What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: philosophy, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 495
1. Sikhs and mistaken identity

American basketball star, Darsh Singh, a turbaned, bearded Sikh, featured this April in a Guardian Weekend piece on cyberbullying. He recalled how his online picture had been circulated with Islamophobic captions. Long before that he’d had to get used to people yelling things like "towelhead”. Since 9/11, Sikhs haven’t just been verbally insulted but have suffered ‘reprisal attacks’.

The post Sikhs and mistaken identity appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Sikhs and mistaken identity as of 4/29/2016 4:57:00 AM
Add a Comment
2. Is Buddhism paradoxical?

Buddhist literature is full of statements that sound paradoxical. This has led to the widespread idea that Buddhism, like some other religions, wants to point us in the direction of a reality transcending all intellectual understanding.

The post Is Buddhism paradoxical? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Is Buddhism paradoxical? as of 4/24/2016 4:24:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. What we talk about when we talk about being disoriented

Disorientations—major life experiences that make it difficult for individuals to know how to go on—are deeply familiar, in part because they are common. It is rare to have never experienced some form of disorientation in one’s own life, perhaps in response to grief, illness, or other significant events.

The post What we talk about when we talk about being disoriented appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on What we talk about when we talk about being disoriented as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
4. Implicit bias in the age of Trump

By any common definition, Trump’s statements and policies are racist. Yet we are researchers on implicit bias—largely unconscious, mostly automatic social biases that can affect people’s behavior even when they intend to treat others fairly regardless of their social group identity.

The post Implicit bias in the age of Trump appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Implicit bias in the age of Trump as of 4/18/2016 7:38:00 AM
Add a Comment
5. Temporal liars

One of the most famous, and most widely discussed, paradoxes is the Liar paradox. The Liar sentence is true if and only if it is false, and thus can be neither (unless it can be both). The variants of the Liar that I want to consider in this instalment arise by taking the implicit temporal aspect of the word “is” in the Liar paradox seriously.

The post Temporal liars appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Temporal liars as of 4/17/2016 4:27:00 AM
Add a Comment
6. Lost in the museum

You go to the museum. Stand in line for half an hour. Pay 20 bucks. And then, you’re there, looking at the exhibited artworks, but you get nothing out of it. You try hard. You read the little annoying labels next to the artworks. Even get the audio-guide. Still nothing. What do you do? Maybe you’re just not into this specific artist. Or maybe you’re not that into paintings in general. Or art.

The post Lost in the museum appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Lost in the museum as of 4/16/2016 4:53:00 AM
Add a Comment
7. The legacy of ancient Greek politics, from Antigone to Xenophon

What do the pamphlets of the English Civil War, imperial theorists of the eighteenth century, Nazi schoolteachers, and a left-wing American artist have in common? Correct! They all see themselves as in dialogue with classical antiquity, drawing on the political thought of ancient Greek writers. Nor are they alone in this; the idea that Western thought is a series of ‘footnotes to Plato’, as Alfred Whitehead suggested in 1929, is a memorable formulation of the extensive role of ancient Greece within modernity.

The post The legacy of ancient Greek politics, from Antigone to Xenophon appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The legacy of ancient Greek politics, from Antigone to Xenophon as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
8. Note to Pope Francis: sex is more than just sex

Pope Francis is boldly liberalizing Catholic teaching on sexual matters. Or so it is commonly believed. In earlier ages of the Christian Church, both East and West, its canons and its teachings always understood human sexuality as having a very powerful effect upon the human soul.

The post Note to Pope Francis: sex is more than just sex appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Note to Pope Francis: sex is more than just sex as of 4/10/2016 5:20:00 AM
Add a Comment
9. The life and work of Buckminster Fuller: a timeline

A self-professed "comprehensive anticipatory design scientist," the inventor Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983) was undoubtedly a visionary. Fuller's creations often bordered on the realm of science fiction, ranging from the freestanding geodesic dome to the three-wheel Dymaxion car.

The post The life and work of Buckminster Fuller: a timeline appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The life and work of Buckminster Fuller: a timeline as of 4/9/2016 5:20:00 AM
Add a Comment
10. Is it all in the brain? An inclusive approach to mental health

For many years, the prevailing view among both cognitive scientists and philosophers has been that the brain is sufficient for cognition, and that once we discover its secrets, we will be able to unravel the mysteries of the mind. Recently however, a growing number of thinkers have begun to challenge this prevailing view that mentality is a purely neural phenomenon.

The post Is it all in the brain? An inclusive approach to mental health appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Is it all in the brain? An inclusive approach to mental health as of 3/30/2016 9:04:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. The American Philosophical Association Pacific 2016: a conference guide

The Oxford Philosophy team is excited to see you in San Francisco for the upcoming 2016 American Philosophical Association Pacific Division Meeting. We have some suggestions on sights to see during your time in California as well as our favorite sessions for the conference. We recommend visiting the following sights and attractions while in San Francisco.

The post The American Philosophical Association Pacific 2016: a conference guide appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The American Philosophical Association Pacific 2016: a conference guide as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
12. The God-man resurrected: a philosophical problem for the Incarnation

Today is Easter Sunday for the majority of the world’s 2.4 billion Christians (most Orthodox Christians will wait until May 1st to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus). After the long penitential season of Lent, Christians are greeting each other with joyful exclamations of “He is risen,” and hearing in glad response, “He is risen indeed, hallelujah!”

