What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Recent Comments

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing Blog: OUPblog, Most Recent at Top
Results 1 - 25 of 5,958
Visit This Blog | Login to Add to MyJacketFlap
Blog Banner
Introducing brilliant authors to the blogosphere. The Official blog of Oxford University Press.
Statistics for OUPblog

Number of Readers that added this blog to their MyJacketFlap: 11
1. Back to the “stove front”: an oral history project about Cuban housewives

We recently asked you to tell us to send us your reflections, stories, and the difficulties you’ve faced while doing oral history. This week, we bring you another post in this series, focusing on an oral history project from Carmen Doncel and Henry Eric Hernández. We encourage you to to chime into the discussion, comment below or on our Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and G+ pages.

The post Back to the “stove front”: an oral history project about Cuban housewives appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Back to the “stove front”: an oral history project about Cuban housewives as of 9/4/2015 11:17:00 AM
Add a Comment
2. Hypertension: more fatal than essential

Hypertension (or high blood pressure) is a common condition worldwide, and is known to be one of the most important risk factors for strokes, and heart attacks. It is considered to affect almost a third of all adults over the age of 18.

The post Hypertension: more fatal than essential appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Hypertension: more fatal than essential as of 9/4/2015 8:17:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. Four myths about the status of women in the early church

There is a good deal of historical evidence for women’s leadership in the early church. But the references are often brief, and they’re scattered across centuries and locations. Two interpretations of the evidence have been common in the last forty years.

The post Four myths about the status of women in the early church appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Four myths about the status of women in the early church as of 9/4/2015 5:53:00 AM
Add a Comment
4. Health inequalities: what is to be done?

The research literature on health inequalities (health differences between different social groups) is growing almost every day. Within this burgeoning literature, it is generally agreed that the UK’s health inequalities (like those in many other advanced, capitalist economies) are substantial.

The post Health inequalities: what is to be done? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Health inequalities: what is to be done? as of 9/4/2015 5:53:00 AM
Add a Comment
5. Compassionate law: Are gay rights ever really a ‘non-issue’?

On his recent visit to Kenya, President Obama addressed the subject of sexual liberty. At a press conference with the Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, he spoke affectingly about the cause of gay rights, likening the plight of homosexuals to the anti-slavery and anti-segregation struggles in the United States.

The post Compassionate law: Are gay rights ever really a ‘non-issue’? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Compassionate law: Are gay rights ever really a ‘non-issue’? as of 9/4/2015 5:53:00 AM
Add a Comment
6. Between the stacks – Episode 26 – The Oxford Comment

Aside from announcing the start of another academic semester, September also marks an essential, if lesser-known, holiday celebrated since 1987: Library Card Sign-up Month. Once a year, the American Library Association (ALA)—working in conjunction with public libraries across the country—makes an effort to spotlight the essential services provided by libraries now and throughout history. But what, exactly, are the origins of the American public library? Moreover, at a time when government services are being pared down by state lawmakers, how have public libraries survived (and even thrived) in a time of economic downturn?

In this month’s episode, Sara Levine, Multimedia Producer for Oxford University Press, sat down to chat with Wayne A. Wiegand, author of Part of Our Lives: A People’s History of the American Public Library, New York City Librarian Emma Carbone, and Kyle Cassidy, creator of Alexandria Still Burns, a project featuring interviews with over one hundred librarians across America. From Benjamin Franklin’s Library Company of Philadelphia to the safe haven the Sweet Auburn Branch provided to African Americans, we explore America’s love affair with the public library, tracing its evolution alongside political, technological, and demographic shifts and its adaptation to our digital era.

Image Credit: “New York Public Library” by draelab. CC BY NC 2.0 via Flickr.

The post Between the stacks – Episode 26 – The Oxford Comment appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Between the stacks – Episode 26 – The Oxford Comment as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
7. Getting to know Celine in music marketing

Our New York office has welcomed a new assistant to our cubicle jungle. Celine Aenlle-Rocha joined the marketing team in August 2015 after recently graduating from college. We sat down with her to talk about publishing, New York, and sweaters.

The post Getting to know Celine in music marketing appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Getting to know Celine in music marketing as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
8. The reptiles of Thailand [interactive map]

Thailand is one of the most ecologically diverse countries in the world, housing more than 350 different species of reptiles. Learning about these turtles, tortoises, lizards, crocodiles, and snakes is more important than ever in light of recent threats to their extinction due to wildlife trade and loss of habitat for agricultural use of their habitat.

The post The reptiles of Thailand [interactive map] appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The reptiles of Thailand [interactive map] as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
9. Kuwait’s war on ISIS and DNA

Kuwait is changing the playing field. In early July, just days after the June 26th deadly Imam Sadiq mosque bombing claimed by ISIS, Kuwait ruled to instate mandatory DNA-testing for all permanent residents. This is the first use of DNA testing at the national-level for security reasons, specifically as a counter-terrorism measure. An initial $400 million dollars is set aside for collecting the DNA profiles of all 1.3 million citizens and 2.9 million foreign residents

The post Kuwait’s war on ISIS and DNA appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Kuwait’s war on ISIS and DNA as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
10. Etymology gleanings for August 2015

I received a question about the greatest etymologists’ active mastery of foreign languages. It is true, as our correspondent indicated, that etymologists have to cast their nets wide and refer to many languages, mainly old (the deader, the better). So would the masters of the age gone by have felt comfortable while traveling abroad, that is, not in the tenth but in the nineteenth century?

The post Etymology gleanings for August 2015 appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Etymology gleanings for August 2015 as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. Prepping for APSA 2015

This year’s American Political Science Association (APSA) Annual Meeting takes place September 3-6 in San Francisco, where over 6,000 of the world's foremost academic political scientists will gather for four days of lectures, sessions, networking, and scholarly discussion. This year’s theme, “Diversities Reconsidered”, promises to ignite intellectual discussion among all participants while still staying grounded in the current state of the nation’s political climate.

The post Prepping for APSA 2015 appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Prepping for APSA 2015 as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
12. How much do you know about Great Expectations? [Quiz]

Do you know your Magwitch from your Miss Havisham? Your Philip Pirrip from your Mr Pumblechook? Perhaps Dickens's best-loved work, Great Expectations features memorable characters such as the convict Magwitch, the mysterious Miss Havisham and her proud ward Estella, as Pip unravels the mystery of his benefactor and of his own heart.

The post How much do you know about Great Expectations? [Quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on How much do you know about Great Expectations? [Quiz] as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
13. “The discovery of a dead body”, extract from The Murder of William of Norwich

The discovery of the mutilated body of William of Norwich in 1144 soon sparked stories of a ritual murder performed by Jews that quickly spread beyond the walls of Norwich. E. M Rose examines the events surrounding the murder as well as the trial that followed the discovery of the body and launches a historical forensic analysis into the death.

The post “The discovery of a dead body”, extract from The Murder of William of Norwich appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on “The discovery of a dead body”, extract from The Murder of William of Norwich as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. Meta-analysis of animal studies: a solution to animal waste

Animal research has always attracted a lot of attention because it involves the welfare of animals being compromised. Given this pressure, you would expect that animal studies are performed according to the highest scientific standards; however, there are big methodological problems.

The post Meta-analysis of animal studies: a solution to animal waste appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Meta-analysis of animal studies: a solution to animal waste as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
15. Wrong again

Unlike fine wine, bad ideas don’t improve with age. One such idea is the Invest in Transportation Act, co-sponsored by Sens. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) and Rand Paul (R-KY), which would institute a temporary tax cut on profits brought back to the United States by American firms from their overseas operations and use the proceeds to fund investment in transportation infrastructure.

The post Wrong again appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Wrong again as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
16. Could a Supreme Court justice be president?

Bill Kristol, whose major political contribution to American public life is the national career of Sarah Palin, has another bright idea to free the Republican Party from the looming prospect of a Donald Trump presidential candidacy. The GOP, he writes, should turn to a dark horse from an unlikely source. After naming several long-shot contenders such as Mitch Daniels and Paul Ryan, Kristol essays the presidential equivalent of a two-handed shot from half court. Why not, he inquires, Justice Samuel Alito from the Supreme Court?

The post Could a Supreme Court justice be president? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Could a Supreme Court justice be president? as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
17. Is phantom limb pain all in one’s head?

Phantom limb pain is thought to result from changes in brain organisation. Recent evidence challenges this view, leaving this mysterious phenomenon unsolved.

The post Is phantom limb pain all in one’s head? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Is phantom limb pain all in one’s head? as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
18. Yorkshire: the birthplace of film?

Any assertions of ‘firsts’ in cinema are open invitations to rebuttal, but the BBC has recently broken news of a claim that the West Yorkshire city of Leeds was in fact film’s birthplace. Louis Le Prince, a French engineer who moved to Leeds in 1866, became one of a number of late 19th-century innovators entering the race to conceive, launch, and patent moving image cameras and projectors.

The post Yorkshire: the birthplace of film? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Yorkshire: the birthplace of film? as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
19. How well do you know the James Bond songs? [quiz]

Very soon now, we’ll find out who sings the next James Bond song. SPECTRE, the superspy’s twenty-fifth outing, will be coming out in the fall. But the song will be more like the thirtieth or so, depending on how you count.

The post How well do you know the James Bond songs? [quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on How well do you know the James Bond songs? [quiz] as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
20. Brand management in the internet age: new options, new concerns

Starting in 2012, ICANN revolutionized the internet with the release of a vast number of new top-level domain spaces. With the launch of over 1000 new spaces in the near future, simply registering your client’s business name in one or two extensions may not prove sufficient to reach their audiences.

The post Brand management in the internet age: new options, new concerns appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Brand management in the internet age: new options, new concerns as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
21. Is the glass half full or will trouble for lawyers prevail?

As new students dive into life as a 1L, recent graduates await their bar results and lawyers continue to soldier on in their ever-changing, ever-growing profession. Legal ethics scholar Deborah L. Rhode, author of The Trouble with Lawyers, and law professor Benjamin H. Barton, author of Glass Half Full, joined us to chat about a few hot topics in law.

The post Is the glass half full or will trouble for lawyers prevail? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Is the glass half full or will trouble for lawyers prevail? as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
22. Silencing Jean Louise: the media and Harper Lee

For a brief moment in July of 2015, the American news media exploded with headline stories about a work of literature, something of an unprecedented turn for the mass media. That this coverage should have focused almost exclusively on race issues and ignored the “new” volume’s revelations about gender issues in Lee’s novels is understandable. The explanation lies in the coincidence of the book’s publication with a series of wrenching racial events from Ferguson to Charleston and summarized in the “Black Lives Matter” campaign.

The post Silencing Jean Louise: the media and Harper Lee appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Silencing Jean Louise: the media and Harper Lee as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
23. Sects, witches, and wizards-from Pythagoreans to Kepler

To start a conversation based on mathematics may seem to some to be one of the tasks inevitably converging towards the plot-line of Mission Impossible. Well, certainly there are more pressing things that would occupy people’s minds, concerning international politics, the future of Europe, and the future of the Middle East. What’s new?

The post Sects, witches, and wizards-from Pythagoreans to Kepler appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Sects, witches, and wizards-from Pythagoreans to Kepler as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
24. Sexual exploitation and abuse by UN Peacekeepers

Sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) by UN peacekeepers is not fresh news. It has been going on for years. It first hit the headlines over ten years ago, and the scandal drove the UN to take action. Yet recent allegations over SEA by French peacekeepers in 2014 have brought the issue to the forefront again, and have motivated the UN Secretary-General to escalate the UN’s response to SEA in its peacekeeping operations.

The post Sexual exploitation and abuse by UN Peacekeepers appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Sexual exploitation and abuse by UN Peacekeepers as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
25. Wine around the world [infographic]

It’s a multi-million dollar global industry. It’s been with us since the dawn of civilization. And it’s constantly developing. The wine business is an intriguing marker of human activity – economic changes, consumer fashions, globalization, social and technological developments.

The post Wine around the world [infographic] appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Wine around the world [infographic] as of 9/4/2015 12:59:00 AM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts