What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from All 1562 Blogs, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 2,000
1. How to set up a blog in no time

How to set up a blog in no time WordPress Plugin इंटरनेट की महत्ता देखते हुए यही लगता है कि Blog आज के समय  की जरुरत बन चुकी है. हम बहुत काम ब्लॉग के माध्यम से भी कर सकते हैं … जैसाकि अपनी कला को दिखाना,  अपना बिजनेस प्रोमोट करना आदि बहुत से काम ब्लॉग […]

The post How to set up a blog in no time appeared first on Monica Gupta.

Add a Comment
2. Book Review: Not Dark Yet, by Berit Ellingsen

Not Dark Yet by Berit Ellingsen
Two Dollar Radio
ISBN: 978-1937412354
Fiction, 202 pages

I don't review a lot of books, but when I do it's because I really want to--I want to share something important and real that I think other writers and readers will enjoy and benefit from. That's why I'm  taking a look today at Not Dark Yet by author Berit Ellingsen, a writer who has enriched my world and inspired me to keep writing, keep striving, keep going, and always take the time to read a good book.

I first heard about Berit via Twitter, the best source I know for discovering books and authors I wouldn't usually have the chance to learn about. Thanks to so many bookstores disappearing from my neighborhood (three more have just gone bankrupt this past month), social media has become my primary source for literary browsing, and when I read a post about Berit and her collection of short stories: Beneath the Liquid Skin, I had to order the book, prontoNothing in my extensive reading life had prepared me for the power and originality of those stories, so naturally I couldn't wait to read her novel, Not Dark Yet. I don't think anything else I've read before or after can compare with either of these books.

Berit lives in Norway, and her work reflects a beautiful sense of place, an isolated starkness that is in direct contrast with much of my own experience. Even desert-y Albuquerque doesn't have the sharp, cold lunar feeling I get from her descriptions. Coupled with this strong geographic presence is a staggering sense of precision to every word she writes, an exactness that has me re-reading many of her sentences for the sheer pleasure of it. In many ways I consider her a "writer's writer" and after I finished reading Not Dark Yet I sat down with my journal to examine what it was that made me love this book so much. Here goes:
  • Setting. An unspecified future; a mysterious Nordic city; a world without clear boundaries, countries, or cultures: the world of Not Dark Yet is a mystery. Yet despite the deliberate masking of time and place, I don't think I read a a single description that left me wondering where I was, or what the characters were experiencing. As I read, I felt every needle of rain, every clod of mud, every veil of mist--and I was actually sorry that I couldn't live there--and this was a depiction of a world in chaos and dangerous change! I mean, what kind of skill makes an awful world attractive?
  • Characters. Main character Brandon Minamoto isn't your everyday protagonist (thank goodness). A complex near-loner with a troubled military history, Brandon is torn between the need to form relationships and the need to be true to himself. I sympathized with his plight every step of the way and was heartbroken when I had to say good-bye on the last page.
  • Plot. I hate plot-spoilers of any kind so I won't drop even a single hint, but I was hooked right from the beginning. I HAD to know: WHAT WILL HAPPEN TO BRANDON?? You'll have to read the book to find out, but his story arc kept me glued to my seat.
  • Writing Style. Oh, wow. There is a zen-like simplicity and clarity to Berit's voice and style that I admire immensely. Seemingly matter-of-fact and terse on the surface, each sentence builds toward the next, roiling on your sub-conscious like some menacing monolithic disaster threatening to change everything you know or believe is true. It's rare to come across so much power in a deceptively plain-spoken sentence, and I found myself constantly wondering how she managed to control it.
  • Subject Matter. I hesitate to call Not Dark Yet science fiction, but I can't think of another category that would fit as well. Sci-fi isn't usually my first choice when choosing a book, but when it goes in the direction of also being character-driven literary fiction, I'm a fan. Not Dark Yet is an excellent example of how to blend (and bend) genre distinctions to good advantage, and one I wish more books would emulate.
  • Metaphor. I've always been impressed with Berit's use of metaphor and symbolism. Whether the focus is on food, the weather, or just getting dressed for a holiday--each scene, story event, or snippet of back story is rich with added-value meaning and subtext.
  • Discussion Points. Which brings me to my favorite thing about this book: I could talk about it all day. It's a book that makes me think. Good literature should lead to great (and memorable) conversation, and I can't imagine anyone not having an opinion or strong feelings about what happens to Brandon and the rest of the cast. In other words, it's the perfect book club book--especially if club members enjoy digging deep and aren't afraid to not always agree on social issues, character motivation, or "what would you do?" if placed in Brandon's shoes. Strong stuff.
So with all that said, I think I have to read the book again. Not Dark Yet is quirky, original, and packed with secrets--the kind you can't wait to unravel and sit with for a long while after. I found the book extremely compelling and one that has stirred my curiosity and desire to learn more, write more, and even try my hand at some fan-art. Highly recommended for readers who enjoy an authentic book of ideas and a serious voyage of self-discovery. Five stars from me--six if I could!