The post The God-man resurrected: a philosophical problem for the Incarnation appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The God-man resurrected: a philosophical problem for the Incarnation as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
13. How well do you know David Hume? [quiz]

This January, the OUP Philosophy team has chosen David Hume as their Philosopher of the Month. Born in Edinburgh, Hume is considered a founding figure of empiricism and the most significant philosopher of the Scottish Enlightenment. With its strong critique of contemporary metaphysics, Hume’s 'Treatise of Human Nature' (1739–40) cleared the way for a genuinely empirical account of human understanding.

The post How well do you know David Hume? [quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on How well do you know David Hume? [quiz] as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
14. “The economics of happiness” – an extract from Happiness Explained

What is happiness and how can we promote it? These questions are central to human existence and human flourishing now plays a central role in the assessment of national and global progress. Paul Anand shows why the traditional national income approach is limited as a measure of human wellbeing and demonstrates how the contributors to happiness, wellbeing, and quality of life can be measured and understood across the human life course. The following extract looks at the connection between income and wellbeing.

The post “The economics of happiness” – an extract from Happiness Explained appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on “The economics of happiness” – an extract from Happiness Explained as of 3/20/2016 6:05:00 AM
Add a Comment
15. Imagining zombies

Understanding the relationship between the mind and the body remains one of the most vexed problems in philosophy, cognitive science, and neuroscience. Physicalism has not reigned unchallenged, however. A number of arguments have been raised which promote dualism in its place -- the view that fundamentally, the mind and body are separate.

The post Imagining zombies appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Imagining zombies as of 3/20/2016 4:03:00 AM
Add a Comment
16. The power of imagination

Sure, imagination is powerful. But can it really change the world? Indeed, it is tempting to answer “no” here -- to disagree with Glaude about the transformative power of imagination. After all, imagination is the stuff of fancy, of fiction, of escape. We daydream to get away from the disappointing monotony of daily life.

The post The power of imagination appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The power of imagination as of 3/19/2016 5:41:00 AM
Add a Comment
17. Paradox of Energy

That life is energy, is evident. What is equally evident is the truth that life-energy, or prana, flows in many channels: the energy of dance, of music, of thought, and of literature; and also the energy at the stock exchange. It assumes many forms: the energy in earth and in water, and the energy of the human mind and of the human heart.

The post Paradox of Energy appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Paradox of Energy as of 3/15/2016 4:08:00 AM
Add a Comment
18. The consistency of inconsistency claims

A theory is inconsistent if we can prove a contradiction using basic logic and the principles of that theory. Consistency is a much weaker condition that truth: if a theory T is true, then T consistent, since a true theory only allows us to prove true claims, and contradictions are not true. There are, however, infinitely many different consistent theories that we can construct.

The post The consistency of inconsistency claims appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The consistency of inconsistency claims as of 3/13/2016 6:53:00 PM
Add a Comment
19. Epicureanism: eat, drink, and be merry?

Most people have a good idea what it is to have a Stoical attitude to life, but what it means to have an Epicurean attitude is not so obvious. When attempting to decipher the true nature of Epicureanism it is first necessary to dispel the impression that fine dining is its central theme.

The post Epicureanism: eat, drink, and be merry? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Epicureanism: eat, drink, and be merry? as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
20. Are you really free? Yes: a new argument for freedom

How is human freedom really possible in the natural world as correctly described by modern physics, chemistry, biology, and cognitive neuroscience? Or, given the truth of modern science, are you really free? By 'real freedom,' I mean 'real free will and real rational agency'.

The post Are you really free? Yes: a new argument for freedom appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Are you really free? Yes: a new argument for freedom as of 2/6/2016 5:28:00 AM
Add a Comment
21. Philosopher of the month: Plato

The OUP Philosophy team have selected Plato (c. 429–c.347 BC) as their February Philosopher of the Month. The best known and most widely studied of all the ancient Greek philosophers, Plato laid the groundwork for Western philosophy and Christian theology. Plato was most likely born in Athens, to Ariston and Perictione, a noble, politically active family.

The post Philosopher of the month: Plato appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Philosopher of the month: Plato as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
22. Slavery contracts

Guy and Doll have agreed that Guy will act as Doll directs, and that Doll is entitled to use force or punishment to get Guy to do as she directs if he ever demurs or falls short. Guy has contracted to be Doll’s slave. Such contracts are familiar from fiction and from history; and some people may have familiarity with them in contemporary life. It is common for philosophers to argue that such contracts are impossible.

The post Slavery contracts appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Slavery contracts as of 2/21/2016 3:13:00 AM
Add a Comment
23. How well do you know Plato? [quiz]

The OUP Philosophy team have selected Plato (c. 429–c. 347 BC) as their February Philosopher of the Month. After his death in 347 BC, educators at the Academy continued teaching Plato’s works into the Roman era. Today he is perhaps the most widely studied philosopher of all time.

The post How well do you know Plato? [quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on How well do you know Plato? [quiz] as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
24. Why we do what we do

You walked out the door this morning. Why did you do it? Perhaps because you wanted to stretch your legs. Perhaps because you wanted to feel the fresh air on your face and the wind blowing through your hair. Is that it? Not quite. I bet you also walked out the door this morning because the phone didn’t ring a second earlier.

The post Why we do what we do appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Why we do what we do as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
25. The true meaning of cell life and death

Two hundred years ago, William Lawrence blew the roof off the Hunter Lecture Series at the Royal College of Surgeons by adding the word "biology" to the English language to discuss living physiology, behavior, and diversity as a matter of gunky chemistry and physics, sans super-added forces.

The post The true meaning of cell life and death appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on The true meaning of cell life and death as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts