What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(from all 1547 Blogs)

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from All 1547 Blogs, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 2,000
1. Poetry Competition: ARTlines2, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX

Writers are invited to submit original poems inspired by five works of art linked to this website and on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH).

Entry guidelines.


This competition accepts poems in two separate age categories: adult (age 20+) and teens (age 13-19). The deadline for entries is midnight November 30, 2014.

 
Five independent judges – Robert Pinsky, David M. Parsons, Patricia Smith, Mary Szybist, and Roberto Tejada – will each select a winner and 7 seven finalists for one of the artworks, totaling five adult winners and thirty-five adult finalists. Writers In The Schools/WITS will judge our free teen competition and select five teen winners.


Please read the Guidelines and other information on this site before submitting your poems. All teens should read the Teen page for separate guidelines.

On April 23, 2015, in celebration of National Poetry Month, a free public program at the Museum will feature ARTlines2 winners in both age categories, as well as comments about each work of art by an art historian.


Poems by all Winners and Finalist will be published with the accompanying artworks in an ekphrastic poetry anthology for ARTlines2 


EKPHRASTIC POETRY may include literal descriptions of a work of art, the poet´s mood in response to a work of art, metaphorical associations inspired by a work of art, or personal memories about a work of art.
ARTlines2 is a national competition organized by Public Poetry in partnership with the Museum of Fine Arts Houston (MFAH).


Eligibility: Adults (20+) and teens (13-19).
Deadline: November 30, 2014

Add a Comment
2. Why I Do Author Visits at Schools

In the mail this week came a fat envelope full of letters from second graders at Sampson Elementary, which I visited during my week of school visits in Houston. I've read them over and over again. Here are some of my favorite lines, with the original spelling reproduced as best I can.

Adam, liking my titles Kelsey Green, Reading Queen, Annika Riz, Math Whiz, and Izzy Barr, Running Star, suggested I write Jackson Baxter, Writing Master. Thomas, hearing that I was stuck on a rhyming title for my work-in-progress about know-it-all Simon Ellis, suggested Simon Ellis, King of Jealous. Great titles, you two!

The kids always like best the ape dance I perform at the end of my assemblies (don't ask!). One of them wrote, "I was laughing so hard I couldn't see or breathe." Another wrote, "I almost did my scream laugh."

Blake told me, "You are one of the best athers I know. I have not read one of your book's but I just know they are reily good. I hope a lot more of your books get publisht. Try to get 20 book's or more publisht in a row that would be awsom." Blake, I couldn't agree more! I'll pass this on to my editor.

Jillian asked, "How many scools have you been to? I think you have bean to a lot! I mean, watt athor rites great books and do's not go to a lot of scools?"

Maria: "I think you are vary prity and nice." Aw, shucks, Maria!

Ava: "War do you git your story idews? I git min from my dog."

Sophie: "What year were you born in. You look like your thert five." I'll take it!

A different Sophie already has a main character for her new story: "Billy the Bad. He is vary bad."

Emily, a "shy arther" herself, sympathized with my report of all the criticism I get on my drafts from my writing group: "I feel like you in your book club my older sister reads my books and she herst my feelings a lot of times."

A third Sophie told me her reading goals: "I want to read more chapter books to impress my teacher Mrs. Hopper."

And finally, Madison told me: "When I get home I'm  going to write a book." Yes, yes, yes!

And this is why I love to do author visits at schools.

0 Comments on Why I Do Author Visits at Schools as of 10/22/2014 4:29:00 PM
Add a Comment
3. Call for Submissions from California Community College English Instructors: Inside English


Inside English is accepting submissions from writers teaching at a California community college for its spring 2015 issue. Deadline is January 15 and theme is teaching.

Inside English is the pedagogical publication of the English Council of California Two-Year Colleges and reserves First North American Serial Rights.

We accept simultaneous submissions, but please notify us immediately if your work is accepted elsewhere.

Paste your submission in the body of the email to:
 
 couringATsbccDOTedu (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )
 
Also include a fifty-word biography including the California community college(s) where you teach.

In the subject line include the genre of the submission, title(s) and your name (Flash Fiction, “Restless Nights,” Marilyn Morgan)

We accept the following genres:

Flash Fiction: 1-2 pieces, a total of 1000 words.

Poetry: 1-2 poems, no more then 50 lines each.

Flash Creative Nonfiction: 1-2 pieces, a total of 1000 words.


Dr. Chella Courington, Creative Editor
Santa Barbara City College

Add a Comment
4. Call for Submissions of Experimental Writing: Best American Experimental Writing 2015

Best American Experimental Writing 2015, to be published by Wesleyan University Press next fall, is now accepting unsolicited submissions. Fully 20% of the 2015 anthology will comprise unsolicited works selected blind by the series co-editors, Jesse Damiani and Seth Abramson, and this year's guest editor, Douglas Kearney. 

Interested poets and writers can read the guidelines and access Wesleyan's Submittable page here

The deadline for submissions is November 1st. We look forward to reading your work!

Jesse Damiani
Seth Abramson
Series Co-Editors, Best American Experimental Writing


Add a Comment
5. Is it Middle Grade or Chapter Book?

You've finished that first draft of your middle grade novel. But now taking a long look, maybe not. Maybe it is a Chapter book. Or is it? 
How can you tell? Now it's not as clear as you first thought in your rapid fire, getting it all out on paper and spouting out to everyone, "I'm working on a middle grade story."
Going back to read or reread all the books that seem the slightest bit similar sometimes helps. And sometimes doesn't -
I found a blog by Emma Walton Hamilton with a clear way to compare.
She uses clues about: 
Audience
Age of Protagonist
Length
Illustration
Content
Yes, there are always exceptions!
I'm still researching every chapter and middle grade book I can get my hands on, but each morsel of information helps me on my journey.


0 Comments on Is it Middle Grade or Chapter Book? as of 10/22/2014 2:26:00 PM
Add a Comment
6. Reflections on Which Dreams May Manifest in Waking Life

Dreams can help keep us healthy.

Hippocrates of Kos taught about dreams indicating illnesses.


If you faithfully keep a dream journal you will notice, over time, many things and events that you dream about come true in waking life. It may be the sequence of events that particularly manifest or it may be that you see a person in dreamtime you never met before–but several months after the dream you meet that person in waking life. Then there are some dreams that don’t appear to have any relationship to current reality or seem so bizarre and surrealistic that it doesn’t seem they could ever be making a true statement about anything.

This raises the question of how do you know if a dream might manifest in waking life? From nearly forty years of dreamwork, I have made these observations about my own dreams. You might see if they apply to your own.

  1. Very realistic dreams tend to manifest in waking life. If I have a dream that is realistic and probable, i.e., I am driving my own car and not some fantasy car, then it probably has something to do with manifesting something in waking life. For example, any physical ailment which I knew about ahead of time in dreamtime presented quite literally and showed up later on a medical test as when years ago I had a dream in which a voice said I had blood in my stool. A medical test actually concurred with that even though a later colonoscopy proved it was nothing to worry about. This rule applies also in cases where the symbolism is present but there is a clear resemblance such as dreaming of having overflowing pipes and end up having diarrhea. This is possible because there is a close proximity to the symbol and waking reality. In fact, Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, said much medical and diagnostic information of this sort could be gained from similar dreams.
  2. Somewhat surrealistic or unrealistic events may be relating events in the far off future. Years ago I had a series of dreams in which I was traveling around Hawaii with my brother. At the time I was living in Massachusetts, and so the possibility of this happening seemed a little far-fetched. The island’s scenery was stylized in my dream, not being typical of a specific place on any of the islands. Yet, as I read my dream journal years later, I found that after I moved to Hawaii, we did travel around the island of Oahu as we did in the dream, and we shared certain concerns that showed up in those early dreams.
  3. Very surrealistic dreams tend to be making a statement about the interior world of the dreamer. Really bizarre, odd or unusual objects in places they don’t usually belong, such as a rare or extinct species of owl in a refrigerator, are most often aspects of the dreamer and need to be looked at as such by asking, “What about me is like this owl?” or “What about me is like the refrigerator?” In this type of dream, I personally have not seen a close or frequent connection to events or objects manifesting in waking life such as opening the refrigerator and finding a rare spotted owl perched next to the orange juice.

