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1. Planning a School Visit

Help a school plan and fund your school visit by sharing this information with them.

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/get-started-planning-fundraising-tips-success

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2. Disneyland Secret No. 1

You guys all know I’m a HUGE Disneyland fan.

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I’d live there, if I could.

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I’m not sure where, because there’s tons of people and security cameras everywhere.  But it’s still one of my dreams.  (Up there with inventing the foldable waterbed.  I forsee very high market demand for that.)

Anyway, because it’s been on my mind, the last time I went to Disneyland, I decided to ask an INSIDER.  An actual CAST MEMBER (!!!!)

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THE TOONTOWN BACKDROP!!!  OF COURSE!!

It makes perfect sense.  No one ever goes to Toontown (or as I like to call it, Abandonedland) so logic says, there’d  be even LESS people behind it!

LivingatDisneyland_11

The waiter said no one ever really goes back there, it’s just full of storage and old props that no one cares about anymore.

(I’m sorry to ruin the magic for you.)

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I thanked the waiter profusely and told him he’d probably be seeing me a lot more often.  Me, and my lice.

He was like:

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ROAD TRIP!  Grab a cardboard box and come along!

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The post Disneyland Secret No. 1 appeared first on Story Monster.

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3. FREE eBook for Kids: The BOGGLER

GET BOGGLED FOR FREE!

THE BOGGLER is FREE today! (May 30th)

THE BOGGLER ON AMAZON.COM
THE BOGGLER ON AMAZON.CO.UK

OR CLICK ON THE BOGGLER BELOW:





And don't forget:
GHOSTIES is still FREE (see below)
HAPPY HAT DAY is still FREE (see below)

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4. And How Did You Spend Your Memorial Day Weekend?

BostonGlobeHornBookMe?  I spent it in Vermont. The rolling green hills.  The bears and red squirrels and little tiny insects that think your left nostril is a house and home.  The lovely company, particularly when you’re deciding the 2016 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award winners.

Yup.  Alongside fellow committee members Roxanne Feldman and Joanna Long (she of the magnificent Vermont home) we put our heads together and came up with some stellar winners.

What’s that you say?  You’d like to know who those winners might be?  Nothing doing, sweet stuff.  You’re going to have to watch the live feed this coming Thursday at 11 a.m. EST like the rest of the world.  I’ll give you one hint though: I like these books.  I mean I really, really like them.

Stay tuned, faithful readers.  The live feed video is here.

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5. Flog a BookBubber 29: Pamela Beason

Many of the folks who utilize BookBub are self-published, and because we hear over and over the need for self-published authors to have their work edited, It seemed to me that it could be educational to take a hard look at their first pages. If you don’t know about BookBub, it’s a pretty nifty way to try to build interest in your work. The website is here.

I’m mostly sampling books that are offered for free—BookBub says  that readers are 10x more likely to click on a book that’s offered for free than a discounted book. Following is the first page and a poll. Then my comments follow, along with the book cover, the author’s name, and a link so you can take a look for yourself if you wish. At Amazon you can click on the Read More feature to get more of the chapter if you’re interested. There’s a second poll concerning the need for an editor.

The Only WitnessShould this author have hired an editor? Here’s the first chapter from a free mystery by Ms. Beason, The Only Witness.

Brittany Morgan knew she was a good mother, no matter what other people said.

She parked her old blue Civic around the corner from the main entry, in the shade of the grocery store so the car would stay cool in the early evening sun, maneuvering it into the middle of three empty spaces. She couldn't get or give any more dings or she'd have to listen to her father's going on and on about the deductible again. When she pulled on the hand brake, it squawked like a Canada goose, interrupting her favorite song. She had to figure out a way to make her parents buy her a better car. She was, to quote her English teacher Mr. Tanz, 'biding her time.' At first she'd thought it was 'biting her time', which made a lot more sense, because you could see how people might want to bite off minutes and hours and spit out the boring parts to get to the good ones. But Tanz made her look it up. It meant, like, waiting.

She’d been biding, putting off asking for a new car for almost a year. All because of Ivy. She looked at the baby, sleeping in her carrier in the passenger seat, backwards like they said, so she wouldn’t get a broken neck if the air bag went off. But then, this junkmobile probably didn’t even have an air bag on the passenger side. She’d have to remember to ask her father, who you would think would show a little more concern for his granddaughter.

The last strains of Love Was faded away and Radio Rick started talking about the (snip)

Were you compelled to turn the page?

Did this writer need an editor? My notes and a poll follow. You can turn the page here.

Number 1 in a mystery series, this novel received an average Amazon rating of 4.6 stars. You’d think a story billed as a mystery would get busy raising story questions right from the start. Apparently this author depends on the blurb to hook you, because the first page didn’t do that for me. What happens? Musing. Parking a car and musing. All setup. There may be a good story here—the baby is kidnapped and the only witness is a gorilla that can do sign language. But will a reader ever get there? Your thoughts?

Should this writer have hired an editor?

© 2016 Ray Rhamey

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6. साथ



इस शोर में भी, तेरी आवाज़ है,
झड़ती तन्हाइयों में भी साज़ है,

नाचती बारिश सी चंचल है वो,
यूँ निराला सा उसका, अंदाज़ है

ओंस की बूँदो सी है वो नाज़ुक,
हँसी उसकी, प्रेम का आगाज़ है,

बयान कर सके तुझको 'ए-इश्क़'
ऐसा ना बना, कोई अल्फ़ाज़ है

इश्क़ में भीगी है वो रूह 'साथी',
गले लगाकर, मुझसे नाराज़ है || DV ||

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7. Spotlight on The Ministry of Ghosts by Alex Shearer, Plus Giveaway!

Today we're spotlighting Alex Shearer's novel, The Ministry of Ghosts! Read on for more about Alex, his novel, an excerpt, plus a giveaway!   Meet Alex Shearer! Alex Shearer was born in Wick, in the far north of Scotland. His father was a blacksmith and his mother was a secretary. He enjoyed...

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8. Prettiest German books

       Stiftung Buchkunst have announced the prettiest German books 2016 -- twenty-five titles selected from 788 submissions; the official prize ceremony will be on 8 September.
       Some interesting titles among the honored titles -- and also interesting to see the print-runs of the various books (numbers which I suspect are more reliable than when these are tossed around by US publishers ...) -- so, for example, the German edition of Zaza Burchuladze's adibas was 4000; I wonder how many copies Dalkey Archive Press printed (or sold ... though, hey, the Amazon.com page says: "Only 20 left in stock (more on the way)" (but also: "Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,681,366 in Books")).

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9. Face-Lift 1317


Guess the Plot

After the Last Dawn

1. Dawn Dimarconi hates her name. really hates it. And she's going to kill every other Dawn on the planet to prove it.

2. When Jo-Jo finds an ancient book with expositions of black sky spattered with shiny dots, he quests for an answer to the still ball of fire overhead. With a photo of a pink horizon he begins a quest to set the world spinning again.

3. Dawn McBally is terrified - a serial killer in her small town has been targeting only women named Dawn. A quick head count reveals the is the last one. Her dilemma: leave town or legally change her name.

4. Eerie Filmore always seems to fall in love with girls named Dawn. After his fifth heartbreaking break-up, he decides to become a Tibetan Monk.... Just in time for the End of Days.

5. After he journeys to the end of the world where he finds giant crabs and little else, H.G. Wells' nameless time traveler returns to England, and discovers that Weena is alive, but wounded, somewhere in the future wasteland. Now he must search for her . . . beyond the last dawn.

6. On a cold foggy dawn, Gustav Bouilliard wakes up to newspaper headlines, "The End is Nigh!" When night falls, the Earth stands still. One cannot say whether robots were involved.

7. 2012: Martin has bet all his money on the Mayan Prophecy. The odds against the world ending are 1000:2. But being a pessimist, he’s sure he'll win. When an asteroid as big as Europe hits the world and doomsday arrives, Martin is thrilled. Problem is: where is he supposed to collect his bet … After The Last Dawn ?

8. To avoid her royal destiny (marriage at sixteen), Princess Pegi leaves the palace and travels the world with her were-mutt. Which goes well until they encounter the Truthists, who claim to have the Sole Truth, but that's a lie. If she can't escape these idiots, she's seen her last dawn.

9. After the last dawn, the demons will be provoked.
After the last noon, the dragons awaken.
After the last dusk, the dead begin to rise.
Now if only Sue can figure out how to put them back to bed.




Original Version

Dear Mr. Evil Editor,

Once upon a time, a princess escaped a fairytale marriage and roamed as free as a bird - until she encountered a world where minds are caged. [Dump this. It says nothing that isn't said again later, it's in past tense while the rest of the query is in present, and the fairytale opening gives the impression your book is for young children.]

Pegi prefers books to jewels, saves animals instead of hunting or eating them and dreams of experiencing life outside the palace walls. [How many animals need saving inside the palace walls?] She doesn’t want to marry at sixteen, become a crowned-head and spend her time entertaining other crowned-heads. To escape her royal destiny, she does a deal with an evil fairy.

That entails embracing a puzzling curse [Is embracing a curse the same as being cursed?]– she must roam the world looking for herself and she cannot find herself without losing herself. [She was born at the wrong time. In the 60's people willingly roamed the world trying to find themselves. Without even being cursed.] [A deal usually involves both parties getting something. I don't see what the evil fairy gets from this deal.] 

Life on the road is not quite the adventurous romp of Pegi’s imaginings, what with her tendency to tumble into messes and scrapes; and the infuriating company of Kumo the were-dog, a mutt who can turn into a wolf at need. [I don't think were-dog is the right term. It would have to have "wolf" as part of its name to distinguish it from dogs that can turn into bears or lions. And it needs "dog" as part of its name to distinguish it from humans who turn into wolves. And it needs "were" to distinguish it from anything that doesn't turn into anything. By anagramming were-dog-wolf, I've come up with the perfect term: gwelderwoof.] Still Pegi revels in her newfound-freedom [Hyphen not needed.]  – until she witnesses the Truthists in action. Truthists believe they possess the Sole Truth. [So, her wanderings have either taken her to the Middle East or the Republican convention.] [How long did it take the Truthists to come up with their name?] They want to outlaw magic and hunt magical creatures. [Including gwelderwoofs?] [Or should that be Gwelderwooves?  Hoof becomes hooves, but roof becomes roofs, so it's not cut and dried. This shows how important it is when making up words to settle early on how you'll handle the plural form.] In lands under their control, ‘unacceptable’ books are burnt and ‘incorrect’ ideas are criminalized. [This sounds like Fahrenheit 451, which, coincidentally, happens to be the optimal temperature for roasting gwelderwoof.] 

A failed attempt to save a bookseller turns Pegi and Kumo into fugitives. [In this world it's against the law to fail to save a bookseller.] [Weren't they already fugitives? From the royal court or whatever?] They get stranded in a desert and Kumo begins to succumb to a mysterious illness. Pegi needs to save her beloved were-dog, escape the desert [If only she had a were-camel.]  and fathom how to remain free in a world where thinking is unfree. [Can the Truthists tell what people are thinking?] Unraveling the curse might help, but time is scarcer than water and vultures are hovering in expectation of a rare feast. [To a vulture, fresh gwelderwoof is a delicacy.]

After the Last Dawn is a 96,000 words fantasy novel for young adults.


Notes

So the lesson Pegi learns is Be careful what you wish for? Staying home, marrying at sixteen, becoming a crowned-head and spending her time entertaining other crowned-heads would have been better than being stranded in a desert, though I doubt that's your point. Does she do anything to change the world she's found outside the palace? Simply fathoming how to remain free in this world isn't the most impressive of goals. What does she want after she gets out of the desert?

As Pegi was reveling in her freedom until she encountered the Truthists, maybe she should limit her roaming to places where the Truthists aren't. Is Truthism a worldwide religion or a local cult?

What are the terms of the curse? First she must lose herself, and then she must find herself, but what happens if she figures out what that means and succeeds? The curse is ended? It's not clear what ending the curse means, since she was basically cursed to do what she wanted to do.


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10. Author Of The Week: Chat with Lindsey Klingele (The Marked Girl), Plus Giveaway!

Welcome to our new weekly special feature post, Author Of The Week!! Each week we will be interviewing a different YA author and highlighting their upcoming release! We will also be hosting a giveaway of the book we are highlighting!!   Introducing Lindsey Klingele, YABC's Author of the Week!!  ...

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11. SOL Tuesday + Some Announcements

Link-up to our weekly writing challenge right here.

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12. Ten years later

This little doodle celebrates the fact that I've been posting drawings on the web for ten years, here's to ten more.

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13. This journal doesn’t care who you are (in a good way)

Hypertronic LiteraryHypertrophic Literary (AL) is open to submissions for upcoming issues. Looking for pieces that evoke a physical reaction, make readers feel something: joy, nausea, shock, desperation. Open to submissions of poetry, fiction, excerpts, and nonfiction. Hypertrophic accepts work in all genres and “[doesn’t] care who you are, if you’ve been published before, if it’s your first book or seventy-fourth.”

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14. David Tod Roy (1933-2016)

       David Tod Roy has passed away; he is best-known for his translation of the classic Chinese novel The Plum in the Golden Vase or, Chin P'ing Mei; see the Princeton University Press publicity page (for volume one), or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk. (I've only read the old four-volume Clement Egerton translation, The Golden Lotus (with its (in)decorous Latin passages ...) -- decades ago -- and would love to tackle this one at some point.)
       No English-language obituaries yet that I could find -- but see, for now, for example, My life: David Tod Roy from a coupe of years ago at the South China Morning Post.

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15. Tiago Galo

Tiago Galo

Tiago Galo is a freelance designer and illustrator based in Lisbon. Influenced by unconventional cinema, comics, and people watching, his series of red and blue illustrations are simply charming no matter what peculiar situation his pudgy characters find themselves in.

Tiago Galo

Tiago Galo 3

Tiago Galo

Tiago Galo

 

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16. Searching for Community

Preparing for my first ALSC guest blog post, I entered the search term “community” on the main page of the ALSC blog.  I wanted to make sure that I was not bringing up something already that had already been discussed.  As librarians, we pride ourselves on our detailed, often photographic memories, and enjoy setting the record straight. It’s in our DNA.

I searched for the word community because after 21 years as a children’s librarian, everything has boiled down to community for me.   I remember some great story times, fun summer reading programs, the excitement of Harry Potter, and selecting materials for a new library branch that was being built. I’ve worked with and for some innovative librarians and in some beautiful buildings.

I’ve decided that community matters the most to me.  The changes in publishing have been quite interesting. Technology and its accompanying acronyms have been overwhelming, but still exhilarating.

The daily interactions with my community-with the children, the parents and other customers I are what make this profession so important to me. Here’s why:  Many librarians are introverts.  Often, we go to library school because we love information, books and systems, and we may just love them more than people.

I spent perhaps the first 15 years of being a children’s librarian figuring out what it meant to be a librarian in my community.  I knew that I liked working with children. And then it hit me:  I realized that my presence in the community meant children and parents would see someone different than themselves, and that others would see someone that did resemble themselves.  In both cases I began to see that library programs, and more specifically story time, brought together people that might not ordinarily spend time with each other outside of the library.

I’m African American, and although I think of myself first as a person, I’m aware that my customers might see me first as a person of color. In fact, for the small children that I see weekly, I might be one of the first persons of color that they see regularly.

Yes, it is extremely important that children see themselves in books. I am thrilled that the topic of diversity in books is being widely discussed and that there is an increase in the number of titles that show what the true makeup of our communities is.

I’d like to add to the discussion by saying this:  When you step into a place and see someone that looks like you, it normalizes your experience. Our world is no longer monochromatic, and the places where we gather information or gather with others must not be either. It is good to remember the power of the relationships in our communities and the power of the desire that parents have to do good things for their kids.

Libraries have always been good at creating programs to bring our communities in. After all, story time is a program. What I believe is that a program is just the icing on the cake. The cake is the foundation of what we, the librarians create by welcoming our customers, all of our customers. We welcome our customers by becoming a part of the fabric of our communities and making our presence known, and our presence must be that which represents the world we live in.

********************************************************************

Photo courtesy of guest blogger

Photo courtesy of guest blogger

Our guest blogger is Ericka Chilcoat. Ericka is a Librarian at the Merced County Library and gets her best ideas about Children’s Services when she is eating Thai food.

Please note that as a guest post, the views expressed here do not represent the official position of ALA or ALSC.

If you’d like to write a guest post for the ALSC Blog, please contact Mary Voors, ALSC Blog manager, at alscblog@gmail.com.

The post Searching for Community appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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17. Memorial Day 2016: Let's Celebrate Memorial Day by Barbara deRobertis

Did you know that Memorial Day was originally called Decoration Day?  During the Civil War, people began to decorate the graves of fallen soldiers with flowers and flags to honor them and their service.  The tradition continues after the Civil War ended and the day eventually became Memorial Day.

I have to be honest and say I didn't know that Memorial Day began with the Civil War.  I did know that when it became Memorial Day, it also became a day to honor those fallen soldiers of all of the wars the United States has been involved in - from the Revolutionary War to our present day conflicts, but apparently I still had things to learn.

Like me, kids probably know the true meaning of Memorial Day from school, especially since it means a day off for lots of them, and the official start of summer, with swimming, picnics, barbecues and getting together with friends and family.  And that's all good.

But if you would like your kids to know and appreciate the day more, then Let's Celebrate Memorial Day by Barbara deRobertis is an excellent place to begin.  This slender book covers not just the history of Memorial Day, but explains traditions associated with it, such as why poppies are associated with it and different kinds of celebrations.

There is a section on war memorials around the country, although most are in Washington DC and if you have''t visited yet, prepare for an emotional but rewarding experience and bring tissues.  There is also a section on different kinds of observances around the country, many of which have sadly been cancelled this year due to poor weather conditions.  And the book acknowledges the veterans, boy and girl scouts around the country that decorate the graves of every single soldier buried in a national cemetery, so no soldier goes unrecognized on Memorial Day.  And last but not least, the book reminds us that "Freedom is never free."

There are lots of photos throughout the book, large print for beginning readers, and easy to understand text.  All in all, Let's Celebrate Memorial Day is an excellent book for learning about Memorial Day, for anyone who doesn't know or needs a little refresher.

Oh yes, and it reminds us to take a moment at 3:00 PM to stop what we are doing and remember our fallen heroes, and thank those presently serving in our Armed Forces.

This book is recommended for readers age 6+
This book was sent to me by the publisher.

In Memoriam
FCP 1955-2001

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18. Happy Memorial Day and Heat-Soaked Mondaze

I have nothing noteworthy for you today: not a thing. For one thing, it's a holiday. Gimme a break. Also, it is really HOT. Thirdly, I'm trapped in the mental quagmire that is novel revision, and it is a doozy. But I did want to pop my head up and... Read the rest of this post

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19. It's Raining Cats and Dogs! - a musicwrap









Where in the world did that phrase originate?  


The most common explanation is:  In olden times, homes had thatched roofs in which domestic animals such as cats and dogs would like to hide.  In heavy rain, the animals would either be washed out of the thatch, or rapidly abandon it for better shelter, so it would seem to be raining cats and dogs.  (FYI)



Unwrapping...







It's Raining Cats and Dogs!

Sing-Along Animal Songs


A new book-CD features ten original songs performed by Al Simmons, Connie Kaldor, Jessica Vigneault, Pau Campagne, and more; illustrations by Marie-Eve Tremblay

Available on June 17, 2016 from the Secret Mountain



Unwrapping some fabulous illustrations...















About the book-CD


Kid's are great animals lovers so it just flows naturally that they would love a whole load of songs about these fascinating critters.  Turn the music on, turn the tunes up and and let the kids be entertained with ten toe-tapping, hand-clapping, unforgettable songs by top-notch singer-songwriters.  

I am so happy to introduce this excellent combo to you.  It's a celebration of friendship, the blues, unrequited love, over-the-moon love for a zany dad, and a lullaby for a beloved dog, just to name a few.  It is intended for ages 3-5 and running time is 28 minutes.  

The illustrations drive the music and vice-versa.  They are playful, whimsical, and ever so kid-friendly.  It is a winner for sure.  I highly recommend it. 




Unwrapping the track listing for you...


Holy Cow! -  Al Simmons
How I Love Them all! - Michelle Campagne
The Musical Cat - Geneviève Toupin
Twelve Kittens - Thomas Hellman and Emilie Clepper
Three Little Mice Marched Merrily  - Paul Campagne
Papa's Quiet Rascals - Glen Bowser
I Love That Dog - Connie Kaldor
Thelma the Cow and Bozo the Dog - Connie Kaldor
A Hunter Through and Through (Sir's Song) - Jessica Vigneault
Lullaby for My Sleepy Dog - Annick Brémault 


The Secret Mountain is dedicated to the creation of children’s books, videos and audio recordings of the highest quality.
Visit www.thesecretmountain.com for the latest news.


About the illustrator...



Marie-Eve Tremblay, a graduate in graphic design from the University of Montreal, has illustrated articles for several magazines.  She has also collaborated with authors on half-dozen children's books, including the series "Questions and Answers About..." (Osborne Publishing).  She lives in Montreal.




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*Email:  Storywrapsblog@gmail.com
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I put hours of work finding the best kid's books to review for you each day.  If you enjoy visiting Storywraps and would like to donate something for my time and effort I would greatly appreciate it.

Go to the top of my blog on the right hand corner (above my photo) and please donate what you feel lead to give.  The amount you donate and the frequency you donate is totally up to you.  I thank you in advance for your support.  I love what I do and appreciate any amount that you may give so I can make our community even better.  Thanks a million! 



Read on and read always!


It's a wrap.

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20. The Thank You Book, by Mo Willems: A terrific finale for Elephant and Piggie (ages 4-8)

It's almost the end of the year for us, and kids are starting to think about how hard it is to say goodbye to favorite teachers. I wish I could give every teacher a copy of The Thank You Book, Mo Willem's terrific finale for his Elephant and Piggie series.

This is a must-read series; kids of all ages love the friendship and banter between Elephant and Piggie, especially 1st graders who are venturing into reading independently.

The Thank You Book
from the Elephant and Piggie series
by Mo Willems
Disney-Hyperion, 2016
Your local library
Amazon
ages 4-8
*best new book*
Gerald and Piggie are best friends. They help each other, they play with each other, and they give each other advice--plenty of it. Piggie is outgoing, and Gerald is cautious. Piggie tends to be head-strong, while Gerald tends to be a worrier. This combination creates plenty of laughs, and it lets kids see different sides of their own personalities.

Kids love reading Elephant and Piggie books aloud--the whole story is told through dialog which bubbles over with emotion. As my friend Carrie Gelson wrote in her Goodreads review,
"This series has transformed many a little reader. It has given the gift of expression, confidence, laughter and fun. And it ends with gratitude."
Gerald and Piggie have starred in twenty five books(!!) together. For their finale, Piggie decides to thank everyone. She's so happy, that she's thanking of all her friends, "everyone who is important to me." But Gerald is worried that she might forget someone...someone very important.
"Thank you all for being great friends!"
Willems creates tension with ease, as Gerald gets more and more upset. Readers are just sure that he wants Piggie to thank HIM, but Willems pulls out the perfect surprise ending.
"You are forgetting someone! Someone VERY important."
In a delightful twist, Gerald turns to Piggie and reminds her that they need to thank their readers. “We could not be ‘us’ without you,” says Gerald. Piggie joins in, adding, “You are the best!” Talk about a moment that melts my heart, each and every time I read it. Willems honors the hard work that young readers do in bringing stories to life, and he does so with joy, humor and heart.

As a teacher and a librarian, I want to thank every child who's shared their reading lives with me, every parent who's entrusted their child to me, every author who's shared a bit of themselves with us through their words. Thank YOU, Mo Willems, for bringing so much joy to all of us, helping us create so many teachable moments, so many wonderful conversations.

Head on over to ThankoRama.com to download, print, and fill out your own #ThankoRama speech bubbles. Teachers, definitely check out The World of Elephant and Piggie Teaching Guide.

Thank you, my blog readers, for sharing the joy of reading with me and with all the kids in your lives! The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Disney-Hyperion. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.

©2016 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

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21. Prémio Camões

       They've announced that this year's Prémio Camões -- the leading Portuguese-language author prize -- will go to Raduan Nassar; see, for example, the report at Globo (with a convenient full list of previous winners at the end).
       Penguin Classics have recently published two of his titles -- though the editions are not yet US-available; get your copy of A Cup of Rage at Amazon.co.uk, and of Ancient Tillage at Amazon.co.uk.

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22. Wanted: Work by writers who ‘like to watch the world burn’

SlashnBurn is “an anti-art arts journal seeking to publish and bring attention to work outside the conveyor belt work coming out of most workshop-based MFA programs.” Currently accepting submissions in fiction, flash fiction, comics, creative nonfiction, memoir, poetry, reviews, and blended-genre. No hard genre work. High-concept is fine, but grounded in real human conflict and action. Deadline: Rolling.

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23. Sketching in a colonial farmhouse


I shared this sketch a few years ago, but just found some video clips so you can see what the scene looked like. (Link to video) Previous post: A Family Eating Dinner, 1760 style

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24. Animation Art Auction Wars: Bonhams, Heritage, Van Eaton Holding Back-to-Back-to-Back Auctions

Around two thousand pieces of animation art and ephemera will be sold at auction in June.

The post Animation Art Auction Wars: Bonhams, Heritage, Van Eaton Holding Back-to-Back-to-Back Auctions appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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25. I am stuck with plotting, but pantsing does not work either.

Question: First off sorry for any grammar / spelling mistakes. English is only my third language so a few might slip in here. My question is the following:

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