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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: pictures, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 106
1. The Birds

The Birds (Gli Uccelli)  is a picture book I published with the now dormant publishing house Despina, based in Milan. Two printings were issued, which are both sold out. So, I’ve decided to put the whole book online, with a couple minor changes.

I hope you like it, and if you do, feel free to spread the word.

Thank you.

Sergio

Click here to open the PDF file: TheBirds

birds72_06

 

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2. Why we are outraged: the New York Post photo controvery

By Barbara Zelizer


A New York Post photographer snaps a picture of a man as he is pushed to his death in front of a New York City subway. An anonymous blogger photographs a dying American ambassador as he is carried to hospital after an attack in Libya. Multiple images following a shooting at the Empire State Building show its victims across both social media and news outlets. A little over three months, three events, three pictures, three circles of outrage.

The most recent event involved a freelancer working for the New York Post who captured an image of a frantic Queens native as he tried futilely to escape an approaching train. Depicting the man clinging to the subway platform as the train sped toward him, the picture appeared on the Post’s front cover. Within hours, observers began deriding both the photographer and the newspaper: the photographer, they said, should have helped the man and avoided taking a picture, while earlier photos by him were critiqued for being soft and of insufficient news value; the newspaper, they continued, should not have displayed the picture, certainly not on its front cover, and its low status as a tabloid was trotted out as an object of collective sneering.

We have heard debates like this before — when pictures surfaced surrounding the deaths of leaders in the Middle East, the slaying of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians, the shattering of those imperiled by numerous natural disasters, wars and acts of terror. Such pictures capture the agony of people facing their deaths, depicting the final moment of life in a way that draws viewers through a combination of empathy, voyeurism, and a recognition of sheer human anguish. But the debates that ensue over pictures of people about to die have less to do with the pictures, photographers or news publications that display them and more to do with the unresolved sentiments we have about what news pictures are for. Decisions about how best to accommodate pictures of impending death in the difficult events of the news inhabit a sliding rule of squeamishness, by which cries of appropriateness, decency and privacy are easily tossed about, but not always by the same people, for the same reasons or in any enduring or stable manner.

Pictures are powerful because they condense the complexity of difficult events into one small, memorable moment, a moment driven by high drama, public engagement, the imagination, the emotions and a sense of the contingent. No surprise, then, that what we feel about them is not ours alone. Responses to images in the news are complicated by a slew of moral, political and technological imperatives. And in order to show, see and engage with explicit pictures of death, impending or otherwise, all three parameters have to work in tandem: we need some degree of moral insistence to justify showing the pictures; we need political imperatives that mandate the importance of their being seen; and we need available technological opportunities that can easily facilitate their display. Though we presently have technology aplenty, our political and moral mandates change with circumstance. Consider, for instance, why it was okay to show and see Saddam Hussein about to die but not Daniel Pearl, to depict victims dying in the Asian tsunami but not those who jumped from the towers of 9/11. Suffice it to say that had the same picture of the New York City subway been taken in the 1940s, it would have generated professional acclaim, won awards, and become iconic.

At a time in which we readily see explicit images of death and violence all the time on television series, in fictional films and on the internet, we are troubled by the same graphic images in the news. We wouldn’t expect our news stories to keep from us the grisly details of difficult events out there in the world. We should expect no less from our news pictures.

Barbie Zelizer is the Raymond Williams Chair of Communication and the Director of the Scholars Program in Culture and Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of About to Die: How News Images Move the Public.  

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3. Why we are outraged: the New York Post photo controversy

By Barbie Zelizer


A New York Post photographer snaps a picture of a man as he is pushed to his death in front of a New York City subway. An anonymous blogger photographs a dying American ambassador as he is carried to hospital after an attack in Libya. Multiple images following a shooting at the Empire State Building show its victims across both social media and news outlets. A little over three months, three events, three pictures, three circles of outrage.

The most recent event involved a freelancer working for the New York Post who captured an image of a frantic Queens native as he tried futilely to escape an approaching train. Depicting the man clinging to the subway platform as the train sped toward him, the picture appeared on the Post’s front cover. Within hours, observers began deriding both the photographer and the newspaper: the photographer, they said, should have helped the man and avoided taking a picture, while earlier photos by him were critiqued for being soft and of insufficient news value; the newspaper, they continued, should not have displayed the picture, certainly not on its front cover, and its low status as a tabloid was trotted out as an object of collective sneering.