0 Comments on Reflections on Which Dreams May Manifest in Waking Life as of 10/22/2014 4:04:00 PM
Add a Comment
7. Netgalley & Edelweiss Reading Challenge 2014: Oct part 2


Disclaimer: I received no compensation from the author, Netgalley or the publisher for this honest review.

About the Book

Love is the Biggest Gamble of All . . . 

Cocktail waitress Sophie Dalton doesn't exactly have a life plan. She's perfectly happy being everyone's favorite party girl. But when a Las Vegas bachelorette party goes awry and an uptight businessman mistakes Sophie for a prostitute . . . well, Sophie wonders if it's time to reevaluate her priorities. Swearing off her thigh-high boots for good, Sophie slinks back home with damaged pride-and a jackpot of a hangover.

Yet what happens in Vegas doesn't always stay there. On a trip to Seattle to open a new office, Grayson Wyatt meets his latest employee-who turns out to be the same woman he recently called a hooker. Wealthy and gorgeous, Gray is a man used to getting what he wants. And it doesn't take long to figure out that smart, sassy, sexy Sophie is everything he's been looking for. As their late nights at the office turn into hot morning-afters, they realize their Vegas misunderstanding may lead to the real thing . . .

Buy the Book


Here's what I'm giving it:

Rating: 4.5 stars

Here's why:

I was expecting a little of the same-old song and dance when it came to this but I got a fireworks show instead and loved every minute of it.

Sophie is the kind of character that you don't see every day in stories. She has issues and yet, she is very sensitive to those around her to point of not taking care of her own emotional needs. She has spunk, yet a vulnerability that kept me glued to my seat as eagerly read through the story.

Gray drove me bonkers because I've met people like him and the urge to shake some emotion into him made me scream in frustration on more than one occasion. At the end of the day, you find out some surprising things about Gray and sympathy as well as a reluctant cheering him on develops.

The two were fantastic as a couple and the humor as well as snappy dialogue between the two was well-written.

The secondary characters were no slouches either. Overall, everything from the plot to the characters to the scenery were awesome and I would willing come back for more.

Would I recommend this? That's a resounding YES!

0 Comments on Netgalley & Edelweiss Reading Challenge 2014: Oct part 2 as of 10/22/2014 12:30:00 PM
Add a Comment
8. 50 States Against Bullying: WASHINGTON, D.C.

The eleventh stop on my 50 States Against Bullying campaign took me to...a district. Not a state, a district! I guess the organizers of the campaign thought 50 States Plus 1 District Against Bullying was a bit wordy.

This was my third time speaking in or around Washington, D.C., and one day I need to visit when I have time to really explore. This time, though rainy, I made my way a few blocks from my hotel to see the White House. The rain made it even more beautiful than the last time I saw it!


The next day, I spoke at the Washington International School. Being in Washington, D.C., I wasn't surprised to find lots of secret doors, such as this one, which guarded my carry-on bag while I spoke to the students.


The historic buildings that made up the campus were beautiful, and the librarian told me a little about the history of the place as we walked to where I'd be speaking. She also lent me a polka-dot umbrella, which was very kind.

On our way to the library, if you look over the soccer field, you can see the Washington National Cathedral. The top of the cathedral is still being renovated after the 2011 earthquake.



If the soccer field at my high school had a view like this, I might have been more inclined to learn the rules and play. (Apparently, according to my plAYSOccer coach, it involves more than simply running after a ball and kicking it hard. But, seriously, that's the most fun part!)


As the students began to arrive, they noticed piles of cookies set out for after my presentation. But you can't leave cookies out and tell people they have to wait. Especially not if you want them to focus on the presenter and not think about cookies! So they "released" the goodies early and a swarm of students quickly descended.


High on sugar, they were a very responsive audience!



0 Comments on 50 States Against Bullying: WASHINGTON, D.C. as of 10/22/2014 3:26:00 PM
Add a Comment
9. Book Discovery App Featured On Kickstarter

Jef Van der Avoort and Serie Wolfe hopes to raise $75,000 for a book discovery application called “Squirl.” With this app, users can check in to a literary-themed location, initiate conversations with fellow authors, and discover related content.

The funds will be used to develop the project. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“Squirl bridges the gap between books and the real world. With the Squirl app you will bump into existing locations from captivating novels, life changing biographies and thrilling mysteries. Imagine passing by a street corner in New York City or a cafe in Paris and suddenly an excerpt from a book pops up on your phone. Literary serendipity!”

(more…)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Add a Comment
10. IT'S THIS WEEKEND!!!


 
Alternative Press Pop-Up / 24th - 26th October 2014 / 139 Greenwich South St  SE10 8NX
 
IT'S THIS WEEKEND!!!
 
DIY Art Show and pop-up zine outlet.
 
Come and see art work, self published
comix, zines, art-books and poetry
pamphlets.
Check out our website here.
Come along over the weekend and,
share ideas, swap zines, buy, sell,
see and do.

Opening times:

Friday, Public View 7 - 11pm
Saturday 11 am - 6pm
(screenprinting workshop 1pm)
Sunday 11am - 6pm
(screenings 1pm)

 
See ya!

 
AP
XX
Alternative Press / London / alternativepress.org.uk         

Add a Comment
11. Call for Historical Crime and Mystery Fiction Submissions for Anthology: Darkhouse Books

Darkhouse Books seeks stories for an anthology of historical crime and mystery fiction. For the purpose of this anthology we are defining historical fiction as, those works set more than a few decades prior to the present and written by someone without direct experience in the setting and events of the story. But should a truly superb story happen to stray from the above strictures and cross our threshold, we would happily consider it.

The submission period is now open and will remain open through 11:59pm (PST), December 31st, 2014.


We are seeking stories in the 2500 to 7500 word range, though if it’s knockout material, we’ll consider any length.

 
The anthology will contain between twelve and twenty stories, depending on the overall length. Authors will share equally fifty percent of royalties received.

 
We accept MS Word .doc and .docx files. Submissions must be in standard manuscript format. Previously published work will be considered, provided the author has the power to grant us the right to publish in ebook, audio, and print versions, and that it has not been available elsewhere more recently than January 1st, 2014.


Submissions may be sent to:

submissionsATdarkhousebooksDOTcom Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

Please leave “Submission-“ in the subject line and add the name of your story.


Now available "The Anthology of Cozy-Noir"!

Add a Comment
12. Jodi Picoult, Cary Elwes, Mac Barnett, & Jon Klassen Debut On the Indie Bestseller List

As You WishWe’ve collected the books debuting on Indiebound’s Indie Bestseller List for the week ending October 19, 2014–a sneak peek at the books everybody will be talking about next month.

(Debuted at #2 in Hardcover Fiction) Leaving Time by Jodi Picoult: “For more than a decade, Jenna Metcalf has never stopped thinking about her mother, Alice, who mysteriously disappeared in the wake of a tragic accident. Refusing to believe she was abandoned, Jenna searches for her mother regularly online and pores over the pages of Alice’s old journals. A scientist who studied grief among elephants, Alice wrote mostly of her research among the animals she loved, yet Jenna hopes the entries will provide a clue to her mother’s whereabouts.” (October 2014)

(more…)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Add a Comment
13. My Neighbor Japsang




Once upon a long ago, I traveled to Seoul, Korea, and visited Changdeokgung Palace.  What a marvel, a historical site rich in history and culture nestled within a bustling and modern city.  I was enchanted by the architecture and blossoming gardens and the beautiful, hungry koi.  But I also spied with my little eye something that would capture my imagination most of all.  On the corners of the rooftop of the main palace building stood little figures, all lined up as if scanning the horizon.  These, I later learned, are called Japsang.  Each figure has its own name.  Delightful!  They are meant to be decorative but also serve to chase away evil spirits.  

I snapped a picture, blew it up, and it has hung on my living room wall ever since.  

Below is a picture inspired by the Japsang and Totoro.  Maybe sitting on the roof while thunderous-looking clouds loom overhead is not the best idea, but I'd like to think the squishy blue guys will keep the kids safe.


0 Comments on My Neighbor Japsang as of 10/22/2014 4:21:00 PM
Add a Comment
14. Large-Screen Nook Makes Its Debut

large nookSamsung and Barnes & Noble have developed a new big-screen version of the Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 Nook. Customers can purchase it starting today at 650 Barnes & Noble brick-and-mortar stores and online.

According to the press release, this new NOOK features a 10.1-inch HD display which is the largest screen that has ever been made available on this device. It weighs 17.28 ounces.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Add a Comment
15. Mini-trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels

We’ve noticed a welcome trend lately: excellent graphic novel memoirs (or fiction that feels an awful lot like) written by women about their adolescence. Here are a few to enjoy. (Thanks, Marjane Satrapi, for breaking ground with Persepolis, and to the Tamaki cousins for Skim and This One Summer! Also Katie’s girl-crush Lucy Knisley, who has a new book out — An Age of License — described by the publisher as “an Eat, Pray, Love for the alternative comics fan.”

satrapi Persepolis Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels   tamaki Skim bookcover Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels   tamaki this one summer Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels   relish Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels
eldeafo Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novelsThe November/December 2014 Horn Book Magazine includes three graphic novel memoirs by women. At the age of four, in 1975, author Cece Bell contracted meningitis, leaving her severely to profoundly deaf. The wonderful El Deafo is a characterful, vivid, often amusing graphic novel memoir that recaptures the experiences of her childhood — adapting to deafness, to others’ attitudes toward it, and to the technology of the Phonic Ear, a cumbersome assistive device. At the heart of her story is an experience relevant to most children: the finding of the “True Friend,” a falling out, and a reunion. Bell combines great humor and charm (her characters are all anthropomorphic bunnies) with emotional complexity and seriousness.

telgemeier sisters Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novelsFans of Raina Telgemeier’s 2010 Boston Globe-Horn Book Nonfiction Honor Book Smile will be smiling all the way through this companion book — Sisters — an often bittersweet but amusingly told story about Raina’s relationship with her younger sister, Amara. The summer before Raina starts high school, she and Amara, their younger brother, and their mom take a road trip from California to Colorado for a family reunion. As in Smile, sepia-toned pages mark the frequent flashbacks, which fill readers in on the evolution of this battle of the sisters. The story ends with a solidly believable truce between the warring siblings, who, one suspects, will continue to both annoy and support each other.

abirached Iremember Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novelsI Remember Beirut by Zeina Abirached (companion to her 2012 book A Game for Swallows, is the author’s memories of the Lebanese civil war, in a loosely connected series of sobering vignettes and impressions, each beginning with the phrase “I remember.” Black-and-white geometric illustrations capture both the enormous scale of the war (with motifs of falling bombs, helicopters, and stranded cars) and its personal repercussions.

Two new ones that recently came into the office:

Tomboy by Liz Prince: “A memoir about friendship, gender, bullies, growth, punk rock, and the power of the perfect outfit” [from flap copy].

Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson (roller derby name “Winnie the Pow”), a graphic novel (fiction) about a teen derby grrl.

Prince Tomboy Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels   jamieson victoria Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels
Have you noticed a trend? Do you have other books to recommend?

share save 171 16 Mini trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels

The post Mini-trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Mini-trend: Grrrl power grrraphic novels as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16. I Declare I am not at War or War Between Authors and Readers? Seriously?

So, I am just a random author in Maine. That's about it. I'm the daughter of a truck mechanic and Welcome Wagon hostess (They did switch jobs a lot, but that's pretty much what I think of them as). I'm not a super-connected author who gets to hang out anywhere super cool and be hip. And I am pretty much a bystander about the big things that happen in the world of writing for children and young adults.

Other authors don't speak for me. I don't speak for other authors. I can't even imagine it.

Mostly when I witness negative interactions, I feel badly for everyone involved. I feel for reviewers who are attacked by authors. I feel for authors who are attacked by reviewers. I feel for any profession, any group of people that are lumped together, stereotyped and attacked because of what they do, their ancestry, their gender identification, their religous identification, ethnic history, employment history, or political party or sexual orientation or income level. Unfortunately, this happens all the time.

What really bothers me is when opinion pieces or news stories do that. This headline in Salon? It does that.Screen Shot 2014-10-22 at 3.11.36 PM


No offense to the headline writers, but I am not engaged in any war. I'm not in a war with bloggers or readers. I'm not in a war with fellow authors. Kathleen Hale is not revealing anything about me.

There is no war waging. There are no flank formations going on. There are no weapons. Even if you count words and news stories as weapons. It is still not a war.

