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1. लडते झगडे मुद्दे

लडते झगडे मुद्दे — मीठा मीठा गप्प गप्प कडवा कडवा थू थू … लडते, झगडे तो कभी सुलझे बच्चे की तरह टीचर(एंकर} के सामने कुछ पूछ्ने के लिए ऊंगली उठाते, बीच बीच में विज्ञापन और अगले कार्यक्रम की सूचना … इतना सब कुछ होता है आजकल न्यूज चैनल की भैंस … ओह क्षमा बहस में, बस पूछिए ही मत… ये शाम का समय तो बेहद ही क्रूशियल होता है. कितनी बार तो चैनल की आवाज ही धीमी करनी पडती है कि पडोसी ये न समझ लें कि हमारे घर में लडाई हो रही है…

हर चैनल, बहस में लडने भिडने मारने को उतारु सा प्रतीत होता है… इसलिए बस आज तो सोच ही लिया कि रोज रोज बुराईयां करने से अच्छा है आज से फालतू की बहस देखना ही बंद … ना होगी भैस ओह पुन क्षमा.. न होगी बहस और न वो पानी मे जाएगी… बस आज शाम टीवी ही नही चलाया… समय गुजर रहा था. गुजर रहा था..

मन मे बुरे बुरे ख्याल आने शुरु हो गए कि आज का मुद्दा क्या होगा. कौन कौन किस चैनल पर आया होगा. किस बात पर लड मर रहे होंगें. किस की खाली कुर्सी दिखाई जा रही होगी.  कुछ सूनापन सा महसूस होने लगा.

खैर ध्यान बटाया कि मोनिका तू कार्टून की बना ले कोई ,पर फिर सोचा कि कार्टून बनाने का आईडिया भी तो यही से मिलता है … बस फिर क्या था. अब मैं टीवी के सामने बैठी  चाय पीते हुए बहस एंजाय कर रही हूं और बार बार चैनल ही बदल बदल कर देख रही हूं और सोच रही हूं  बिल्कुल बेकार मुद्दे … आज तो देख लिया बस पर कल से बिल्कुल नही देखूगी…   :)

Cover story: Freedom for Women

लडकियां मोबाइल का प्रयोग न करें, जींस न पहनें। घर से बाहर निकलते हुए सिर पर पल्लू रखें, बाज्ार  न जाएं..।लडकियों की शादी कम उम्र में कर देनी चाहिए। इससे बलात्कार की घटनाएं कम होंगी और वे सुरक्षित रहेंगी..।

बलात्कार के 90 फीसदी मामले आपसी सहमति के होते हैं..।

लडकियों को देर रात घर से बाहर नहीं निकलना चाहिए..।

ये सारे बयान और फरमान देश के ज्िाम्मेदार लोगों द्वारा दिए गए हैं। ऐसे समय में जबकि स्त्रियां हर क्षेत्र में अपना वर्चस्व कायम कर रही हैं, ऐसे बयान हास्यास्पद हैं। ये स्त्रियों के प्रति संवेदनहीन नज्ारिए का जीवंत उदाहरण हैं। राष्ट्रीय राजधानी दिल्ली क्राइम कैपिटल में तब्दील हो रही है। सेंटर फॉर सोशल रिसर्च ने दिल्ली में जनवरी 2009 से जुलाई 2011 के बीच दर्ज मामलों के अध्ययन के बाद एक रिपोर्ट पेश की। रिपोर्ट में कहा गया है कि दिल्ली में महिलाएं दिन में भी सुरक्षित नहीं हैं।

See more…

The post लडते झगडे मुद्दे appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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2. Movie Matinee #7: Yankee Doodle Dandy

HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY!
HAVE FUN, STAY SAFE!

Yankee Doodle Dandy is a historically not terribly accurate bio-film about the life of George M. Cohan (James Cagney).  It begins when he is summoned to the White House by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. There, he begins to tell the President the story of his life, beginning with his birth on July 4, 1878 in Providence, RI, where his father was performing in vaudeville.  The scene then leaves the Oval Office and flashes back to that date.

From there on, in voice overs, Cohan narrates each scene change as time go by, and he and his sister Josie grow older and join in their parents vaudeville act, becoming The Four Cohans.  We seea very talented though somewhat arrogant George as a boy starring in Peck's Bad Boy, and blowing the family's chance to play Broadway with his demands.

Later, George meets Mary, the girl he will marry, and for whom he wrote the song "Mary is a Grand Old Name."  The whole time the family is performing, George is writing musical theater scores, but no one is interested.  Finally, he meets Sam H. Harris, also not succeeding in selling his material, and the two become partners and successes with their production of Little Johnny Jones, most noted for the songs "Yankee Doodle Dandy" and "Give My Regards to Broadway."

When the US enters World War I in 1917, George tries to enlist, but is told he is too old at 38.  Leaving the recruiting station, he runs into soldiers and an Army marching band, and as he listens to them,  the song "Over There" begins to formulate in his head.  

But Cohan's professional successes and failures isn't the only storyline.  The movie also follows his family life, though only when it suits Cohan's story.  For instance, his sister get engaged and we never find out what happened to her until later we learn that both his mother and sister have already died.  And after Cohan marries Mary, there is no mention of their three children, or his first marriage, for that matter.  The whole movie I thought they were childless because of his career.

Eventually, Cohan retires and travels the world, but when he is offered a part on Broadway playing the President, he jumps at the chance to go back to the smell of the greasepaint, the roar of the crowd.  And that's when he is called to the White House.  Thinking he is in trouble, instead he is give the Congressional Medal of Honor for his two songs,  "You're a Grand old Flag," written in 1906 for Cohan's musical play George Washington, Jr and "Over There" written in 1917.

Original Sheet Music courtesy of the Library of Congress
The finale is priceless, even if anachronistic.  As Cohan leaves the White House he joins a parade of soldiers singing "Over There" and obviously heading off to fight in WWII.  Cohan received his Medal of Honor in 1940, a year and a half before the US entered the war.  But, so what, it is still an ending that is sure to bring a tear to the eye.  

Besides James Cagney Yankee Doodle Dandy has a wonderful cast.  There is Walter Huston as his father Jerry, and Rosemary de Camp as his mother Nellie, Cagney's real sister Jeanne ss his Cohan sister Josie, and Joan Leslie as his wife, Mary.  Richard Whorf played Sam Harris, Cohan's partner and one of my favorites, S.Z. Sakall, has a small but pivotal part in the film (Sakall played Uncle Felix, the chef in Christmas in Connecticut).

Yankee Doodle Dandy is a little corny, a whole lot energetic and off the charts flag waving patriotic propaganda now that the US had entered WWII.  Still, the dancing numbers are wonderful, and although James Cagney is not Fred Astaire, I loved the tap dancing scenes.

Movie premiere May 29, 1942 in New York City, as a war bonds benefit
(Public Domain)
Yankee Doodle Dandy has been named as one of the American Film Institutes 100 Greatest American Films; James Cagney won the Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role; and the Library of Congress chose it to be preserved in the National Film Registry for being "culturally, historicaily or aesthetically significant."  And while it is certaainly historically significant, there is one scene that bears this out in a rather offensive way when The Four Cohans are seen performing in blackface.  Historically accurate, sadly yes, but no less odious to the modern viewer.

Here is the offical movie trailer from 1942:


As long as this is a Yankee Doodle day, I thought I would also include a copy of the Uncle Sam movable paper puppet you can put together.  It's been circulating around the Internet for a while and we actually made one yesterday, but it went home with one of the kids and I didn't have time to make another.  I printed it out on 8 1/2" by 11"white card stock, cut it out and just followed the directions.  As far as I know, it was from an old postcard, printed in London, from around 1914 (I couldn't find a recent copyright, so I assume this is in the public domain now).


Oh, this modern world!  I actually rented Yankee Doodle Dandy from iTunes and watched in on my iPad with headphones.  A weird, yet rather pleasant experience  

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3. envy shouldn't fuel our conversations, good luck doesn't earn us pride: let us do some good in this world

Being an old woman now, being a veteran of hope and disappointments, promises made and not always kept, I've seen things. I've felt things. I've wondered.

Many conclusions I've kept to myself. Some I've shared privately, quietly, with friends. Never in a bookstore gathering, nor on a panel, nor in a public forum, nor in a passive-aggressive social-media way have I thought it okay—from a human perspective, from the perspective of career advancement, even—to strike back or out at others. To put one writer or book down in order to promote another. To laugh at the person not in the room, or at the person sitting just a few stools down.

These are books we are writing, and if we are writing them for the right reasons, we're not writing them to win, we're not writing them to be famous, we're not writing them to put ourselves on an endless tour away from home and family. We're not writing so that we will own the headlines. We're writing because within the deep of us, something stirs—idea, character, language. The stuff of the soul.

Good luck in our own careers doesn't earn us entree to prideful pronouncements. Bad luck shouldn't put us on a battleground. Envy shouldn't fuel our conversations.

Our country trembles. Our planet stands at desperate risk. Dangers lurk and hearts are broken. People are dying too soon and for no other reason than that they were in a church at a wrong time, or on a beach when terror came, or in a museum when someone raised a gun, or in a hotel when a plane fell.

May we write books that explore, expose, ponder, transcend, heal. May we live, as authors, with the ambition of doing some measurable good in this world.



0 Comments on envy shouldn't fuel our conversations, good luck doesn't earn us pride: let us do some good in this world as of 7/4/2015 10:16:00 AM
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4. GJ Book Club, Chapter 13: Variety of Mass

On the GJ Book Club, we're looking at Chapter 13: "Variety of Mass" in Harold Speed's 1917 classic The Practice and Science of Drawing. The following numbered paragraphs cite key points in boldface. If you would like to respond to a specific image or point, please precede your comment by the corresponding number.

This chapter brings us to some Speed's best material about painting, with some insights that I haven't seen in other instructional manuals.


1. Variety of shape is one of the most difficult things to invent, and one of the commonest things in nature.

He brings up the excellent point that if you don't regularly study from nature, your work will contain "two or three pet forms repeated." I'm thinking of N.C. Wyeth's whipped-cream clouds, for example (sorry, N.C.) . I think this tendency to see forms in a standardized way can even be a problem for a plein-air painter if they aren't sufficiently patient and selfless to really observe carefully and slowly and vary their approach.

2. Nature does not so readily suggest a scheme of unity, for the simple reason that the first condition of your picture, the four bounding lines, does not exist in nature. 

Despite the fact that we must go to nature to appreciate the endless variety of nature, at some point we need to impose design order on it because we're operating within the artificial universe of a rectangular picture.

3. Variety of tone values

Speed defines tone value (light to dark on a gray scale) as a property of light on form, and also as an element of pictorial design. Both of these properties can influence the tone you choose for a passage, and alter it from the actual local color of the object you're painting. 

Twachtman at the Metropolitan Museum
4. This quality of tone music is most dominant when the masses are large and simple.

Another way to say it is: "big tones create mood." The Twachtman above has both big tones and simple shapes. Large, simple masses of similar tone are what give a picture poetic impact, but they can be hard to achieve. Speed mentions that mist or fog can help. I would add that backlighting can too, because it automatically reduces complex value patterns to simpler silhouettes. 

5. Tone relationships are most sympathetic when the middle values of your scale only are used, that is to say, when the lights are low in tone and the darks high. They are most dramatic and intense when the contrasts are great and the jumps from dark to light sudden.

This is a great truth in keying a picture. The value scale has a lot to do with lighting, as any photographer knows. Fashion or food photographers can control the lighting ratio and the softness of the light using fill lights and diffusers and thereby achieve an image well within the middle range. By contrast, film noir directors use lighting to emphasize dramatic contrasts between light and dark areas. 

But unlike photographers, painters have complete control over all the variables of a picture, and we can achieve effects that are almost impossible in photography.

6. Variety in quality and nature is almost too subtle to write about with any prospect of being understood.
C'mon, Harold! It's a bit of a cop out for him to bring up this point and then not really explain it. But I think he's talking about variety of textures within a painting, including the types of brushstrokes (dry vs. wet, large vs. small, thick vs. thin paint, etc.). He argues—and I agree with him—that many of the celebrated Impressionists suffer from an overall sameness of paint texture, which interferes with any sense that you're looking at nature's infinite variety. You just get stuck in the paint instead.

I love his line "Nature is sufficiently vast for beautiful work to be done in separate departments of vision, although one cannot place such work on the same plane with successful pictures of wider scope." 

7. Every student should make a chart of the colours he is likely to use. 
The purpose of this chart is to see how the paint changes over time. In oil, the chart should have thick blobs of paint on one side thinned with the palette knife to a thin smear. There's a tendency, he says, for oil to rise up through the paint if it can't sink into an absorbent ground, and certain oils can darken. Can one of our paint material experts explain this a bit more?


8. Variety of edges.
He gives the usual advice to vary the edges around a given form—hard, soft, hard, etc. 

He then makes the more unusual observation that in some great works: "the most accented edges are reserved for unessential parts." In other words the face is handled with a lot of softness, and the accessory areas around the face, such as the costume, is given more hard-edge handling. He shows the detail from Velazquez's Surrender of Breda, but I think Sargent has many good examples of this, too.

It strikes me that this quality is the opposite of what you would do in focusing a camera on a face with a shallow-focus prime lens, where you'd want sharpness and detail in the eyes and the center of the face, and softer edges everywhere else. 

9. A picture that is a catalogue of many little parts separately focussed will not hang together as one visual impression.

Little bits separately focused is a common flaw in beginner's work. The unity of vision that he's setting up as a goal in picture-making is one of the marks of enduring masterpieces, and it requires conscious effort to achieve.

10. What perspective has done for drawing, the impressionist system of painting to one all-embracing focus has done for tone. 

We're talking about atmospheric perspective here, which he says is as radical a discovery as the discovery of linear perspective in the Renaissance. 

He continues, "Before perspective was introduced, each individual object in a picture was drawn with a separate centre of vision fixed on each object in turn. What perspective did was to insist that all objects in a picture should be drawn in relation to one fixed centre of vision." These days we've absorbed impressionist values so completely that it's hard to appreciate the impact that the revolution in vision brought to painting.


11. Treatment of foliage edges

Speed discusses the challenge of painting convincing foliage silhouettes. He says: "The poplar trees in Millais' "Vale of Rest" are painted in much the same manner as that employed by the Italians, and are exceptional among modern tree paintings, the trees being treated as a pattern of leaves against the sky. Millais has also got a raised quality of paint in his darks very similar to that of Bellini and many early painters."

He continues, "It is interesting to note how all the great painters have begun with a hard manner, with edges of little variety, from which they have gradually developed a looser manner, learning to master the difficulties of design that hard contours insist on your facing, and only when this is thoroughly mastered letting themselves develop freely this play on the edges, this looser handling."

12. Variety of Gradation
There's one more thing to consider when planning how to handle tone—variety of gradation. He concludes: "There you have only the one scale from black to white to work with, only one octave within the limits of which to compose your tone symphonies."

The Practice and Science of Drawing is available in various formats:
1. Inexpensive softcover edition from Dover, (by far the majority of you are reading it in this format)
3. Free online Archive.org edition.
and The Windsor Magazine, Volume 25, "The Art of Mr. Harold Speed" by Austin Chester, page 335. (thanks, अर्जुन)
GJ Book Club on Pinterest (Thanks, Carolyn Kasper)
New GJ Facebook page, credit Jenna Berry

Original blog post Announcing the GJ Book Club

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5. You KNOW!


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6. This is Florence- a commission I did for a lovely couple. Yay...



This is Florence- a commission I did for a lovely couple. Yay for pugs!



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7. Out and About (2015)

Out and About: A First Book of Poems. Shirley Hughes. 1988/2015. Candlewick Press. 56 pages. [Source: Review copy]

I really enjoyed reading Shirley Hughes Out and About: A First Book of Poems. These poems reminded me that I do like poetry, good children's poetry, about subjects that are easy to relate to. These poems celebrating living life in all four seasons: spring, summer, autumn, and winter. These poems celebrate spending time outdoors. Best of all, these poems are kid-friendly.

For example, "Mudlarks"

I like mud.
The slippy, sloppy, squelchy kind,
The slap-it-into-pies kind.
Stir it up in puddles,
Slither and slide.
I do like mud.
and "Water"
I like water.
The shallow, splashy, paddly kind,
The hold-on-tight-it's-deep-kind.
Shlosh it out of buckets,
Spray it all around.
I do like water.
I like this poetry collection because it's joyful. These poems capture joyous moments. Well, for the most part! I suppose the poem about being stuck in bed SICK isn't capturing joy, it's capturing frustration. But still. These poems are easy to relate to. 


© 2015 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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8. कब छटेंगे बादल

ये मेरी पहली कविता थी.  मन में भाव तो हमेशा ही उमड घुमड कर आते रहते थे पर ये पहली बार थी जब इन विचारों की दिशा मिली …

 

कब छटेंगे बादल

दल में बादल, गहरे बादल, काले बादल
उथले बादल, क्षितिज में विचरते बादल,
पर्वतों के ऊपर छत्र की तरह छाए बादल।

बादल………. दलदल बादल,
आखिर………कब छटेंगे ये बादल
क्या बरसात में ही पैर बढ़ा दूँ मैं……….?
की रूक जाऊँ, ठहर जाऊँ मैं………?
ठहर जाऊँ………..??
जिंदगी वैसे ही है ठहरी,ठहरी
कौंधती बिजली………गर्जते बादल,
हलचल मचा रहे मन में,
अरे! बुलबुले बने, टूटे……..,
देख मन में आस जगी…..
काले घन में भी है बिजली चमकी……..
फिर…….. हे मन, तू क्यों है व्यथित……….
क्यों……… आंखों के आगे काले बादल बैठाए हैं…….
ज़रा अश्रू तो पोंछ, पलक साफ कर…….
देखा………..!! छट गए न बादल………
न बादल, न दल में बादल
पैर बढ़ा, चल मंजिल की ओर……….
ठहरी जिंदगी को दे नया बल……..
दल में बादल…….??
भुज बल में भी तो है आंधी…….
देखा…… छट गए ना बादल……….!!

 

नकारात्मक सोच से शुरु ये कविता आखिरकार सकारात्मकता पर खत्म हुई … आपको कैसी लगी … जरुर बताईएगा :)

The post कब छटेंगे बादल appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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9. Five things to know about Al Qaeda and Bin Laden

Despite Bin Laden's death in 2011, the extremist group Al Qaeda has since survived and, some argue, continued to thrive. The effort and resources Bin Laden invested into Al Qaeda fortified its foundation, making it difficult, if not impossible, to disband or weaken the group after his death. But how did the terrorist group come to be what it is today?

The post Five things to know about Al Qaeda and Bin Laden appeared first on OUPblog.

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10. Free First 5 Pages Workshop is Now Closed

Hi Everyone,

Sorry but the Free First Five Pages Workshop is now closed. Once again, we filled up in under a minute! I will email the participants that made it into the workshop today. If you don't hear from me, I'm sorry but you didn't get in this month. Please try again next month!

Erin

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11. #BookADay: MINRS by Kevin Sylvester (Simon & Schuster, Sept/2015)

Appropriately enough, I began and finished Kevin Sylvester's MiNRS underground. It was soOooOooOOoo good that I missed my subway stop. Twice.

MiNRS is Kevin's upcoming action-adventure sf book for middle grade ... though honestly, I believe older readers will enjoy it as well. The premise: A 12-year-old boy and his friends have to survive in the mining tunnels after their new space colony are attacked during an Earth communication blackout.

Love the unexpected plot twists.

Loved the action and adventure, sense of real danger. The darker bits are part of what helps set this sf middle grade apart from others.

Love the main character, Christopher, and how his character develops throughout the story. Love the fact that he's just an ordinary boy (no superpowers, etc.) who has to use resources available to him to figure things out and learn how to be a leader.

Loved the depth of the character interactions and complexity of some of the relationships.

Loved the strong female characters.

Loved the fascinating tech/science behind the asteroid mining process.

Just ***LOVED***.

Can't wait until MiNRS comes out this September from Margaret K. McElderry Books/Simon & Schuster.

And Kevin: I want MORE, PLEASE.

Read about MiNRS on the Simon & Schuster website.

Find out more about Kevin and his work at KevinSylvesterBooks.com.

---------------------

More info: Donalyn Miller's Summer Book-A-Day Challenge | Archives of my #BookADay posts

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12. Gingerbread for Liberty (2015)

Gingerbread for Liberty: How A German Baker Helped Win the American Revolution. Mara Rockliff. Illustrated by Vincent X. Kirsch. 2015. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 32 pages. [Source: Review copy]

First sentence: Everyone in Philadelphia knew the gingerbread baker. His honest face...his booming laugh...And, of course, his gingerbread--the best in all the thirteen colonies. His big, floury hands turned out castles and queens, horses and cows and hens--each detail drawn in sweet, buttery icing with the greatest skill and care. And yet, despite his care, there always seemed to be some broken pieces for the hungry children who followed their noses to the spicy-smelling shop. "No empty bellies here!" the baker bellowed. "Not in my America!"

Premise/plot: Gingerbread for Liberty is the untold, near-forgotten story of Christopher Ludwick, a German-born American who loved and served his country during the American Revolution in the best way he knew how: by baking.

My thoughts: I loved, loved, loved, LOVED this one. I loved the end papers which feature a recipe for "Simple Gingerbread." I loved the illustrations. Never has a book's illustrations gone so perfectly-perfectly well with the text. The illustration style is very gingerbread-y. It works more than you think it might. At least in my opinion! I loved the author's note. I did. I loved learning a few more facts about Christopher Ludwick. It left me wanting to know even more. Which I think is a good thing. The book highlights his generosity and compassion as well as his baking talents.

But most of all, I loved the text itself, the writing style. The narrative voice in this one is super-strong. And I love the refrain: Not in MY America!  

Text: 5 out of 5
Illustrations: 4 out of 5
Total: 9 out of 10

© 2015 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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13. Illustrator Challenge #7

Draw a horse. Try to begin with the bone structure to make sure you get the anatomy correct. You can use references on this one. :)

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14. Week in Review: June 28-July 4

From June:
The Silmarillion. J.R.R. Tolkien. 1977. 386 pages. [Source: Bought] 
The Semi-Detached House. Emily Eden. 1859. 172 pages. [Source: Bought]
Follow Your Gut. Rob Knight with Brendan Buhler. 2015. Simon & Schuster (TED) 128 pages. [Source: Library]
Grump. Janet Wong. Illustrated by John Wallace. 2001. Simon & Schuster. 32 pages. [Book I Bought] 
Board Book: The Doghouse. Jan Thomas. 2008/2015.  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 36 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
Peppa's Chalk ABCs. Scholastic. 16 pages. [Source: Review copy]
The Message of the General Epistles: Wisdom from James, Peter, John, and Jude. Brandon D. Crowe. 2015. P&R Publishing. 240 pages. 
Packer on the Christian Life. Sam Storms. 2015. Crossway. 224 pages. [Source: Review copy]

From July: 
Lost in the Sun. Lisa Graff. 2015. Penguin. 304 pages. [Source: Library]
The Great Good Summer. Liz Garton Scanlon. 2015. Simon & Schuster. 224 pages. [Source: Library]
My Brother's Secret. Dan Smith. 2015. Scholastic. 304 pages. [Source: Review copy]
How To Catch a Mouse. Philippa Leathers. 2015. Candlewick. 40 pages. [Source: Review copy]
Pete The Cat's Train Trip (I Can Read) James Dean. 2015. HarperCollins. 32 pages. [Source: Library]
Gingerbread for Liberty: How A German Baker Helped Win the American Revolution. Mara Rockliff. Illustrated by Vincent X. Kirsch. 2015. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 32 pages. [Source: Review copy]
The Foot Book. Dr. Seuss. 1968. Random House. 36 pages. [Source: Library]
Funny Face, Sunny Face. Sally Symes. Illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw. 2015. Candlewick. 32 pages. [Source: Review copy]
Out and About: A First Book of Poems. Shirley Hughes. 1988/2015. Candlewick Press. 56 pages. [Source: Review copy]
The End of Me. Kyle Idleman. 2015. David C. Cook. 240 pages. [Source: Review copy]
Uncensored: Daring to Embrace the Entire Bible. Brian Cosby. 2015. David C. Cook. 208 pages. [Source: Review copy]
The Innocent. Ann H. Gabhart. 2015. Revell. 400 pages. [Source: Review copy]

This week's recommendation(s):

I read some really great picture books this week. I loved, loved, loved How To Catch a Mouse and Grump and Gingerbread for Liberty. But. Probably my favorite this week was The Silmarillion. 

© 2015 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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15.

4840

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16. हद हो गर्इ

कई बार….  हमारे देश मॆं जिस तरह से भूण हत्याएं हो रही हैं मन विचलित हो जाता है और उसी विचलित मन से बन जाती हैं ऐसी कविता कि हद हो गई … बस बहुत हो गया …

अब बहुत हो गया

बस
अब बहुत हो गया
हद हो गर्इ
टी.वी. हो या समाचार पत्र
कविता प्रतियोगिता हो या राज्यस्तरीय विवाद
पर लगा नहीं पा रहे
भ्रूण हत्या पर लगाम
कह कह कर थक गए हम
पर हम अडि़ग हैं कि
कन्या नही…… कन्या नही
बस चाहिए पुत्र रत्न ही
कोर्इ बात नही

ज्यादा दूर नही है, देख लेंगेें
आज से बीस साल बाद
जब…..
लड़की नही मिलेगी कोर्इ
आपके कुल दीपक से ब्याहने को
आपका वंश चलाने को
ना होगी तब नवरात्रि में कंजको की पूजा
ना होगी पति की लम्बी उम्र के लिए उपवास पूजा
ना छम छम पायल से किसी का घर आँगन चहकेगा
नाना-नानी बनने का शौक अधूरा ही रह जाऐगा
ना रहेगा प्रेम, ना होगी करूणा
क्योंकि यह तो है नारी का गहना
बेबस मन कन्यादान से वंचित रह जाऐगा
हरा भरा घर मकान बन कर ही रह जाऐगा
मनु, इंदिदरा, कल्पना का नाम पन्नों में ही रह जाऐगा
बस……….
कुछ ही सालों की है बात
हैरान, परेशान हताश खुद ही कह उठेंगें आप
कन्या थी अनमोल रत्न
पर तब तक शायद बहुत देर हो चुकी होगी
हमें इन्तज़ार करना होगा
शायद फिर से बीस सालों का
पर तब तक सब कुछ बदल चुका होगा
खामोशी,उदासी, मायूसी का फैल चुका होगा आतंक
तो फिर………..
क्यों हो रही हैं ये भ्रूण हत्याएँ
ठान लो
बस बहुत हो गया
जानते हो
हम भारतवासी……… एक जुट हो क्या है कर सकते
मुसीबत पडने पर दे सकतें हैं जान
चीर सकतें हैं धरती की छाती
उधेड़ सकतें हैं पहाड़ों का सीना
जब ला सकतें हैं हरियाली बंजर धरा पर
फिर क्यों है रोक कलियों के प्रस्फुटन पर
चलिए लें संकल्प
आज, अभी, यहीं
भ्रूण हत्या पर लगाए
कस कर लगाम सभी
मत ड़गमगाने दें भारत का आधार
नर और नारी से ही है हमारा घर संसार
उठो, जागो, चलो
बनाए संसार में भारत की अलग पहचान
ताकि फिर से ना पड़े कहना कि…….
मोनिका, अब बहुत हो गया
हद हो गर्इ

कैसी लगी आपको ये कविता … जरुर बताईगा…

The post हद हो गर्इ appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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17. Free 1st 5 Pages Workshop with Author Ava Jae and Agent Patricia Nelson Opens Today!

Our July workshop will open for entries today at noon, EST. We'll take the first five Middle Grade, Young Adult, or New Adult entries that meet all guidelines and formatting requirements. Click here to get the rules. I will post when it opens and closes on Adventures in YA Publishing and on twitter (@etcashman), with the hashtag #1st5pages.

And we have some exciting news here at the workshop! We have four fabulous new permanent mentors:  Brenda DrakeJanet B. TaylorStephanie Scott and Wendy Spinale.  All have wonderful books coming out in the next several months that I can't wait to read! (And if you want a chance to win one - make sure to add them to your shelf on Goodreads!) Also, the workshop will now run for 4 weeks.

  • Week One: Your two assigned permanent mentors plus Ava Jae provide feedback on your original entry, and you receive additional feedback from other workshop participants. You revise based on their comments.
  • Week Two: Permanent mentors and the guest mentor review and critique your 1st revision. You do another revision.
  • Week Three: Permanent mentors, the guest mentor, and the literary agent mentor review and critique your 2nd revision. 
  • Week Four: You provide a pitch (up to 200 words) that would be the core of a query letter and describes what your manuscript is about. Mentors and the agent mentor review it, consider whether it matches up to your first five pages, and recommend changes to make sure it matches up with your manuscript and answers questions while sounding enticing and marketable.

Another new feature we're introducing this month is that the guest agent will chose a workshop "winner" -- but, of course, you win just by joining the workshop, accepting the feedback, and working hard on revising your pages! The guest agent will review and comment on a partial of the winner's manuscript or work-in-progress!

In addition to our talented permanent mentors, we have Ava Jae, author of the forthcoming BEYOND THE RED, and Patricia Nelson of the Marsal Lyon Literary Agency. So get those pages ready!

Read more »

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18. Happy 4th of July!




"Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves." - 
Abraham Lincoln


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Best wishes,
Donna M. McDine
Multi Award-winning Children's Author



Ignite curiosity in your child through reading!



Connect with

A Sandy Grave ~ January 2014 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ 2014 Purple Dragonfly 1st Place Picture Books 6+, Story Monster Approved, Beach Book Festival Honorable Mention 2014, Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

Powder Monkey ~ May 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ 2015 Purple Dragonfily 1st Place Historical Fiction, Story Monster Approved and Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

Hockey Agony ~ January 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ 2015 Purple Dragonfly Honorable Mention Picture Books 6+, New England Book Festival Honorable Mention 2014, Story Monster Approved and Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

The Golden Pathway ~ August 2010 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Literary Classics Silver Award and Seal of Approval, Readers Favorite 2012 International Book Awards Honorable Mention and Dan Poynter's Global e-Book Awards Finalist
















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19.



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20. your bill of writes

Photo by Vicky Lorencen

Photo by Vicky Lorencen

In the spirit of Independence Day, I present to you [cue the fife and drum please] . . .

A Writer’s Bill of Rights

You have the right to observe, but not follow trends.

You have the right to seek a second opinion.

You have the right to ask, “What if?”

You have the right to laugh at your own writing. Hey, if you’re funny, you’re funny.

You have the right to leave your beloved critique group if it’s no longer serving its purpose.

You have the right to say no when a friend of a friend asks for feedback on her 1,000-word non-fiction picture book about the history of toe jam.

You have the right not to feel guilty if someone asks for your honest opinion and doesn’t like your response (assuming you delivered the news graciously).

You have the right to try a new genre.

You have the right to read reviews, even if everyone advises against it. (And you have the right to admit it when everyone was right.)

You have the right to think a certain author or book (or movie based on that book) is lame, even if everyone else thinks it’s the greatest thing since WiFi.

You have the right to love a certain author or book even if no one else does.

You have the right to prefer printed books to e-books (or vice versa).

You have a right to take a break from writing (or the pursuit of publication) if you need to. Plus, you have the right to not feel guilty about it.

You have the right to scrap the whole darn thing and start over.

You have the right not to participate in every form of social or digital media imaginable simply for the purpose of following the crowd.

You have the right to be selective and protective of your time.

You have the right to ignore feedback if it does not ring true to you or serve your story.

You have the right to pass on an opportunity because you know it’s not right for you, even if (and especially if) you’re feeling desperate and needy.

Did I miss any rights? If so, you, my friends, have every right to add more.

Now, go exercise your freedom!

I was intelligent enough to make up my own mind. I not only had freedom of choice, I had freedom of expression. ~  Amy Tan

 


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21. One Of Everything - a bookwrap











Unwrapping quotes about freedom...











Unwrapping today's featured adult book...









How does one find a place in her world where she is happy and content and fits?  How does one know what lifestyle suits her, what location to live in and with whom, and the magic formula to make her own personal life satisfying and worth while?  All these questions are pending as the author tries to devise the perfect recipe for a happily-ever-after life.  

In 1976 the author starts exploring to find love and acceptance.  She travels, attends Berkeley University, expands her mind with drugs, and broadens her sexual life with interracial and bisexual affairs. Still searching for happiness she marries, divorces and dabbles in paganism. Donna finds Salsa dancing therapeutic, find her way into Mormonism and a Temple wedding and the mother of three adopted siblings.  Are these the ingredients she needs to finally find peace and contentment?  

"From shame to self-acceptance, from sexual ambiguity to definitive choice, from skepticism to belief, Donna Carol Voss's journey from childhood to marriage and motherhood is both unique and universal, a story that will resonate long after the last page is read."



Unwrapping an expert from the book...


Introduction


“It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.”
—André Gide, Autumn Leaves



I am a woman with a past. I never met a door I didn’t open. Like Eve in the Garden of Eden, I bet it all on firsthand experience. The only question now is what to tell the broad- shouldered man across from me. He is not right for me—too old, too already-done-that—and I am, improbably now at thirty-eight, determined to start a family. We don’t add up on paper, yet his vivid sky blues, leveled at me patiently, waiting for me to speak, pull me in. Soft warmth suffuses through me and despite myself, I see a future. Telling him is only right.
A forgettable sports bar with a summertime Formula One race blaring from each television is the crossroads of my past life and unlikely future. We are alone in the restaurant but for the beer drinkers and occasional margarita skirts lapping the bar. Above our table, a solitary fixture beams its spotlight onto our unfolding passion play, and I hear my cue.
“I need to tell you some things about my history,” I start and then hesitate as self- protection battles honest disclosure; I am no stranger to rejection.
“Okay.”
He doesn’t react visibly, but I know these church boys, so sheltered, so naïve. I’m afraid he will never see me the same way again. My insides, a moment ago so soft and warm, twist into a sinking, dull heaviness. I am no stranger to panic either. At least that’s what I would have called it at fourteen had I been able to feel anything after the bomb went off in my life.
My face shows none of the apprehension welling up in my chest. I know this because my
gift from the trauma, the silver lining that embroiders its bittersweet edge around every wound, is the ability to project a strength and a confidence so absolute they reveal nothing else. If what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, what almost kills you makes you near invincible. Pretending for years afterward, even to myself, that everything was fine, that I was fine, had solidified into a facade of smoothest granite. Under our bright spotlight, all he sees is a very put-together brunette, a woman who’s quite sure of herself and her place in the world. He is, paradoxically, both correct and beguiled.
We met at church, which makes it even more difficult to say the things I have to say. Late to the party of organized religion, I am not haloed in the blushing aura of goodliness he may expect. My crown, rather, is one of hard-fought life experience woven with Siamese twin strands of gratitude and remorse. Every awful, disturbing, exhilarating moment made me who I am, including the ones for which I will have eternal sorrow.
I want to tell him that I ache for many of the things I’ve done but harbor secret glee for others, certain scandalously thrilling experiences that happen only on the edges of propriety. I need him to understand that some things were done out of emotional pain or the scraggly search for meaning, and some were done out of the darkness of ignorance, but many were done because I hungered for and don’t regret the experience. I need him to see that I am not the person I used to be, and yet I vaulted each wave with the same courage and integrity I possess now.
I find his eyes, and he is still there, still patiently waiting. It is now or never. “I’ve been divorced,” I say, testing the water with my easy one.
He breaks into a broad grin, so handsome with his salt-and-pepper hair. “Don’t feel like the lone ranger on that!” he chuckles somewhat ruefully. 





About the author...










                                                                                                             





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22. Free 1st 5 Pages Workshop is Now Open!

Our July workshop is now open. We'll take the first five Middle Grade, Young Adult, or New Adult entries that meet all guidelines and formatting requirements. Click here to get the rules. I will post when it opens and closes on Adventures in YA Publishing and on twitter (@etcashman), with the hashtag #1st5pages.

In addition to our talented permanent mentors, we have Ava Jae, author of the forthcoming BEYOND THE RED, and Patricia Nelson of the Marsal Lyon Literary Agency. So get those pages ready!

Read more »

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23. Happy Independence Day!

I hope your day is filled with celebration with friends and fireworks, hot dogs and apple pie! Click the image to the right to find Independence Day-themed coloring pages for the little ones.

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24. Seuss on Saturday #27

The Foot Book. Dr. Seuss. 1968. Random House. 36 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence:
Left foot
Left foot
Right foot
Right
Feet in the morning
Feet at night
Left foot
Left foot
Left foot
Right
Premise/plot: Does The Foot Book have an actual plot? Probably not. It's a rhyming celebration of all sorts of feet, I suppose.

My thoughts: Probably not my favorite Seuss title. Not that I actively dislike it, mind you. It's just not going to make my top thirty.

Have you read The Foot Book? Did you like it? love it? hate it? I'd love to know what you thought of it!

 If you'd like to join me in reading or rereading Dr. Seuss (chronologically) I'd love to have you join me! The next book I'll be reviewing is I Can Lick 30 Tigers Today and Other Stories.

© 2015 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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25. Happy Fourth of july!

fourth-sutton.jpg

Image by Ward Sutton

Happy fourth to all! I’m taking it easy on the pre San Diego news to run errands, upgrade my laptop and do all those real world things I’ve been putting off, but the maelstrom of pre Comic-Con news starts again tomorrow! In the meantime have a safe and happy holiday from all of us here at The Beat.

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