What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(from all 1551 Blogs)

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from All 1551 Blogs, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 2,000
1. MARCH ADNESS, Round 1, Day 1


Yes, it's time for March Adness. 
64 ads competing for the top prize:
an appearance in a major publication.

We have four brackets.
The Blog Bracket (ads about EE and his blog)
The Book Bracket (ads for EE's books)
The Product Bracket (stuff EE endorses or sells)
The Miscellaneous Bracket (other ads)

On each of the next eight days I'll post half of a bracket.
Vote for your faves in the comments. 
Use any criteria you wish.
I won't actually post your votes, 
as they might influence later voters, but I will compile them.
Once we're down to 32 ads, we'll start round 2.
Voting remains open on all games
until the entire round is complete.
Click on ads to enlarge them.



"BLOG" BRACKET (Top Half)

Game 1: Bubble Bath vs Magic Lamp





Game 2: Joyous Woman vs. Big Ben





Game 3: Mime Trio Vs. Water Cooler





Game 4: Smitten Kitten Vs. Sexy Dude




0 Comments on MARCH ADNESS, Round 1, Day 1 as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
2. an ode to Wayne, in today's Inquirer

I moved a lot as a child—and then, at last, settled in.

In this weekend's Philadelphia Inquirer, I'm writing about the place that has been close to my heart ever since that eighth-grade move, the town of Wayne, PA, which has beguiled me, supported me, and, of late, returned old friends to me.

With gratitude to all those fellow Radnorites and shop owners and librarians: this. While this Wayne story and my South Street/Magic Gardens story were written too late to be incorporated into my forthcoming collection of essays and photographs, Love: A Philadelphia Affair, both essays live close to my heart.

Meanwhile, this past week I've been watching intense movies, reading an extraordinary book, talking to the esteemed editor Daniel Menaker, sharing a glass of wine with the great Debbie Levy, and learning from my Class of Spectaculars at Penn. I'll reflect on all that in the Monday edition of tomorrow's blog.

Anyone interested in receiving a free ARC of One Thing Stolen can now enter the giveaway on Goodreads.

0 Comments on an ode to Wayne, in today's Inquirer as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
3. Weekend Links: Lots of Kidlit Book Goodness

Welcome to Weekend Links! As usual I have encountered some pretty amazing book-related articles, programs and links that I want to share with my book-loving readers.Enjoy!

weekend links

CCBC Stats Show Children’s Books Shifting Toward Diversity @publisher’s weekly

 

Want to learn how to change your family’s life in just 20 minutes a week? It’s easier than you think! Change Your Family’s Life in 20 Minutes Each Week @Scholastic Parents.

family-reading-time-amy-mascott-blog

My beloved Head Elf and Virtual Assistant Becky shared with me that she personally thought Big Hero 6 was the best kids movie that she’d seen awhile (she also said she would love her own personal Baymax). Here’s another person, and more reasons to love Big Hero 6: INTERVIEW: Big Hero 6 Producer Roy Conli Talks About Multiculturalism and Cool Nerds.

Big Hero 6

What Do Muslims Really Want Anyway?! 17 Books on Muslim World for Kids via @PragmaticMom

17-Great-Books-for-Kids-and-Teens-on-the-Arab-World-580x829

Are you a new author or an existing author with published works you need help promoting? I was fortunate enough to find some really good articles this week about that very topic:

011_036

Book Marketing 101: Five Things to Do Before Your Book is Released  via LEE and LOW
How Successful Authors Use Social Media to Sell More Books – The Write Life
Is Social Media a Good Thing for Writers? (Pros, Cons and My Tips)

By now, many of you know that our much-anticipated Waldorf Homeschool Handbook is HERE! Not only is it here, it’s been selling like hotcakes!

Waldorf Homeschool Handbook is perfect for homeschooling families who are looking for an all-in-one homeschooling guide filled with samples of lesson plans and curriculum, along with helpful hints and the secrets behind the three Areas for Optimum Learning. This wonderful resource for homeschoolers was written by author and homeschool expert Donna Ashton. If you have not grabbed your copy of the Waldorf Homeschool Handbook, we recommend that you do it ASAP! For extended book details and ordering information go HERE The Waldorf Homeschool Handbook

waldorf collage

The post Weekend Links: Lots of Kidlit Book Goodness appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

Add a Comment
4. Democracy is about more than a vote: politics and brand management

With a General Election rapidly approaching in the UK, it’s easy to get locked into a set of perennial debates concerning electoral registration, voter turnout and candidate selection. In the contemporary climate these are clearly important issues given the shift to individual voter registration, evidence of high levels of electoral disengagement and the general decline in party memberships (a trend bucked by UKIP, the Greens, and the Scottish National Party in recent months).

The post Democracy is about more than a vote: politics and brand management appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Democracy is about more than a vote: politics and brand management as of 3/1/2015 7:21:00 AM
Add a Comment
5. Alethea Kontis, author of DEAREST, on being inspired by actors and their characters

DEAREST was released a few weeks ago, and it is Alethea Kontis's third book of The Woodcutter Sisters, her series that weaves together various fairy tales. Alethea's publisher has generously provided a copy of DEAREST for one lucky winner, so make sure to enter below.

So, Alethea, what is your favorite thing about DEAREST?

When I was 27, someone I cared about deeply committed suicide. In Dearest, I brought him back to life. That person was Jonathan Brandis. 

YES, it was a schoolgirl crush of the first water, an unrequited friendship over which I spent countless hours of my teenage youth daydreaming. But when I got the news that he'd killed himself...it hit me like a truck. I was actually surprised at how intense my reaction was. We were the same age. I had already begun to blossom into my strange and beautiful life. It was not out of the realm of possibility that we might meet one day, and wouldn't I have a story to tell him! Only now we never would. 

When Mr. Eko (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje) died on the television show Lost, I was so upset that I immediately wrote him into the book I was working on at the time...and thus the character of Jolicoeur sprang forth into Enchanted fully formed. Who said I couldn't do the same for Jonathan? From this beautiful, sad, innocent, unrealized affection, came the character of Tristan Swan. While I was at it, I mentally cast the roles of Tristan's brothers, using some other star crushes of my youth. For instance: Sebastian is absolutely Noah Hathaway. I actually met Noah at Dragon Con back in 2003. I told him this fun story about Atreyu and this naming game my little sister and I used to play on long road trips. I am sure he still remembers me. 

What was your inspiration for writing DEAREST?

The "base note" fairy tale of Dearest is Hans Christian Andersen's The Wild Swans. Followed closely by The Goose Girl, Swan Lake, Tristan & Isolde, and Robert San Souci's A Weave of Words. 

What scene was really hard for you to write and why, and is that the one of which you are most proud? Or is there another scene you particularly love?

The hardest scene for me is always the "kill the bad guy" scene, because I never plot it out in advance. I know it needs to happen, but once I get there I have to think to myself, "Okay...now where are we and what have we got to make this happen?" It makes me feel a lot like Danny Ocean planning a heist on the fly. 

I do rather love the Ladyhawke-type scene at the end of Chapter 3...no spoilers, but that is the scene I read out loud when I'm on book tour. It gets a fabulous response. When I finish I snap the book shut and say, "Don't worry. Buttercup does not get eaten by the sharks at this time," just like the grandfather does in The Princess Bride. (The book, not the movie. READ THE BOOK.)

I also love the scene where a certain person shows up at the end of Chapter 15. He did not originally show up there in the first draft of the manuscript, but I caught a flaw in my logic during the revision and POOF! There he was and it changed everything else, all the way to the end. You know how authors say, "This character just showed up and started talking in their voice and I couldn't do anything but go with it"? It's a rare occurrence for me, but that's exactly what happened here. Like magic. 

What book or books would most resonate with readers who love your book--or visa versa?

The Darkangel Trilogy by Meredith Ann Pierce. Beauty, Deerskin, and The Blue Sword, by Robin McKinley. Howl's Moving Castle, by Diana Wynne Jones. Tamora Pierce's Alanna series. Alexander's Chronicles of Prydain. And anything Sharon Shinn wrote set in the world of Samaria.  

How long did you work on DEAREST?

One year. Most of the writing was done in that last few months, but it was SO nice to have the whole year to fully develop the characters and work out the plot devices. I was forced to write Hero in only a few months, so having a full year for Dearest was positively blissful. 

What did this book teach you about writing or about yourself?

That I really wish I had a year to write every book! But even then, the writing doesn't get done unless I sit my butt in that chair and do it. 

What do you hope readers will take away from DEAREST?

My hope for the whole Woodcutter series is that it inspires people of all ages to read (or re-read) the original Grimm, Andersen, Lang, and Perrault fairy tales, as well as all the other classic fantasy literature I reference in my books. Disney is a great storyteller, but I feel we lose much by letting our children believe that Disney invented fairy tales. 

How long or hard was your road to publication? How many books did you write before this one, and how many never got published?

I was born into a family of storytellers. I started reading when I was three. I started writing around the age of eight, mostly poetry. I wrote tons of poetry and short stories and essays and everything else. I started my first novel at the age of eleven (see Wattpad), but though I rewrote it in high school, I never finished it. I only finished one novel before Enchanted (which was originally published as a short story called "Sunday" in Realms of Fantasy magazine). 

But Enchanted was not the first book I sold. That book was AlphaOops: The Day Z Went First, which I wrote in eight hours and emailed to a friend who worked in the book industry. She then forwarded it to a friend of hers, and a few months later I received a surprise call from the head editor of Candlewick Press, enthusiastically telling me that the art director had read my story out loud to the entire department and they were all cracking up and could they PLEASEPLEASEPLEASE publish it?!? (I said yes.)

Was there an AHA! moment along your road to publication where something suddenly sank in and you felt you had the key to writing a novel? What was it?

I've had a couple of those AHA! Moments. The first, and biggest, came when I was about nine years old...after I wrote a poem in school called "Friendship." The world CLICKED and I knew--KNEW--I was a writer. I announced to my parents that if the whole acting thing didn't pan out (I had just starred in an 8-part miniseries on our local PBS affiliate) that I would fall back on writing. My parents didn't care for that statement...which is why I have a degree in Chemistry. 

The second biggest AHA! moment was when I working on "Sunday" as a short story. The world just kept getting bigger and bigger in my head. I'd had yet another epiphany while driving to my little sister's house in Charleston for Spoleto opening weekend, at which point I had to make a deal with myself. I was allowed to leave all these brilliant new details out of my short story, so long as I immediately turned the story into a novel when I was finished. That was one promise to myself that I was very happy to keep. 

What's your writing ritual like? Do you listen to music? Work at home or at a coffee shop or the library, etc?

I prefer silence and a comfy chaise lounge, but I will write anywhere, anytime, on anything (I have multiple scenes on Starbucks receipts and poems scribbled on the back covers of comic book digests to prove it). Here's my typical writing routine:
Step 1: Sit down with hot coffee/tea, glass of water, and laptop. 
Step 2: Write until coffee/tea gets cold. 
Step 3: Heat up coffee/tea in microwave. 
Step 4: Repeat. 
It's very glamorous, I tell you. 

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?

Be Kind. 
Be Patient. 
Be Stubborn. 

What are you working on now?

That is SUCH a dangerous question to ask me. Let's see...right now I'm editing the newest Fairy Tale Rant video and waiting to hear back from Janet Lee about the release date of our Diary of a Mad Scientist Garden Gnome. I'm working on chapter six of Trixter, a Trix novella that runs parallel to the Woodcutter sisters novels. I'm plotting out Book Four of the Woodcutter Sisters (Thieftess), and revising the first of a trilogy of New Adult short contemporary romance novels set in Sand Point, Florida. GAH, as Sophie Hatter says. There need to be more hours in the day!

ABOUT THE BOOK

Dearest
by Alethea Kontis
Hardcover
HMH Books for Young Readers
Released 2/3/2015

In her third book about the delightful Woodcutter sisters, Alethea Kontis masterfully weaves "The Wild Swans," "The Goose Girl," and a few other fine-feathered fairy tales into a magical, romantic companion novel to Enchanted and Hero.

Readers met the Woodcutter sisters (named after the days of the week) in Enchanted and Hero. In this delightful third book, Alethea Kontis weaves together some fine-feathered fairy tales to focus on Friday Woodcutter, the kind and loving seamstress. When Friday stumbles upon seven sleeping brothers in her sister Sunday's palace, she takes one look at Tristan and knows he's her future. But the brothers are cursed to be swans by day. Can Friday's unique magic somehow break the spell?

Purchase Dearest at Amazon
Purchase Dearest at IndieBound
View Dearest on Goodreads


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

New York Times bestselling author Alethea Kontis is a princess, a fairy godmother, and a geek. She’s known for screwing up the alphabet, scolding vampire hunters, and ranting about fairy tales on YouTube.

Her published works include: The Wonderland Alphabet (with Janet K. Lee), Diary of a Mad Scientist Garden Gnome (with Janet K. Lee), the AlphaOops series (with Bob Kolar), the Woodcutter Sisters fairy tale series, and The Dark-Hunter Companion (with Sherrilyn Kenyon). Her short fiction, essays, and poetry have appeared in a myriad of anthologies and magazines.

Her YA fairy tale novel, Enchanted, won the Gelett Burgess Children’s Book Award in 2012 and the Garden State Teen Book Award i 2015. Enchanted was nominated for the Audie Award in 2013, and was selected for World Book Night in 2014. Both Enchanted and its sequel, Hero, were nominated for the Andre Norton Award.

Born in Burlington, Vermont, Alethea currently lives and writes in Florida, on the Space Coast. She makes the best baklava you’ve ever tasted and sleeps with a teddy bear named Charlie.You can find Princess Alethea online at: www.aletheakontis.com.

GIVEAWAY


0 Comments on Alethea Kontis, author of DEAREST, on being inspired by actors and their characters as of 3/1/2015 7:14:00 AM
Add a Comment
6. Jessica Brody, author of UNCHANGED, on how writing a book is like building a house

As you can see from yesterday's large lineup of talented authors, we are very fortunate because so many generous folks are willing to stop by and share information about their books and writing processes. As a result, our Saturdays have become jam-packed with awesome interviews. We have decided to spread the wealth by opening up Sundays for author interviews, too. Going forward, we will share writing advice, inspiring journeys to publication, and behind-the-scenes info about the creation of your favorite books on both Saturdays and Sundays. Remember to swing by on both days to hear from from many wise and wonderful writers.

Kicking off the first Sunday of interviews is Jessica Brody with her latest novel UNCHANGED, the third and final book in her Unremembered Trilogy.

So, Jessica, what was your inspiration for writing the Unremembered Trilogy?

A few years ago, I read a newspaper article about a teen girl who was the sole survivor of a plane crash. I was instantly fascinated by the story. Namely because they had no idea why she survived when no else did. I started brainstorming reasons as to why she was so lucky. One particular reason (a rather intricate, science-fiction-inspired one) stuck in my mind and refused to leave. It continued to grow and blossom until I had an idea for an entire trilogy. A trilogy that starts with a mysterious plane crash and a single survivor.

What scene was really hard for you to write and why, and is that the one of which you are most proud? Or is there another scene you particularly love?

Normally the scenes I’m the most proud of or really fall in love with are scenes that feel effortless. They kind of just flow out of me and I feel like I don’t have to try. Like I’m just a vessel through which the story is being told. I love when that happens. Of course, it’s not every day. I’m lucky if I get 2 or 3 of those per book.

In UNCHANGED, the final book in the Unremembered trilogy, one of those scenes was actually the very last scene of the book/series. I’d had that ending in mind since I started writing the first book and I wouldn’t let myself skip ahead and write it early. So when I finally got to that scene, I felt all this enormous pressure to make it right…not to mention STRESS that I would fail and it wouldn’t come out as good as it had been in my head for the past four years. Fortunately, I love what I wrote. I think it’s even better than I pictured it. And I hope readers love it too.

What book or books would most resonate with readers who love your book--or
visa versa?

The Unremembered Trilogy has been compared to some really amazing books. Some of my favorites (that I’m honored to be compared to!) are MAXIMUM RIDE by James Patterson, ORIGIN by Jessica Khoury, and THE MAZE RUNNER by James Dashner.

Hey…I just realized all of our names start with J…AND all of our names are either Jessica or James. FREAKY!

How long did you work on UNCHANGED?

UNCHANGED took longer than any other book in the trilogy. And that’s probably because I wrote 250 pages and then totally scrapped them all and started over. It was one of those crazy pivotal moments in your career when you just have to follow your gut (and my gut was telling me this wasn’t the right book) and start over from scratch. I’ve never done that before in my published career. It was really scary at the time but the book was SO much better because of it!

What did this book teach you about writing or about yourself?

That sometimes you write the wrong book. And sometimes you have to right the WRONG book (or the first 250 pages of it) before you can realize what the RIGHT book is.

What do you hope readers will take away from UNCHANGED?

First and foremost, I write my books to entertain readers. If they get something extra out of the process, then that’s just a nice bonus. To me, this book (the whole series really) is about the delicate balance between science and nature. I’m all for technological innovation and progress, but at what cost? And at what point are we just messing with something nature mastered a long time ago? I set out to explore these questions in this trilogy. And it would be a nice bonus if readers took something away about that after reading.

How long or hard was your road to publication? How many books did you write before this one, and how many never got published?

My road to publication was quite long and difficult. It took me five years to sell my first book. Actually my “first” book was never published. It’s still sitting on my shelf! I tried for three years to get an agent for that book and eventually started a new book that would become my first published novel. After five years, I finally landed my first agent and she sold my book in only 10 days! So I like to say my overnight success story took five years. ☺

Was there an AHA! moment along your road to publication where something suddenly sank in and you felt you had the key to writing a novel? What was it?

Actually, there was! My first book to ever sell was a women’s fiction novel called THE FIDELITY FILES, about a “fidelity inspector” who was hired by suspicious wives and girlfriends to test the fidelity of the men in their lives. I shopped that book all around town for years, constantly tweaking it and rewriting and yet I still got the same feedback. It was too dark and depressing. The main character, Jennifer Hunter, saw nothing but cheating spouses and it was a downer. Plus no one could understand why Jennifer just didn’t quit her job since she clearly hated it so much.

Then I got a rejection from my agent that changed everything. She said, “I think this would work so much better if Jennifer thought of herself like a modern superhero. She loves her job. She feels like she’s righting an epic wrong. Saving the world from infidelity, one cheater at a time.”

I nearly gasped when I read this. It was the magic ingredient that I’d been missing. The subtlest shift in the kaleidoscope to make the whole thing take shape. I instantly started rewriting the book from scratch with this note. I sent that agent the first 100 pages to see if I was on the right track. She ended up signing me on those 100 pages and we sold the book as soon as it was finished.

What's your writing ritual like? Do you listen to music? Work at home or at a coffee shop or the library, etc?

First off, I have a really cool “white noise” track that I listen to when I write. It’s a track called “Waterfall Entrainment” and it’s nothing but a constant waterfall sound that goes “SHHHHHHHH!!!!” in my ear. I loop it and play it full blast.

And second, I ONLY drink coffee when I’m writing. I’ve actually managed to trick my brain into thinking that coffee equals productivity. Plus, limiting my caffeine intake makes the caffeine more effective. So as soon as that coffee hits my blood stream, I am ready to rock!

In fact, I actually wrote a whole blog post about this. It’s called How to Trick Your Brain Into Writing. You can view it here: http://www.jessicabrody.com/2011/05/tips-for-writers-how-to-trick-your-brain-into-writing/

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?

Don’t be afraid to write badly. All writers have awful first drafts. That’s why they’re called first drafts. Sometimes you have to just get through the story before you can make it pretty. I think a lot of new authors quit halfway through the book because they’re afraid that it’s not good. The first draft won’t be good. Just finish it and make it good later. The hardest part about writing a book is getting to that last page.

Writing a book is like building a house. You can’t worry about where to hang the pictures or what color to paint the walls until you actually build the house. Get the foundation down, get the story in place, then worry about whether or not it all looks pretty.

I always say, Don't be afraid to write crap because crap makes great fertilizer.

What are you working on now?

I just turned in my next book to my editor. It’s a contemporary comedy called A WEEK OF MONDAYS, about a teen girl who has to repeat the same awful Monday (in which her boyfriend breaks up with her) over and over again until she figures out how to fix it. It’s kind of like Groundhog Day meets Some Kind of Wonderful.

It was really fun to go back to something light and comedic. Especially after writing UNCHANGED, which is by far the darkest of the trilogy.

A WEEK OF MONDAYS will be out in spring 2016.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Unchanged
by Jessica Brody
Hardcover
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Released 2/24/2015

In this mesmerizing conclusion to the Unremembered trilogy, Sera will fight those who have broken her.

After returning to the Diotech compound and receiving a successful memory transplant, Seraphina is now living a happy life with another synthetically engineered human like herself, with whom she is deeply in love. She has no recollection of Zen. But the nagging feeling that something is missing from her life continues to plague her. Diotech's newest product is about to be revealed—a line of genetic modifications that will allow people to live longer, fight disease, and change any unfavorable physical attribute they desire.

As more secrets are revealed, more enemies are uncovered, and the reality of a Diotech-controlled world grows closer every day, Sera and Zen must find a way to destroy the company that created her, or they’ll be separated forever.

Purchase Unchanged at Amazon
Purchase Unchanged at IndieBound
View Unchanged on Goodreads

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jessica has sold ten novels (two adult novels to St. Martin’s Press and eight young adult novels to Farrar, Straus, Giroux/Macmillan Children’s.) These books include Fidelity Files, Love Under Cover, The Karma Club, My Life Undecided, 52 Reasons to Hate My Father, Unremembered, Unforgotten, and Unchanged. Unremembered was recently optioned for film by the producers of The Vampire Academy, Zero Dark Thirty, Life of Pi and Slumdog Millionaire. Jessica’s books are published and translated in over twenty foreign countries including the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Czech Republic, Norway, Denmark, China, Russia, Brazil, Poland, Bulgaria, Israel, and Taiwan. Jessica now works full time as a writer and producer. She currently splits her time between Los Angeles and Colorado.

0 Comments on Jessica Brody, author of UNCHANGED, on how writing a book is like building a house as of 3/1/2015 7:14:00 AM
Add a Comment
7. A Request!

Hello, All!
 
  In my ongoing quest to run into a brick wall as many times as possible...no. That's not right.  In my ongoing quest to find out more about obscure UK comic creators of the past I have needed my nose and teeth fixed several times.....oh, there, see -THAT is where I should have typed "running into brick walls" but the moment has gone!

  Anyway, being far more serious: I have looked and dug around the internet and written letters far and wide but still have not been able to find photographs of most of these creators.

 Gerald Swan and Denis M. Reader you might think had photos taken by someone -apparently, Denis Gifford thought it was "a bit impolite" to ask if he might take a photograph (oh, Denis!!) and Jock McCail and his brother, William A. Ward Harry Banger -you'd think family at least might have a page or online images. Nothing.

 Now I know that there are quite a few knowledgeable comickers out there with all sorts of journals, books, etc.  So, my big request is this: if you have any photographs of these people or others who worked for Swan -even if only "cartoon portraits" could you please get in touch or pass the word around?

 My sincere THANKS to anyone who can help!
Cheers
Terry

Add a Comment
8. Making Viva Frida

By Yuyi Morales - fascinating!

With spare, polished text and luscious illustrations, award-winning author/illustrator Yuyi Morales explores the passionate, imagination of the incomparable Frida Kahllo. Video with Music by Miguel Martinez.
Click the image to watch the video on YouTube.

0 Comments on Making Viva Frida as of 3/1/2015 9:08:00 AM
Add a Comment
9. Yaşar Kemal (1923-2015)

       Turkish great Yaşar Kemal has passed away; see, for example, The New York Times' obituary.
       The New York Times suggests he was Turkey's "first novelist of global stature"; whether he was first or not, he was certainly of global stature, and a serious Nobel candidate.
       Memed, My Hawk is a good place to start: see the New York Review Books publicity page, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

Add a Comment
10. Does marijuana produce an amotivational syndrome?

Does marijuana produce an amotivational syndrome? Whether the amotivational syndrome exists or not is still controversial; there are still too few poorly controlled small studies that don't allow a definitive answer. Most people who use marijuana don't develop this syndrome.

The post Does marijuana produce an amotivational syndrome? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Does marijuana produce an amotivational syndrome? as of 3/1/2015 9:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. Video Sunday: La la la!

Morning, folks.  We’ve a good store of goodies this morning, and I’m pleased as punch to give them to you.  First up, a short film.  A very short film, actually.  I’ve spoken in the past on how Hollywood views children’s writers and the creation of children’s books.  This film seems to believe that children’s books in general are being urged to be “darker”.  Even picture books.  An odd sentiment, but there you go.

Thanks to Stephanie Whelan for the link!

So, First Book is doing something called the Speed Read Challenge.  It’s being done to draw attention to First Book’s Be Inspired campaign, which is attempting to get 1 million books into the hands of kids.  You can see a whole slew of celebrities told to speed read book in ten seconds.  First, recent Newbery winner Kwame Alexander:

Next, Mo Willems:

I wanna do it.

As you may have heard from folks like Travis Jonker, Jimmy Kimmel started a regular feature where he has a bookclub with kids.  So far they’ve covered Goodnight Moon and There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly.  Naturally when it came time to embed one, I went with The Giving Tree. To know me is to know why.

Barb Langridge has made it her goal to get the ALA Youth Media Award titles back in the public eye and conversation.  Here she talks with the people of Baltimore about the recent winners.  Good stuff.

 

And for our off-topic video,  I had two really good choices.  Still, in light of last Sunday’s Oscars, this seemed like the link that made a bit more sense:

Share

0 Comments on Video Sunday: La la la! as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
12. Maya Rock, author of SCRIPTED, on the agony and ecstasy of writing

Maya Rock's thriller SCRIPTED was released a few weeks ago and explores the darkness lurking in Reality TV.

Maya, what scene in SCRIPTED was really hard for you to write and why, and is that the one of which you are most proud? Or is there another scene you particularly love?

Ugh, the um, love scene with Callen and Nettie towards the end. It wasn’t the most technically difficult, but I was way too self-conscious the whole time. No, I’m not the most proud of it. I think I’m too close to the manuscript right now to have one I’m most proud of, but I always had a certain comfort level with scenes with Lia in them. I also really always was fond of the moment in the party scene when Nettie leaves for the beach (and Callen). There are probably more little moments that I’m proud of than scenes.

What did this book teach you about writing or about yourself?

Oh my gosh. So much!!! And it continues to do so. Well, I felt I went into this book fairly humble, but it turns out I had a whole lot more humbling to go. First, I felt that my skills as an editor were almost completely nontransferable to my own writing. That was frustrating because I felt I was a confident editor and an insecure writer (are there any other kinds?)  I thought it taught me to have a thicker skin about my writing because I had been intensely shy about showing people my work and then had to show many drafts to my editor. 

What do you hope readers will take away from SCRIPTED?

Mostly I hope they have fun reading it. I also hope they like the characters.

How long or hard was your road to publication? How many books did you write before this one, and how many never got published?

It was haphazard. I wrote a manuscript awhile ago, but never sought to get it published. Then six years later, I wrote another one, and it got a publisher fairly quickly, but was in rewrites for awhile (four years). What to say except that everything they say about writing, the agony and the ecstasy, I have experienced. 

ABOUT THE BOOK

Scripted
by Maya Rock
Hardcover
Putnam Juvenile
Released 2/5/2015

Reality TV has a dark future in this thought-provoking thriller.

To the people suffering on the war-torn mainland, Bliss Island seems like an idyllic place. And it is: except for the fact that the island is a set, and the islanders’ lives are a performance. They’re the stars of a hit TV show, Blissful Days—Characters are adored by mainland viewers, yet in constant danger of being cut if their ratings dip too low. And no one really knows what happens to cut Characters.

Nettie Starling knows she’s been given the chance of a lifetime when a producer offers suggestions to help her improve her mediocre ratings—especially when those suggestions involve making a move on the boy she’s been in love with for years. But she'll soon have to decide how far she's willing to go to keep the cameras fixed on her. . . especially when she learns what could happen to her if she doesn't.

Purchase Scripted at Amazon
Purchase Scripted at IndieBound
View Scripted on Goodreads

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Maya RockMaya Rock lives in New York, where she freelance writes and edits and can be found at karaoke, art galleries, parks, and pizzerias when not in front of a screen. Scripted is her first novel. You can learn more about her and her work at www.maya-rock.com.

0 Comments on Maya Rock, author of SCRIPTED, on the agony and ecstasy of writing as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
13. forward...launch!

As announced on Friday, I'm embarking tomorrow on a birthday month poetry challenge inspired by fellow Piscean Laura Shovan's February Poetry Projects (if you haven't, check out three years' worth here, here and here).

I got to thinking about the word "MARCH"  and all the other great words that end in -CH.  I realized that I have a particular fondness for words that end in -ch; they show up in my poems again and again.  So I'll be stretCHing myself to post five -CH poems weekly throughout March.  I'm allowed one previously published per week, but most will be brand-new.

Please join me in this CHallenge, poetry friends!  If you can't write with me every day, maybe you'll share your one or two per week, or your five-in-a-row, or your favorite poem by another author including the -CH word of the day....I welcome your participation, however you choose to do it!

I'll post my poem each evening, and you can send me yours by email or by leaving it in the comments for that post.  I'll round up as we go and on Sunday mornings, and at the end of the month there will be a PRIZE for the "StretCHiest MarCHer" who contributes the most poems!

To get us started, here's a poem from my first book, Squeeze: Poems from a Juicy Universe (2005).  I'm hoping this will encourage the crocuses that I know are out there straining against two layers of frozen snow!


Launch

Crocuses are rocketing
            inch by inch
                   out of the crumbled earth

the yellows aim for the sun
the purples push          toward deep space

         and inside
little astronauts in orange suits
    cock their ruffled helmets
                                toward spring

Heidi Mordhorst
all rights reserved

And here is the collection of -CH words, one muscular verb for eaCH weekday of MarCH, that I'll be using to enriCH my little patCH of the Kidlitosphere with as muCH poetry as I can.  It should be a cinCh, but if I find I'm parCHed of poems and miss a day, then ouCH--but I'll reaCH in and try again.   Don't believe me?  Just watCH!

Forward...MarCH CHallenge: Dates and Words

2 march
3 stretch
4 twitch
5 punch
6 fetch

 9 preach
10 sketch
11 smooch
12 pitch
13 arch

16 inch
17 lurch
18 botch
19 lunch
20 hatch

23 clutch
24 crouch
25 snatch
26 perch
27 quench

0 Comments on forward...launch! as of 3/1/2015 6:33:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. Free First Five Pages Workshop Opens on March 7!

The First Five Pages February Workshop has come to an end.  This talented group worked so hard on their revisions, and it showed! A huge thanks to our guest mentor, Chelsea Pitcher  (I adored THE LAST CHANGELING) and to Shelby Sampsel, our guest agent/editor, and of course to all of our fabulous permanent mentors! You can check out the final revisions here:  First Five Pages February Workshop 

Our March workshop will open for entries at noon, EST,  on Saturday March 7, 2015. We'll take the first five Middle Grade, Young Adult, or New Adult entries that meet all guidelines and formatting requirements. In addition to our wonderful permanent mentors, we have Patricia Dunn as our guest author mentor, and Kimberly Brower as our guest agent mentor.  So get those pages ready – click here to get the rules!


March Guest Mentor - Patricia Dunn

Patricia Dunn has appeared in Salon.com, The Christian Science Monitor, the Village Voice, the Nation, LA Weekly, and others. With an MFA in creative writing from Sarah Lawrence College, where she also teaches, this Bronx-raised rebel and former resident of Cairo settled in Connecticut, with her husband, teenage son, and toddler dog.  Patricia loves visiting class rooms – for more information about virtual visits, click here 

A fresh and authentic coming-of-age story set during the early days of the Arab Spring.
All Mariam wanted was a vacation. What she got was a revolution...
It’s tough fitting in, especially when you have super-traditional Muslim parents and are the only Egyptian at your high school. So when Mariam and her best friend and fellow outcast, Deanna, get arrested after an ill-fated night of partying, she knows that she is in big trouble.
Convinced they need more discipline, their parents pack Mariam and Deanna off to Cairo to stay with Mariam’s grandmother, her sittu. But Mariam’s strict sittu and the country of her heritage are nothing like she imagined, challenging everything Mariam used to believe.

 When a girl named Asmaa calls on the people of Egypt to protest against their president, Mariam and Deanna find themselves in the middle of a revolution, running from teargas, dodging danger in the streets of Cairo, and falling in love for the first time. As Mariam struggles to reconcile her rich Egyptian heritage with her American identity, she finds that revolution is everywhere, including within herself.  

You can order here: 




We are thrilled to announce that Kimberly Brower, of the Rebecca Friedman Literary Agency, will be our guest agent for March! Kimberly fell in love with reading when she picked up her first Babysitter’s Club book at the age of seven and hasn’t been able to get her nose out of a book since. Reading has always been her passion, even while pursuing her business degree at California State University, Northridge and law degree at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles. By joining the Rebecca Friedman Literary Agency in 2014, she has been able to merge her legal background with her love of books. Although she loves all things romance, she is also searching for books that are different and will surprise her, with empathetic characters and compelling stories. Kimberly is interested in both commercial and literary fiction, with an emphasis in women’s fiction, contemporary romance, mysteries/thrillers, new adult and young adult, as well as certain areas of non-fiction, including business, diet and fitness.

0 Comments on Free First Five Pages Workshop Opens on March 7! as of 3/1/2015 9:40:00 AM
Add a Comment
15. German March/spring best-of lists

       The German-critics-best list for March is out, the SWR-Bestenliste, where 26 prominent literary critics vote for their top title of the month: Ian McEwan's The Children Act tops the list, albeit very unenthusiastically -- a total of 67 points is lower than if every judge had voted it in fourth place .... Meanwhile, Stefano D'Arrigo's much more interesting sounding Horcynus Orca, which I mentioned recently, came in second, with the new Kundera a lowly seventh, the new Houellebecq an even lowlier eighth (the latter two also still to come in English). Not much uniform enthusiasm, it seems.

       Meanwhile, there's the Bestenliste "Weltempfänger" from Litprom, where a jury selects the best translated (into German) works from Africa, Asia, and Latin America -- the new spring selections more conveniently listed here -- which looks pretty interesting too.

Add a Comment
16. Main Antagonist

Hi, my question is regarding about my antagonist, I have here antagonist A who I decide the story's main opposition. But somehow I tempted to an idea to

Add a Comment
17. Creating a constructive cultural narrative for science

The Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities (TORCH) is currently running a series of events on Humanities and Science. On 11 February 2015, an Oxford-based panel of three disciplinary experts — Sally Shuttleworth (English Literature), John Christie (History), and Ard Louis (Physics) – shone their critical torchlights on Durham physicist Tom McLeish’s new book Faith and Wisdom in Science as part of their regular ‘Book at Lunchtime’ seminars.

How can we understand the relation between science and narrative? Should we even try to? Where can we find and deploy a constructive cultural narrative for science that might unlock some of the current misrepresentations and political tangles around science and technology in the public forum?

In exploring the intersection of faith and science in our society, positive responses and critical questions at the recent TORCH Faith and Wisdom in Science event turned on the central theme of narrative. Ard Louis referred to the book’s ‘lament’ that science is not a cultural possession in the same way that art or music is, and urged the advantage of telling the messy story of real science practice. John Christie sketched the obscured historical details within the stories of Galileo and Newton, and of the Biblical basis beneath Frances’ Bacon’s vision for modern science, which serve to deconstruct the worn old myths about confrontation of science and religion. Sally Shuttleworth welcomed the telling of the stories of science as questioning and creative, yet suffering the fate of ‘almost always being wrong’.


What resources can Judeo-Christian theology supply in constructing a social narrative for science – one that might describe both what science is for, and how it might be more widely enjoyed? The project we now call ‘science’ is in continuity with older human activities by other names: ‘natural philosophy’ in the early modern period and in ancient times just ‘Wisdom’. The theology of science that emerges is ‘participatory reconciliation’, a hopeful engagement with the world that both lights it up and heals our relationship with it.

But is theology the only way to get there? Are we required to carry the heavy cultural baggage of Christian history of thought and structures? Shuttleworth recalled George Eliot’s misery at the dissection of the miraculous as she translated Strauss’ ‘Life of Jesus’ at the dawn of critical Biblical studies. Yet Eliot is able to conceive of a rich and luminous narrative for science in Middlemarch:

“…the imagination that reveals subtle actions inaccessible by any sort of lens, but tracked in that outer darkness through long pathways of necessary sequence by the inward light which is the last refinement of energy, capable of bathing even the ethereal atoms in its ideally illuminated space.”

Eliot’s sources are T.H. Huxley, J.S. Mill, Auguste Compte, and of course her partner G.H Lewes – by no means a theological group. (Compte had even constructed a secular religion.) Perhaps this is an example of an entirely secular route to science’s story? Yet her insight into science as a special sort of deep ‘seeing’ also emerges from the ancient wisdom of, for example, the Book of Job. In his recent Seeing the World and Knowing God, Oxford theologian Paul Fiddes also calls on the material of Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes to challenge the post-modern dissolution of subject and object. Participatory reconciliation emerges for both theologian and scientist motivated to draw on ancient wisdom for modern need. Was Eliot, and will all secular thinkers in the Western tradition be, in some way irrevocably connected to these ancient wellsprings of our thinking?

An aspect of the ‘baggage’ most desirable to drop, according to Shuttleworth, is the notion that scientists are a sort of priesthood. Surely this speaks to the worst suspicions of a mangled modern discourse of authority and power? Louis even suggested that the science/religion debate is really only a proxy for this larger and deeper one. Perhaps the Old Testament first-temple notion of ‘servant priesthood’ is now too overlain with the strata of power-play to serve as a helpful metaphor for how we go about enacting the story of science.

But science needs to rediscover its story, and it is only by acknowledging that its narrative underpinnings must come from the humanities, that it is going to find it.

Headline image credit: Lighting. CC0 via Pixabay.

The post Creating a constructive cultural narrative for science appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Creating a constructive cultural narrative for science as of 3/1/2015 4:56:00 AM
Add a Comment
18. Diplomatic mission


0 Comments on Diplomatic mission as of 3/1/2015 9:45:00 AM
Add a Comment
19. What have you got lined up in the coming weeks and months?

Where is Jon - compressed


Aside from two days of Fun with Fiction workshops at Millington Elementary School, and my teaching gig at the GCU, I haven't done any speaking events so far this year.

I do have a couple of talks lined up,
and I'll certainly be attending some writing group meetings, but for the most part, I'm keeping my head down, having a great time working on major revisions for Abraham Lincoln Stole my Homework and the outline/first draft of Dead Doris (also middle grade).

Here are some of the talks and events I'll be giving during the coming months:

2015 SPRING SEMESTER  
EN215: Creative Writing
Georgian Court University
Lakewood, NJ


2015 APRIL 1st (Weds)   Autism in the Family (7pm - 8:30pm)
Speaking on the Spectrum (SPotS)
Camden County Library (South County Regional Branch) 35 Cooper Folly Road, Atco, NJ 08004

2014 APRIL 26th (Sun) Author Lunch

Add a Comment
20. super librarian poster - in welsh!

Remember this sign? I've had so many people spot it in libraries around Britain and abroad.



And I've had requests to translate it into Welsh, so with the linguistic help of Bob Miles & friends, here's a version that you can download and print. If you know anyone who would like it, please let them know! I'm not asking for any money for it, but if you could leave a note in the comments here to let me know who you are and where you're using it, I'd love to know!



Click here to download in colour as an A3 PDF, and here as an A4 PDF.

I've also created a black and white version if you'd like to colour it yourself or have kids in the library colour it for you:



Click here to download in black & white as an A3 PDF, and here as an A4 PDF.

And here's the version in English, which you can download from my earlier blog post. Thanks to all the great feedback from Wales about last year's Mythical Maze themed Summer Reading Challenge!



Keep up the work, fabulous librarians! Your training and skills at connecting kids with reading are a backbone of our society and we think you're awesome. We hope governments and councils everywhere comes to see things the same way.

Add a Comment
21. John C. Ford, author of THE CIPHER, on being inspired by a news article


John C. Ford joins us with his techno-thriller THE CIPHER, which taps into current concerns about internet privacy.

John, please tell us about your inspiration for writing THE CIPHER.

I read a news article about a teenage boy who may have solved a math riddle known as the Riemann Hypothesis.  I knew nothing about it at the time, but the article said that the Riemann Hypothesis--which dates back to the 1850s--had important implications for modern computer encryption systems.  I couldn't believe that a math problem that was over 150 years ago could be the key to modern computer security, but as I researched more, I discovered that it is absolutely vital to encryption.  The boy's solution turned out to be a false alarm.  But then I wondered:  what if he HAD solved it, and what if that solution gave him the ability to see any encrypted material?  I was off and running with The Cipher . . . .

What scene was really hard for you to write and why, and is that the one of which you are most proud? Or is there another scene you particularly love?

The opening of the book was difficult to write -- it's a prologue-type scene with an older character, which you realize the importance of later on.  I'm really pleased with the way that turned out, and I think it sets the right tone for the story to come.  Also, there's a one scene in which the two main characters, Smiles and Melanie, go out to eat and end up getting in a fight.  They are both quite vulnerable at that moment in the story, each of them feeling hurt for different reasons.  Something about that scene just worked for me, and if I had to pick one of my favorites that would be it.

What book or books would most resonate with readers who love your book--or visa versa?

I think The Cipher would appeal to anyone who likes the Alex Rider stories, or Cory Doctorow's Little Brother.  Fans of Ally Carter's Gallagher Girls or Heist Society books might enjoy it, too.  I hope anyone who likes thrillers or mysteries will give it a chance.

What do you hope readers will take away from THE CIPHER?

When you write a book about codes and encryption, I think the expectation is to say that you hope readers appreciate the importance of math, etc., etc.  Which, for the record, I do.  But this is not a math book; it's a thriller written for entertainment.  So I hope they come away having enjoyed the roller coaster ride that the characters went through.  And I particularly hope that they relate in some way to the characters -- the slacker Smiles, the genius Ben, and the "perfect" girl, Melanie.

ABOUT THE BOOK

The Cipher
by John C. Ford
Hardcover
Viking Juvenile
Released 2/24/2015

You think your emails are private?
Your credit card number is secure?
That stock trades, government secrets, and nuclear codes are safe?
...th1nk aga1n.

Robert “Smiles” Smylie is not a genius. He feels like he’s surrounded by them, though, from his software mogul dad to his brainy girlfriend to his oddball neighbor Ben, a math prodigy. When Ben cracks an ancient, real-life riddle central to modern data encryption systems, he suddenly holds the power to unlock every electronic secret in the world—and Smiles finally has a chance to prove his own worth.

Smiles hatches a plan to protect Ben from the government agents who will stop at nothing to get their hands on his discovery. But as he races from a Connecticut casino to the streets of Boston, enlisting the help of an alluring girl, Smiles comes to realize the most explosive secrets don’t lie between the covers of Ben’s notebook—they’re buried in his own past.

Eerily close to reality and full of shocking twists, this techno-thriller reveals how easily the private can become public, and just how dangerous it can be to encrypt our personal histories.

Purchase The Cipher at Amazon
Purchase The Cipher at IndieBound
View The Cipher on Goodreads

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John C. Ford (johncfordbooks.com and @fordjohnc) is the author of The Morgue and Me, a YA take on the classic detective novel that was nominated for an Edgar Award and short-listed for five different state teen book awards. A former litigator who practiced in the nation's capital, he eventually returned to his love of writing fiction, and to his hometown outside Detroit, Michigan.

0 Comments on John C. Ford, author of THE CIPHER, on being inspired by a news article as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
22. Meet Inspector Barnaby

The Killings At Badger's Drift. (Inspector Barnaby #1) Caroline Graham. 1987/2005. Felony & Mayhem. 272 pages. [Source: Library]

I'm so glad I checked out The Killings at Badger's Drift on a whim!!! It's always a good thing to browse in the library!

The Killings at Badger's Drift is the first book in the Inspector Barnaby mystery series. Readers meet Detective Chief Inspector Barnaby and Sergeant Troy (his assistant). I definitely liked Inspector Barnaby!!!

The first character readers meet is Miss Emily Simpson, a spinster who stumbles upon something she shouldn't see in the woods. That knowledge will lead to her death...readers however are not told exactly what she saw--or WHO she saw...leaving plenty of mystery and suspense for the rest of the book.

Readers next meet another spinster, Miss Lucy Bellringer, Miss Simpson's best, best friend. She is convinced that her friend was MURDERED. And she is seeking out Inspector Barnaby. The doctor may not be convinced that there was a crime, but, she is out to convince Barnaby and Troy to investigate and see for themselves. (They do take the case).

Plenty of characters are introduced and described throughout the book, throughout the investigation. Most, if not all, are potential suspects. Some seem more obvious than others. But. All are flawed in one way or another...making it just plausible enough that they could be guilty...

I definitely enjoyed this one. It was a quick read. I definitely HAD to know what happened.

Death of A Hollow Man. (Inspector Barnaby #2) Caroline Graham. 1989/2006. Felony & Mayhem. 306 pages. [Source: Library]

Death of a Hollow Man is the second book in the Inspector Barnaby series by Caroline Graham. I definitely liked it, even though I had some reservations. Why? Well, I know I'm in the minority, but, I prefer my fiction to be on the clean side. It's not necessarily the content so much as the description involved--if that makes sense. That being said, I liked this one. I never once seriously thought of putting it aside.

Death of a Hollow Man is set in a small-town theatre world. Most of the characters--suspects and victim--are actors for their local theatre. (Inspector Barnaby's wife is among the actors--though not the list of suspects.) Amadeus. That is what they'll be performing. Over half the book occurs BEFORE the crime, setting the stage for the oh-so-dramatic on-stage murder. Lest you think I'm spoiling things dreadfully, it's mentioned on the jacket copy. I won't be mentioning WHO the victim is OR who the top suspects are. That would definitely be spoilerish. After all, I like my mysteries to stay mysteries.

I liked the writing for the most part. There are SO many characters. Some I liked, some I didn't like at all.

My library only has one more book in this series. But I've decided to start watching Midsomer Murders for more Inspector Barnaby fun.

© 2015 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

0 Comments on Meet Inspector Barnaby as of 3/1/2015 10:53:00 AM
Add a Comment
23. The Sunday Post and Stacking the Shelves–It’s March!

The Sunday Post is hosted by Kimba of The Caffeinated Book Reviewer.  This is a weekly meme where we can share news of the week and highlight new books received.

Dean and I are taking a little break this weekend, which I’ll tell you all about next Sunday.  I hope you are having a great weekend and that the weather is improving wherever you are!

I am reading Murder of Crows by Anne Bishop and it’s fantastic! What are you reading today?

Check out my current contests!  See the Contest Widget on the Sidebar to enter!

Stacking the Shelves is a weekly meme hosted by Tynga’s Reviews to share new additions to our library.  Click here to learn more about it.

New Arrivals at the Café:

Cold  Burn of Magic

No One Like You

Dark Heir

Force of Attraction

The Shattered Court

A Night Divided

Royally Ever After

My Japanese Husband (still) Thinks I’m Crazy

A great big thanks to the publishers for their continued support!

What did you get? Please leave links and share!

 Subscribe in a reader

The post The Sunday Post and Stacking the Shelves–It’s March! appeared first on Manga Maniac Cafe.

Add a Comment
24. Empty Mind

"Make an empty space in any corner of your mind, and creativity will instantly fill it."--Dee Hock "Once you are empty then there is no barrier for the divine to enter in you." - Osho It may sound like a contradiction to try to empty your mind when you write. After all, if your mind is “empty,” how can you possibly find the words and images you need to set down on paper? But I’d like to

0 Comments on Empty Mind as of 3/1/2015 10:05:00 AM
Add a Comment
25. Nineteenth and twentieth century Scottish philosophy

In the history of Britain, eighteenth century Scotland stands out as a period of remarkable intellectual energy and fertility. The Scottish Enlightenment, as it came to be known, is widely regarded as a crowning cultural achievement, with philosophy the jewel in the crown. Adam Smith, David Hume, William Robertson, Thomas Reid and Adam Ferguson are just the best known among an astonishing array of innovative thinkers, whose influence in philosophy, economics, history and sociology can still be found at work in the contemporary academy.

The post Nineteenth and twentieth century Scottish philosophy appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Nineteenth and twentieth century Scottish philosophy as of 3/1/2015 4:56:00 AM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts