What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: *Featured, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 2,571
1. A woman’s journey in Kashmiri politics

Nyla Ali Khan’s recent book The Life of a Kashmiri Woman: Dialectic of Resistance and Accommodation, though primarily a biography of her grandmother Akbar Jehan, promises to be much more than that. It is also a narration of the story of Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah, the charismatic political leader who is still recognized as the greatest political leader that Kashmir ever produced.

The post A woman’s journey in Kashmiri politics appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on A woman’s journey in Kashmiri politics as of 4/19/2015 7:09:00 AM
Add a Comment
2. Learning country music in the digital age

Recently reading through the Notes and Discographies section of Greil Marcus’s book Mystery Train (first published in 1975), I was struck by Marcus’s meticulousness when it came to recommending records.

The post Learning country music in the digital age appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Learning country music in the digital age as of 4/19/2015 7:09:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. A Jazz Appreciation Month Playlist

Established in 2001, Jazz Appreciation Month celebrates the rich history, present accolades, and future growth of jazz music. Spanning the blues, ragtime, dixieland, bebop, swing, soul, and instrumentals, there's no surprise that jazz music has endured the test of time from its early origins amongst African-American slaves in the late 19th century to its growth today.

The post A Jazz Appreciation Month Playlist appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on A Jazz Appreciation Month Playlist as of 4/18/2015 5:57:00 AM
Add a Comment
4. Darwin’s “gastric flatus”

When Charles Darwin died at age 73 on this day 133 years ago, his physicians decided that he had succumbed to “degeneration of the heart and greater vessels,” a disorder we now call “generalized arteriosclerosis.” Few would argue with this diagnosis, given Darwin’s failing memory, and his recurrent episodes of “swimming of the head,” “pain in the heart”, and “irregular pulse” during the decade or so before he died.

The post Darwin’s “gastric flatus” appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Darwin’s “gastric flatus” as of 4/18/2015 8:29:00 AM
Add a Comment
5. Getting to know Brian Muir

From time to time, we try to give you a glimpse into our offices around the globe. This week, we are excited to bring you an interview with Brian Muir, an Online Marketing Assistant on our Direct Marketing team in New York. Brian has been working at the Oxford University Press since March 2014.

The post Getting to know Brian Muir appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Getting to know Brian Muir as of 4/18/2015 10:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
6. Wittgenstein and natural religion

In the philosophy of religion ‘Wittgensteinianism’ is a distinctive position whose outlines are more or less unanimously agreed by both its defenders and detractors. By invoking a variety of concepts to which Wittgenstein gave currency – language games, forms of life, groundless believing, depth grammar, world pictures – the defenders aim to defuse rationalistic criticisms of religion by showing them to be, in the strict sense, impertinent.

The post Wittgenstein and natural religion appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Wittgenstein and natural religion as of 4/19/2015 4:35:00 AM
Add a Comment
7. Five lessons from ancient Athens

There's a lot we can learn from ancient Athens. The Greek city-state, best recognized as the first democracy in the world, is thought to have laid the foundation for modern political and philosophical theory, providing a model of government that has endured albeit in revised form. Needless to say, the uniqueness of its political institutions shaped many of its economic principles and practices, many of which are still recognizable in current systems of government.

The post Five lessons from ancient Athens appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Five lessons from ancient Athens as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
8. Nostalgia and the 2015 Academy of Country Music Awards

The country music tradition in the United States might be characterized as a nostalgic one. To varying degrees since the emergence of recorded country music in the early 1920s, country songs and songwriters have expressed longing for the seemingly simpler times of their childhoods—or even their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods. In many ways, one might read country music’s occasional obsession with all things past and gone as an extension of the nineteenth-century plantation song, popularized by Pittsburgh native Stephen Collins Foster, whose “Old Folks at Home” (1851) and “My Old Kentucky Home” (1853) depicted freed slaves longing for the simpler times of their plantation youths.

The post Nostalgia and the 2015 Academy of Country Music Awards appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Nostalgia and the 2015 Academy of Country Music Awards as of 4/16/2015 4:05:00 PM
Add a Comment
9. Can marijuana prevent memory decline?

