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1. Book Review: To Catch a Cheat by Varian Johnson

Title: To Catch a Cheat
Author: Varian Johnson
Published: 2016
Source: Edelweiss

Summary: After the shenanigans of The Great Greene Heist, Jackson is trying to keep his nose clean. Really! He is!  But he's framed for a cheating con, and the principal is all too eager to take the excuse to strike him down. Complicating matters are a fight with his best friend, and his attempts to kiss his sort-of girlfriend for the first time. (Yikes!) Still, Jackson's got to clear this up. What can a reformed con artist do, but con his way to the center of this mystery?

First Impressions: A fun romp, although I got lost more than a few times with all the characters. And I definitely spent some time wanting to knock Jackson and Charlie's heads together.

Later On: The things I liked (and the things I didn't) about the first one carried over into this book. I still loved the casual diversity (Jackson is black, Charlie and Gabi are Latinx, they have friends of other ethnicities as well) and the fine ear for the complexities of middle-school life. The con stuff got really, really involved, especially when the story juggled multiple characters of dubious intentions. Still, I think that this could become an entertaining MG series.

I was never entirely clear on why Charlie and Jackson were at odds, although I could see how it
played out. Charlie's been in Jackson's shadow a lot, and Jackson is just clever enough to be arrogant about it, and that arrogance would grate.

More: Kirkus
Book Nut

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2. महिलाएं और उनकी अनसोशल नेटवर्किंग

महिलाएं और उनकी अनसोशल नेटवर्किंग थोडी देर पहले मार्किट जाते हुए एक महिला जोकि स्कूटी पर तीन बच्चों को लेकर जा रही थी. वो  गर्दन टेढी करके फोन पर भी बात करती जा रही थी. चौराहे पर जब वो रुकी तो मैने पता नही क्यो पर उसे टोक दिया कि आप प्लीज एक तरफ स्कूटी […]

The post महिलाएं और उनकी अनसोशल नेटवर्किंग appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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3. Featured Review: The Safest Lies by Megan Miranda

About this book: Kelsey has lived most of her life in a shadow of fear, raised to see danger everywhere. Her mother hasn’t set foot outside their front door in seventeen years, since she escaped from her kidnappers with nothing but her attacker’s baby growing inside her—Kelsey. Kelsey knows she’s supposed...

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4. FREE KIDS EBOOK : HAPPY HAT DAY

FREE KID'S EBOOK
Happy Hat Day is FREE today! (May 29th)

HAPPY HAT DAY ON AMAZON.COM
HAPPY HAT DAY ON AMAZON.CO.UK

Happy Hat Day Free eBook


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5. Bloom: You Were Born to Bloom

Hi, folks! Today is my twenty-eighth wedding anniversary with the sweetest man ever, Tim Blaisdell. He is also a blogger and writes over at THE MUSINGS OF A MEANDERING MIND.  I also am in a entrant in QUERY KOMBAT. Queries are selected by judges and they go head and head in a VOICE-esque contest. Only one query moves to next level. I'm Southern Gothic Secrets and my critique partner Ellen is Mochi Monster!

What do we win? Twenty-eight agents and editor will be looking at the queries with the possibility of landing an agent or even a contract. Did you notice 28 and 28? Feels very portent-y to me!

This week I'm writing about a deep truth. We are all born to bloom. A dear friend facing who suffers from a cancer syndrome hugged me and whispered, "I want to bloom but I feel like I'm falling apart."

I hugged her back because I know what it is like to be broken on a genetic level. Some things don't need words. What we can do is focus on the splendor of now.  Blooming does not come from us but creator of all things.

I grew up with a plant-loving mom, and she surrounded my life with flowers. So this week, I'm going to share about unusual blooms that I have seen in my life. I love flowers and I pay attention. I hope you will take lessons from these blooms and realize that you are stronger that you know.

A half-of a daffodil  bloomed in my mother's yard once. It was the most beautiful thing. A genetic anomaly but more beautiful because of it was unique.

One time there was a sad rhody in my yard that covered with some kind of leaf disease. I had to hack away more than half of the plant. The next year the rhody bloomed with almost a hundred gorgeous blood-red blooms that took my breath away. It had never bloomed before.

Once my mom stopped the car beside the road and made me get out and look at this field of spiky plants with these gorgeous white blooms on tall spears. She told me to soak it in because these were century plants and this might not happen again in my life time.

I planted a cemetery rose in my backyard from a cutting that was about two inches long.  This year rose is the size of a small car and it has hundreds of blooms.

So this week, I was blessed by this: my daylilies bloomed during the 8 inches of rain that fell on my house this week in 24 hours. The splash of color on such a dreary day uplifted my heart. Bloom during the flood!

Maybe one of these blooms speaks to you. Just like you were born to share, to be merciful, to smile, and to love, you were born to bloom. Seize every day.

I will be back next week with a new series about the Monomyth.   I hope you will join me.

Here is a doodle:



Here is a quote for your pocket:

Why should I be unhappy? Every parcel of my being is in full bloom. Rumi

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6. A king and a coloring book - Works in progress

I decided I need a nursery rhyme for my portfolio.
So I found a sort of obscure one - King Boggen.

"Little King Boggen he built a fine hall.
Pie-crust and pastry-crust, that was the wall;
The windows were made of black puddings and white.
And slated with pancakes, you ne'er saw the like!"

It has food, architecture, and is a children's book thing, which hits three of my sweet spots!

I found a couple of versions of the rhyme. One doesn't call him "Little" King Boggen, and there are other fiddly bits in the text that are different. But I decided to go with "Little", and make him a kid. I also toyed with the idea of making him a dog or other animal (well, it doesn't say the king is a person, does it?), but then stuck with the kid. I did like adding the dog though, and fell in love with the idea of the King being a chef, and the "fine hall" is a table-top size creation that they then enjoy eating.

So this was my first version.






An earlier incarnation . . .


And some revisions to the dog . . .




Then, after sitting on it for a day or so, decided it was too static and predictable.
So I sketched around a bit more, and came up with this ~


The Fine Hall is now a real building size, and everyone's moving around. I added the cat having a wash, and the bird making off with a pancake from the roof. The dog is leaping for a pancake (like a frisbee), and the King is just a weird little guy with a fancy pitchfork, picking pancakes and bits off the Hall and flinging them around. More fun, right? (and fyi, "black puddings and white" is blood sausage (black) and pork/oatmeal sausage (white), which will be the panes of the windows).

I have the dog just about exactly how I want him, and the cat needs a little refining.
But the King needs some work. Not sure exactly who he is - how old, is he jolly or bland or goofy, or what? And what exactly is his outfit? And let's get those legs just right . . .




And the hands - blimey. The top one holding the pitchfork is in probably the hardest position I could possibly create to draw. (Try holding a broom or something, and see how odd your arm/hand looks from this angle).



Still trying different things . . .


and that's where I've left it, for now.


Of course I googled this to see who else had already illustrated this, and found this 1915 image by Frederick Richardson (1862 - 1937) ~



~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  

And then, I'm also working on the next Drawings of Knitting coloring book.
This next one will be full of more 'normal' drawings of knitting (not so 'arty'), and will have Fair Isle designs to color.

I'm going to do a couple of Fair Isle versions of each design, then have one, or maybe two, "blank" versions (like the mittens below) so that people can make up their own designs if they want to.

So here are some mittens ~


And here is a very work-in-progress Turtleneck Sweater. This shows exactly how I create these drawings. I sketch out the basic shape and design, then lay in the rows of stitches, very roughly, with "V's" to show where each stitch goes, then I painstakingly draw each stitch with the black 'ink'. After that's done I'll erase out the background guidelines, and clean everything up. There are always "overdraws" and bits that haven't quite joined up right, that need touching up. Its very fiddly, and I have to take quite a few breaks. 



Its Memorial Day weekend here in the States. Regular working people get a 3-day weekend. Not the rest of us though. I'll be doing more of this, and maybe some weed-pulling if its not too hot. I hope you all have a good holiday if you get to have one!



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7. Writing from ... Indonesia

       With Indonesia as the Guest of Honour at last year's Frankfurt Book Fair there has been a bit more international coverage -- and more translations than usual (still only a handful, but still ...) -- of the local literature, and in The Guardian Louise Doughty now takes a look at '17,000 islands of imagination': discovering Indonesian literature.
       Works by several Indonesian authors -- including some mentioned in the piece -- are under review at the complete review -- though also not nearly enough.

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8. Children’s Book Illustrations from British Library

via Lines and Colors :: a blog about drawing, painting, illustration, comics, concept art and other visual arts http://ift.tt/1TF4uFB

Children's Book Illustrations from British Library
As part of the huge trove of public domain images being posted on Flicker — which I reported in 2013 — the British Library has assemble a large collection of children’s book illustrations.

As is often the case with these kinds of large scale image resources, best results come from a bit of patience and digging.

Some of the illustrations are not directly attributed to the artists, but reference is given to the books from which they were taken.

[Via DCAD Library and Century Past History on Twitter]

 
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9. 7-Imp’s 7 Kicks #485: Featuring Alexis Deacon

  I’ve got some art today from author-illustrator Alexis Deacon’s first graphic novel, Geis: A Matter of Life & Death. (“Geis,” a Gaelic word for a taboo or curse, is pronounced gesh.) It will be on bookshelves in July from Nobrow Press. Let me back up a bit and say that I love to see […]

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10. WRITER'S RITES: Nobody's got time for that

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11. Certain Songs #550: Guided by Voices – “Hardcore UFOs”

GBV - Bee Thousand Album: Bee Thousand
Year: 1994

I’m pretty sure the first time I heard of Guided by Voices was by reading about them in SPIN, whose Senior Editor, Jim Greer, had just written a biography of R.E.M. I liked called Behind The Mask.

I don’t remember exactly what he wrote about GBV, I just remember there was a Jim Greer piece in SPIN that really made me want to hear them. Because that’s how we still discovered music in 1994: we found writers whose opinions we trusted, and triangulated their recommendations with our individual tastes.

But it just wasn’t Greer and SPIN. As a matter of fact, as the release of Bee Thousand became imminent, the advance buzz was so huge and overwhelming that in my review of the album for Kade Magazine, I wrote “at this point, it doesn’t even matter how good Bee Thousand actually is, cos there is now no question that Guided By Voices are going to be the next indie-rock superstars.”

That was a couple of months after I succumbed to the hype and bought it without having ever heard even a note of their of their music, and was instantly confronted with “Hardcore UFOs.”

Featuring a pair of spot-on 1990s guitars — one shimmering in the right speaker and one malfunctioning in the left speaker — a drummer that couldn’t even get going until halfway through the song, “Hardcore UFOs” could have turned me off of GBV right then and there.

Because, frankly, it’s a mess.

But it’s a beautiful, glorious mess, which starts with Robert Pollard and Tobin Sprout (I think) harmonizing in the middle of the chaos.

Sitting out on your house
Watching hardcore ufos
Drawing pictures, playing solos til ten

Are you amplified to rock?
Are you hoping for a contact?
I’ll be with you, without you, again

Hell, even the vocals get fucked up near the third verse, like somebody accidentally hit “record” on the four-track without protecting the vocal track and immediately realizing what he did, and everybody else was too drunk to notice.

Between that and the lead guitar — “lead” guitar because it’s the rhythm guitar that’s mixed the highest — that drops in and out of the mix throughout the song, and GBV became an instant standard-bearer for a certain kind of rock ‘n’ roll aesthetic that has always been dear to my heart.

And it ain’t lo-fi: to me the lo-fi was more of a necessary result of the thing I instantly loved about Guided By Voices — the way Bee Thousand felt like it was a bunch of friends hanging out and making music for the sheer fun of it, even if they weren’t particularly good musicians.

And in June of 1994, when Bee Thousand was released, it felt like that kind of spirit was in short supply. I mean, sure, there was Pavement or Archers of Loaf, but you could tell that they were slumming, and even the most off-handed moments of their music felt somewhat conceptualized. I mean, don’t get me wrong: I loved their concepts, but it always felt like every note & beat — even the bum ones — was right where it was supposed to be.

No so with GBV. They weren’t good musicians playing raggedy music, they were raggedy musicians reaching further than they could possibly grasp. And it was thrilling.

“Hardcore UFOs”

Every Certain Song Ever
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Certain Songs Spotify playlist
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The post Certain Songs #550: Guided by Voices – “Hardcore UFOs” appeared first on Booksquare.

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12. Just Received ... Somebody Stop Ivy Pocket!



Around this time last year, I was reviewing  Anyone But Ivy Pocket on this site. Yesterday, the sequel arrived. This time I seem to have the finished product instead of the proof copy, so the illustrations I missed last time are there!

I said at the time it rather reminded me of Judith Rossell's delightful Withering-By-Sea, so we will have to see how our favourite maid(but nobody else's)goes this time.

Here's the blurb from the Bloomsbury web site.

Ivy is now the beloved daughter of Ezra and Mother Snagbsy, coffin makers, even if she does have to work rather like a maid. Their trade is roaring, and Ivy is as happy as a pig in clover. Especially when she escapes to the library to talk to the devastatingly sympathetic Miss Carnage. 

But then Ivy guesses that all is not as it seems with her new parents, and discovers that she can pass into the world of the Clock Diamond. There, she sees her friend Rebecca, horribly sad and desperate. 

Can Ivy save Rebecca, and what do a missing aristocrat, a forbidden love affair and a bullfrog have to do with her mission?

Illustrated in humorous gothic detail by John Kelly, Somebody Stop Ivy Pocket is the second tale in Ivy's deadly comic journey to discover who she really is ... Perfect for fans of Lemony Snicket.

I'm looking forward to reading it!

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13. Patrick White at 104

       It would have been Australian Nobel laureate Patrick White's 104th birthday yesterday -- as good an excuse as any to read some of his books (even if many are still/again woefully hard to fnd in print ...).
       I missed this a couple of weeks ago, but in the Sydney Morning Herald Linda Morris recently reported that National Library secures Patrick White's first book of poems.
       My favorite part of the story:

White wrote to the National Library saying if they didn't take their copy of his other poetry anthology off shelves he'd steal it himself and destroy it.

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14. Novel Spanning Months???

Question: In the current novel I am writing, (a realistic fiction with a paranormal-ish twist,) the protagonist, in short, is staying away from home, during

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15. Rhyming Mistakes

It's easy to write poorly in rhyme, so make sure to avoid these mistakes.

https://li.st/l/6G5mNeBDX1faUIfJRdIscE

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16. ICYMI: Author Spotlight Series

Many thanks to Bob, Isabel, Julie, Lauren, Liz, Maribeth and Paula for sharing part of their writing lives with our community of teachers and writers this week. In case you missed any of their blog posts, this post contains links to each of their posts. Be sure to leave a comment on each of their blog posts by June 4th, 2016 for a chance to win one of their books.

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17. Is it okay to have a completely fictional setting for an otherwise realistic story?

Question Writing a story which takes place in a city where I've never truly lived in is treacherous. I've seen a lot of comments on other books pointing

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18. Introducing Two New Co-Authors

We're delighted to welcome two new writers to our #TWTBlog Co-Author Team.

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19. ऑडियो – व्यंग्य – आम बनाम आम आदमी

क्लिक करें और सुनें  व्यंग्य आम बनाम आम आदमी                            ऑडियो – व्यंग्य – आम बनाम आम आदमी ऑडियो – व्यंग्य – आम बनाम आम आदमी गर्मी का मौसम है और बहार आई हुई है आम की… सोचा आज इस बारे में ही […]

The post ऑडियो – व्यंग्य – आम बनाम आम आदमी appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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20. Submit a #alaac17 Program Proposal

Submit a Program Proposal for the 2017 ALA Annual Conference

ALSC is now accepting proposals for innovative programs for the 2017 ALA Annual Conference. Be part of this exciting professional development opportunity by submitting your program today!

To submit a program proposal for the 2017 Annual Conference, please visit the ALSC website. for the submission form and instructions. The 2017 ALA Annual Conference is scheduled for June 22-27, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. All proposals must be submitted by Thursday, June 2, 2016.

