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1. StoryMakers | Mother’s Day Special

StoryMakers - Mother's Day Special 2016 Featured Image

In the spirit of celebrating moms KidLit TV produced a Mother’s Day special inspired by Josh Funk’s popular rhyming picture book, Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast. Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast are best friends who find out there is only one drop of syrup left in the refrigerator. Soon the friends embark on a hysterical and sometimes treacherous dash to get that one last drop. Of course they they both learn a valuable lesson — but the end is anything but typical.

StoryMakers host Rocco Staino and Josh Funk were joined by dad and travel blogger Jason Greene (One Good Dad). Together the trio cooked up a Mother’s Day breakfast fit for a queen … A queen who loves pancakes, French toast, strawberries and cream! If you’re still thinking about what to do for the special lady in your life — whether she be your partner, wife, or mom — we highly recommend watching this episode. If that’s not enough to keep you glued to the screen, two of Jason’s children make a special appearance.

What’s your idea of the perfect Mother’s Day? What’s your favorite breakfast dish? Let us know in the comment section below!

We’re giving away three (3) copies of Josh Funk’s picture book, Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast. The giveaway ends at 11:59 PM on May 18, 2016. Enter now!

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Mother's Day Special StoryMakers - Josh Funk & Jason Greene Pinterest Image

Download the free Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast activity kit.

Mother's Day Special - Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast Activity Kit Cover

ABOUT LADY PANCAKE & SIR FRENCH TOAST


Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast
Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast - Mother's Day Brunch
Written by Josh Funk; illustrated by Brendan Kearney
Published by Sterling Publishing

A thoroughly delicious picture book about the funniest “food fight!” ever! Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast have a beautiful friendship—until they discover that there’s only one drop of maple syrup left. Off they go, racing past the Orange Juice Fountain, skiing through Sauerkraut Peak, and reeling down the linguini. But who will enjoy the sweet taste of victory? And could working together be better than tearing each other apart? The action-packed rhyme makes for an adrenaline-filled breakfast … even without a drop of coffee!

ABOUT JOSH FUNK

Via Josh Funk Books
Josh Funk writes silly stories and somehow tricks people into publishing them as picture books – such as the award-winning Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast (Sterling), as well as the forthcoming picture books Pirasaurs! (Scholastic 8/30/16), Dear Dragon (Viking/Penguin 9/6/16), It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk (Two Lions, 2017), and more.

Josh is a board member of The Writers’ Loft in Sherborn, MA and the co-coordinator of the 2016 and 2017 New England Regional SCBWI Conferences.

Josh grew up in New England and studied Computer Science in school. Today, he still lives in New England and when not writing Java code or Python scripts, he drinks Java coffee and writes picture book manuscripts.

Josh is terrible at writing bios, so please help fill in the blanks. Josh enjoys _______ during ________ and has always loved __________. He has played ____________ since age __ and his biggest fear in life is being eaten by a __________.

CONNECT WITH JOSH FUNK
Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

ABOUT JASON GREENE

Via One Good Dad
From the time I was a child, my dream was to become an actor and a writer. After college, I set out along with my wife to chase that dream. We arrived in New York City and I was ready to “make it.” After a few years of auditioning and bit parts here and there, my wife gave me the news that I was about to take on the biggest role imaginable — the role of a daddy. After my son was born, I became a stay-at-home dad and now I’m a proud papa of 4 children. Being a stay-at-home dad has changed the way I think about myself and the world around me. And that has lead me to become a dad blogger and travel blogger.  My blog touches on parenting challenges and rewards, faith, travel, entertainment, sports, sponsorships and reviews, or whatever else is keeping me from getting that great night of sleep I so desperately need.

CONNECT WITH JASON GREENE
Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

CONNECT WITH KidLit TV
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StoryMakers
Host: Rocco Staino | Executive Producer: Julie Gribble | Producer: Kassia Graham

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The post StoryMakers | Mother’s Day Special appeared first on KidLit.TV.

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3. Everland

Everland. Wendy Spinale. 2016. Scholastic. 320 pages. [Source: Review copy]

Everland is a dystopian, steam-punk retelling of Peter Pan.

If I was giving stars for premise, it would be five stars for sure. The premise is surely the most interesting and captivating thing about Everland. Gwen Darling is the heroine. Since a virus/plague killed off most--if not all--of the adults in England, Gwen is responsible for her younger siblings, Mikey, the youngest, and her sister Joanna. When Gwen is out scavenging one day, Joanna is kidnapped by the Marauders, the Marauders are led by Captain Hook, though Hook is just a nickname. His initials are H.O.O.K. Fortunately for Gwen, on the same scavenging trip, she caught her first glimpse of Pete and Bella. These two come to her rescue. Pete eagerly and generously. Bella with much protest and grumbling. Pete hopes that Gwen is truly IMMUNE, the one human on earth who is immune to the virus, the one whose blood or antibodies in the blood may hold the cure for saving those left alive. Pete takes Gwen and Mikey to the underworld--the underground remains of Everland, or London. She'll join the Lost Boys. Bella is the only other girl. Jack and Doc are two Lost Boys that seem to stand out from the rest.

So, as I mentioned earlier, the premise gets five stars from me. Unfortunately, I found the world-building, the storytelling (narration, plotting), and the characterization to all be lacking.

The world-building seemed all-surface and not much depth. Like flimsy props on a set that could potentially be tipped over leading to disaster. I never once forgot myself in the story or got lost in the story. And that's what you want in fantasy: to be swept into a whole new world, to become absorbed in it, fascinated even. It isn't that the world created doesn't have potential or promise. It does. But I don't want potential-fulfillment, I want actual fulfillment. One thing that bothered me was the depiction of this "war" between England and Germany. The German bad guys--led by the oh-so-evil Queen that we never once meet--didn't come across to me as well-executed.

The narration was an almost for me as well. I really did not enjoy the alternating narrators. Chapters alternate perspectives between Gwen and Hook. If I had to have alternating characters, I'd much rather have gotten to know Bella or Pete or if it absolutely had to be a bad guy, Smeeth. Seeing Captain Hook through Smeeth's eyes would have likely been more entertaining than being stuck in Hook's head. Still, I think readers didn't get to know Bella enough, and, it would have been great to have alternating chapters between Gwen and Bella. It would have made for a lively, tension-filled read. Because Bella seemed fierce, strong, stubborn.

The plot itself was okay, but, it was the little things that annoyed me. For example, the "need" to represent pixie dust leading to the gold dust powder that somehow, someway enables all the characters to see in the dark. That's just one example of how the need to represent as many details as possible from Peter Pan led to a weaker story. That being said, the surprise introduction of Lily was very much necessary. Now that I think about it, LILY would have made a good alternate narrator. What I was not thrilled with was the "instant" romance between Pete and Gwen.

The characterization. I personally found it on the weak side. If the premise wasn't so strong, would anyone really keep reading? Or, would I have kept reading?! (That would be the fairer question). Gwen, Pete, Bella, Hook, all the characters really felt like paper dolls. Some readers prefer action-driven novels. Some readers prefer character-driven novels. I happen to prefer character-driven novels. And I like my action novels to have a certain depth to their characters. I think the best villains should be fleshed-out villains. Even though we were in Captain Hook's head, I never once really thought of him as being a developed character.

Think of LOST. Tons of characters, plenty of action and drama, plenty of tension and suspense, plenty of mystery. Yet what hooks me is the DEPTH of the characterization. Every single character is fully fleshed out--past, present, everything in between. You may or may not "like" a character. But every action, every word seems to come from within a character, staying true to that character. The same could be said of Once Upon A Time. And that show put a WHOLE new spin and then some on Peter Pan and Captain Hook!!!!

Would a rereading at some point persuade me to reevaluate this one, and "like" it more??? Perhaps. After all, such has occurred before. But I'm not eager to do so now.

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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4. almost finished

I've almost finished illustrating Jinks & O'Hare Funfair Repair! I ought to celebrate by tidying my desk.

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5. Press Release: Kendare Blake's Anna Dressed In Blood

Cameron Monaghan Maddie Hasson Anna Dressed In Blood  We are so excited to share this amazing news with you regarding the incredible Kendare Blake's young adult series that begins with....  Anna Dressed In Blood...... Movie rights have been acquired by Fickle Fish Films which is owned by Twilight author Stephanie Meyer and Maddie Hasson (Freeform's Twisted) as  Anna and...

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6. Mother’s Day Breakfast In Bed Ideas

Happy Mother's DayMake a Mother’s Day Breakfast!

With Mother’s Day this weekend, have you thought about what you are going to do to show your mom how much you love and appreciate her? If you still haven’t got a clue, here’s an awesome plan that you, your siblings, and your dad can do for the ultimate Mother’s Day gift from the heart.

On the menu is a classic breakfast of toast, eggs, strawberries, and any other cereal or yogurt you know your mom loves. What makes this breakfast uber-adorable is the heart-shaped toast and strawberries. Here’s how to make them:

Heart toast

photo credit: jenifoto/iStockphoto

1. Heart-shaped toast with egg
Ok, so here’s where art class might come in handy. Grab a piece of toast and use a butter knife to cut out a big heart shape in the center. Have a grown-up help you turn the stove to medium high and add butter to a non-stick pan. Place the bread with the cut out heart on the pan and slowly crack an egg into the middle of the heart shape, making sure the egg whites fill out the area. Cook as desired, either on one side or flip to get both sides cooked.

Strawberry hearts

photo credit: talitha_it/iStockphoto

2. Heart-shaped strawberries
Have you ever noticed that strawberries look like hearts? They could make the cutest fruit garnish to top off Mom’s favorite bowl of cereal, oatmeal, or yogurt. To do this, hold the strawberry so that the flatter and wider side faces you. Have a grown-up help you cut the leafy stem off in a v-shape. Then carefully slice the strawberry down the middle, in the opposite direction of the v-shape, so that the strawberry looks like a heart.

Make sure you do a few trial runs first to perfect your technique. Also, don’t forget to wake up a little early that day before Mom wakes up so you have time to prepare. She’ll love waking up to a big breakfast surprise made by YOU.

Let us know YOUR good ideas for Mother’s Day!

-Sandy

 

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7. The Wild Robot - an audiobook review

The Wild Robot by Peter Brown

Read by Kate Atwater
Hachette Audio, 2016

AudioFile Magazine Earphones Award Winner

I recently reviewed The Wild Robot for AudioFile Magazine.  You can read my full review and hear an audio excerpt here. [http://www.audiofilemagazine.com/reviews/read/110681/the-wild-robot-by-peter-brown/]

The Wild Robot, a novel for ages 8 and up, is a departure from Peter Brown's usual offering of picture books (Creepy Carrots, Mr. Tiger Goes Wild, My Teacher is a Monster - and more), but his customary excellence is just as apparent.

The link to my review is above, however, I'd like to highlight a few things.  The Wild Robot premise is unique and thought-provoking - a robot designed with AI and programmed for self-preservation and nonviolence, is marooned on an island with animals, but no humans from which to learn.  The narrator, Kate Atwater, does a stellar job (see review) and sounds a bit like Susan Sarandon. The audio book is unique in that the beginning and the closing chapters have sound effects including music and sounds of nature.

Overall, it's very well done!  If you'd prefer to check out the print version, Little Brown Books for Young Readers offers an excerpt of the print version of The Wild Robot here. [http://openbook.hbgusa.com/openbook/9780316382014]

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8. ANNOUNCING THE LUCKY WINNERS OF GAZPACHO FOR NACHO!

Dear Readers,

Who are the lucky winners of GAZPACHO for NACHO? Is it you? It could be. 

                                          ***CONGRATULATIONS TO***  

WINNER #1:  Lynne Marie

WINNER #2:  Martin Segal

            Please e-mail me: claragillowclark(at)gmail(dot)com with your mailing address and how you'd like your book personalized by Tracey. Please respond by 5/12/16 or a new winner will be chosen.  


THANK YOU, SENORA TRACEY KYLE for sharing insights and inspiration for GAZPACHO for NACHO and for generously donating TWO copies of your charming book! As Nacho would say……Olé! 

 Visit Tracey's website:  http://www.gazpachofornacho.com

 Order her book here: http://amzn.to/1VL6EsE
 
School Library Journal Review: K-Gr 3: This is the charming story of a picky eater who only wants one thing to eat - gazpacho. While most parents would be delighted if their children ate this Spanish vegetable-based soup, Nacho's mother desperately tries to offer him other dishes, including typical Spanish desserts, to no avail. In an attempt to get him to expand his culinary repertoire, his mother takes Nacho to the market; these illustrations will delight readers with large renditions of beautifully whimsical vegetables, such as vibrant green chiles and large plump tomates that will surely make an enticing and delicious soup. The text is integrated nicely on the spreads and easy to read. Though Latin inspired, this tale of a picky eater will resonate with many. It will make a fun read-aloud because of the rhyming text in addition to lending itself to interesting discussions about food, food avoidances, and trying new things. A recipe for gazpacho and a glossary of Spanish words with the language articles in parentheses are appended.—Maricela Leon-Barrera, San Francisco Public Library

Thank you, dear readers, for stopping by to join the gazpacho party. We really enjoyed your fun and thoughtful comments. 

I'll be back next week with something totally different! Author posts and giveaways will continue through the year! Author Jennifer Swanson is up next in June. Take it from me, she's fabulous! 
                                             Happy CINCO DE MAYO!


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9. Celebrate Mother’s Day: Read a Book Together!

Looking for a great way to celebrate Mother’s Day? Read a book together and try these activities.

The books below are just some of the books identified by Search Institute that model behaviors that make families stronger: collaborating, encouraging and exploring.

Read these books together and use the activities listed after each book to grow together as a family.

Brothers At Bat: The True Story of An Amazing All-Brother Baseball Team by Audrey Vernick; illustrated by Steven Salerno

brothers at bat
The kindness and generosity of the Acerra family helped their twelve sons become the longest-playing all-brother baseball team in history.

This book shows collaborating: learning, growing and solving problems with your child.

Try this after reading:

Your family is like a team. Each person plays a different role and has different talents. To help your family recognize these, sit down as a group and have each person write or draw pictures of a strength they think each member of the family brings to your team. Talk as a family about the work you do to support one another, as well as skills you can teach one another.

Abuela by Arthur Dorros; illustrated by Elisa Kleven

abuela
Take flight with Rosalba and her grandmother as they soar in Rosalba’s imagination all over New York City, visiting family and seeing places with special meaning to Abuela.

This book shows exploring: exposing your child to new ideas, experiences and places.

Try this after reading:

Maps offer fun opportunities to talk about and discover places of importance to you.
Talk with your child about familiar locations, like the places where friends and family live and work, then draw a map together that includes those spots. Or, ask your child to invent a world they’d like to travel to, then draw a map of it and pretend you’re visiting that place together. What do you see, smell or hear? Talk with your child about this new world and the things that make it different from your own.

My Name is Yoon by Helen Recorvits; illustrated by Gabi Swiatkowska

Yoon
Yoon feels unhappy after her family moves from Korea to the United States, until she gets encouragement at home and at school and learns to write her name in English.

This book shows encouraging: praising your child’s efforts and achievements.

Talk and ask questions as you read:

  • Tell your child about a time you felt like you didn’t belong. ASK: Has that happened to you? What did you do? Did someone help you feel included?
  • Yoon’s parents are proud of her when she sings to them in English. Remind your child about a time you were proud of him or her. ASK: What are you proud of?

Educators and program leaders serving children in need can find more books with tips and activities in the Build Strong Families with Stories section of the First Book Marketplace. Developed in partnership with  Search Institute, through generous funding from Disney, each book comes with a FREE downloadable tipsheet with tips and discussion questions like the ones above.

 

 

The post Celebrate Mother’s Day: Read a Book Together! appeared first on First Book Blog.

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10. Sneak Peek: You Know Me Well by David Levithan and Nina LaCour + Giveaway (US Only)

Hi, YABCers! Today we're super excited to present a sneak peek from David Levithan and Nina LaCour's YOU KNOW ME WELL, releasing June 7, 2016 from St. Martin's Griffin. Check out information about the book below, the sneak peek, and a giveaway! YOU KNOW ME WELL by Nina LaCour, David Levithan...

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11. How to Choose & Mine Mentor Texts for Craft Moves: Teaching Writing with Mentor Texts

I've been researching and working with mentor texts for over a decade. Here's how I choose them and mine them for craft moves to teach young writers.

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12. Happy Mother's Day

First off, I'd like to let everyone know that I am now offering critiquing services for picture book manuscripts. Picture books are my passion and I would love to help others polish up their stories and get them ready to send off to publishers. Click on my Critiquing and Design Services tab for more information.

But more importantly, Happy Mother's Day to all the mothers out there, especially my own mother and mother-in-law. My mom had a rough week last week but came through it like a champ. It's great to hear her talk about plans for the future and all the things she has to look forward to. My mom is a strong woman who knows who she is and has always made her children feel loved. We've had our differences in life but have always overcome them and become closer. Now that we have our writing in common, we have tons to talk about and constantly give each other encouragement. My mother has always had faith in her kids and never failed at giving us the confidence we needed to conquer our fears. I love you mom!

I admire my mom and also my mother-in-law. Even though neither she nor my own mom were crazy about my husband and I getting married, she has always welcomed me into her home and made me feel like a part of her family. Her love and support have been very precious to me and I am one of the lucky people who wouldn't trade my mother-in-law for anyone! I love you too, Vi!

Mother's are a special breed. Not everyone is cracked up to be one and even those that are mother's, may not do it well. But if you have love in your heart for your child (or pets, in my case) and they feel that love, than in my opinion that's the most important part of mothering. Even when my own mother and I disagreed or got in an argument about something, there has never been a moment when I doubted her love for me or my siblings. And that love has carried us all through some difficult times.


To all of us who are fortunate enough to still have our mother's, let's give them an extra big hug this year. And to those that have lost their mother's, blow a kiss towards heaven, I'm sure they're waiting for it!



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13. Deborah Marcero's URSA'S LIGHT - Guest Post


Ursa’s Light
by Deborah Marcero

PART 1: PATH TO PUBLICATION
      I have always loved writing and drawing. My love of making art took me to art school, then to New York City for a few years, which then led to me to an MFA in Poetry.
      In all those years of my twenties I collected many tools, but even after my MFA, I still wasn’t sure how I was going to use all that I had learned to build a creative life. After a few years of freelancing, I decided to take another turn altogether and dedicated myself to teaching.
      I worked in the Chicago Public Schools as a reading and writing lead teacher for three years. This job, with all its rewards and hardships, gave me an incredible gift: it re-introduced me to the books I fell in love with as a kid, and showed me NEW books I wished were around when I had been in fifth grade.
      I led enrichment programs, one of which was “Young Authors," where I stayed after school and helped my students publish their works as authors and illustrators. Working with them, made me realize, I want to do this. For real. That was 2009.
      In between then and now, I stopped teaching, started my own photography business, moved to a small city in Michigan and began to dedicate half or more of my time to writing and illustrating. In Ursa’s Light, my debut picture book, so much of my journey to publication is in her story. Ursa is a dreamer and a scientist. She embodies one of my favorite quotes from Thoreau:
“If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.”
     It is through being a dreamer and a pragmatist, that I found my path. And like Ursa, I have failed many times. Each of those failures shaped my journey and forced me to be even more determined, creative and patient.
      Ursa’s victory isn’t just that she becomes a shooting star in the play. It’s more than that. Her dream, her amplified study of the world, her taking risks and making embarrassing mistakes and ultimately being brave enough to be HERSELF in front of everyone - is her shining moment. To be her true self, to be seen, to be vulnerable – flaws, oddities and all – to follow the beat of her own drum, to forge her own path is Ursa’s journey, and it’s mine too.
      I am now writing and drawing every day. I wake up every morning to a life I am truly grateful for. I am still failing and learning and growing. But all those tools I’ve picked up along the way, from 1000 hours of figure drawing in art school to studying poetry, to teaching narrative writing to my fourth graders – all those tools are on my table now. They are in use, and helping me build the creative life I have always wanted.

PART 2 : ILLUSTRATION METHOD FOR URSA’S LIGHT
      Once the manuscript was approved, I composed and paced all the spreads in detail with a very fine pencil (2H 0.3 mm lead).
      Once the sketches were approved, I inked in all the lines with Black Cat India ink and a dip-ink pen.
      Then, before I moved to color, I decided on a color palette for the entire book (this is the MOST important part!). I was also given the option to create a font for Ursa (which, consequently is one of my favorite things to do) so of course, I said YES.
     Ursa’s palettes of rusts, mossy greens, sometimes-heavy blacks, brick red and navy anchor the story in a gritty pull-yourself-up-with-your-own-bootstraps kind of tone, and avoids (for example) saccharine pastels, which could have turned Ursa’s tale into something different altogether. Not that I don’t love pastels – I DO! Just not for Ursa.
      After I established the palette, I created a stack of potential textures – woodblock cuts, ink lines, watercolor, gouache, etc. on my drawing table. Then, finally, I digitally layered, pieced and collaged them into the ink line-work.


     A little more behind the scenes development of my illustration style for Ursa’s Light can be found on my blog here: http://deborahmarcero.com/coming-soon-ursas-light/.
Website: deborahmarcero.com
Twitter: @deborahmarcero

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14. Diversity 102: Ageism in Children’s Literature

diversity102-logoToday we are pleased to share this guest post from LGuest Bloggeribrarian and Diversity Coordinator Laura Reiko Simeon on ageism in children’s literatureWelcome, Laura!

Super Grandpa by David M. Schwartz was inspired by the true story of Gustaf Håkansson, who in 1951 at age 66 won a 1000-mile bike race in Sweden after being banned from entry on the grounds that he was too old. Before reading this inspiring tale to my elementary-aged students, I asked them to say the first words that came to mind when they heard the word “grandpa.” Some of them were positive to be sure (kind, gentle, loving, cheerful), but most were far less so: slow, bent, broken down, tired, sleepy, weak, cane, and, ahem, smelly! Of course, they cheered for Super Grandpa and were deeply indignant that he wasn’t even officially allowed to try to race (given how often children are forbidden from doing things on the basis of age, I suspect the injustice of this resonated on a personal level)!

However, I couldn’t stop thinking about their initial responses to the word “grandpa.” As I began to pay closer attention, I noticed that a significant number of picture books about older people seemed intended to help children come to terms with their grandparents’ Super Grandpa by David M. Schwartzdeath or mental deterioration. I also observed that older people were often shown as lonely, objects of pity, or cantankerous and vaguely alarming. The AGHE Book Award for Best Children’s Literature on Aging encourages “positive portrayals of older adults in children’s literature” to help counteract this, but is unfortunately not yet very well known.

Surveys of children’s literature confirm my impressionistic observations, but also offer reason for hope. Edward Ansello’s groundbreaking 1977 study found that the three adjectives most frequently used to describe old people in children’s literature of the time were “old,” “sad” and “poor.” In J.B. Hurst’s 1981 survey, older adults were referred to as “nice” or “wise” in three of the books sampled, but in the remainder were described as “funny, small, little, grumpy, lonely, poor, and weak.” In a 1993 study, Sandra McGuire wrote that, “The literature is almost void of older people; frequently fails to fully develop older characters; often focuses on illness, disability and death; and gives children little to look forward to as they age.” Jessica L. Danowski‘s survey of picture books published between 2000-2010 found that the elderly were disproportionately portrayed as white (77%) and male (60%), and that they comprised only 5.6% of all characters. On the bright side, however, the portrayals overall were positive in nature, and most frequently showed older adults who were physically active.

As increasing numbers of people live healthy, vibrant, active lives ever later in life, we need more of these types of picture books that reflect the true gamut of roles older adults play in our society. Given the reverence and respect shown to elders in many cultures, diverse literature is a natural place to look to fill this need.

An immigrant grandmother turns innovator in Frances and Ginger Park’s The Have a Good Day Cafe. Tired of her family’s leaving her at home while they go out to run their hot dog stand, Grandma declares, “I did not travel ten thousand miles just to stay home and rest my feet day after day.” Observing that the stand is suffering from competition from other vendors, she and her grandson come up with a plan to differentiate themselves by selling her Korean specialties, leading to an upsurge in business. This is an enterprising woman who isn’t about to let the grass grow under her feet!

interior spread from The Hula Hoopin' Queen
from The Hula Hoopin’ Queen

You’re never too old to be a hula-hooping champion, or so proves Miz Adeline in Thelma Lynne Godin’s The Hula-Hoopin’ Queen, set in a gloriously diverse New York City neighborhood. After Kameeka gets distracted while running an errand, her mother is unable to make a birthday cake for their beloved elderly neighbor.

Far from being a pitiful recluse or a crotchety old scold, Miz Adeline is popular and high-spirited. Her friend and hula-hooping rival Miss Evelyn is no slouch either, and the two older women breathe life into the party! Godin handles this skillfully, making hula hooping something that forges a bond across generations rather than turning Miz Adeline into a “bizarre and comical” old person, another common stereotype.

In A Morning with Grandpa by Sylvia Liu, Mei Mei learns tai chi from her grandfather, Gong Gong, and in turn teaches him some yoga. The ebullient little girl struggles to achieve the fluid, deliberate grace of tai chi, while the older man has a bit of trouble with some of the more challenging asanas. Together they have a ball, laughing and encouraging one another, each doing their best while trying something new. It is a charming portrayal of a playful, loving intergenerational relationship.

from A Morning With Grandpa
from A Morning With Grandpa

In Holly Thompson’s touching The Wakame Gatherers, biracial Nanami heads out into the surf collecting seaweed with Gram, her white American grandmother visiting from Maine, and Baachan, who is part of her multigenerational household in Japan. Neither woman speaks the other’s language, but they are bound together by their love for their granddaughter and a spirit of open-mindedness. In this lovely story, two women who lived through a world war that pitted their countries against one another now embrace new cultural experiences, from trying new food to embarking on trans-Pacific travel.

Books that help children come to terms with the loss and bereavement, as well as distressing medical conditions, are certainly necessary—but these tragedies can afflict the young and middle aged as well the old. Greater diversity in picture book portrayals of the elderly benefit readers of all ages.


 

Laura SimeonThe daughter of an anthropologist, Laura Reiko Simeon’s passion for diversity-related topics stems from her childhood spent living all over the US and the world. An alumna of the United World Colleges, international high schools dedicated to fostering cross-cultural understanding, Laura has an MA in History from the University of British Columbia, and a Master of Library and Information Science from the University of Washington. She lives near Seattle where she is the Diversity Coordinator and Library Learning Commons Director at Open Window School.

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15. BLUE PRINT NYC 2016 - flyers

We are sticking with Blue Print for this next post with a selection of single flyers for designers who will be represented at the show by the Cinnamon Joe Studio, who are also the organisers of Blue Print. Here we see gorgeous designs from Balakrishna Madana, Rachel Westhead, Rosie Maddocks, Helen Black, Kim Hawes and Luan Thomas.

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16.





Bienvenidos -  Benvenuti - Bienvenus - Welcome





 Ilustración Artística

Illustrazione Artistica

Illustration Artistique

Illustration Art

                                           

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17. BLUE PRINT 2016 - ine beerten : zesti

Zesti - aka designer Ine Beerten) will be exhibiting at Blue Print in booth 35. Ine is very excited to be doing her first solo show after exhibiting with the Forest Foundry Collective at Surtex for the past two years. If this colourful kitchen collection (above & below) is anything to go by then you will see wonderful things from Zesti at the show and Ine's portfolio is certainly not to be

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18. ALSC Award Confidentiality: Let us know what you think!

For decades many ALSC book and media award committees have observed time-honored confidentiality policies. The question has been brought to the ALSC Board: For research purposes, should there be a designated statute of limitations on these confidentiality policies?

That’s a big question to think about, and we want your input!  Please complete the following survey by Wednesday, May 18:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HVVWNRZ

Let us know what you think!

The post ALSC Award Confidentiality: Let us know what you think! appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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19. महिला , रेप , न्याय प्रणाली और सन्नाटा

महिला , रेप , न्याय प्रणाली और सन्नाटा आजकल निल बटटा सन्नाटा फिल्म बहुत चर्चा में है वही आजकल रेप मामले में भी हमारी कानून व्यव्स्था की ओर से भी बहुत सन्नाटा है क्योकि कुछ हो ही नही रहा … आखिरी पेज की बस खबर बन कर रह गई है रेप धटनाए… !!! ऐसे में […]

The post महिला , रेप , न्याय प्रणाली और सन्नाटा appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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20. Guest Post: Greg Leitich Smith on Hapa Characters: Asian-White Biracial Representation

By Greg Leitich Smith
for Cynthia Leitich Smith's Cynsations

As with a lot of aspects of creative media these days, Disney movies have been criticized for their lack of diversity.

While such criticism is necessary, I think it’s important as well to give praise where it’s due and acknowledge things done right.

So I want to hand it to Disney for featuring resonant Asian-white characters in several of its recent animated movies, something you rarely see in any media.

The characters Hiro and Tadashi from "Big Hero Six;" Wilbur Robinson from "Meet the Robinsons;" and Russell from "Up" are all Asian-white (this in a field that's largely #whitewashedOUT, and note that all of these films were financially successful).

One of the things about these portrayals that I particularly liked, too, was that while the characters are clearly the products of their backgrounds, their ethnicities were not the be all and end all of their existences.

In other words, they are fully developed characters – persons – with individual wants and needs that have nothing to do with their heritage.

Being of German and Japanese descent myself, I tend to notice this sort of thing.

Portraying Asian mixed-race characters as mainstream with idiosyncratic wants and needs is something I've striven for in my books.

My first novel, Ninjas, Piranhas and Galileo, pokes some fun at the “caught between two worlds” motif: Shohei O’Leary (one of three co-protagonists) is of wholly Japanese descent and has been adopted by parents of Irish descent. Still, he is first and foremost a kid who has to deal with his specific wacky parents.

By Blake Henry from Chronal Engine
In Tofu and T.rex, the protagonist, Hans-Peter Yamada (whose family owns a German delicatessen and butcher shop), has to deal with a vegan cousin who comes to live with them.

Although both Shohei and Hans-Peter are Japanese American, their ethnicity informs their background rather than wholly defines it (like their being Chicagoans informs their backgrounds rather than wholly defining them).

Similarly, the protagonist, Max Takahashi-Pierson, and his siblings in Chronal Engine and Borrowed Time (both Clarion) are, like Hans-Peter, hapa. They're Asian and white. (Their friend Petra is Mexican-German American.)

Max is focused on surviving encounters with Tyrannosaurus rex and surviving being caught between the contemporary world and the world of dinosaurs (literally),  as opposed to being "caught between two [ethnic] worlds."

This is all to say, when it comes to animated hapa boys: Good job, Disney.

Now about live-action kids, other identities-intersections, and hapa girls...

Cynsational Notes


Check out the educator guides for Little Green Men at the Mercury Inn, Chronal Engine and Borrowed Time. See also the Chronal Engine Activity Kit.

Greg is currently booking for fall 2016 and the 2017-2018 school year. Contact The Booking Biz to invite him to your event.

Greg uses the term hapa to refer to someone of biracial (Asian) heritage. He learned it from his mother, who is Japanese-American, originally from Hawaii.

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21. Hervé Tullet introduces Let’s Play!











Imagination according to Einstein..











Unwrapping ...






Created by Hervé Tullet



Unwrapping some illustrations..

















About the book...

Hey anybody want to play?  From the creator of "Press Here" and "Mix It Up", Hervé Tullet's brand new creation "Let's Play!" takes you out of your box to discover the emotions and excitement of playing with colour and line.

A kid-friendly yellow dot invites you to "Press the top corner to get me started," and you put your finger on the page!  Yellow dot is the guide extraordinaire that will encourage your child not to be shy but get involved with every page.  Fasten your seat belt as you play hide-in-seek in a forest of trees, enter into a dark ominous tunnel, and ssshhhhh!! tip toe up the stairs.  You will be energized as you flip, turn, clap and say za-za-zoommmm!   Surprises await the young reader as the yellow dot gets animated and bounces right off the page into your hair! Oh my!

 The yellow dot teaches your child to STOP at a red light, and GO at a green light. It introduces your child to a world of wonder, how to overcome obstructions, and come to terms with fears such as being afraid of the dark or being scared of heights.   Tullet is a genius when it comes to thinking creatively and making reading come alive with many playful twists and turns.  The book is non-stop fun page after page and little ones will be giggling and asking for more.  



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22. TGIPF: Thank Goodness It's Poetry Friday!

Welcome, poetry friends! I'm happy to host Poetry Friday once again right here. Jump to the bottom and link your post below courtesy of Mister Linky. Meanwhile, Mother's Day is coming up, so I thought I might take a moment to share some poetry resources for celebrating the moms and grandmoms in our lives-- and other women who are special to us. So, in that spirit, here is a list of 10 of my favorite books of poetry about mothers. (You can find many more in my Poetry Teacher's Book of Lists. FYI)

Diverse Poetry Books about Mothers

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What better tribute for a mother, aunt or grandmother than a well-chosen poem? Poets have given us words with which to honor the women in our lives in many poetry books in picture book form or in novels in verse or in anthologies of poems by many poets. 
  1. Atkins, Jeannine. 2010. Borrowed Names; Poems About Laura Ingalls Wilder, Madam C. J. Walker, Marie Curie, and Their Daughters. Henry Holt.
  2. Grimes, Nikki. 2015. Poems in the Attic. Ill. by Elizabeth Zunon. New York: Lee & Low. 
  3. Holt, K. A. 2015. House Arrest. San Francisco: Chronicle.
  4. Lewis, J. Patrick. 2005. Vherses: A Celebration of Outstanding Women.Mankato, MN: Creative Editions.
  5. McCall, Guadalupe Garcia. 2011. Under the Mesquite. New York: Lee & Low.
  6. Mora, Pat. 2001. Ed. Love to Mamá: a Tribute to Mothers. New York: Lee & Low Books.
  7. Smith, Hope Anita. 2009. Mother: Poems. New York: Henry Holt.
  8. Thomas, Joyce Carol. 2001. A Mother’s Love: Poems for us to Share.New York: Joanna Cotler.
  9. Wong. Janet S. 1999. The Rainbow Hand: Poems about Mothers and Children. New York: McElderry.
  10. Yolen, Jane and Heidi E.Y. Stemple. 2001. Dear Mother, Dear Daughter: Poems for Young People.  Honesdale, PA: Wordsong/Boyds.
Plus, I hope you'll also indulge a plug for the many poems about mothers in The Poetry Friday Anthology for Celebrations, including the poem that Janet Wong wrote especially for Mother's Day. (And yes, that is my own mom and holding me as a newborn in the photo!)

Now, let's see what poetry goodness awaits us at other lovely blogs! Mister Linky will gather all our posts below. Thanks for sharing!









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23. Oooh, I made them "Very Angry"!

It appears I have made certain individuals

VERY ANGRY

However, let me make it very clear that emails to my email account on this matter will no longer be treated as confidential. Try to do so anonymously your ISP address WILL be reported and also posted here along with your ID which can easily be found via the ISP number.

You don't like the truth -tough.

But now it's up for those who keep allowing the comic bullies to continue to act.

For me, it's a closed subject.

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24. Throwback Thursday

From Do You See What I See? —“Up and down lines pull me up, up, up with them, until I feel as tall as a steeple and as taut as a stretched rubber band. I think of lofty trees, a lighthouse rising above the sea, a rocket soaring high into the sky, noble kings in […]

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25. Comics: The Cowards Remain Silent and The Bullies Continue


If there is one thing that I have learnt over my many years in UK comics it is that there is no "one thing" wrong with it.

Comic publishers were businessmen and only produced comics to make money and they knew all the tricks of double and triple book keeping.  Doing hand shake deals with distributors so that comics were hardly delivered. "1% of books returned" -cancel book and merge it with another for the tax benefit and all the other little "perks" that came with it.

It took me thirty years of speaking to former comic management and bosses before it all made sense.  With 1% returns of a title the company was STILL making good money -what was the sense in cancelling a book making money? WHY was distribution, even into the 1980s so bad?  The books went out so where were they?

Spot a kid who can hardly draw -get him onto 2000 AD, say he's "hot young talent" but don't say you are only paying him less than half the pro going rate per page (that goes into your pocket). Kid vanishes because he started asking for more money as he was a "hot young star".  Next!

WHY did I and other script-writers have to produce a second copy of our work to accounts? Because there was so much fraud going on they wanted to make sure it was actually work they were paying for.  Why was the warehouse where IPC/Fleetway kept all the original art unknown to editors or people below management?  Theft.  Or as it was explained to me "original art walking off". There was quite a bit of trade in stolen comic artwork.

And who replaced the tried and trusted, dependable, professional script-writers and artists? People with over blown egos, mates of mates -all of who were willing to be a great pal....until the chance came to stick the knife in the back -even of people who helped them.

Not greatly talented "yes" men who sucker up to editors and put a few very bad words into the thick editorial ear to brown-nose even more and to kick the real talented pros who made British comics what they were out of work. Little fat heads who declare openly that they never asked for "creators rights" and that the "bosses should pay what THEY think is fair even if not much because they are the bosses".  Dregs.

You point unfairness out to these little back stabbing turds of poison and they try bullying.  They alter emails, they hide comments that counter anything they say. And if that does not work then they, and their equally slimy little pals of low IQ, will launch a trolling campaign. They do not just inundate your email inbox but they go onto every UK comic site they can where they lie outright and malign peoples character and work.  Complain, as a few have found, to those sites monitors and they will defecate themselves in fear of getting the same treatment.  Or, they are a part of this cowardly system and state it is "free speech" -but you cannot respond.

There are people out there who have no career and will start these flame wars and fan those flames because "I was merely stating a point of view" and so it goes on.

Most of this small group of Z list creators profess to be the "nice guys" of comics.  They smile and shake your hand but they've just slandered you to a group of other people.  They are known by everyone who works in comics for more than a month. Here is the thing: those who know will sit back, they will not speak out.  They allow friends and people who have helped them through very hard to be maligned.  They will not speak up.  They sit back.  Some will even agree with the ugly little wretches "because" they do not want to get the bad treatment.  These little dregs do not control UK comics or the industry because there is no UK comics industry.

These people are sitting back and allowing this to go on.  I hear from people who get this bad treatment.  Those who know or turn a blind eye to all of this are nothing more than spineless cowards and UK comics have paid the price of all of this.

They conspire and trash talk people on their private blogs and groups and here is the other thing: many of those organising UK comic conventions know all of this.  Yet they give free passes to these people to continue their bullying and harassment at those events. These organisers are also cowards.

Do not contact me privately and ask me not to cite you as an example. Speak out on your own blog.  Your Face Book page or even in comments on CBO.  I am no longer interested in your "I don't want to be bullied any further" -you can get legal protection from internet bullying and even report these people to their ISPs.  You let them get away with it then you must like it.  You are adults.  Act like adults.

If you want to get into comics then self-publish.  Have nothing to do with UK comic sites. Be your own boss and all that entails.  This is 2016.

Leave the untalented little men to live in their own little power fantasy worlds because they have no careers.  Most of them are stabbing each other in the back -I get the emails and it's almost comical.at times.  Their worlds are collapsing around them.

You do not need these people to produce and sell your own comics. Kablam!, lulu and other print on demand companies are out there.  Until the cowards speak-up the UK comic scene will remain stagnant and dying.

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