Can smoking marijuana prevent the memory loss associated with normal aging or Alzheimer’s disease? This is a question that I have been investigating for the past ten years. The concept of medical marijuana is not a new one. A Chinese pharmacy book, written about 2737 BCE, was probably the first to mention its use as a medicine for the treatment of gout, rheumatism, malaria, constipation, and (ironically) absent-mindedness.

The post Can marijuana prevent memory decline? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Can marijuana prevent memory decline? as of 4/16/2015 4:05:00 PM
Add a Comment
10. From Carter to Clinton: Selecting presidential nominees in the modern era

Franklin D. Roosevelt broke the two-term precedent set by George Washington by running for and winning a third and fourth term. Pressure for limiting terms followed FDR’s remarkable record. In 1951 the Twenty-Second constitutional amendment was ratified stating: “No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice…” Accordingly, reelected Presidents must then govern knowing they cannot run again.

The post From Carter to Clinton: Selecting presidential nominees in the modern era appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on From Carter to Clinton: Selecting presidential nominees in the modern era as of 4/17/2015 4:45:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. Publishing the Oxford Medical Handbooks: an interview with Elizabeth Reeve

Many medical students are familiar with the "cheese and onion," but not the person responsible for the series. We caught up with Oxford Medical Handbooks' Senior Commissioning Editor, Liz Reeve, to find out about her role in producing Oxford's market leading series.

The post Publishing the Oxford Medical Handbooks: an interview with Elizabeth Reeve appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Publishing the Oxford Medical Handbooks: an interview with Elizabeth Reeve as of 4/17/2015 7:15:00 AM
Add a Comment
12. Living with multiple sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is widely thought to be a disease of immune dysfunction, whereby the immune system becomes activated to attack components of the nerves in the brain, spinal cord and optic nerve. New information about environmental factors and lifestyle are giving persons with MS and their health care providers new tools...

The post Living with multiple sclerosis appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Living with multiple sclerosis as of 4/17/2015 7:15:00 AM
Add a Comment
13. Narrating nostalgia

The most recent issue of the Oral History Review will be zipping across the world soon. To hold you over until it arrives, we interviewed one of the authors featured in this edition, Jennifer Helgren, about her article, “A ‘Very Innocent Time’: Oral History Narratives, Nostalgia and Girls’ Safety in the 1950s and 1960s.”

The post Narrating nostalgia appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Narrating nostalgia as of 4/17/2015 9:47:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. The long history of World War II

World War Two was the most devastating conflict in recorded human history. It was both global in extent and total in character. It has understandably left a long and dark shadow across the decades. Yet it is three generations since hostilities formally ended in 1945 and the conflict is now a lived memory for only a few. And this growing distance in time has allowed historians to think differently about how to describe it, how to explain its course, and what subjects to focus on when considering the wartime experience.

The post The long history of World War II appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The long history of World War II as of 4/18/2015 5:57:00 AM
Add a Comment
15. A better strategy for presidential candidates

The invisible primary is well underway. From Jeb Bush to Hillary Clinton, Rand Paul to Marco Rubio, candidates are already angling for votes in the prized Iowa caucus. News cycles are abuzz with speculation about who the candidates will be and what their chances are, but much of this coverage asks the wrong question.

The post A better strategy for presidential candidates appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on A better strategy for presidential candidates as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16. ‘Buyer beware': how the Federal Trade Commission redefined the word ‘free’

Last month marked the hundredth anniversary of the Federal Trade Commission, the regulatory agency that looks after consumer interests by enforcing truth in advertising laws. Established by the Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 and signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson, the FTC opened its doors in March 16 of 2015, taking the place of the older Bureau of Corporations.

The post ‘Buyer beware': how the Federal Trade Commission redefined the word ‘free’ appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on ‘Buyer beware': how the Federal Trade Commission redefined the word ‘free’ as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
17. Who was the first great Shakespearean actress?

The first female Juliet appears to have been Mary Saunderson, to Henry Harris’s Romeo in 1662 when her future husband, Thomas Betterton, played Mercutio. Later she acted admirably as Ophelia and Lady Macbeth but nothing I have read characterizes her as great. Elizabeth Barry (c.1658–1713) succeeded her as Betterton’s leading lady, excelling in pathetic roles and achieving her greatest successes in the heroic tragedies of her own time.

The post Who was the first great Shakespearean actress? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Who was the first great Shakespearean actress? as of 4/13/2015 5:20:00 AM
Add a Comment
18. Reflections on the Reith Lectures: the future of medicine

The Reith lectures were inaugurated in 1948 by the BBC to celebrate and commemorate Lord Reith’s major contribution to British broadcasting. Many distinguished names are to be found in the alumni of lecturers, whose origins are not confined to this sceptred isle in which the concept of these educational thought provoking radio talks were conceived.

The post Reflections on the Reith Lectures: the future of medicine appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Reflections on the Reith Lectures: the future of medicine as of 4/13/2015 7:52:00 AM
Add a Comment
19. Signs, strategies, and brand value

The semiotic paradigm in market research gives new meaning to the expression, "You are what you eat." The semiotic value of goods, from foodstuffs to cars, transcends their functional attributes, such as nutrition or transportation, and delivers intangible benefits to consumers in the form of brand symbols, icons, and stories. For instance, Coke offers happiness, Apple delivers "cool," and BMW strokes your ego.

The post Signs, strategies, and brand value appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Signs, strategies, and brand value as of 4/13/2015 10:26:00 AM
Add a Comment
20. How well do you know Anthony Trollope?

Next week, 24 April 2015 marks the bicentenary of one of Britain’s great novelists, Anthony Trollope. He was an extremely prolific writer, producing 47 novels, as well as a great deal of non-fiction, in his lifetime. He also worked for the Post Office, and introduced the pillar box to Britain. So, do you think you know Anthony Trollope? Test your knowledge with our Trollope bicentenary quiz.

The post How well do you know Anthony Trollope? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on How well do you know Anthony Trollope? as of 4/16/2015 4:05:00 PM
Add a Comment
21. The Oxford Etymologist gets down to brass tacks and tries to hit the nail on the head

I have always been interested in linguistic heavy metal. In the literature on English phrases, two “metal idioms” have attracted special attention: dead as a doornail and to get (come) down to brass tacks. The latter phrase has fared especially well; in recent years, several unexpected early examples of it have been unearthed.

The post The Oxford Etymologist gets down to brass tacks and tries to hit the nail on the head appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The Oxford Etymologist gets down to brass tacks and tries to hit the nail on the head as of 4/16/2015 4:05:00 PM
Add a Comment
22. Before Bram: a timeline of vampire literature

There were many books on vampires before Bram Stoker's Dracula. Early anthropologists wrote accounts of the folkloric vampire -- a stumbling, bloated peasant, never venturing far from home, and easily neutralized with a sexton’s spade and a box of matches. The literary vampire became a highly mobile, svelte aristocratic rake with the appearance of the short tale The Vampyre in 1819.

The post Before Bram: a timeline of vampire literature appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Before Bram: a timeline of vampire literature as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
23. Who was Leonardo da Vinci? [quiz]

On 15 April, nations around the globe will be celebrating World Art Day, which is also Leonardo da Vinci’s birthday. A creative mastermind and one of the top pioneers of the Italian Renaissance period, his artistic visions fused science and nature producing most notably the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper.

The post Who was Leonardo da Vinci? [quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Who was Leonardo da Vinci? [quiz] as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
24. Greece vs. the Eurozone

The new Greek government that took office in January 2015 made a commitment during the election campaign that Greece would stay in the Eurozone. At the same time, it also declared that Greece’s relations with its European partners would be put on a new footing. This did not materialize. The Greek government accepted the continuation of the existing agreement with its lenders, the International Monetary Fund, the European Commission, and the European Central Bank. This was the only way of ensuring Greece would not run out of funding.

The post Greece vs. the Eurozone appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Greece vs. the Eurozone as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
25. Capital flight from Africa and financing for development in the post-2015 era

The more money you make, the more you lose. That is the story of Africa over the past two decades. Indeed, along with the impressive record of economic growth acceleration spurred by booming primary commodity exports, Africa continent has experienced a parallel explosion of capital flight.

The post Capital flight from Africa and financing for development in the post-2015 era appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Capital flight from Africa and financing for development in the post-2015 era as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts