future Shakespeare productions.

    Which of the following is true?

    a. Alaska cotton is a species of grass growing in the Alaskan wetlands.
    b. Alaska candy is strips of smoked salmon.
    c. An Alaska divorce is liberating oneself from marriage by murdering the spouse.
    d. Baked Alaska is a dessert in which a quickly baked meringue encases a blob of frozen ice cream.

    Where does the word “buckaroo” come from?

    a. Slang for ranch hands on the American frontier who were initially paid a dollar (“a buck”) to work for a rancher
    b. Name given to young men at the stage of their equine apprenticeship when they would handle young male horses in the Colonial South
    c. Buckra, meaning someone with power or knowledge in the Efik language of West Africa, which passed into American English via Barbados Creole
    d. An invention of screenwriter and dime novelist John Grey for the silent western “Canyon of Fools”

    What is “bisket”?

    a. A Boston expression for unleavened bread made from flour, salt, and water
    b. A Yiddish expression for dough, sometimes found in New York English
    c. A Chinook expression for a day when it doesn’t rain during the winter months
    d. An alternate spelling of “biscuit” found in rural Alabama and Mississippi

    In the 1980s, the song “Valley Girl” about the singer’s teenage daughter and her affinity for Valspeak (a word blend of “San Fernando Valley” and “speak”), unintentionally lead to an enormous popularity for this style of English. Which singer

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    18. How to Create a Viral QuickQuiz

    Some of you may already know about the new viral book marketing technology from BookBuzzr named QuickQuiz.
    This book marketing technology can be extremely powerful when used in the right way. This article gives you a few guidelines on how to create a QuickQuiz game that gets you the best returns on the time that you spend creating it.

    1. Choose a topic that:

    • Is relevant to your book’s topic
    • Resonates with your readers
    • Has a large enough audience

    For example, let’s say you’ve written a book that features witches and werewolves and is targeted towards young adults. An effective QuickQuiz game could be on the Harry Potter series.

    2. Don’t try to market your book through the quiz. You can always put up your marketing message in the “Sponsor’s Message” section. This will appear at least 5 times in a game that gets completed.

    3. If a reader answers wrong or runs out of time, he will not be able to play that QuickQuiz again! Don’t make the first few questions too difficult. Make the first two or three questions easy so that your readers feel encouraged and are able to move forward.

    4. Give your QuickQuiz a short, snappy title which looks attractive when viewed on a reader’s Facebook wall.

    5. Create many quizzes. There is no limit on the number of QuickQuizzes you can create. You are limited only by your creativity. Remember that each quiz you create can give you hundreds or even thousands of exposures (impressions) for your book.

    6. Share your QuickQuizzes with as many people as you can. Every QuickQuiz will have its own link. Share the link on Twitter, post it on your Facebook page, and email it out to your friends. You can also embed the QuickQuiz on your blog or website. This will engage readers who visit your blog or website and make it fun for them to stick around.

    7. Note that a reader who completes a QuickQuiz will be presented with another QuickQuiz that you’ve created. This will continue to happen until all the quizzes that you’ve created are shown to the reader. After this, other quizzes created by other authors will be presented.

    8. The reader will have 3 ‘Quiz-Keys’, that help the reader in completing the quiz. You can make the questions progressively difficult as the reader can invoke the 3 ‘Quiz-Keys’ in order to complete the game (see picture below).

    So go ahead and have some fun creating a few interesting quizzes that entertain your readers. Done right, your readers will spread your QuickQuizzes while you focus on what you do best: Writing your next book!

    See a live, working QuickQuiz below:

    Sorry, your browser does not support iframes. Click here to continue.


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    19. What Everyone Needs To Know About China: A Quiz

    Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom is a Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine.  His new book, China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know, covers everything form Confucius and Mao to Internet censorship.  In the post below Wasserstrom poses some questions about China that you can find the answers to in his book.  See if you can answer them in the comments.  We will post the answers tomorrow.  For more China questions check out another quiz by Wasserstrom that appeared on The China Beat.

    Q: Which country is most like China in internet usage?

    Q: Which country’s population is most like China’s?

    Q: Which country follows China in overall Greenhouse Gas emissions (China is number one, this country is number two)?

    Q: When China hosted the Summer Games in 2008 was it the first, second, third or fourth Asian country to do so?

    Q: Has Confucius always been revered in China?

    Q: When did Mao’s face begin to appear on Chinese banknotes?

    In 1949 (when the PRC was founded)
    In 1966 (when the Cultural Revolution began and the Mao cult peaked)
    In 1976 (when Mao died)
    In 1999 (the 50th anniversary of the founding of the PRC)

    Q: What replaced his face on some 2008 banknotes?.

    

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    20. The Tony Quiz

    Geoffrey Block, Distinguished Professor of Music History at the University of Puget Sound, is the author of Enchanted Evenings: The Broadway Musical From Show Boat to Sondheim and Lloyd Webber.  The book offers theater lovers an illuminating behind-the-scenes tour of some of America’s best loved, most admired, and most enduring musicals, as well as a riveting history.  In the original post Block challenges readers to test their Tony knowledge.  We will post the answers next Wednesday so be sure to check back.

    1. Who is Tony?

    2. What was the first musical to win the Tony for Best Score?

    3. What was the first musical to win the Tony for Best Musical?

    4. What was the second musical to win the Tony for Best Musical?

    Hint: This show made its debut only a little more than three months after the first winner.

    5. In what year were the Tony Awards first nationally televised?

    6. Who has the most Tony Award wins in the Best Score category?

    7. What other lyricists and composers (or lyricist-composers) have won two or more Tony’s in the Best Score category?

    8. Who has received more Tony’s than anyone else since the awards were established?

    9. One winning musical in the Best Score category was the only musical nominated that year.

    10. What year produced arguably the most impressive line-up of Tony nominated musicals?

    11. So far there has been only one tie in the Best Musical category? Name the two shows.

    12. Fourteen times in the last fifty years the Best Musical and Best Score winners were not the same. No less than half of these disparities have occurred in the past twelve years. What are the names of these last seven shows that won the Tony for Best Musical but not Best Score? What shows did win for Best Score in those years?

    13. Name the two Best Musicals that went on to win Best Picture Oscars.

    14. Name the three Best Musicals losers that went on to win Best Picture Oscars.

    15. Starting in 1994, the Tony Awards decided to make the Best Musical Revival its own category instead of forcing musicals to share the award with revivals of plays. In the years since, the Best Musical Revival category has often proven to be fiercely competitive. Name the three winning revivals that first appeared before the launching of the Tony Awards and the four winning revivals that did not win a Tony Award for Best Musical the season of their Broadway debut.

    16. The Four Questions: What show won the Tony for Best Musical in 1984? What Pulitzer Prize winning show lost that year? Who wrote the winning score? What controversial remarks did the winner utter on national television?

    17. One composer had been dead for nearly 70 years when he won for Best Score. Who was this composer and what musical did he write?

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    21. Valentine's Day Book Boyfriends

    Valentine's Day is right around the corner so what better time than to find out who your book boyfriend should be? TeenReads.com has a great quiz up to help you discover what literary character you should be spending Valentine's Day with.

    My book boyfriend? Etienne St. Clair from Anna and the French Kiss.

    Take the quiz then come back and tell me who your book boyfriend is!

    Or if your ideal book boyfriend isn't listed as one of the options in the quiz, who do wish would come on Valentine's Day and sweep you away? My biggest book boyfriend remains Gilbert Blythe from Anne of Green Gables-major swoon!!

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    22. C’mon, Mr. Capote. Tell us what you really think.

    Even today, Truman Capote remains one of most America’s most controversial authors. Following early literary success his flamboyant became well-documented at the many parties and restaurants he frequented. Always claiming to be researching his next book, Capote was a social celebrity and may have had just as many strong opinions about other people as they had about him. In the quiz below, you'll find a series of quotes from

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    23. How to Use the John Locke Principle to Market Your Book Through Games

    John Locke has sold a million copies of his various books. He has also written a very useful guide titled “How I Sold 1 Million eBooks in 5 Months” that describes his methods.

    One of the key principles in the book is the idea of “transfer of loyalty”. While this is a well-known and much used principle in marketing, John has used it to great effect in creating effective blog posts that promote his books. Hence, I’ve referred to it as the John Locke principle.

    So what is this principle?

    Take a topic that will be of interest to your audience and somehow tie your own content to that topic so as to get the audience to transfer its loyalty to your content. For example, let’s say that you’ve written a book that will appeal to Harry Potter fans. You write a blog post about the latest Harry Potter movie. Then you push your blog post on Twitter to people who are looking for anything related to Harry Potter. They land up on your blog post, realize that you’ve got a book that has something for the Harry Potter aficionado and voila, you’ve got a potential customer!

    The method is really simple and really effective.

    Many writers were already using this principle in their blog posts prior to the release of John’s manual. Now with the release of the book, the number of writers creating blogs that are intended to get readers to transfer their loyalty is bound to explode.

    At BookBuzzr, we believe that this method can be used to market books by creating word games and quiz games that help get new readers. In fact, we developed our Hangman game technology some months ago keeping this principle in mind (although at that time it did not have a name or a famous author endorsing the system!) A word game that allows for transfer of loyalty has novelty value. Done right may work even better than a blog post. Here’s why:

    1. It can be consumed faster than a blog post.
    2. It can be more fun and interactive than a blog post.
    3. In most cases, it’s faster to create than a blog post.

    Working Example:

    BookBuzzr Author Pro subscriber – Eric Hamilton Wilson – has written a book that revolves around the death of Princess Diana. He describes his book ‘Love & Death In Paris ’97’ as under:

    This suspenseful novel contains themes of love and loss, peace and forgiveness. It follows the adventures of Daniel Plain, a young man from Seattle who moves in Paris in the fateful year of 1997. Daniel’s life becomes intertwined with events linked to Diana, Princess of Wales, and he finds himself in great danger as he seeks to unravel the mysteries surrounding the tragic loss of the people’s princess.

    To promote his book, Eric Hamilton has created a Hangman trivia game that challenges the reader to make up the words. Try the game below and see if the concept works for you.

    Now all Eric Hamilton has to do is to market this game to people who are interested in Princess Diana (and I think there are about a billion such people in the world!) One way for him to market this game is to send a tweet to

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    24. INTELLIGENCE TEST

    My friend, Diane Sismour, posted this on a Yahoo Group. It made me lol, out loud (and also made me feel a little dumb), so I copied the intelligence test below.

    (Read more ...)

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    25. Sudan: How much do you know? 2011 Place of the Year

    Yesterday, we announced that South Sudan is the 2011 Place of the Year. How much do you know about Sudan, South Sudan, and Darfur? Test your knowledge with this quiz by Andrew S. Natsios.

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