We have heard debates like this before — when pictures surfaced surrounding the deaths of leaders in the Middle East, the slaying of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians, the shattering of those imperiled by numerous natural disasters, wars and acts of terror. Such pictures capture the agony of people facing their deaths, depicting the final moment of life in a way that draws viewers through a combination of empathy, voyeurism, and a recognition of sheer human anguish. But the debates that ensue over pictures of people about to die have less to do with the pictures, photographers or news publications that display them and more to do with the unresolved sentiments we have about what news pictures are for. Decisions about how best to accommodate pictures of impending death in the difficult events of the news inhabit a sliding rule of squeamishness, by which cries of appropriateness, decency and privacy are easily tossed about, but not always by the same people, for the same reasons or in any enduring or stable manner.

Pictures are powerful because they condense the complexity of difficult events into one small, memorable moment, a moment driven by high drama, public engagement, the imagination, the emotions and a sense of the contingent. No surprise, then, that what we feel about them is not ours alone. Responses to images in the news are complicated by a slew of moral, political and technological imperatives. And in order to show, see and engage with explicit pictures of death, impending or otherwise, all three parameters have to work in tandem: we need some degree of moral insistence to justify showing the pictures; we need political imperatives that mandate the importance of their being seen; and we need available technological opportunities that can easily facilitate their display. Though we presently have technology aplenty, our political and moral mandates change with circumstance. Consider, for instance, why it was okay to show and see Saddam Hussein about to die but not Daniel Pearl, to depict victims dying in the Asian tsunami but not those who jumped from the towers of 9/11. Suffice it to say that had the same picture of the New York City subway been taken in the 1940s, it would have generated professional acclaim, won awards, and become iconic.

At a time in which we readily see explicit images of death and violence all the time on television series, in fictional films and on the internet, we are troubled by the same graphic images in the news. We wouldn’t expect our news stories to keep from us the grisly details of difficult events out there in the world. We should expect no less from our news pictures.

Barbie Zelizer is the Raymond Williams Chair of Communication and the Director of the Scholars Program in Culture and Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of About to Die: How News Images Move the Public.  

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4. Economix: How our Economy Works (And Doesn’t Work) in Words and Pictures


Economix: How our Economy Works (And Doesn’t Work) in Words and Pictures
Fantastic Piece on
BoingBoing!!









“Economics books usually bore me, but in the hands of Goodwin and Burr, the subject was engrossing (and like Gonick, often funny). Light switches flicked on in my mind every few pages or so, and after reading Economix I felt like I understood many fundamental aspects about the way the world works that I had been too lazy to learn about before…
Economix is a book I'm going to buy and give to people.”
427,976 UVM!

About the book
Stimulus plans: good or bad? Free markets: How free are they? Jobs: Can we afford them? Occupy Wall Street . . . worldwide!
Everybody’s talking about the economy, but how can we, the people, understand what Wall Street or Washington knows—or say they know? Read Economix.
With clear, witty writing and quirky, accessible art, this important and timely graphic novel transforms “the dismal science” of economics into a fun, fact-filled story about human nature and our attempts to make the most of what we’ve got . . . and sometimes what our neighbors have got. Economix explains it all, from the beginning of Western economic thought, to markets free and otherwise, to economic failures, successes, limitations, and future possibilities. It’s the essential, accessible guide to understanding the economy and economic practices. A must-read for every citizen and every voter.





PRAISE FOR ECONOMIX“Goodwin brilliantly contextualizes economic theories with historical narrative, while Burr’s simple but elegant illustration employs classical techniques like caricaturing politicians and symbolizing big businesses (as a gleeful factory) to help the reader visualize difficult concepts.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Having never taken economics in college, I find the world of high finance needlessly complicated and confusing. Thankfully Michael Goodwin saw the need for a basic primary on how the economy currently works and how we got here. A text like this would certainly help high school and college students gain their first taste of financial literacy and it comes recommended for the rest of us.” —ComicMix.com

“It’s simply phenomenal. You could read ten books on the subject and not glean as much information.”
— David Bach founder of FinishRich Media; author of nine New York Times bestsellers, including Debt Free for Life and The Automatic Millionaire











“Goodwin has done the seemingly impossible—he has made economics comprehensible andfunny.”