Do you know what war is?

War is death. Homes blown apart. Children broken. Lives ripped apart. Limbs separated from bodies. War is two or more sides trying to destroy each other in an attempt to grab some kind of power. It's an organized effort.

Holding people accountable for their actions is not war. Calling people out on their behaviour is not war.

Even if you go by a more mellow definition of war, what happens between the reading community and the writing community still doesn't fit. I'm not involved in a state of conflict. I'm not antagonizing readers or bloggers or reviewers and I sure don't feel like they are antagonizing me.

I pretty much love readers and bloggers and reviewers. It's not an oppositional relationship. It's a symbiotic one.

And incidents like the one involving author Kathleen Hale, her Guardian story, and reviewer Blythe Harris are not representative of an entire community. Two people are never representative of an entire community and it is simplistic to believe so. Even 100 people aren't. And a community like this? Even 1,000 people don't cut it. Writers and bloggers and reviewers come in all ages, all genders, all races and religions. And some (Gasp!) don't live in the U.S. And some (Gasp!) don't even use the internet.

While some writers or bloggers occasionally band together to call out for what they believe is justice via a boycott or twitter hashtag, that still doesn't equal war.  It doesn't usually even count as a representative group. It counts as advocating for themselves or calling out what they perceive as an injustice. And you know what? That's pretty cool.

But the thing is...

I know people who have been in wars. I know people who have seen terror.

This is not it.

Individuals behaving badly does not indict an entire profession. Other people calling them out on it does not make a war between two groups even if those groups have different viewpoints and feelings. To think so? That's a generalization that creates bigotry. I used to be a newspaper editor. I understand headlines. I understand that hyperbole sells. But that doesn't mean we should feed into it.

I am not at war with anyone. I hope you aren't either. I happen to love the writing community and the blogging community and reviewers who take the time to read and comment about books (even when they hate them). How cool is that? It's super cool. Actually, it's pretty amazing. It's called engagement. Not war. And engagement is something our world needs more of, not less.

So, I am declaring an un-War. I hope you'll join me.

Add a Comment
17. Longreads’ Best of WordPress, Vol. 7

Here it is! A new collection of our favorite stories from across all of WordPress.

As always, you can find our past collections here. You can follow Longreads on WordPress.com for more daily reading recommendations, or subscribe to our free weekly email.

Publishers, writers, you can share links to your favorite essays and interviews (over 1,500 words) on Twitter (#longreads) and on WordPress.com by tagging your posts longreads.


1. What Happens When a Veteran High School Teacher Becomes a Student for the Day

Grant Wiggins

“I waited fourteen years to do something that I should have done my first year of teaching: shadow a student for a day.” A high school teacher learns some sobering lessons about how kids experience a typical day — and the amount of sitting required.

2. No Apology

Mehreen Kasana

The truth about being Muslim in America:

In the eyes of those perpetually seeking an apology from Muslims, I am a Bad Muslim. I don’t put hashtag-suffixed apologies online for what someone else of my faith does. When 9/11 happened, I was as shocked and terrified as anyone else was. We scary-looking Muslims experience human emotions, too. … We Muslims react to unexpected loss of life like any non-Muslim would. We cry, we mourn.

3. The Rise and Fall of Public Housing in NYC

Richard Price, Guernica

A “subjective overview” of the history of public housing in New York City from the novelist Richard Price, framed through the lens of his own upbringing in the North Bronx’s Parkside Houses.

4. Ways Men In Tech Are Unintentionally Sexist

Kat Hagan, This Is Not a Pattern

How our behavior and language can have a harmful impact — and how we can fix it. “Small, simple changes will build the foundation for a better tech culture.”

5. Gone Girls: Human Trafficking on the Home Front

Mike Kessler, Los Angeles Magazine

Kessler talks to survivors of child prostitution, as well as law enforcement officers, judges, politicians, and advocates working to prevent the sex trafficking of minors.

6. The Evans Family Is Living in This World

Linda Vaccariello, Cincinnati Magazine

A community comes together to help a family after a tragedy:

“The reality hit me like nothing I’d ever experienced,” McDonald says. “She had no one. I couldn’t imagine what that was like.” McDonald went to Ao, threw her arm around the sobbing woman’s shoulders, and said, “We’ll help you.”

7. The Plunge

Carl Schreck, Grantland

The story of Shavarsh Karapetyan, a Soviet swimming champion who dove into Armenia’s Lake Yerevan and saved dozens of lives from a sinking trolleybus.

8. How Pixar’s Gurus Brought the Magic Back to Disney Animation

Caitlin Roper, Wired

A profile of John Lasseter and Ed Catmull, whose intense focus on storytelling helped revive Disney’s animation studio with hits like Frozen and Wreck-It Ralph.

9. ‘I Am Darren Wilson’: St. Louis and the Geography of Fear

Sarah Kendzior & Umar Lee, Quartz

St. Louis is a city long on the run from itself. White flight has spread from suburbia to exurbia, while decades of black demands — for better jobs, better schools, better treatment—go unheeded. This is a region deprived of resources, forcing residents to scrounge for more fertile terrain.

10. Stephen Powers Puts the Writing on the Wall

Neima Jahromi, Bklynr

From the magazine Bklynr, a profile of the street artist behind some of Brooklyn’s most recognizable murals.

Photo: dystopos, Flickr


Filed under: Community, Reading, WordPress, WordPress.com

0 Comments on Longreads’ Best of WordPress, Vol. 7 as of 10/22/2014 1:17:00 PM
Add a Comment
18. Indies First Launches The Upstream Initiative

Indies FirstThe organizers behind the Indies First campaign are launching a new initiative called Upstream. The team asks that participating writers sign copies of their books and have them be sold at the independent bookstores of their choice.

Daniel Handler (a.k.a. Lemony Snicket) has posted a message to his colleagues imploring them to take part. He also encourages authors to promote this program. Here’s an excerpt from Handler’s letter:

“Will Upstream rescue us all from strife and worry? Of course not. But the hope is that it will remind both authors and booksellers of their local, less monolithic resources, and to improve general esprit de corps at a disheartening time.”

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Add a Comment
19. Writing Competition: Sequestrum's Editor's Reprint Award

Sequestrum is accepting submissions for our first annual Editor's Reprint Award! For complete guidelines, visit our website.
 

Contest Guidelines:

Open to reprints of fiction and nonfiction in any original format (electronic or print).

One $200 prize plus publication.
One runner-up prize including publication and payment (just above our usual rates). Finalists listed on the site.


$15 entry fee.
Tentative close date of April 30th
. (See site for details)

Include the name and email address of the original publisher in your cover letter.
Length and subject are open.
Submit via our online submission system.
Manuscripts reviewed on a rolling-basis.
Multiple submissions allowed.

No identifying information should be on your manuscript.

Not previously published? No worries! We're always accepting general submissions. Send them here.


About Sequestrum:
We average 1,000+ readers a month, keep our archives free and open to the public, are a paying market, and pair all our publications with stunning visual arts created by outside artists or our staff. Our contributors range from award-winning novelists and poets (with other works featured in publications including The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The American Scholar, The Kenyon Review, many other university periodicals, and Best American Anthologies) to emerging voices and first-time writers.


We're proud of our little plot on the literary landscape and the writers and artists we share it with. Come see why.

Add a Comment
20. Frankenstein

#Frankenstein for day 22 of #inktober and #sketch_dailies

0 Comments on Frankenstein as of 10/22/2014 4:41:00 PM
Add a Comment
21. Longreads’ Best of WordPress, Vol. 7

Here it is! A new collection of our favorite stories from across all of WordPress.

As always, you can find our past collections here. You can follow Longreads on WordPress.com for more daily reading recommendations, or subscribe to our free weekly email.

Publishers, writers, you can share links to your favorite essays and interviews (over 1,500 words) on Twitter (#longreads) and on WordPress.com by tagging your posts longreads.


1. What Happens When a Veteran High School Teacher Becomes a Student for the Day

Grant Wiggins

“I waited fourteen years to do something that I should have done my first year of teaching: shadow a student for a day.” A high school teacher learns some sobering lessons about how kids experience a typical day — and the amount of sitting required.

2. No Apology

Mehreen Kasana

The truth about being Muslim in America:

In the eyes of those perpetually seeking an apology from Muslims, I am a Bad Muslim. I don’t put hashtag-suffixed apologies online for what someone else of my faith does. When 9/11 happened, I was as shocked and terrified as anyone else was. We scary-looking Muslims experience human emotions, too. … We Muslims react to unexpected loss of life like any non-Muslim would. We cry, we mourn.

3. The Rise and Fall of Public Housing in NYC

Richard Price, Guernica

A “subjective overview” of the history of public housing in New York City from the novelist Richard Price, framed through the lens of his own upbringing in the North Bronx’s Parkside Houses.

4. Ways Men In Tech Are Unintentionally Sexist

Kat Hagan, This Is Not a Pattern

How our behavior and language can have a harmful impact — and how we can fix it. “Small, simple changes will build the foundation for a better tech culture.”

5. Gone Girls: Human Trafficking on the Home Front

Mike Kessler, Los Angeles Magazine

Kessler talks to survivors of child prostitution, as well as law enforcement officers, judges, politicians, and advocates working to prevent the sex trafficking of minors.

6. The Evans Family Is Living in This World

Linda Vaccariello, Cincinnati Magazine

A community comes together to help a family after a tragedy:

“The reality hit me like nothing I’d ever experienced,” McDonald says. “She had no one. I couldn’t imagine what that was like.” McDonald went to Ao, threw her arm around the sobbing woman’s shoulders, and said, “We’ll help you.”

7. The Plunge

Carl Schreck, Grantland

The story of Shavarsh Karapetyan, a Soviet swimming champion who dove into Armenia’s Lake Yerevan and saved dozens of lives from a sinking trolleybus.

8. How Pixar’s Gurus Brought the Magic Back to Disney Animation

Caitlin Roper, Wired

A profile of John Lasseter and Ed Catmull, whose intense focus on storytelling helped revive Disney’s animation studio with hits like Frozen and Wreck-It Ralph.

9. ‘I Am Darren Wilson’: St. Louis and the Geography of Fear

Sarah Kendzior & Umar Lee, Quartz

St. Louis is a city long on the run from itself. White flight has spread from suburbia to exurbia, while decades of black demands — for better jobs, better schools, better treatment—go unheeded. This is a region deprived of resources, forcing residents to scrounge for more fertile terrain.

10. Stephen Powers Puts the Writing on the Wall

Neima Jahromi, Bklynr

From the magazine Bklynr, a profile of the street artist behind some of Brooklyn’s most recognizable murals.

Photo: dystopos, Flickr


Filed under: Community, Reading, WordPress, WordPress.com

0 Comments on Longreads’ Best of WordPress, Vol. 7 as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
22. The Epic Reads Timeline of Young Adult Historical Fiction (yay for GOING OVER!)

Can I say how happy this makes me? I know that the graphic reads little small on my blog. But if you go over to the fabulous Epic Reads you'll find rocking good stuff, at the right size, for readers, teachers, and librarians.

I am grateful—to Epic Reads and to Ilene Wong, who Twittered me the news.

0 Comments on The Epic Reads Timeline of Young Adult Historical Fiction (yay for GOING OVER!) as of 10/22/2014 4:56:00 PM
Add a Comment
23. Call for Submissions: The Lindenwood Review

The Lindenwood Review is currently accepting submissions of fiction, poetry, and personal essay for issue 5 through December 15, 2014. We are also accepting submissions for our free flash fiction contest through November 15.  

While current LU MFA students are not eligible, alumni are welcome to submit. 

Please visit our website for full submission guidelines and to read excerpts from previous issues.

Add a Comment
24. Prologues

Not all prologues are created equal. 

http://ingridsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/09/16/4-types-of-prologues/

0 Comments on Prologues as of 10/22/2014 4:48:00 PM
Add a Comment
25. Call for Submissions: Prime Number Magazine

Prime Number Magazine is open for submissions! We're especially looking for excellent creative nonfiction (under 5000 words) and short essays (under 1000 words) in addition to short stories (under 5000 words), flash fiction (under 750 words), and poetry. (Book reviews and interviews, too, but query the Books editor first.) In all categories, we're looking for distinctive work. 

Full Submission Guidelines here

And check out our latest issue, #61.

Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts