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1. Dinotopia Exhibition coming to Connecticut




Next month, the Stamford Museum and Nature Center will host a major Dinotopia exhibition.



There will be over 50 original paintings from several of the books, including Dinosaur Parade, Waterfall City, and Dinosaur Boulevard. The artwork is completely different from the Lyman Allyn show a few years ago.
The show will also include preliminary sketches, reference maquettes, and several dinosaur fossils.
I will be in attendance for a few special events:

Farm to Table Supper with Chef Tim LaBant
Saturday February 28, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM

Enjoy a casual, rustic winter supper in the warmth of the Bendel Mansion featuring Tim LaBant, Owner/Chef of the Schoolhouse at Cannondale. Guests will begin with cocktails and artisanal hors d’oeuvres in the Museum Galleries with artist James Gurney who will provide a tour of the Dinotopia galleries, with stories behind the paintings. Here's the link for tickets.

Fantasy Drawing Workshop with James Gurney
Sunday, March 1, 2015, 1:00-3:00
Leonhardt Gallery in the Stamford Museum

James Gurney will present a digital slide program and a hands-on drawing workshop for artists of all levels of experience. Gurney will demonstrate the water-soluble colored pencil techniques he uses for many of his observational and imaginative sketches. Participants will get a chance to try out the watercolor pencils as they draw dinosaur models and still life objects. The workshop will take place in one of the exhibition galleries. Materials will be provided. The class size is extremely limited. Link for more info.

Book signing and public presentation
Sunday, March 1, 2015, 3:30-4:30
Leonhardt Gallery in the Stamford Museum

After the private workshop, all museum guests are invited to meet the author/artist. Mr. Gurney will offer a mini-lecture about the making of Dinotopia, followed by a book signing. Copies of Gurney's Dinotopia editions and art instruction books Imaginative Realism and Color and Light will be available at the gift shop.
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Stamford Museum and Nature Center
Farm to table sign-up


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2. Products, Props and Tools

Products, props and tools-01 Products, props and tools-02

Here are some examples of my vector renderings for specific products, props or tools. I love rendering objects just as much as I love creating characters and telling stories. There is nothing better than getting into the fine detail of a rivet or a bolt.

It is so much fun to simplify the shapes and then make those shapes come to life with gradients and transparency.

      

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3. Welcome To Post No. 81

It's interesting that France and Germany have been in the top five sources for views of CBO.  Germany tends to drop off and back to 4th, 5th or 6th place while France has at times exceeded views from the United States or United Kingdom.

But though France seems to be providing a steady source of CBO views Bulgaria has gradually been creeping up the positions so that, today (it's 1325 hrs here in the UK) it is the country producing the highest number of hits.  Yes, Bulgaria is Number 1 in the CBO chart!

Thank you, Bulgaria.


Our good friends at Lambiek (which you should really all be checking out) provided a guide, albeit brief,to Bulgarian comicshere: http://www.lambiek.net/comics/bulgarian.htm

What comics, if any, are being published in Bulgaria today I have no idea.  I do know that in Sofia there is Elephant Bookstore (? if I remember correctly) and a comic museum opened in 2014 -I hope I'm remembering this all correctly as I have too much junk in my head.

Bulgaria -YOU NEED BLACK TOWER COMICS!  That or a company to reprint them under licence!

So, welcome, Bulgaria and if there is comic media news you would like to see more of on CBO get in touch.  Or want people to know about your comics?  I'm an easy going guy!

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4. Emoticons

Sammet_emoticons-01

Don't you just love giving emotions to animals? I do. This little guy has been displayed hundreds of times.

      

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5. This Book Just Ate My Dog - a bookwrap




Unwrapping...




Authored and illustrated by Richard Byrne and appropriate for ages 3-6.



Let's totally toss away the wrap and peek inside...































Bella decides to take her dog out for a nice, peaceful stroll.  Together they saunter across the page but low and behold she makes it across but her dog mysteriously disappears into the gutter of the book.  Oh my. Bella is puzzled and confused.  How can that be?  How can she find her dog and get him back?  Along comes Bella's friend Ben and when he asks her what's up she tells him  "this book just at my dog." Story on......

It's Ben to the rescue, or so he thinks!  In his attempt to get to the source of the mystery, he too vaporizes into the gutter.  Oh my! Along come the first responders to try their luck and guess what?  Yep, in they go too.  Finally Bella, the last character standing, has had enough and, ... ooooh noooo!!! Gone!  

This clever, smart girl then realizes how hopeless she and her commrads are, so brilliantly she tosses a note to the reader to please help them out (literally). Will the readers take her seriously?  Can they possibility bring the characters back from the gutter safely?

This ingenious, interactive book makes the reader part of the story.  How fun is that?  Kids will love to be the super heroes and save the day!  The illustrations are kid-friendly and engaging.  "The Book Just Ate My Dog" is a wonderful twist on the phrase...the dog just ate my homework. Both young and old will get a kick out of this delightful tale.






Born in a hospital. Brought up in Brighton. Learnt to colour-in in Eastbourne. Worked in graphic design. Worked in Brighton, London, Manchester and Yorkshire Hills. Worked for myself. Met Philippa somewhere along the way. Had two children. Had the mid life crisis. Bought my first guitar. Got the urge to create a children’s book. Got an agent. Got a book deal. Got another book deal. Got to Chichester.
Got to go. Bye for now.

Reach me…



Read on and read always!

It's a wrap.

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6. Kin selection, group selection and altruism: a controversy without end?

I recall a dinner conversation at a symposium in Paris that I organized in 2010, where a number of eminent evolutionary biologists, economists and philosophers were present. One of the economists asked the biologists why it was that whenever the topic of “group selection” was brought up, a ferocious argument always seemed to ensue. The biologists pondered the question. Three hours later the conversation was still stuck on group selection, and a ferocious argument was underway.

Group selection refers to the idea that natural selection sometimes acts on whole groups of organisms, favoring some groups over others, leading to the evolution of traits that are group-advantageous. This contrasts with the traditional ‘individualist’ view which holds that Darwinian selection usually occurs at the individual level, favoring some individual organisms over others, and leading to the evolution of traits that benefit individuals themselves. Thus, for example, the polar bear’s white coat is an adaptation that evolved to benefit individual polar bears, not the groups to which they belong.

The debate over group selection has raged for a long time in biology. Darwin himself primarily invoked selection at the individual level, for he was convinced that most features of the plants and animals he studied had evolved to benefit the individual plant or animal. But he did briefly toy with group selection in his discussion of social insect colonies, which often function as highly cohesive units, and also in his discussion of how self-sacrificial (‘altruistic’) behaviours might have evolved in early hominids.

In the 1960s and 1970s, the group selection hypothesis was heavily critiqued by authors such as G.C. Williams, John Maynard Smith, and Richard Dawkins. They argued that group selection was an inherently weak evolutionary mechanism, and not needed to explain the data anyway. Examples of altruism, in which an individual performs an action that is costly to itself but benefits others (e.g. fighting an intruder), are better explained by kin selection, they argued. Kin selection arises because relatives share genes. A gene which causes an individual to behave altruistically towards its relatives will often be favoured by natural selection—since these relatives have a better than random chance of also carrying the gene. This simple piece of logic tallies with the fact that empirically, altruistic behaviours in nature tend to be kin-directed.

Strangely, the group selection controversy seems to re-emerge anew every generation. Most recently, Harvard’s E.O. Wilson, the “father of sociobiology” and a world-expert on ant colonies, has argued that “multi-level selection”—essentially a modern version of group selection—is the best way to understand social evolution. In his earlier work, Wilson was a staunch defender of kin selection, but no longer; he has recently penned sharp critiques of the reigning kin selection orthodoxy, both alone and in a 2010 Nature article co-authored with Martin Nowak and Corina Tarnita. Wilson’s volte-face has led him to clash swords with Richard Dawkins, who says that Wilson is “just wrong” about kin selection and that his most recent book contains “pervasive theoretical errors.” Both parties point to eminent scientists who support their view.

What explains the persistence of the controversy over group and kin selection? Usually in science, one expects to see controversies resolved by the accumulation of empirical data. That is how the “scientific method” is meant to work, and often does. But the group selection controversy does not seem amenable to a straightforward empirical resolution; indeed, it is unclear whether there are any empirical disagreements at all between the opposing parties. Partly for this reason, the controversy has sometimes been dismissed as “semantic,” but this is too quick. There have been semantic disagreements, in particular over what constitutes a “group,” but this is not the whole story. For underlying the debate are deep issues to do with causality, a notoriously problematic concept, and one which quickly lands one in philosophical hot water.

All parties agree that differential group success is common in nature. Dawkins uses the example of red squirrels being outcompeted by grey squirrels. However, as he intuitively notes, this is not a case of genuine group selection, as the success of one group and the decline of another was a side-effect of individual level selection. More generally, there may be a correlation between some group feature and the group’s biological success (or “fitness”); but like any correlation, this need not mean that the former has a direct causal impact on the latter. But how are we to distinguish, even in theory, between cases where the group feature does causally influence the group’s success, so “real” group selection occurs, and cases where the correlation between group feature and group success is “caused from below”? This distinction is crucial; however it cannot even be expressed in terms of the standard formalisms that biologists use to describe the evolutionary process, as these are statistical not causal. The distinction is related to the more general question of how to understand causality in hierarchical systems that has long troubled philosophers of science.

Recently, a number of authors have argued that the opposition between kin and multi-level (or group) selection is misconceived, on the grounds that the two are actually equivalent—a suggestion first broached by W.D. Hamilton as early as 1975. Proponents of this view argue that kin and multi-level selection are simply alternative mathematical frameworks for describing a single evolutionary process, so the choice between them is one of convention not empirical fact. This view has much to recommend it, and offers a potential way out of the Wilson/Dawkins impasse (for it implies that they are both wrong). However, the equivalence in question is a formal equivalence only. A correct expression for evolutionary change can usually be derived using either the kin or multi-level selection frameworks, but it does not follow that they constitute equally good causal descriptions of the evolutionary process.

This suggests that the persistence of the group selection controversy can in part be attributed to the mismatch between the scientific explanations that evolutionary biologists want to give, which are causal, and the formalisms they use to describe evolution, which are usually statistical. To make progress, it is essential to attend carefully to the subtleties of the relation between statistics and causality.

Image Credit: “Selection from Birds and Animals of the United States,” via the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

The post Kin selection, group selection and altruism: a controversy without end? appeared first on OUPblog.

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7. Sunrise

0 Small Dog's House Cover-01

I love rendering weather scenes. This is just one of many images of mine that incorporates a specific weather or time-of-day. You can probably tell that the clouds were pure delight to create. I find silhouettes to be important for any scene. The negative spaces and shapes formed with the silhouette can either help or hinder the visual communication.

      

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8. The Art and Death of the Thank You

This is really more of a personal rant than a business post, but it's my blog so, hey, why not.

What happened to thank you notes? Is it just me or are they getting more and more rare, almost nonexistent?

I tend to really like the written or snail mailed thank you. Sometimes I take the effort to hand write a note, other times I use an app service like Postagram to mail a postcard thank you with a photo and personal message. It's rare that I'll write an email or social media thank you, but that does happen as well. Now I'm not saying I'm perfect. Sure there are times I've forgotten or neglected to send a thank you, but I think I get it done more often than not.

I don't expect anyone to be as nuts about thank you notes as me, but there are certain times I do, in no uncertain terms, expect a thank you. Recently I sent gifts for the following occasions and received no acknowledgment; a wedding, a baby shower, and birthday parties in which the gifts were shuttled to another room and opened after the guests left. In all of those cases I took the time and spent the money to choose a gift I thought the recipient would like. Don't I deserve a thank you?

Anyway, I think it's common courtesy to send a thank you of some sort, even if it's a message in my Facebook inbox, and I'm a little annoyed by those who don't make the effort, mostly in the case of the events I listed above. But maybe I'm just an old fuddy-duddy.

--jhf




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9. My tweets

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10. A rubric!!

Hi everyone,

If you thought my last post about judging writing contests was helpful, check out what this amazing writer did with the information! She made a rubric!! :)

http://www.shannonrigney.com/2015/01/28/fun-with-rubrics/

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11. Signing books

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12. Black Tower Overseas Licensing?

Posting no. 82 for January -happy Bob?

As 2015 is going to be my last fully active year in comics -though, like Bond, I never say "never again"- I need to make some money.  Seriously, if any overseas publisher is interested in publishing Black Tower books under licence then please get in touch -derails in the About section at the top of page.

Remember that BTCG books are black and white and I do NOT provide a translation service.

I've been asked a couple of times about an interview well, my usual objections I'm throwing aside for this year so....

That's it.  Now I need to go draw!

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13. Happy Puzzle Day!

The word is out...

Our next installment in The Poetry Friday Anthology series will be published in March! And to whet your appetite for The Poetry Friday Anthology for Celebrations, here is the poem for January 29 (today!):

And here are the Take 5! activities that accompany this poem:
Sample puzzle from National Geographic.com/games
1. Hold up a single piece from a (jigsaw) puzzle and ask children to guess what it is from. Then read this poem aloud slowly.
2. Invite everyone to join in on the final line (“a puzzling scene”) while you read the poem aloud again.
3. Just for fun, work together to complete an online jigsaw puzzle. One source: NationalGeographic.com/games/photo-puzzle-jigsaw/
4. Pair this poem with this picture book: Hide-and-Seek Science: Animal Camouflage (Holiday House, 2013) by Emma Stevenson, and guide children in finding the hidden animals within each ecosystem to celebrate National Puzzle Day.
5. For another poem about 100 things, look for the poem “My 100th Day Collection” by Betsy Franco (mid-January to mid-February, pages 38-39) and for riddle and puzzle poems, check out Kindergarten Kids: Riddles, Rebuses, Wiggles, Giggles, and More! by Stephanie Calmenson (HarperCollins, 2005).

In a nutshell, The Poetry Friday Anthology for Celebrations offers:
  • 156 new, unpublished poems by 115 poets
  • poems tied to holidays, celebrations, historic events, and wacky occasions across the calendar year
  • all the poems in both English and Spanish
  • Take 5! activities for sharing every poem with children
  • every poem paired with a picture book to read aloud for a story time or lesson plan
  • skill connections (for CCSS, TEKS, and NCSS)
  • poems appropriate for children preK-5 (and beyond)

Pre-order your copy today here. And for more info go here.


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14. Thumbs down to THE MAYFLOWER by Mark Greenwood

In July of 2014, Holiday House released The Mayflower written by Mark Greenwood. Illustrated by his wife, Frane Lessac, some people think it is a contender for the Caldecott. I sure hope not, but America loves its birth narratives and many segments of America refuse to see it in a balanced or accurate light.

Greenwood and Lessac provide that same romantic story, as shown on these pages (source: https://wondersinthedark.wordpress.com/2014/11/27/caldecott-medal-contender-the-mayflower/). Here's Squanto:


And of course, that meal:



For further reading:



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15. Candice Ransom's LOOKING FOR HOME - a trespassing journey


Fellow Hollins professor, prolific author, and dear friend Candice Ransom has achieved a new and somewhat unexpected (to her) achievement... Longwood University has established a collection of her photos in their Greenwood Library's Digital Commons website. The reason being, Candice has an unusual hobby - taking photos of abandoned places, which usually requires a bit of trespassing to accomplish. The results are gorgeous - she's a natural photographer. And she wrote a lovely essay to accompany her photos. I adore her work and I know you will too, so GO HAVE A LOOK! And CLICK HERE to read more about how this all came to pass on her blog, Under the Honeysuckle Vine. (It's delightful reading.)

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16. 10 New Writers Sign On to Write For Chipotle Cups And Bags

chipotlebagsChipotle Mexican Grill has recruited ten new writers to contribute pieces for its “Cultivating Thought” line.

Jonathan Safran Foer returns to serve as both curator and editor. The participants include Neil Gaiman, Aziz Ansari, Augusten Burroughs, Walter Isaacson, Amy Tan, Paulo Coelho, Carlos Ruiz Zafon, Barbara Kingsolver, Julia Alverez and Jeffrey Eugenides. The company’s cups and bags will feature short stories and illustrations.

Gaiman announced on his Facebook page that his piece focuses on “refugees and the fragility of the world.” Here’s an excerpt: “There are now fifty million refugees in the world today, more than at any time since the end of the Second World War. And at some point, for each one of those people, the world shifted. Their world, solid and predictable, erupted or dissolved into chaos or danger or pain. They realized that they had to run. You have two minutes to pack. You can only take what you can carry easily.” Follow this link to learn more. (via The Hollywood Reporter)

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17. Dinos

 I have just finished my first title for 2015 'Hello, Dino!
It's a touch and feel/sound book with dinosaurs.
The above artwork is is from a different project but
I hope to share some samples with you soon!

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18. Lauren Oliver Writes a Vanishing Girls Short Story

Vanishing GirlsAuthor Lauren Oliver has written a short story set in the universe of her forthcoming young adult novel, Vanishing Girls.

EpicReads.com has posted part one of the piece which is called “The Search.” Part two will be unveiled on February 9th.

The release date for Oliver’s book has been scheduled for March 10th. Follow this link to reach an excerpt.

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19. ALSC to receive 2014 USBBY Award #alamw15

Día: Diversity in Action

Día: Diversity in Action (image courtesy of ALSC)

Recently, ALSC was awarded the 2014 Bridge to Understanding Award for their Día Family Book Club Program. ALSC President Ellen Riordan will accept this award from the United States Board on Books for Young People (USBBY) during the USBBY Gathering from 8 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 30, 2015 at the Hilton Chicago – Williford A. This event is open to all ALA Midwinter attendees.

Established in memory of Arlene Pillar, an educator who served USBBY as newsletter editor from 1984 until her untimely death in 1990, the Bridge to Understanding Award formally acknowledges programs that use children’s books to promote international understanding among children. The responses of many of the families who participated in the Día Family Book Club show just how successful this program has been.

For more information about the Día Family Book Club program and to download the club toolkit and lesson plans please visit: http://dia.ala.org/content/start-book-club.

The post ALSC to receive 2014 USBBY Award #alamw15 appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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20. Catalogging Consortium

Lots of great titles from lots of great small press publishers in the 2015 Consortium catalog - here are the ones that caught my eye with some catalog copy to describe them:

Three Kinds of Motion: Kerouac, Pollock and the Making of the American Highways by Riley Hanick (Sarabande Books). In 1943, Peggy Guggenheim commissioned a mural from Jackson Pollock to hang in the entryway of her Manhattan townhouse. It was the largest Pollock canvas she would ever own, and four years later she gave it to a small Midwestern institution with no place to put it. When the original scroll of On the Road goes on tour across the country, it lands at the same Iowa museum housing Peggy's Pollock, revitalizing Riley Hanick's adolescent fascination with the author. Alongside these two narrative threads, Hanick revisits Dwight D. Eisenhower's quest to build America's first interstate highway system. When catastrophic rains flood the Iowa highways with their famous allure and history of conquest, they also threaten the museum and its precious mural. In Three Kinds of Motion, his razor-sharp, funny, and intensely vulnerable book-length essay, Hanick moves deftly between his three subjects. He delivers a story with breathtaking ingenuity.

The Shark That Walks on Land....and Other Strange But True Tales of Mysterious Sea Creatures by Michael Bright (Biteback Publishing). When you dive into the sea, do you ever wonder what's down there, beneath you, poised to take an inquisitive bite? Author of Jaws Peter Benchley and film director Steven Spielberg certainly did, for below the waves lies a world we neither see nor understand; an alien world where we are but the briefest of visitors. The Shark that Walks on Land uncovers tales of ancient and modern mariners, with stories of sea serpents, mermaids and mermen, sea dragons, and the true identity of the legendary Kraken. But this book contains more than just a medley of maritime myths and mysteries for marine biologists; it celebrates wonderful discoveries by blending the unknown and the familiar in an entertaining miscellany of facts, figures, and anecdotes about the myriad creatures that inhabit the oceans. Along the way we meet the giants, the most dangerous, the oddballs, and the record breakers; and the shark that really does walk on land!

Enormous Smallness: The Story of E.E. Cummings by Matthew Burgess, Illus by Kris Di Giacomo (Enchanted Lion Books). Here E.E.'s life is presented in a way that will make children curious about him and will lead them to play with words and ask plenty of questions as well. Lively and informative, the book also presents some of Cummings's most wonderful poems, integrating them seamlessly into the story to give the reader the music of his voice and a spirited, sensitive introduction to his poetry.

In keeping with the epigraph of the book -- "It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are," Matthew Burgess's narrative emphasizes the bravery it takes to follow one's own vision and the encouragement E.E. received to do just that.


Mischief and Malice
by Berthe Amos (Lizzie Skurnick Books).
Set in New Orleans, Louisiana, on the eve of World War II, Mischief and Malice is a brand new work from an iconic figure in young adult literature. Following the death of her Aunt Eveline, fourteen-year old Addie; who we first met in Berthe Amoss's classic Secret Lives; is now living with her Aunt Tooise, Uncle Henry, and her longtime rival cousin, Sandra Lee. A new family has just moved into Addie's former house, including a young girl who is just Addie's age. Meanwhile, Louis, the father of Tom, Addie's lifelong neighbor and best friend, suddenly returns after having disappeared when Tom was a baby. Between school dances, organizing a Christmas play, fretting about her hair, and a blossoming romance with Tom, Addie stumbles upon a mystery buried in the Great Catch All, an ancient giant armoire filled with heirlooms of her family's past, which holds a devastating secret that could destroy Louis and Tom's lives. Once again, Berthe Amoss has created an indelible portrait of a young girl coming of age in prewar New Orleans.

The Astrologer's Daughter by Rebecca Lim (Text Publishing Company). Avicenna Crowe's mother is missing.

The police suspect foul play. Joanne is an astrologer, predicting strangers' futures from their star charts. Maybe one of her clients had a bad reading?

But Avicenna has inherited the gift. Armed with Joanne's journal, she begins her own investigation that leads into the city's dark underworld. The clock is ticking, and as each clue unravels Avicenna finds her life ever more in danger.


The Keeper's Daughter
by Jean-Francois Caron, Translated by Don Wilson (Talonbooks)
. Young Dorothea is appointed by the tourist bureau to direct a documentary film re-enacting life at a lighthouse off Quebec's North Shore in the 1940s and '50s. To obtain material for the film, she is advised to interview an old woman, Rose Brouillard, the daughter of a fisherman who grew up on a nearby island in the St. Lawrence. Rose is finally tracked down in Montreal. She is now old: her memory and grasp of reality are hazy; nevertheless she tells her story and takes Dorothea back to scenes from her childhood. We see fishermen on the docks with their nets, hard-at-work villagers with shirtsleeves rolled up to the elbow, leafy gardens and tree-lined streets, all recreated from Rose's failing memory. The problem is that many of these scenes are invented, not real. Does that matter? Or are the stories we tell more important?

(This one is listed as "Finding Rose" in the catalog but "The Keeper's Daughter" at the publisher and online booksellers - not sure what it really is, though.)

Load Poems Like Guns: Women's Poetry from Herat, Afghanistan compiled & translated by Farzana Marie (Holy Cow! Press). A groundbreaking collection of poetry by eight contemporary Afghan women poets in English translation en face with the original Persian Dari text. These poets live in Herat, the ancient epicenter of literature and the arts.


The Red Notebook by Antoine Laurain (Gallic Books). Bookseller Laurent Letellier comes across an abandoned handbag on a Parisian street and feels impelled to return it to its owner.

The bag contains no money, phone or contact information. But a small red notebook with handwritten thoughts and jottings reveals a person that Laurent would very much like to meet.

Without even a name to go on, and only a few of her possessions to help him, how is he to find one woman in a city of millions?

The Little Free Library Book by Margret Aldrich (Coffee House Press). Take a book. Return a book." In 2009, Todd Bol built the first Little Free Library as a memorial to his mom. Five years later, this simple idea to promote literacy and encourage community has become a movement. Little Free Libraries; freestanding front-yard book exchanges; now number twenty thousand in seventy countries. The Little Free Library Book tells the history of these charming libraries, gathers quirky and poignant firsthand stories from owners, provides a resource guide for how to best use your Little Free Library, and delights readers with color images of the most creative and inspired LFLs around.

Fanny Says by Nickole Brown (BOA Editions, Ltd). In this "unleashed love song" to her late grandmother, Nickole Brown brings her brassy, bawdy, tough-as-new-rope grandmother to life. With hair teased to Jesus, glued-on false eyelashes, and a white Cadillac Eldorado with atomic-red leather seats, Fanny isn't your typical granny in a rocking chair. Instead, think of a character that looks a lot like Eva Gabor in Green Acres, but tinted with a shadow of Sylvia Plath.

Chernobyl Strawberries by Vesna Goldsworthy (Wilmington Square Books). How would you make sense of your life if you thought it might end tomorrow? In this captivating and best-selling memoir, Vesna Goldsworthy tells the story of herself, her family, and her early life in her lost country. There follows marriage, a move to England, and a successful media and academic career, then a cancer diagnosis and its unresolved consequences. A profoundly moving, comic, and original account by a stunning literary talent.

The Surfacing by Cormac James (Bellevue Literary Press). Far from civilization, on the hunt for Sir John Franklins recently lost Northwest Passage expedition, Lieutenant Morgan and his crew find themselves trapped in ever-hardening Arctic ice that threatens to break apart their ship. When Morgan realizes that a stowaway will give birth to his child in the frozen wilderness, he finds new clarity and courage to lead his men across a bleak expanse as shifting, stubborn, and treacherous as human nature itself.

Well Fed, Flat Broke by Emily Wright (Arsenal Pulp Press). This collection of 120 recipes ranges from the simple (perfect scrambled eggs, rice and lentils) to the sublime (Orecchiette with White Beans and Sausage, Mustard-fried Chicken). Chapters are organized by ingredient so that you can easily build a meal from what you have on hand. Well Fed, Flat Broke has flavours to please every palette including Thai, Dutch, Indonesian, and Latin American-inspired recipes such as Kimchi Pancakes, Salvadoran Roast Chicken, and Pantry Kedgeree, reflecting a diverse array of affordable ingredients and products in grocery stores, markets, and delis.

Emily is a working mother and wife who lives with a picky toddler in one of Canada's most expensive cities. She offers readers real-talk about food, strategic shopping tips, sound advice for picky eaters, and suggestions on how to build a well-stocked, yet inexpensive pantry. Cooking every night can be challenging for busy families who are short on time and lean in budget; Emily includes plenty of one-pot dishes to keep everyone healthy, full, and happy.

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21. This Book Just Ate My Dog! from Henry Holt and Company

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22. A Sketch for Today

A sketch for today. May all of you out there creating, whatever form you choose, have a lovely day.

2015_01_29_sketch1

The post A Sketch for Today appeared first on Lita Judge.

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23. Where I'll be this winter/spring, and some good news about Linc and George Washington

So far, 2015 has been all about writing for me. It's been nice to hibernate a little, especially with all the snowfall we're having here in Colorado.

But I do like to get out every once in a while. And I hope to see you at one of these events, if you find yourself in Colorado!

Here's where I'll be:


I’ll be at the SCBWI table, sharing all the great things SCBWI has to offer!
 
I’m hosting a free workshop for local writers on how to plot a novel using plot points.
 
Presenting a workshop on reaching reluctant MG and YA readers 

Faculty member, presenting workshops on writing MG, plotting, and author platform building.
 
Double Vision trilogy books will be available at the bookstore at all events. Hope to see you there!

And to add a bit of good news: Double Vision: Code Name 711 will be out in paperback on February 10th!

Just in time for Presidents Day (since the book features George Washington), very cool...

To celebrate, there's a giveaway of signed copies over at Goodreads (see nifty gadget to the right). Or be wild and crazy with seven bucks, and buy yourself a copy at your favorite bookstore, or straight from the awesome people at Harper Children's. I love paperbacks, don't you?
 
 
 

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24. Claudette Free Comic Book Day with CBLDF

This May! Claudette and Friends will appear in CBLDF’s FREE COMIC BOOK DAY comic. Pick it up at your local comic book store for Free! CBLDF has been defending our right to read and write comics and even get occasionally flambéed by dragons for over 25 years. Also in the comic, are other creators we love: Andi Watson, Gene Yang, George O’Connor, Dan Parent, Larry Marder, Watson, Sonny Liew, O’Connor, Parent, and Marder. You can even DOWNLOAD a preview.

Defend Comics

Defend Comics


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25. BOOKLIST lists American Indians in Children's Literature as a Resource

Booklist's February 2015 issue is titled "Spotlight on Multicultural Literature." The feature article is online. Written by Sarah Hunter, the article opens with:

It’s no secret that children’s publishing has a problem. Numerous venues, from the New York Times to Twitter, have rightfully brought to light the significant disparity in the representation of diversity in kids’ books. So what can librarians do, both immediately and in the long term, to make things better?
She closes with a quote from two librarians at Chicago Public Library:
McChesney and Medlar similarly note, “These conversations may ‘feel’ uncomfortable to a librarian, but they are important to our kids and [they] help them gain power as both consumers and critics.” If librarians allow themselves the room to make mistakes, and openly and humbly accept feedback, they should be able to help create change, even it if is incremental rather than overnight.
And, she links to American Indians in Children's Literature and the American Indian Library Association's Youth Literature Award as resources:



Click on over and read Hunter's article. If you can't get to it, let me know and I'll send you a pdf of the article. 

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