— Joel Bakan, author of The CorporationThe Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power

“An amazing lesson in true-world economics! Delightfully presented, powerful, insightful, and important information! What a fun way to fathom a deep and often dark subject!”



— John Perkins, author of Hoodwinked and the New York Times bestseller Confessions of an Economic Hit Man

“Smart, insightful, clear, and as close to the truth as economics can get. The bonus: Who would have guessed that economics could be fun, and—here's the joy—really accessible? Goodwin roots us in history and fills us with common sense understanding. As he puts it early on, economics seems horribly complicated mostly because we're looking at it all at once. Broken down into its component pieces, it's relatively easy to understand. And a good understanding of economics is critical to maneuvering in the world today. If I were compiling a list of the 100 most important books you can read in a lifetime, this would be on it.”

Stephen Petranek, editor-in-chief, Weider History magazines, former editor-in-chief ofDiscover magazine

“Through a potent mix of comics and punchy, concise, accessible prose, Goodwin takes us on a provocative, exhaustively researched, and exceedingly engaging trip through our history and present day, creating an alternately hilarious and scary picture of where we are today as an economy— and what it all means. More than that, Goodwin makes the arcane, understandable. If your mind either spins or slumbers at the thought of economics, read Goodwin's Economix and all will become clear. 




Nomi Prins, author of It Takes a Pillage: An Epic Tale of Power, Deceit, and Untold Trillions

Economix is a lively, cheerfully opinionated romp through the historical and intellectual foundations of our current economy and our current economic problems. Goodwin has a knack for distilling complex ideas and events in ways that invite the reader to follow the big picture without losing track of what actually happened. Any reader wondering how our economy got to where it is today will find this a refreshing overview.”
Timothy W. Guinnane, Philip Golden Bartlett Professor of Economic History, Yale University


About the author
Michael Goodwin is a writer and editor with a degree in Chinese studies. He has lived in China, India, and now New York City. Dan E. Burr illustrated the classic graphic novel Kings in Disguise. He lives in Milwaukee.

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5. Little Tug Spotting with Stephen Savage

This morning Little Tug author Stephen Savage went 'Tug Spotting' for footage for the upcoming book trailer for Little Tug (on sale October 2!).

Check out Stephen's pictures and captions from this morning's tug spotting boat ride!

 

 

July 12, 2012: Macmillan Children's Publishing Group Director of Marketing Elizabeth Fithian took us on a tug-spotting boat ride.

 

Our fearless captain was Elizabeth's dad, Dick Kohn (middle). Also on board was video director David Franklin...

 

... and me, Stephen Savage -- author and illustrator of LITTLE TUG (Roaring Brook Press, Neal Porter Books).

 


The sun rose at 5:36am.

 

Hey, that looks like a page from the book!

 

Well... sorta.

 

The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, which connects Brooklyn with Staten Island, was the model for the bridge in the book.

 

David shot video footage for the upcoming tug trailer.

 

At 8:30, the beautiful morning light was gone and Captain Kohn returned to shore!

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6. BEA Books

Well here is the post with the pictures of books that I snagged at BEA. I have a few duplicates that I will be giving away within the next couple of weeks. Right now I have The Darkest Minds contest going on so make sure to enter that. The next contest going up will be Magisterium by Jeff Hirsch who wrote The Eleventh Plague. It's not signed. If I grabbed a book, I generally didn't stand on line for signings, because you get another book and well, carrying said books gets really heavy. I did bring a suitcase and checked it in so I could dump books when it became the shoulder bags became so heavy.


One thing about this year at BEA was the amount of finished copies I received. Usually the pubs just give away ARCs or bound galleys, but as you can see from the far left column of books, I have seven finished copies. Yeah, they're very heavy.


Um, yeah, these stacks are crazy. As you can tell I cut off the top not willingly, but because I just couldn't get the stacks all in one picture! The far right column of books are the giveaway books. Hubby actually came up with a good idea and said I should've created a list of books that I grabbed and crossed it off so I wouldn't end up with duplicates. But in all honesty, it's easy to forget what book you took and what you thought you took. Hence, the ending up with duplicates or even triplicates! (Which kinda sucks because, yeah, I have to carry them!)


Here's a better picture of the stacks. Some of my favorite books that I got are Fallen Kingdoms, The Farm, Shadows, Crewel, Throne of Glass, For Darkness Shows the Stars, The Darkest Minds, Altered, Eve & Adam. I made sure to pick out some books for my 8 yo as well. They had so many middle grade books just for the taking that I really couldn't pass that up. To see her face when I brought them home was priceless. I also picked her up a HUGE Reeses Peanut Butter Cup from the Hershey Store. ONE POUND of chocolate peanut butter goodness. When I say that it is huge, I am not lying!

BEA was a blast and I had so much fun meeting up with bloggers that I tweet with and having people recognize my blog was just incredibly humbling. I was invited to so many after parties or breakfasts. I would really have to say meeting my publishing contacts was really awesome. Putting a face to a name really makes them more human and not just an e-mail. I was so excited to meet my Little Brown contact at the SoHo Press party and when she told me she knew my blog and she worked for LB, I knew exactly who she was. I had a great time meeting her roommate and her neighbor, who I've been told is a fantastic cook (I've already invited myself over for dinner! :-p).
<

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7. Thank you. :o)


Remember my blogging workshop at the Filipinas Heritage Library? The picture above is with about half of the participants. I'd like to take this opportunity to thank all of the participants. I really enjoyed meeting new people and talking about blogging and other social media!

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8. My heart is so full.

Now to make my bookshelves just as full. :o)

By the way, click here to see where I got the picture above. It goes with a nice little rant about how a lot of people forget the diversity in Asia.

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9. Oldies, but Goldie's (Where are we heading now?)

Reviews 
Picture Books
  1. Wild About Books- This picture book is written by Judy Sierra and illustrated by Marc Brown. It won the E.B White Read Aloud Award in 2005. It was published by Alfred A. Knopf in August 2004. It is a great book to read aloud both in the classroom and at bed time. What happens when librarian Molly McGrew by mistake drove her bookmobile into the zoo. All the animals end up having fun borrowing her books. The illustrations are wonderful and the story brings your child into a world where animals read books and the adventures they have doing so. The animals also discover reading. This is probably one of my favorite books. It will be a great read for any child or adult. I highly recommend it to be available in any school library. 
  2. Flotsam- This book was illustrated by David Wiesner. It won the Caldecott Medal in 2007. It was published by Clarion Books in 2006. This book uses only illustrations to tell a wonderful story. The main character is a boy spending time on a beach. The boy's story is told through pictures that flow smoothly. He discovers an old camera with film in it. It seems the pictures had traveled in the ocean for a very long time. It is a great book for children because each illustration tells its own story. It also proofs that picture books do not necessary need words to tell a wonderful story. 
  3. MoonPowder- This book was written and illustrated by John Rocco a very good friend of mine. It was published by Hyperion Books for Children. It came out in 2008. This book is the story about Eli Treebuckler who is known for fixing everything. Then one day the Moonpowder factory is on the blink and he is the only that can fix it. The question is will he get there on time. This book is full of wonderful illustrations and a fantastic story. This is a great book to read to your child at bedtime. It covers topics like dreams and nightmares. It also takes Eli on a amazing journey to save the Moonpowder factory. I believe it will also take your children there.          
Middle Readers
  1. Charmed Life- This book was written by Diana Wynne Jones. It was published by Macmillian Children's Books in 1977. This is the story about two siblings a boy named Eric who has no talent with magic and Gwendolyn   who is a gifted witch with astonishing powers, it suits her enormously when she is taken to live in Chrestomanci Castle. This is the home of a great enchanter. However, life with his family is not what either of the children expects and sparks start to fly. This is a charming story that is probably like the Harry Potter of it's day. Even though it came out over thirty years ago it can still be viewed in our day. It has a great story that any middle grader interested in magic and fantasy  could enjoy. I highly recommend this book for them. 
  2. Over Sea, Under Stone- This book was written by Susan Cooper. It was published in 1965 by Simon and Schuster and came out again in 2000 from Aladdin paperback. This book is the first in the Dark is Rising Sequence. When three siblings go on holiday to Cornwall they find an ancient manuscript which sends them on a dangerous quest for a grail that would reveal the true story of King Arthur and entraps them in a battle b

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10. David Thorne Imitates Justin Bieber’s Hair Tour

In an effort to raise money for Japanese earthquake relief, singer Justin Bieber sent a lock of his hair on tour and fans around the country have paid $1 to take a picture with it. Mimicking the young pop star, author David Thorne has sent a lock of his own hair on a bookstore tour.

Thorne’s editor, Michael Solana, explained in the release: “Thorne declared war on Justin Bieber last month with his site HelpMeSellMoreBooksThanJustinBieber.com. A 10-city tour of his hair was kind of inevitable.”

Thorne’s hair will spend three days in each store. For every location that hosts the Thorne lock, Penguin Group (USA)’s Tarcher/Penguin will donate $200 to the National Children’s Cancer Society.

continued…

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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11. Latest Filipino Book Bloggers Meetup

Yesterday was the latest Filipino Book Bloggers meetup. As always, I learned a lot from my fellow book lovers/bloggers and was amazed by the range of diversity in the blogosphere! Here are a few pictures from the meetup. Hope to see you at the next one!








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12. A KinderScares-ian slip, and other bits of randomness

Since becoming literate, our eldest has enthusiastically joined in on the practice of spelling things she doesn't want her little brother to overhear. The other day in the car she asked us, "Can we go to the m-a-u-l?"

Luckily we were only gobsmacked for a minute before figuring it out. "No. And 'mall' is spelled m-a-l-l."

Too many monster stories on the brain, I guess.

In other news, do you remember the Heck series, by Dale E. Basye? Well the fourth book, Fibble: The Fourth Circle of Heck, is due to come out on May 24! That's mere days away! And, well...it was on the shelf when we were at the bookstore yesterday, so you may not even have to wait those few days. The argument over who gets to read it first at our house will probably last until at least the 24th, though.

Last but not least, here's a bashful beast to maul you with cuteness:

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13. Foldabots Comic Book Launch



I celebrated Free Comic Book Day by attending the launch of the first comic compilation of the Foldabots series by Jomike Tejido (who, by the way, continues to amaze me with how well he gets along with kids).







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14. Hats off to the Class of 2011!

Congratulations to all of the graduates in the Class of 2011! I bet you thought you'd never get here. Hats off to you for your accomplishment and best wishes in your future endeavors where ever they may lead you.



I remember being in middle school and counting ahead to the year when I would graduate. It seemed so far in the future. Now, I look back and it seems so far in the past. Why, when I graduated in 1885...errrr, I mean 1985, the members of the class of 2011 weren't even a twinkle in their parents' eyes.



Even though Tera already posted a link to old photos of me, I'll go ahead and toss some up.

Here I am last year when I visited "the hill," where Pike Liberal Art School sits in Troy, Alabama. The campus has changed quite a bit, but there was still the same familiar feel on the soil that I walked for twelve years.

DSC_0389

Here's my senior portrait. Keep in mind, this was back in the days when thick eyebrows and girl mullets were the fashion. LOL!

scan0003

I had twenty-eight (28) people in my senior class. We were a really tight-knit group through our years together from first grade until twelth. It seemed as if our world would end being "busted up," but so many people have gone on to wonderful lives. Careers that include, the military, lawyer, policeman, several school teachers, nurses, and even a district judge! Then there's little old me...the published author. Who'd a thunk it? LOL!

Here's our senior portfolio. I'm on the top line because I was a class officer. This is hanging in the hallway at my alma mater, along with all of the other classes. (Check out the big hair on everyone!) Sadly, there's a prayer hand notation on one of my classmates who passed away.

DSC_0360

Actually, when I left high school for The University of Alabama, I had planned on getting a degree in psychology and then going forward into medical school. That all changed after my freshman year at Bama when I my creative juices took over in my communication and writing classes and I longed to go into marketing/advertising/public relations. Now *that's* a switch!

That's the great thing about this time in your life. You can change your mind. You can try on dreams and ideas and see what fit. The only thing that matters is that you discover who you are...and who you want to be...and don't let anyone or anything hold you back from your dream, whatever it may be.

So...congrats to the class of 2011! I wish you success and happiness!

Hugs,
Marley = )

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15. Wow, how time flies.

Remember when I decided to take a long break from teaching back in 2006? Remember when I decided last year to take a break from work in general? Well, I'm back! =D I'm teaching English again - to children and teens at the Obelisk International Learning Hub and to adult learners at the Ateneo Language Learning Center (ALLC).

I'd like to share some pictures of my BEAUTIFUL colleagues and students at the ALLC. =D








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16. In My Mailbox: The Scholastic Dinner Edition

Every Sunday through the In My Mailbox meme, YA book bloggers share the books they recently bought, borrowed, or received!


Friday night, Joyce Bautista, trade manager of Scholastic Philippines, and Roselle Masirag, education and trade manager of Scholastic Philippines, hosted a dinner for Filipino book bloggers.


I was glad to meet some Filipino book bloggers for the first time, namely: Ronald of RonReads, Leia of Bitter Pills & Breathing Spaces, and Meann of New Worlds.




Of course, I was glad to see my blog friends again! <3

Aaron of Guy Gone Geek


Tina of One More Page

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17. Whoa, it exists.


One picture with two of my favorite things: children's books and K-pop!

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18. Happy Philippine Children's Book Day!!!

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19. With my students from. . .


Japan, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Thailand, and East Timor! :o)

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20. So what do English teachers do for fun?

They eat good food.







They visit cemeteries where revolutionaries used to secretly meet.



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21. More Studentsssssss



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22. (Nearly) Wordless Wednesday: My Mommy :o)


I have the most beautiful mommy in the world. <3 She was a beauty queen and model for many years!

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23. The SCBWI Photoblog!

Have you been taking great photos of your friends at the New York conference? Post them to the first-ever photoblog.

It's easy:

From a mobile phone, share your photos via email by sending them to:

zeoliazb565@tumblr.com

(The body text of the email will become the caption, not the subject.)

Or, from a computer, click here!
Enjoy the photos, and (to be read in the voice of a stern mother) use your best judgment when you post.

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24. Winter Conference has started ( An insider's look).

Day 2 SCBWI 13 annual winter conference In the Big Apple.

       Wow, can't believe another day had just passed. It was an over whelming one full of lots of enlightenment and good news on all genres from picture books to young adults and beyond. I will try to put In the important information in here in a a few paragraphs. I have 11 pages of notes but will try to make it brief.
   It was a list of amazing guest speakers which included authors, agents, editors, publishers and other people involved in the business. The day started with breakfast, and the first keynote speaker was Chris Crutcher. He was a very inspiring speaker, that inspired the room that represented 49 states and 20 countries. The conference had 1400 people. He spoke about the importance of balancing out stories with tragedy and comedy. Here is a brief list to inspire you guys of what he talked about 1) Look into your life to find information 2) Put this into every story you write. 3) Power and connection of family is important. 4) Just write your story. 5) Hear it in your language and voice.
     The next speakers was panel children book pros which included two editor directors, a marketing person and agent. They covered lots of information, but I will l.limit the list to three basic important ideas.
1) Independent Book stores are growing 2) Picture Books are not dead 3) The Digital publishing market is expanding. In general now is a good time to get your book out there in the publishing industry. You also must understand that it takes a village to make a book. That it is important to also work as a team on each book.
    Our next speaker was a great surprise for all of us. It was Henry Whinkler. He was one of the best speeches of the day. He got a standing ovation today. He only spoke for ten minutes, but his ideas, comedy and inspiration touched us all.
     We then broke up into small groups I went to a fantasy meeting first. Then after lunch I had  two picture book small groups. Before the two afternoon sessions we had another key note speaker her name was Cassandra Clare she spoke of Love triangles and forbidden love in YA adult books. She was interesting speaker but not very inspiring to me, since it was not my kind of topic.
    I will just list the basic things of what editors are looking for in picture book manuscripts:
1) Characterization 2) Narrative guilty 3) Voice 4) Humor 5) Universal appeal. 6) Clear ideas and simplicity.
       In conclusion, the day ended with a wonderful cocktail party, and dinner that gave us two hours to network with other people in the industry. The day ended, and I got back on the train home full of inspiration, new ideas and hope for the future of children's books. There is now one more day left for this conference that I look forward to tomorrow.  I will make my last post this month called All great things come to an end.  
  

                        

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25. In case you need a moment of zen today...

...thought I'd share some sweet little faces with you to oooh and ahhhh over.


Bath time always leads to nap time.


But Mommy, I want to wear the sunglasses!


The orange side of Madison.


Driver's assistant, Boo Bear!


One of Madi's favorite napping spots.

Hugs,
Marley = )

www.marleygibson.com
www.ghosthuntress.com

Ghosts don't hang up their sheets after Halloween!
GHOST HUNTRESS series - The Awakening, The Guidance,
The Reason, The Counseling - available now!

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