Submit a proposal

Need help getting started? In January, the Program Coordinating Committee put out a call for ideas and asked for your feedback. We offered thirteen topic areas and asked members to rank their favorites. Here are all thirteen topic areas we suggested ranked in order of ALSC members’ choices:

  1. Diversity in children’s lit
  2. Partnerships and outreach
  3. Age specific programming
  4. STEM/STEAM
  5. Summer learning
  6. Difficult conversations
  7. Media mentorship
  8. Recent immigrant communities
  9. Collection development
  10. Diversity in the profession
  11. Advocacy
  12. Gender diversity
  13. Networking

Need more inspiration? Below you’ll find additional ideas suggested by ALSC members in response to the survey. These are not ranked and appear in the order in which they were received. Additional Program Ideas:

  • Continuing Education after the MLIS
  • Working with difficult coworkers/directors/city agencies– best practices, stress relief, etc.
  • Programming for Children with Special Needs
  • Localized networking- how to bring back info from ALA, etc, and share with people who can’t afford time/money for conference
  • Poetry, poetry programs, apps, National Poetry Month
  • Social services: ie. Food programs at the library to serve hungry families, homelessness, libraries as a safe environment etc
  • Child development and how it relates to library services, the mechanics of reading ( to help with readers advisory for emerging readers)
  • The impact on tech on families
  • Recent youth space upgrades/renovations. Slide shows etc
  • Early Literacy/Babies Need Words
  • Preschool Programming outside of storytime
  • Becoming a youth services manager
  • Statistics, budgeting
  • I would love to see a diversity track that covers diversity in the profession, networking with others that are from a more diverse culture, diversity in children’s lit, gender diversity, also how to encourage diversity in publishing and other areas related to libraries.
  • Creating a culture of reading in our community
  • Time/workload management; librarian lifehacks
  • Leadership and management chops
  • Homeschooling
  • Serving low-income kids and families
  • Parent involvement
  • Advancing early literacy best practices based on research- screens and reality

Please note that participants attending ALSC programs are seeking valuable educational experiences; the Program Coordinating Committee will not select a program session that suggests commercial sales or self-promotion. Presentations should provide a valuable learning experience and avoid being too limited in scope.

Please contact the chair of the ALSC Program Coordinating Committee, Amy Martin with questions.

Submit a proposal

Image courtesy of ALSC.

The post Submit a #alaac17 Program Proposal appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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21. Facebook Live meets a manual typewriter

Yesterday Jeanette and I decide to try out an experiment.


It's the day before graduation at Bard College. Students are roaming around campus with their parents. We place the typewriter on a table in the student center, and I arrange the sketch easel.

We hope the typewriter will lure someone to pose for an impromptu portrait. First Cullan, and then his mom, try it out.

We set up the iPad to webcast the action via Facebook Live. The first session has audio issues due to problems with our old iPad (sorry). We switch over to an Android cellphone, and then it works fine. Here's the 16 minute webcast. (Link to video).


I start sketching Jeanette, but abandon the start and turn the page when Kathleen sits down. I lay down a few lines in watercolor pencils, then launch off with brush and watercolor to place the main shapes. With progressively smaller brushes, I place the smaller details.

Kathleen, watercolor and gouache 
Thanks to everyone who joined the webcast and left a comment. Let me know in the comments what you'd like to see on a future webcast. Thanks to Kathleen, Cullan, and Joe for lending a hand and being such good sports.
-----
My next video tutorial "Portraits in the Wild" comes out June 13. It's full of moments like this.

"Gouache in the Wild" HD MP4 Download at Gumroad

Subscribe and follow and you won't miss a future webcast.
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22. Privet Drive at Warner Bros. Studio Tour London

We recently gave you an exclusive sneak peak at the interior of Privet Drive at The Making of Harry Potter tour in London. Fiona Shaw (Aunt Petunia Dursley) opened the doors of her on-film house, leading guests in to tour the set.

This event only runs until June 6th, so make sure you book tickets pronto if you’d like to visit the inside of Number Four Privet Drive before then!

Find more information, and Leaky’s exclusive look at the set here.

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23. Thoughts from a Library School Student

This week marks the end of my first semester of graduate school; the end felt unreal until I received my grades today. They’re my roller-coaster-photo-finish proof the last five blurry months actually happened, complete with wild hair and shocked expression. If you’re just starting this adventure, fasten your seatbelt and prepare yourself for a wild ride with a few suggestions from a recent first-timer in mind.

TIMING IS EVERYTHING:

Most students I’ve met are also juggling several roles, and online programs allow flexibility for those with a lot of things up in the air. However, the ability to attend class in pajamas can lend a false sense of security; it’s easy to lose track of deadlines and projects when classwork is squeezed in whenever you find a spare moment. I carved out mornings for classwork, and after the kids came home from school, we did homework together. During my lunch breaks at work, homework; after I came home from work, homework. Basically, the semester was homework with real life “squeezed in whenever”. But those hours I’d specifically carved out for school work were sacrosanct (in theory – I’m a parent). Which brings me to my next point…

MOVE IT OR LOSE IT:

When I had pneumonia shortly before the semester began, I asked my doctor how long it would take to recover. She replied it would be a few weeks and joked, “Why, do you have a marathon planned?” I explained I’d soon have a full load in graduate school, plus my part-time job and three kids, so yes, I had a marathon planned. She advised me, as she survived medical school and residency with kids, to make time for exercise. When I asked hopefully if “exercise” included the movement of Dr Pepper or chocolate in hand to mouth, she laughed and said it could at times, but actual exercise would keep me sane. It didn’t matter what I did, as long as I got up and moved for at least 30 minutes a day. Remember the wise words of Elle Woods? “Exercise gives you endorphins. Endorphins make you happy. Happy people just don’t shoot their husbands.”

REMEMBER YOUR PASSION:

It’s a safe bet if you’re in graduate school for library science, you want to be there. If you’re exploring the ALSC site and found this post, you’re probably interested in library services for children. Nevertheless, at one time or another during library school, you’ll find yourself wondering why you traded Netflix binges after work for writing research papers until dawn. But then you’ll find that one class or idea that sets your world aflame with possibilities and everything’s touched by the burning to know more. That’s the hope, at least. If your studies haven’t uncovered something yet, then recall what inspired you to be a librarian. Was it a librarian who touched your life? Quirky picture books? Your love of cardigans, cats, or library-cake memes? Suggested pick-me-ups: Neil Gaiman’s “libraries are the future” lecture or Library Journal’s inspiration board on Pinterest.

One last tip:

There might be a learning curve on your ride, but don’t worry. Just lean into it. Embrace the opportunity to grow and stretch your skills, maybe even throw your hands up in the air and scream. It will eventually come to an end and you’ll roll to a stop, amazed you’ve come so far despite how quickly it went.

*************************************************************

Today’s Guest Blogger is Stephanie Milberger. Stephanie is a youth librarianship student in the College of Information at the University of North Texas and children’s assistant at the Highland Park Library in Dallas. You can contact her online at Twitter (@milbergers) or email milbergers@gmail.com.

Please note that as a guest post, the views expressed here do not represent the official position of ALA or ALSC.

If you’d like to write a guest post for the ALSC Blog, please contact Mary Voors, ALSC Blog manager, at alscblog@gmail.com.

The post Thoughts from a Library School Student appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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24. Featured Review: Wandering Wild by Jessica Taylor

About The Book: Raised by Wanderers, sixteen-year-old Tal travels the roads of the southern wild in her Chevy by day and camps in her tent trailer at night. Hustling, conning, and grifting her way into just enough cash to save her fifteen-year-old brother, Wen, from bare-knuckle fighting was once enough to...

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25. Emma Watson, Emma Thompson, and others Take Part in Red Nose Day 2016 Celebrity Plea

On May 26, Emma Watson, Emma Thompson, and other celebrities got silly for a cause to raise awareness for Red Nose Day, a global fundraising event that uses comedy to help raise funds for children living in poverty. Spot our Hermione and Professor Trelawney in the video below as they fight other celebrities for the audience’s attention.

 

 

Though Red Nose Day had its start as an iconic British fundraising event, this is the second year of participation for the United States. A primetime television event aired on May 26 featuring comedic skits, musical performances, and short films documenting the lives of children affected by poverty in the U.S. and around the globe. In the days leading up to the television event, celebrities shared their silly side to up awareness for the event–like the photo below that the de-light-fully funny Emma Watson shared on her Instagram account.

 

@rednosedayusa

A photo posted by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on


Red Nose Day donations are still being accepted. For more information, read more at E News. To make a donation, visit the Red Nose Day website.

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