Tip of the Day: Be sure to check out Berit Ellingsen and her wonderful books. After all, to a writer it's love and reading that makes the world go 'round!

0 Comments on Book Review: Not Dark Yet, by Berit Ellingsen as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
3. The Underground Abductor

The Underground Abductor. (Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales #5) Nathan Hale. 2015. Abrams. 128 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: It is time to hang this spy! Are you sure? Can't we get one more story out of him first?

Premise/plot: Nathan Hale sets out to prove that America isn't perfectly perfect, and, that America has in fact "taken part in some truly horrible, despicable, abominable, atrocious, downright evil acts." He speaks, of course, of slavery. And in this graphic novel, he tells the story of Harriet Tubman (aka Araminta Ross). It's an intense story without a doubt. He speaks of her growing up in slavery, the abuses she faced, the challenges she overcame, her marrying a free man, her decision to run away, her decision to run back into slavery. For it became her mission to travel back and forth between North and South saving slaves--escorting slaves to safety, to Canada, in fact. All via the "underground railroad" of abolitionists. Some of this information I was familiar with, but, some was new to me. For example, I was not aware of her head injury perhaps leading to her narcolepsy. I had no idea of her visions either!

My thoughts: I am so glad I discovered this series. I really have enjoyed reading these books practically back to back. I would definitely recommend all of the books in the series. I hope it is a very LONG series.


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

0 Comments on The Underground Abductor as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
4. Coming soon...

They say some people match their dogs.
I wish I had a dog so I could know what I look like.
I so often enjoy looking behind the camera at the world.
For an upcoming project, I was asked to make a kid portrait of myself. 
A selfie? A sketchie? A skelphie?

I approached it the same way I approach a new character. 
Sketch a zillion bundle of possibles,
then hone in on who that character is.
So.. who am I?


What do I look like anyway?
What do I feel like?
What would I look like if I combined me now
with some of my favorite things from childhood?
Books. Overalls. Sunshine. Rain.
Puddle boots.
 
This is the girl I settled on. Bookish. Hopeful. Happy.
Not afraid to get messy.

Here's to finding your happy self this week, my friends.



0 Comments on Coming soon... as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
5. GOLD.fish




0 Comments on GOLD.fish as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
6. Use Guided Reading Levels to Find the Perfect Books on the First Book Marketplace

Book Relief high school girl readingUse Guided Reading Levels to find the perfect books for every child you serve. Thanks to the feedback from our community of educators, First Book Marketplace users can now utilize our Advanced Search tool to find books with Guided Reading Levels (GRLs). GRLs are great for both students and educators.

Here’s why: 
GRLs help educators:

  • Assess the fluency and reading level of each child
  • Track student progress over time
  • Organize school and classroom libraries so that educators and kids can access the best-fit books for every child

GRLs help students:

  • Find books at their level of confidence
  • Develop the skills they need to read increasingly challenging books
  • Discover books they will love to read again and again

Watch the short video tutorial below to learn more about how to the First Book Marketplace’s Advanced Search to find books by GRL:

If you’re an educator serving kids in need, click here to register to receive brand-new books for the children you serve for free or low cost.

The post Use Guided Reading Levels to Find the Perfect Books on the First Book Marketplace appeared first on First Book Blog.

0 Comments on Use Guided Reading Levels to Find the Perfect Books on the First Book Marketplace as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
7. Prescription

My headache was a killer;
I was overdue for lunch.
Two hours at the iPhone store
Had wearied me a bunch.

The remedy was simple, though
(Much more so than the phone) –
Two Advil with some water
And a Shake Shack custard cone.

The flavor was a favorite
And the wait was not too long.
In just a flash I felt that
Not a thing at all was wrong.

So here is my prescription
When a headache makes you groan –
Take some Advil for your head
And for your soul, an ice cream cone!

0 Comments on Prescription as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
8. going deeper

There is, in fact, no master plan, but this is what is happening: I'm growing.

No, I'm not referring to the physiological impact of the morning oatmeal cookie (butterscotch!). I'm referring to my spheres of interest, the books I'm reading, the ways I'm paying attention to the news, the bravado I displayed when I buckled down to learn how to throw a clay pot on a wheel (to learn, not to master; hardly master), the expanding repertoire in the kitchen. Hisham Matar's The Return has taught me some of the history, geography, and politics of Libya (and disappeared dissidents). Rebecca Mead has taught me Middlemarch and George Eliot. Katie Roiphe has taught me John Updike, Maurice Sendak, Dylan Thomas, and James Salter (among others). Scott Anderson, with his glorious New York Times Magazine essay, has taught me the antecedents of contemporary Middle East. Viet Thanh Nguyen is teaching me, with his Pulitzer winning The Sympathizer, the Vietnamese experience of war.


The world is complex. The news requires perspective. Life is once. I'm going deeper.

0 Comments on going deeper as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
9. Verse of the Day

John 14:6
Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, 
the truth, and the life: no man cometh 
unto the Father, but by me.

There's an old song by Point of Grace that I was listening to this morning in the car that has this verse in it and it's been on my mind all morning. Here's the link if your interested in listening to it also! 

Jesus is the way. No matter what your facing, He is able...

There's freedom in that....

Summer is officially over for us but here's a few fun photos that I took.

Bubbles
This was absolutely the best bundt cake I've ever had. It was from Nothing Bundt Cake. It was really rich and very moist. Super delicious!

We ate tons of Mexican food this summer while visiting the southwest.

I'm really trying to get back into a routine with the new school year started and lazy summer days over but it's a challenge. I find myself searching for anything related to "organization" on Pinterest these days. How about you?

Blessings,
Jenni

0 Comments on Verse of the Day as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
10. ‘Gumball’ Creator Ben Bocquelet To Headline Pictoplasma NYC

The character design conference returns to NYC this November.

The post ‘Gumball’ Creator Ben Bocquelet To Headline Pictoplasma NYC appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

0 Comments on ‘Gumball’ Creator Ben Bocquelet To Headline Pictoplasma NYC as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
11. Para minha mãe


Minha mãe é uma menina 
de tranças loiras
olhos verdes
sorriso doce
coração carioca
onde não falta espaço
e sobra tempo
pra no silêncio do gesto
falar ao dia:
eu te amo!


Feliz aniversário, minha mãe,

Eliana Quintella de Linhares.







0 Comments on Para minha mãe as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
12. Petersen Museum.

Gouache painting of the Petersen Museum last weekend.

0 Comments on Petersen Museum. as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
13. #picturesmeanbusiness: publishing perspectives

Big thanks to Alastair Horne for running this #PicturesMeanBusiness interview on Publishing Perspectives:



You can follow Alastair on Twitter at @pressfuturist, and @pubperspectives. Big thanks to Declan Shalvey, over in the USA, who's been doing similar work for the #ArtCred campaign. If you're at New York Comic Con, be sure to support the talk he's giving. (@declanshalvey on Twitter.)



You can read more about the #PicturesMeanBusiness campaign at picturesmeanbusiness.com.

Add a Comment
14. Mort Drucker

via Paperwalker http://ift.tt/2bfjBJn

The National Cartoonists Society has released a 40-minute video profiling legendary cartoonist and illustrator Mort Drucker.

via

0 Comments on Mort Drucker as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
15. The Five Building Blocks You Need to Make Great Art

Manelle Oliphant Illustration - illustration@manelleoliphant.com

Periodic Table of The Elements

What’s that called? That image up there… yes, I know this is a blog for artists but humor me.

It’s the periodic table, right? Right. To be even more precise it’s the Periodic Table of the Elements.

What are elements? Elements are things that help you build other things. The elements on the periodic table build pretty much everything. We can’t break them down smaller, and when you put them together, they make new things. For example, when the elements of hydrogen and oxygen combine they make water.

Ok, I’m done talking about science, but there is a point. Just like elements make the world around us, We also use elements to make pictures. They are the Elements of design.

The Elements of Design Are:

Line, Shape, Value, Texture, and Color.

Take a moment to think about any art you’ve ever seen. If you can think of a piece that doesn’t use one or more of these elements, I would think you were crazy. Because as far as I know, it’s not possible to make art without the Elements of Design.

Let’s talk about them now.

Line

Leonardo Da Vinci used line to create this sketch.

Leonardo Da Vinci used line to create this sketch.

I’m pretty sure you know what a line is. We use them all the time. Lots of times we use lines to make shapes. Lines can be hesitant, beautiful, bold, straight, curved, sketchy, and much more. Read more about line by clicking here.

Shape

As I said, lines can make shapes, but you can make them in other ways. Take a paint brush and blob it on your paper. You’ve just made a shape. Lots of times we think the shapes with names, triangle, circle, square, oval, etc. But there are also shapes that don’t have names. These shapes are part of the elements of design too.

The way you choose to design your shapes can have a huge impact on how your art looks. Let’s face it; some shapes are just more interesting than others.

Value

Value is how light or dark something is. Think of a black and white movie or a grayscale image. The reason you can still tell what is going on is because of the values. Values tell us a lot of stuff, where the light is coming from, where forms change direction, if it’s a sunny or overcast day, and lots of other things.

When I see paintings that aren’t working, it’s usually because there is a problem with the values. I’ve written some other articles about value. Read this oneor this one. 

Texture

Monet used Heavy Brush Strokes created paintings with Real Texture.

Monet used Heavy Brush Strokes created paintings with Real Texture.

Texture is how something feels, rough, smooth, furry, slimy, etc. and texture can be real, or implied.

Real texture is really there. Like the texture of the paper, or the ridges and bumps created from brush strokes.

Implied texture is texture you only show in your picture.  For example, if you paint a tree trunk, and it looks rough but actually isn’t if you touch it, that is implied texture.

You can learn more about texture in this article on chrisoatley.com 

Color

Red, Yellow, Blue, etc. Right? Right… The thing is it doesn’t just stop there. Every color has a value, temperature, and saturation.

I’ve created a worksheet to walk you through the different aspects of color and show you ways to use them. You can download it free when you sign up for my mailing list.  Click here to sign up and Get The Color Worksheet.

The Elements as building blocks

By now you I hope you see how the Elements of Design make up the pictures, sculptures, and other art we see. If you want to work more with them, I’ve created a downloadable worksheet so you can get to know them a little better. You know, make friends and stuff. I hope you enjoy it.

Download Elements of Design Worksheet (0)

The post The Five Building Blocks You Need to Make Great Art appeared first on Manelle Oliphant Illustration.

0 Comments on The Five Building Blocks You Need to Make Great Art as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16. Political Cartoon – Current Topics

  Political Cartoon – Current Topics मेरा सिधु आएगा .. ! भाजपा हो, कांग्रेस हो या आम आदमी पार्टी सभी की नजरे नवजोत सिह सिधु पर है कि क्या फैसला लेते हैं  भिन्नता में एकता का साक्षात उदाहरण है कि पार्टी अलग अलग हो विचार धारा अलग अलग हो पर मंथन एक है और वो […]

The post Political Cartoon – Current Topics appeared first on Monica Gupta.

Add a Comment
17. LAST SEEN LEAVING by Caleb Roehrig \\ The YA Version of Gone Girl?

Review by Sara... LAST SEEN LEAVING By Caleb Roehrig Series: No Hardcover: 336 pages Publisher: Feiwel & Friends (October 4, 2016) Language: English Goodreads | Amazon Flynn's girlfriend has disappeared. How can he uncover her secrets without revealing his own?Flynn's girlfriend, January, is missing. The cops are asking questions he can't answer, and her friends are telling stories

0 Comments on LAST SEEN LEAVING by Caleb Roehrig \\ The YA Version of Gone Girl? as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
18. Presidential Polar Bear Post Card Project No. 208 - 8.22.16


The cross-country coaching season has begun... so a running bear it is! GRRR!

0 Comments on Presidential Polar Bear Post Card Project No. 208 - 8.22.16 as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
19. Filler Chapters

Question: How do you fill in time between significant events? I have seen in this website that you should not use fillers to fill in time but without them

Add a Comment
20. Review: Girl Underwater

Title: Girl Underwater
Author: Claire Kells
Publisher: Dutton
Publication date: 03/31/2015
Stars: 5

Summary: An adventurous debut novel that cross cuts between a competitive college swimmer’s harrowing days in the Rocky Mountains after a major airline disaster and her recovery supported by the two men who love her—only one of whom knows what really happened in the wilderness. 

Nineteen-year-old Avery Delacorte loves the water. Growing up in Brookline, Massachusetts, she took swim lessons at her community pool and captained the local team; in high school, she raced across bays and sprawling North American lakes. Now a sophomore on her university’s nationally ranked team, she struggles under the weight of new expectations but life is otherwise pretty good. Perfect, really.
That all changes when Avery’s red-eye home for Thanksgiving makes a ditch landing in a mountain lake in the Colorado Rockies. She is one of only five survivors, which includes three little boys and Colin Shea, who happens to be her teammate. Colin is also the only person in Avery’s college life who challenged her to swim her own events, to be her own person—something she refused to do. Instead she’s avoided him since the first day of freshman year. But now, faced with sub-zero temperatures, minimal supplies, and the dangers of a forbidding nowhere, Avery and Colin must rely on each other in ways they never could’ve imagined.
In the wilderness, the concept of survival is clear-cut. Simple. In the real world, it’s anything but.


Review: This book... so many things I want to say. From the beginning it's an extremely gripping tale. The book jumped around a bit. Which I normally hate. However, in the first half of this book it's perfect! I love that it does that. It gives you glimpses of what had happened and what is happening. At the end of the book I do not like it so much. It feels a little sloppy and can be a bit confusing. I really had a hard time following those parts. Like when they were drinking and things started to happen or the part near the end in which I cannot describe because I don't want to ruin it. I feel the beginning of the book was perfect. But once you got to the end it just seemed to fall apart. The story still worked but I had to re-read pages more than a couple times. I loved that she got back on the plane. I feel like she should have said something to the lady that laughed at her for saying something about a plane crash though. I loved this book so much that I do not know how to rate it based off of that. However, I was extremely satisfied with the epilogue. That is how I had hoped the book would go the whole way. It's a perfect fit. Colin I loved Colin. He is such a strong character. You love him from the very beginning. Well at least I did. Even when Avery tries to avoid him like the plague. I didn't like Lee so much. I didn't even know Avery had a boyfriend in the beginning of the book. She was talking about how hot Phil was. Lee as a person, he was a good guy. But I didn't like him because I didn't want them to be together. Those little boys were so strong and continued to be strong especially Tim. Then there was Avery although I am not a big fan of her name and I connected with Colin before I connected with her. She was amazing. When she wasn't strong Colin was. They were an amazing team getting through those 5 days together. She put too much on herself and she didn't want help at first after they were rescued. It took her a long time to heal. But she did, she finally accepted help. I would recommend this book based on that just be weary of the end.

0 Comments on Review: Girl Underwater as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
21. Thank You, JK: A DreamWorks Artist Remembers The Studio That Katzenberg Created

Yesterday was Jeffrey Katzenberg's last day as head of DreamWorks Animation. What he created will never exist again.

The post Thank You, JK: A DreamWorks Artist Remembers The Studio That Katzenberg Created appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

0 Comments on Thank You, JK: A DreamWorks Artist Remembers The Studio That Katzenberg Created as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
22. Mars Huang (B6 Drawing Man)

via Lines and Colors :: a blog about drawing, painting, illustration, comics, concept art and other visual arts http://ift.tt/2bvUzTX

Mars Huang (B6 Drawing Man), watercolor and ink sketches
Mars Huang is an artist based in Japan (I think — most of the pieces are labeled as scenes from Japan and Taiwan). Though he signs his work “Mars”, his Tumblr blog credits him only as “B6 Drawing man”; it wasn’t until I followed a link to one of his process videos on Vimeo, that I came across his actual name.

His blog is filled with delightfully loose and gestural ink and watercolor sketches of architecture, interior spaces, and, in particular, quirky vehicles like scooters and small cars — often loaded down with luggage.

He excels at reducing complex subjects down to their linear essentials, highlighting them with just enough touches of color to give you a sense of texture and presence.

Be sure to follow the link trough to the larger images on his blog, the small example images I’m posting here don’t give an adequate feeling for the work.

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

0 Comments on Mars Huang (B6 Drawing Man) as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
23. Grammar Checklist

This handy checklist will help you eliminate grammatical mistakes in your manuscript.

http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/grammar-girls-editing-checklist

0 Comments on Grammar Checklist as of 8/23/2016 12:36:00 PM
Add a Comment
24. Writer Wednesday: Where It All Begins


It's my daughter's last week of summer break, and we've been busy formatting her first book and reading. She read three books in two days! I can't tell you how happy it makes me to see her love of the written word. She's even writing news articles--okay, so they're about Monster High dolls, but she's nine. ;) I'm amazed at how well she puts her thoughts to paper and/or screen.

She reminds me of someone--a little girl who always had a book in her face (hence my awful eyesight). A little girl who wrote poems and short stories and thought they made the best gifts for her family members.

For some of us, writing is something we've done since we could hold a pencil. But I know that's not the case for everyone, so today I want to hear how you came to be a lover of the written word (as a reader and/or writer).

How did it begin for you?

Add a Comment
25. 10 Reasons to Celebrate Bilingual Books

Last year, we gave our 10 favorite reasons to read diversely. One reason being that we live in a diverse world, so why not the books that we read? Books help us see the world through someone else’s eyes, and in the case of bilingual books, through another language.

Here are our ten favorite reasons to read bilingual books!

Bilingual books…

  1. Teach us how to read in two languages.
  2. Celebrate the 22% of students who speak a language other than English at home.
  3. Develop strong critical thinking skills
  4. Keep our brains young, healthy, and sharp.
  5. Expose us to new ways of communicating.
  6. Make reading an inclusive activity for all students.
  7. Highlight the achievement of knowing more than one language.
  8. Encourage interest in other cultures and languages.
  9. Expand our vocabulary and lexicon.
  10. Bring readers together.

Lee and Low Bilingual Books Poster

Tell us why you read bilingual books!

0 Comments on 10 Reasons to Celebrate Bilingual Books as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts