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1. every princess needs a castle...

©the enchanted easel 2015
and this one is no different!

juggling 4 paintings in the next 2 weeks....1 of which has a deadline of midnight, march 12 (for a certain movie being released the following day. any guesses??? hint-there may be a glass slipper involved somehwhere...;)

the other 3 paintings? a custom nursery art order for a sweet little boy named Turner whose lovely grandma contacted me for some custom initial panels to match her gorgeous nursery for her 2 grandsons. aww, how sweet! :)

pics to follow...

{MARRIED TO THE PAINTBRUSH, I AM! LIFE IS GOOD!}

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2. Time Management Tuesday: Time Shaming

Things I Can Say About MFA Writing Programs Now That I No Longer Teach In One by Ryan Boudinot received quite a bit of attention, of one kind or another, from two different groups on my Facebook wall this past week. I have never been part of a MFA program, so I can't even pretend to address what he has to say about them. I will, however, address what he had to say about time.

Yeah, That Was Harsh


"If you complain about not having time to write," Boudinot said in bold, "please do us both a favor and drop out." While expanding on that thought, he said, "My experience tells me this: Students who ask a lot of questions about time management, blow deadlines, and whine about how complicated their lives are should just give up and do something else. Their complaints are an insult to the writers who managed to produce great work under far more difficult conditions than the 21st-century MFA student."

Talk about insulting.

I have heard others disparage people with, shall we say, "time management issues." They seem to believe that those who can't manage their time suffer from some kind of moral failing. Certainly, they are "other," not like the people who perceive themselves as being time masters.

Why Time Shaming Is So Very Odd

 

What I find particularly interesting about this situation is that there are so many workable time management techniques. Psychologists have studied procrastination and impulse control problems it is related to. There is even writing process related to writing faster, which has a definite impact on how much writers can do with the time they have. Why, then, do people in positions to help writers treat those who wonder how they can find the time to write as if they just lost some kind of life lottery by merely asking the question?

I can only speculate, of course.
  1. We are a very them-or-us type of culture.  "I write at the drop of a hat, you don't. I know I'm good, so you must be bad." See also: Organic vs. plotting writers. Lots of arguments over whether or not one writing method is better than the other.
  2. The shamers simply don't know anything about time management. Not knowing something makes them uncomfortable, knocking down someone else makes them feel better.
One final speculative question:  Why not teach writers how to manage their time?



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3. Writer Wednesday: Wattpad

2015 is the year of branching out for me. I'm trying new ways to reach readers. My latest venture is with Wattpad. I wasn't very familiar with this platform, but I know a lot of readers are there grabbing free samples of books. So I thought why not?

I joined and got permission from the very awesome people at Spencer Hill Press to upload my two FREE Touch of Death series companions, which are also available on the SHP website. 

The first is Curse of Death, which is the myth behind the series. It shows why I love Medusa and feel she was wrongfully cursed. 
The second is Kiss of Death, which is a prequel novella told from Alex's POV, because I just love Alex and his story needed to be told pre-Jodi.

So what does this mean? I'm not entirely sure yet, but I'm hoping to reach new readers and introduce them to my work. I'll keep you posted on how it's going. In the meantime, feel free to follow me on Wattpad here and to read my free stories.

Are you on Wattpad? Feel free to leave your link in the comments so I can follow you. If you aren't, what do you think of a site that allows you to sample an author's work?

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4. Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge: Day 4 of 31

It's Day Four Classroom Slicers!

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5. कार्टून …. बजट ईफेक्ट

The post कार्टून …. बजट ईफेक्ट appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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6. Coconuts' Art Give Away!

Dear friends and backers,

This is Coco posting.  We are getting very closed to our goal ... I want to support Alina with her project, so I make 15 little cards with my paws as special THANK YOU gift to you!!  If you haven't pledged yet, it's not too late to join the fun now!!   If you already pledge and would like to receive my card.  You could chip in a buck or two to have my card adding into your reward package.
I only make 15 of these cards ... so these would be first come first served.  Starting now!!  Woof!!! Woof!!

Join the pledge now at or you can click the link under Alina's profile for quick access:

Thank you!  Woof! Woof!!

Sincerely,

Coconuts

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7. Annie DVD Giveaway

Extra!Attention, all Annie fans!

We are offering you a special opportunity for a chance to enter to win a DVD copy of the Annie movie (rated PG) starring Jamie Foxx as Will Stacks and Cameron Diaz as Miss Hannigan.

But, here’s the thing. You can ONLY enter if you subscribe to the STACKS Blast Newsletter.

Quevenzhane Wallis as Annie

Quevenzhane Wallis as Annie

So right now you may be thinking. . .

YOU: Oh no! I’m not a STACKS Blast subscriber and I don’t even know what the STACKS Blast is!

ME: The STACKS Blast is our free monthly e-mail newsletter. You give us your e-mail address and an e-mail address for one of your parents, and once a month (usually around the 15th), we send you a newsletter full of polls, quizzes, books, and a sweepstakes you can enter.

YOU: Cool! I want to get that newsletter! But wait, I want to enter for a chance to win that DVD now. How do I enter?

ME: Patience, grasshopper! First, you sign up for the newsletter. Then you must wait until March 13 when Hooray! the STACKS Blast will arrive in your e-mail inbox. Hurry up and open it! Inside, you’ll see a special section for the STACKS Giveaway. That’s where you enter. OK?

Don’t forget to sign up for the STACKS Blast Newsletter and enter the sweepstakes. Good luck!

image from kids.scholastic.com — Sonja, STACKS Staffer

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8. Read Across America


Yesterday marked the 111th birthday of beloved children's book author, Dr. Seuss.

Each year on March 2nd the National Education Association sponsors Read Across America in honor of Dr. Seuss's birthday.   Now in its 18th year, this year-round program focuses on motivating children and teens to read through events, partnerships, and reading resources.

Here in the Children's Room, we have an annual tradition of donning our Cat in the Hat hats and taking a photo to mark the day.  This year we have our new trainee, Miss Meghan, along with Miss Rosemarie and Miss Amy looking snazzy in their hats.


posted by Amy

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9. Reading in March

February is the worst month of the year in my opinion. It’s the last solid month of winter in which all the fun things about cold and snow suddenly become terrible. It’s the month every year during which winter overstays its welcome. Good thing February is short! Now March, March is a month of wild weather swings that can bring us t-shirt wearing weather one day and a blizzard the next. But the thing about March is, no matter snow, ice, sleet, or cold, there is an end of winter in sight.

In mid-February I came to a realization about my reading this time of year. Starting around the end of January when the cold begins to wear me out, my reading begins to go all wonky. Any classic or serious book, any heavy nonfiction is impossible for me to focus on. This pretty much happens to me every year but I have just now bothered to recognize it instead of fighting it. So I gave myself permission to not bother with a couple books I have on the go and totally indulge in what made me feel good. Mostly that has been gardening books and science fiction and fantasy.

Even though I had been enjoying it, I decided to give up on Steven Pinker’s The Sense of Style. When I kept picking up everything but that book it became clear that I lost interest. I feel bad about that because it is a good book, but I just need to move on to something else right now. Maybe I will pick it up again another time.

I didn’t read more than a few pages in Naomi Klein’s This Changes Everything, and I didn’t read one page of Proust.

What I have been immensely enjoying is Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Sword. I am about twenty pages from the end and oh, do I love this book! I also started reading A Dance with Dragons by George R.R. Martin. When I finish it, which will be a little while, I will be all caught up and waiting with the rest of the world for Martin to finally finish the next book. I fear when that book comes out Bookman and I might have to arm wrestle to determine who gets to read it first. Or we will each have to by our own copy.

I am reading a number of books for review in other places. It makes things a bit complicated for writing about those books here since I am reading and writing for someone else. It’s fun, but I have to figure out some kind of balance so I don’t get overwhelmed. One of the books I am reading is for Library Journal and is called The Great Detective: the amazing rise and immortal life of Sherlock Holmes by Zach Dundas. It is off to a marvelous, nearly perfect start which has me so very excited about it. I hope it manages to sustain that excitement. Don’t worry, I will let you know, I wouldn’t leave you hanging like that.

Just as in February I spent time reading about chickens, I will be reading more about chickens this month too. I’ve also got a couple gardening books to peruse. One of them is about biodynamic gardening, Culture and Horticulture by Wolf-Dieter Storl. I am only marginally familiar with biodynamic gardening so the book should be interesting. Part of this gardening practice is to plant according to the lunar calendar. I do not believe in astrology, but I am curious to learn more because it also emphasizes an integrated practice of soil fertility, plant growth and animal care to create a sustainable system. Stay tuned.

Technically I can now also start placing library hold requests again. I am pretty surprised I managed to make it two months without putting any new books on hold. I still have six or seven outstanding hold requests though and haven’t even begun to make a dent in the books I own that are sitting on my reading table. So I have decided to not go crazy and request books. I’m going to try very hard and limit myself to no more than five outstanding library hold requests at a time. That means until two or three of my current requests make their way to me, I will not be placing any new ones. Seems like a good idea, right? We’ll see if I can stick to it.

I hope March turns out to be a happy reading month for everyone!


Filed under: Books, In Progress

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10. Children’s Literature Connections in San Francisco

San Francisco is thrilled to host the ALA Annual Conference again this June. The Bay Area has a rich literary tradition and children’s books definitely are a part of it. Years ago, I wrote an article for School Library Journal (Déjà Views: A Tour of San Francisco Settings You’ll Recall from Children’s Books, SLJ, June 1997) that highlighted the city’s ties to Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, Kate Douglas Wiggin, Laura Ingalls Wilder and her daughter Rose Wilder Lane, Kathryn Forbes, Berta Hader, Jade Snow Wong, Virginia Lee Burton, Eleanor Cameron and Laurence Yep. Several of the books mentioned in it are now in limited supply, if not out of print. This is not surprising: Wilder’s letters to her husband Almanzo, chronicling her journey to the city to visit their daughter, popular journalist Lane, and the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, were written 100 years ago (West from Home). Wiggin’s work to establish the first free kindergarten in San Francisco (funding it with proceeds from the sale of The Bird’s Christmas Carol) took place almost 30 years before that. Maybelle’s uphill battle to save her species—can anyone conceive of a San Francisco without its cable cars?—was based on the successful Citizens’ Committee to Save the Cable Cars, almost 70 years ago (Maybelle the Cable Car, by Virginia Lee Burton).

But the literary spirit lives on, and thrives. A list of current local children’s and teen authors and illustrators, or books set here, would be a long one.

Indulge me, then, as I mention just a few, and the ALSC Preconference: Distinguished and Diverse: Celebrate the 2015 ALSC Honor Books, on Friday, June 26, 2015, 11:30 AM – 4:00 PM, as there are several Honor Books (and their authors and illustrators) with Bay Area connections:

  • Yuyi Morales (Caldecott Honor Viva Frida) lives part time in San Francisco, and learned to make puppets from books borrowed from the Western Addition Branch Library.
  • Jon Klassen’s partner-in-imagination, Mac Barnett (Caldecott Honor Sam & Dave Dig a Hole) is from Oakland, and as teen, he was Peter Pan at Oakland’s Children’s Fairyland.
  • Belpré Illustrator Honor Little Roja Riding Hood, Susan Guevara, received her BFA from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. Author Susan Middleton Elya lives in the Bay Area.
  • All California children benefitted from Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation (Belpré Illustrator Honor, Sibert Honor), written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh.
  • Several of the illustrious people profiled in Portraits of Hispanic America Heroes (Belpré Author Honor, by Juan Felipe Herrera) are well-known to the Bay Area, including Joan Baez and Rita Moreno.
  • We are so proud of talented local illustrator Christian Robinson, who created the Sibert Honor book Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker with author Patricia Hruby Powell.
  • And of course, those top-of-the-food chain Neighborhood Sharks: Hunting with the Great Whites of California’s Farallon Islands (Sibert Honor by Katherine Roy) are from our neighborhood (on a clear day, I can see the Farallon Islands from the park at the end of my street).

The Gold Rush may have ended almost two centuries ago, but San Francisco continues to offer literary gold—and several have shiny silver medals this year. Please join us in honoring them, and all other ALSC book honor winners, at the ALSC Preconference. Welcome back to the Bay Area, ALA!

**************************************************************

Today’s blog post was written Carla Kozak, the Children’s and Teen Collection Development Specialist at the San Francisco Public Library, for the Local Arrangements Committee.

 

The post Children’s Literature Connections in San Francisco appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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11. Prodigal Son Leads iBooks Bestsellers List

Prodigal Son by Danielle Steel has joined the iBooks bestsellers list this week at No. 10.

Apple has released its top selling books list for paid books from iBooks in the U.S. for week ending March 2, 2015. The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins is No. 1 and E L James Fifty Shades Darker is No. 1 and Fifty Shades of Grey is No 3.

We’ve included Apple’s entire list after the jump.

iBooks US Bestseller List – Paid Books 3/2/15

1. The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins – 9780698185395 – (Penguin Publishing Group) 2. Fifty Shades Darker by E L James – 9781612130590 – (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group) 3. Fifty Shades of Grey by E L James – 9781612130293 – (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group) 4. Fifty Shades Freed by E L James – 9781612130613 – (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group) 5. American Sniper by Chris Kyle, Jim DeFelice & Scott Mcewen – 9780062190963 – (William Morrow) 6. Still Alice by Lisa Genova – 9781439157039 – (Pocket Books) 7. Fifty Shades Trilogy Bundle by E L James – 9780345803573 – (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group) 8. The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah – 9781466850606 – (St. Martin’s Press) 9. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn – 9780307588388 – (Crown Publishing Group) 10. Prodigal Son by Danielle Steel – 9780804179621 – (Random House Publishing Group) 11. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr – 9781476746609 – (Scribner) 12. A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler – 9781101874288 – (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group) 13. Private Vegas by James Patterson & Maxine Paetro – 9780316211147 – (Little, Brown and Company) 14. Motive by Jonathan Kellerman – 9780345541383 – (Random House Publishing Group) 15. The DUFF by Kody Keplinger – 9780316123242 – (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers) 16. Falling For My Best Friend’s Brother by Helen Cooper & J. S. Cooper – 9781502215000 – (J. S. Cooper) 17. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee – 9780062368683 – (Harper) 18. Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty – 9780698138636 – (Penguin Publishing Group) 19. Indestructible by Angela Graham – 9781311074379 – (Angela Graham)

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12. The Discreet Hero review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of the latest novel by Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa to be translated into English (by Edith Grossman), The Discreet Hero.

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13. Crimson Bound: Blog Tour Sign-Up

If you’re a lover of fairy tale retellings and gorgeus, atmospheric writing, the next tour we’re hosting may be right up your alley! We host a handful of tours each year for authors or books we love, and the first one for 2015 will be Crimson Bound by Rosamund Hodge. When the author asked if I’d consider doing this, I didn’t hesitate for a second, since I enjoyed the dark romance of Cruel Beauty so much. Tour Details Rosamund is putting together some terrific guest posts (including some flash fiction pieces!) that I’m pretty excited about. Our goal with these tours is always to help bring new audiences to an author’s work, but also to enhance the experience for existing fans, so you can be sure that these pieces are going to be memorable and special. We’re working on the specifics of the tour, but the basic details are as... Read more »

The post Crimson Bound: Blog Tour Sign-Up appeared first on The Midnight Garden.

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14. THE WINNER'S CRIME by Marie Rutkoski is EVERYTHING: Book & Audiobook Review

by Andye THE WINNER'S CRIMEThe Winner's Trilogy #2by Marie RutkoskiAge Range: 12 - 18 yearsHardcover: 416 pagesPublisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) (March 3, 2015)Audiobook Narrated By Justine Eyre Length: 10 hrs Publisher: Listening LibraryGoodreads | Amazon | Audible Following your heart can be a crime A royal wedding is what most girls dream about. It means one celebration after

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15. Day 4 of the March SOLSC! #SOL15

It’s the fourth day of our month-long writing challenge. How’s it going?

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16. What I Read in February


February was absolutely amazing, in terms of reading and pleasure.  We had some amazingly gorgeous days that we spent outside in t-shirts and flip flops and we had several snow days that kept us inside where it's nice and warm.



I did a lot of this:

And even got to take a weekend trip to Cottontown, Tennessee to see my very best friends and to do absolutely nothing but play tons of board games and read books and talk.



In terms of books, here's what I read:

Decompression by Julie Zeh
Pointe by Brandy Colbert
Texts from Jane Eyre by Mallory Ortberg
Strong Female Protagonist by Brennan Lee Mulligan and Molly Ostertag
The Book of Strange New Things by Michael Faber
Skim by Mariko Tamaki
Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Calahan
Welcome to Braggsville by T. Geronimo Johnson
Alone Forever by Liz Prince
I Am Not A Slut by Leora Tanenbaum
The Bishop's Wife by Mette Ivie Harrison
Reveille by George David Clark
The Most Dangerous Animal of All by Gary L. Stewart
The Ancient Path by John Michael Talbot
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Total books read in February: 15
Pages read in February: 4225

What did you read?


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17. Walking on Ice

Walking on ice is not very nice;
In fact, it’s not pleasant at all.
So here’s my advice, be sure to think twice
Before you go out, or you’ll fall.

But if you must go, be sure to walk slow
Or you will end up on your rump;
For ice isn’t snow and will fool you although
You may think that such danger you’ll trump.

It’s much better to stay very far from harm’s way
Or to put it much clearer, inside;
If you thus disobey what the weathermen say,
Then all sympathy you’ll be denied.






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18. Thematic Book List - Biographies of Early Scientists (through Newton)

In a letter to Robert Hooke in 1676, Isaac Newton wrote "If I have seen further it is by standing on ye sholders of Giants." Newton, just like the scientists of today, relied on the work of scientists and mathematicians who came before him.

Below you will find a list of books on scientists before and including Newton. I've also thrown in a couple of important mathematicians. Titles are roughly arranged in chronological order.
The Life and Times of Aristotle (2006), written by Jim Whiting - This biography from the Biography from Ancient Civilizations series provides a compelling look at Aristotle and his influence across history in a wide range of subjects. Though Aristotle was a philosopher, he was for many centuries considered the world's greatest scientist. Whiting explores Aristotle's contributions to science, as well as history and politics. Back matter includes a chronology, selected works, timeline in history, chapter notes, glossary, and further reading ideas.

The Librarian Who Measured the Earth, written by Kathryn Lansky and illustrated by Kevin Hawkes - This biography of the Greek philosopher and scientist Eratosthenes, who compiled the first geography book and accurately measured the globe's circumference, tells the story of his life from his birth over two thousand years ago in northern Africa (modern Libya) to his work as the chief librarian at the great library of Alexandria in ancient Egypt. 

Of Numbers and Stars: The Story of Hypatia, written by D. Anne Love and illustrated by Pamela Paparone - The daughter of Theon, a mathematician, philosopher, and the last director of the Library at Alexandria, Hypatia was educated in the ways of many young men of her time and was one of the first women to study math, science, and philosophy. This book provides a nice overview of the time and place in which Hypatia lived. The artwork evokes both Egyptian and Greek styles and nicely incorporates images that reflect the subjects Hypatia studied. This is a carefully crafted picture book biography on a woman that little is known of. Despite this, her story is one that will inspire. Included are an author's note and bibliography, as well as some additional notes about mathematics.

Blockhead: The Life of Fibonacci (2009), written by Joseph D'Agnese and illustrated by John O'Brien - Medieval Italian mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci is introduced in this first person biography. In traveling with this father, Fibonacci learned geometry in Greece, fractions from the Egyptians, and Hindu-Arabic numerals in India. Largely responsible for converting Europe from Roman numerals to Hindu-Arabic numerals, he also realized that many things in nature followed a certain pattern, today known as the Fibonacci sequence.
Leonardo: Beautiful Dreamer (2012), written and illustrated by Robert Byrd - In this gorgeously illustrated picture book biography, Byrd provides a wealth of information about da Vinci's life and work. In addition to the traditional narrative, da Vinci's own words, anecdotes, and journal excerpts are found in sidebars and small panel illustrations. Byrd clearly and concisely explains da Vinci's theories in a way all readers can understand.

Leonardo da Vinci: Giants of Science (2008), written by Kathleen Krull and illustrated by Boris Kulikov - An extensive biography for older students (middle grades and up), this engaging work in the Giants of Science series focuses on the life of da Vinci while exploring his study the natural world, including aerodynamics, anatomy, astronomy, botany, geology, paleontology, and zoology. Special attention is given to da Vinci's notebooks and their meaning.

Leonardo da Vinci for Kids: His Life and Ideas: 21 Activities (1998), written by Janis Herbert - This biography of da Vinci is interspersed with activities readers can try on their own, including observing nature, painting birds, growing an herb garden, making minestrone soup, building a kite, and more. Includes extensive reproductions of da Vinci's sketches and paintings. Includes a list of related Web sites.

Neo Leo: The Ageless Ideas of Leonardo da Vinci (2009), written and illustrated by Gene Barretta - This biography for younger students focuses on the ideas and inventions found in the more than 20,000 pages of da Vinci's notes. Readers learn how many inventions that came centuries after da Vinci's time were actually imagined and described in his notes.
Galileo For Kids: His Life and Ideas: 21 Activities (2005), written by Richard Panchyk - This biography of Galileo is interspersed with activities readers can try on their own, including letter writing, observing the moon, playing with gravity and motion, making a pendulum, painting with light and shadow, and more. Back matter includes glossaries of key terms, people, and places in Italy, helpful web sites, and a list of planetariums and space museums.

Galileo's Telescope (2009), written by Gerry Bailey and Karen Foster and illustrated by Leighton Noyes - Every Saturday morning, Digby Platt and his sister Hannah visit Knicknack Market to check out the interesting and unique “antiques” for sale. In finding a telescope, the children learn about the life of mathematician, physicist and astronomer Galileo Galilei. Back matter includes a glossary.

I, Galileo (2012), written and illustrated by Bonnie Christensen - This first person biography opens with Galileo imprisoned and remembering his life from childhood onward, highlighting his education and scientific discoveries. In the Afterword, Christensen explains that it took nearly 400 years for the Catholic Church to admit they were wrong to condemn Galileo. Back matter includes a glossary, chronology, and descriptions of his experiments, inventions, improvements, and astronomic discoveries. 

Starry Messenger: Galileo Galilei, written and illustrated by Peter Sis - In this Caldecott honor book, gorgeous illustrations take center stage in telling the story of Galileo. Sis creates for readers images of the things Galileo saw in his observations of space, including sunspots, planets revolving around Jupiter, valleys and chasms on the moon, and more. Though not a detailed treatment of his life, the text is enhanced by notes and quotes from Galileo's own writings, scrawled throughout the pages.

Summer Birds: The Butterflies of Maria Merian, written by Margarita Engle and illustrated by Julie Paschkis. Maria Merian was an artist and scientist who studied plants and animals in their natural habitat and then captured them in her art. This book is based on the true story of how Merian secretly observed the life cycle of summer birds (a medieval name for butterflies) and documented it in her paintings. Focusing on her young life, this book shows readers how curiosity at a young age can lead to a lifelong pursuit. 

Isaac Newton: Giants of Science (2008), written by Kathleen Krull and illustrated by Boris Kulikov - An extensive biography for older students (middle grades and up), this engaging work in the Giants of Science series focuses on the life of Newton, a boy who was incredibly curious. Though he lived a solitary life, he attended Cambridge, worked for an apothecary, served in Parliament, and so much more. Despite his successes in the fields of math and science, Newton was also "secretive, vindictive, withdrawn, obsessive, and, oh, yes, brilliant." 

Isaac Newton and Physics for Kids: His Life and Ideas with 21 Activities (2009), written by Kerrie Logan Hollihan - This biography of Newton is interspersed with activities readers can try on their own, including making a waste book, building a water wheel, making ink, creating a 17th century plague mask, tracking the phases of the moon, testing Newton’s Three Laws of Motion, and more. Back matter includes a list of useful books and web sites.  
World History Biographies: Isaac Newton: The Scientist Who Changed Everything (2013), written by Philip Steele - This book in the National Geographic World History Biographies series profiles Newton as more than just a physicist, but also as an acclaimed mathematician, astronomer, alchemist, philosopher, and inventor as well. 


Online Resources

That's it for this list. Coming up next is a list of biographies for scientists from the 18th and 19th centuries.

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19. 1993 -Black Tower in Comic World Magazine

Comic World February, 1993 item on Black Tower.  Somehow all the info presented in clear black and white press release became a garbled mess.  No wonder I never got to see a proof of the item -that was common practice then and now!

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20. New(ish) issue of list

       The website for the 'Books from Korea' publication list, from the Literature Translation Institute of Korea, recently underwent a redesign, and they still seem to be figuring things out -- that 'Current Issue' page still isn't current (and doesn't offer much of an(y) issue) ... -- but with a little effort at least the Winter 2014 issue can now be found -- with Yi Mun-yol (Our Twisted Hero, etc.) as 'Featured Writer' -- complete with A Letter to My Readers Around the World from him, as well as a Q & A.

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21.


One week to release day!

Here's the latest review. This from the Children's Book Council.

In this wordless story, a little boy finds a book that he loves at the library. It’s a match made in kid lit heaven. But not for the book. Sometimes the little boy’s excitement gets the better of him and the book suffers from possibly too much love: bent pages, tears, hugs, tossing, and shaking. The boy soon learns that the book is not just an object and is so much more on the inside. He loves what the book gives him more than the fun he had playing with it. Bob Kolar’s charming and hilarious illustrations show how sometimes our love for a good book can be too much, but with a more gentle touch, books can give us much comfort and joy.

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22. Book piracy in ... Zimbabwe

       In The Herald Beaven Tapureta reports on a Raw deal for academic, non-fiction authors in Zimbabwe, as:

The fight against book piracy in Zimbabwe has become a requiem which writers and publishers continue to sing in perpetual hopelessness. The literary choir has its rhythm toned down and it now plays to the gallery.
       Which is at least a nice way of putting it .....
       Summing up:
It is clear that if nothing is done to clear loopholes in the local book industry, the country is likely to lose its indigenous publishing gusto and posterity will suffer. The current situation indeed calls for collective action involving concerned parties.

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23. New Cookbooks for January and February: Healthy (and Tasty!) Cooking

Most of the new cookbooks released in January and February tend to fall into the "healthy" and "diet" arenas. Luckily, we live in a time when healthy cooking can be so delicious and filling that we hardly know we are dieting. Not in the mood to diet? There is a short list of dessert cookbooks [...]

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24. Christopher Myers’ My Pen


“But I know my pen can do anything, anywhere. There are a million pens in the world and each one has a million worlds inside it. So if you have a pen,
see what you can do—let those worlds inside your pen out!”

(Click to enlarge and spread in its entirety)


 

I’ve got a review over at BookPage of Christopher Myers’ newest picture book, My Pen (Disney-Hyperion, March 2015).

That review is here, and I’m following up today with a few spreads from the book.

Enjoy.



 


“… then tells everyone I love that I love them.”
(Click to enlarge)


 


“… but it doesn’t always get it right.”
(Click to enlarge)


 



 

* * * * * * *

MY PEN. Copyright © 2015 by Christopher Myers. Illustrations reproduced by permission of the publisher, Disney-Hyperion, New York.

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25. Coconuts' Kickstarter Up-date:

Dear friends and backers,

This is Coco posting.  We are getting very closed to our goal ... I want to support Alina with her project, so I make 15 little cards with my paws as special THANK YOU gift to you!!  If you haven't pledged yet, it's not too late to join the fun now!!   If you already pledge and would like to receive my card.  You could chip in a buck or two to have my card adding into your reward package.
I only make 15 of these cards ... so these would be first come first served.  Starting now!!  Woof!!! Woof!!

Join the pledge now at or you can click the link under Alina's profile for quick access:

Thank you!  Woof! Woof!!

Sincerely,

Coconuts


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